cooked - vegetarian recipes

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cooked vegetarian recipes

Rice Pudding with Berries

January 8 2018 Meatless Monday 

The Chinese often begin their day with a congee, or rice porridge. This breakfast rice, sweetened up with cinnamon and berries, is a great way to use up leftover rice. You can use any type of rice. Serves 4     - 2 cups brown rice, precooked - 1-1/­­2 teaspoons cinnamon - 1/­­2 cup almonds, slivered - 3 cups soymilk - 1/­­2 cup mixed berries Mix all ingredients and simmer until thick, stirring constantly. Serve hot or cold and garnish with berries. The post Rice Pudding with Berries appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Chickpeas in Coconut Onion Sauce – Manglorean Chana Gassi

January 6 2018 Vegan Richa 

Chickpeas in Coconut Onion Sauce – Manglorean Chana GassiChana Gassi /­­Ghassi – Mangalorean Coconut Onion sauce with Chickpeas. Simplified adaptation of Regional Indian Curry from Coastal Karnataka. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Nut-free Recipe I remember trying a version of Kori Gassi which is a popular chicken curry from Mangalorean cuisine (coastal region in Karnataka state) way back when. The Sauce is made with a few ingredients but packs an amazing complex flavor. This coconut onion sauce can be used with veggies and tofu as well. I use chickpeas with it and served it with tomato rice. Dried chickpeas that are soaked for a few hours and pressure cooked in a pressure cooker/­­Instant Pot. You can also make it in a saucepan, see recipe notes. The sauce cooks and caramelizes under pressure with the chickpeas, it it does not need to be pre-roasted. If however you are using cooked chickpeas or veggies, cook the sauce until the onion doesn’t smell raw, then add the veggies/­­chickpeas and simmer. Just when you thought we cant have more chickpea curries :). There are many sauces and curries across regional Indian cuisines that use various ingredients and spices very different from each other and often paired with meats, paneer or legumes. The different flavors, textures, spices all work equally beautifully with the different beans and pulses, seitan/­­chikin subs, and tofu. Its all about the sauce. Lets make this Mangalorean Chana Ghassi! Continue reading: Chickpeas in Coconut Onion Sauce – Manglorean Chana GassiThe post Chickpeas in Coconut Onion Sauce – Manglorean Chana Gassi appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Spiced Sprouted Lentils, Cajun Roasted Sweet Potato Bowl

January 3 2018 Vegan Richa 

Spiced Sprouted Lentils, Cajun Roasted Sweet Potato BowlSpiced Sprouted Lentils, Cajun Roasted Sweet Potato Bowl with Veggies, Greens and Tahini Garlic Dressing. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Recipe. Use cooked lentils, beans or chickpeas for variation. Happy New Year Everyone! Starting up the year with this amazing Sprouted lentil bowl. Lentils are sprouted, then lightly spiced, greens are wilted with garlic, Veggies roasted with Cajun spice and served in a bowl with a dressing of choice.  Use sprouted mung beans or other sprouted chickpeas/­­beans for variation. I also love this with sprouted brown chickpeas. Cook it a bit longer to reduce the raw flavor and serve up in the bowl. Sprouted Lentils and Beans makes the nutrients more bio-available, improves the quality of the protein and also makes them more digestible for some. You can also use cooked lentils or chickpeas instead for a quicker meal. Lets get Sprouting. Continue reading: Spiced Sprouted Lentils, Cajun Roasted Sweet Potato BowlThe post Spiced Sprouted Lentils, Cajun Roasted Sweet Potato Bowl appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Kitchen-Sink Capellini

January 2 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Kitchen-Sink CapelliniAs the name implies, theres everything but the kitchen sink in this delicious Kitchen-Sink Capellini, including artichoke hearts, Kalamata olives, and two kinds of tomatoes. Made with quick-cooking capellini, this meal is ready in just minutes with a complex flavor that belies its speedy preparation.   Kitchen-Sink Capellini As the name implies, theres everything but the kitchen sink in this delicious pasta dish, including artichoke hearts, Kalamata olives, and two kinds of tomatoes. Made with quick-cooking capellini, this meal is ready in just minutes with a complex flavor that belies its speedy preparation. - 8 ounces capellini or angel hair pasta - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 3 garlic cloves, finely minced - 2 14-ounce cans fire-roasted diced tomatoes, undrained - 1 16-ounce can cannellini beans, drained and rinsed - 1/­­3 cup oil-packed or reconstituted sun-dried tomatoes, cut into thin strips - 1 6-ounce jar marinated artichoke hearts, drained and chopped - 1/­­2 cup Kalamata olives, pitted and halved - 4 cups baby spinach or 1 cup chopped frozen spinach, thawed and squeezed (optional) - 2 tablespoons fresh chopped basil or 1 teaspoon dried - Salt and ground black pepper - 1/­­4 cup toasted pine nuts or chopped walnuts - Cook the pasta in a pot of boiling salted water until just tender, about 4 minutes. Drain the pasta in a colander. Drizzle with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil, toss to coat, and set aside. - In the same pot in which you cooked the pasta, heat the remaining 1 tablespoon of the oil over medium heat. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant, 30 seconds. Stir in the diced tomatoes, cannellini beans, artichoke hearts, olives, spinach (if using), basil, and salt and pepper to taste. Cook over medium heat until hot and well combined, about 5 minutes. Add the reserved pasta and toss gentle to combine and heat through. Serve hot sprinkled with the pine nuts. Recipe from Cook the Pantry (C) 2015 by Robin Robertson. Photo by Annie Oliverio. Used by permission Vegan Heritage Press LLC. Save Save The post Kitchen-Sink Capellini appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Lime Wild Rice Lentils

January 1 2018 Meatless Monday 

Black lentils and wild rice are cooked together, then seasoned with tomato paste, garlic, lime juice, oregano and chili powder. Crushed wakame seaweed adds a unique umami flavor to the dish, which is delicious when finished with hot chili flakes and cool Greek yogurt. This recipe comes to us from Marica of Wasabi Honey Bee. Serves 4 - 2 cups black lentils, rinsed and picked over - 1/­­2 cup wild rice, rinsed - 1 6 ounce can tomato paste - 3 cloves garlic, crushed - 6 sticks wakame seaweed*, crushed into pieces - juice from 1 lime - 1 teaspoon chili powder - 1/­­2 teaspoon oregano - salt and black pepper, to taste - hot chili flakes, to taste - plain lowfat Greek yogurt, to taste *Found in Asian markets or the Asian or dried good section of most grocery stores. Bring the water, lentils and rice to a boil in a large pot over medium high heat. As soon as the water boils, reduce heat to medium low and simmer for about 25 minutes, or until the lentils are cooked through. Drain the lentils and rice and return them to the pot. Return the pot medium low heat. Add the tomato paste, crushed garlic, wakame seaweed pieces and lime juice to the pot. Season with the chili powder, oregano and salt and pepper to taste. Stir, taking care to ensure that all ingredients are evenly distributed. Simmer, stirring occasionally, for 3-5 minutes more, or until the flavors meld together. Divide into 4 servings, finish each with a sprinkle of red pepper flakes and a dollop of Greek yogurt and enjoy! The post Lime Wild Rice Lentils appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Apple-Almond Butter Pancakes

December 26 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Apple-Almond Butter Pancakes Apple slices with nut butter are a great healthy snack. Now, this delicious flavor combo can be enjoyed in these luscious Apple-Almond Butter Pancakes. For gluten-free, use gluten-free flour. Apple-Almond Butter Pancakes Apple slices with nut butter are a great healthy snack. Now, this delicious flavor combo can be enjoyed in these luscious pancakes. For gluten-free, use gluten-free flour. - 1/­­2 cups all-purpose flour - 1 tablespoon natural sugar - 2 teaspoons baking powder - 1/­­4 teaspoon salt - 1 1/­­2 cups almond milk - 1/­­2 cup apple juice - 3 tablespoons almond butter - 1 teaspoon vanilla extract - 1 large apple, peeled, cored, and chopped - 2 tablespoons chopped roasted almonds - In a large bowl, combine the flour, sugar, baking pow- der, and salt. - In a blender, combine the milk, apple juice, almond butter, and vanilla and blend until smooth. - Pour into the flour mixture, stirring with a few swift strokes until just moist. Fold in the chopped apple and almonds. - Preheat the oven to 200°F. Lightly oil a griddle or non- stick skillet and heat until hot. Ladle about 1/­­4 cup of the batter onto the griddle or skillet. Cook on one side until small bubbles appear on the top of the pancakes, about 2 minutes. - Flip the pancakes with a spatula and cook until the second side is lightly browned, about 1 minute longer. Repeat with the remaining batter. Keep the cooked pancakes warm in the oven while preparing the remaining pancakes. From The Nut Butter Cookbook by Robin Robertson. (C)2014 Robin Robertson. Used by permission from Vegan Heritage Press. Photo by Lori Maffei. The post Apple-Almond Butter Pancakes appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Happy Holidays Brussels Sprout Salad

December 22 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Happy Holidays Brussels Sprout Salad Well this feels a bit weird. Writing about winter food in the middle of the night from a cute little house with a tiny swimmingpool in warm and humid Bali, Indonesia. We decided to skip Christmas this year and instead bring the kids on a sort of honeymoon holiday, so we left Stockholm last week and will stay here in Bali for a couple of more weeks. We’re mostly airbnb-ing around the island and have already experienced lots of beautiful places, monsoon down pours mixed with sunshine, excellent tempeh (and crunchy sweet tempeh), creepy insects and countless fruit platters and smoothie bowls. Traveling with three kids is definitely trickier than just one or two but we’re learning and adapting. And at the end of each day it still feels so rewarding seeing the world with them and talking about all the funny and weird travel related subjects that pop-up in their heads. Several years ago we wrote a blog post (and a chapter in our travel book) about traveling with kids and we’re thinking about writing an updated version with more guidelines and tips that we’ve picked up as our crew has grown. Let us know if you’d be interested in that. But enough about that now. The goal of the day was simply to share this little salad before Christmas is over. I realize that it’s a little late and many of you have already planned your holiday menu. But if you happen to be searching for a side dish that also could work as a main salad and is both pretty and damn tasty, you should give this one a try. We have made this recipe a couple of times in the weeks before we left. Crunchy roasted brussels sprouts have always been a popular dish in our house but what we’ve done lately is adding coconut chips to the tray and also dust everything with cinnamon and finely chopped hazelnuts which adds a super nice nuttiness to the dish. Dried apricots offer sweetness and chewiness, lentils make it more filling and blood orange more festive and fresh. We serve this salad with a simple yogurt dressing but you can skip that if you want to make it vegan. Or drizzle with tahini instead. We love this little dish and hope you will too. That’s it. The last post of the year. Have a wonderful holiday with lots of good food and we’ll be back in the beginning of January with more recipes, videos, anecdotes, maybe some Bali photos and what not. Thank you for following along! Hugs and kisses. - David, Luise and the kids. Brussels Sprouts & Blood Orange Salad with Cinnamon & Hazelnut Dust Serves 4 500 g brussels sprouts olive oil or coconut oil 1 tsp ground cinnamon sea salt & pepper 1 handful coconut flakes /­­ chips 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked black lentils 500 ml /­­ 2 cups water, to cook olive oil to drizzle salt and pepper 1/­­2 lemon, juice 2 blood oranges 1 handful dried apricot 1 handful hazelnuts 1 cup natural yoghurt 1/­­2 lemon, juice 1 large handful fresh parsley Preheat the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F. Trim bottom of brussels sprouts and cut them in halves. Place in a bowl, drizzle with a few tablespoons oil, sprinkle with cinnamon and salt and toss to cover all. Place on a baking tray and roast in the oven for 25-30 minutes until they are soft, golden and have crispy edges. A few minutes before the brussels sprouts are done, take out the tray and scatter over a handful of coconut chips, drizzle with oil and cinnamon and place the tray back in the oven and roast until golden. Meanwhile, prepare the lentils. Place rinsed lentils and water in a saucepan and bring to a boil. Lower the heat and let simmer for about 20 minutes, check the exact time, it depends on your specific type lentils. They should be soft and chewy, not mushy. Pour into a sieve to remove any excess water. Place in a bowl and drizzle with olive oil, salt, pepper and a squeeze of lemon juice. Peel and slice the blood oranges, chop the dried apricots and finely chop the toasted hazelnuts. Place the yogurt in a small bowl and stir in lemon juice, chopped parsley, salt and pepper to taste Arrange the roasted brussels sprouts and coconut chips on a serving platter together with the lentils. Add sliced blood oranges and scatter with dried apricot and hazelnut dust. Finely add dollops of yogurt sauce and chopped parsley.

Vegan Paella from the Pantry

December 19 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Vegan Paella from the PantryThis vegan paella is the ultimate in delicious pantry cooking. The quickest way to get it on the table is by having cooked rice on hand. If you have cooked rice in the freezer, it defrosts quickly in the microwave. You can also substitute a quick-cooking grain such as quinoa, if you prefer. Paella from the Pantry This vegan paella is the ultimate in delicious pantry cooking. - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 large yellow onion, chopped - 3 cloves garlic cloves, minced - 1 cup vegetable broth - 1 pinch saffron threads or ground annatto or turmeric, for color - 1 teaspoon smoked paprika - 1 teaspoon dried oregano - 1/­­2 teaspoon red pepper flakes - 1 28-ounce can diced fire-roasted tomatoes, undrained - Salt and freshly ground black pepper - 1 cup frozen green peas, thawed - 1 1/­­2 cups cooked chickpeas, or 1 (15.5-ounce) can chickpeas, drained and rinsed - 2 1/­­2 to 3 cups cooked rice - 1 6-ounce jar marinated artichoke hearts, drained and chopped - 1 6-ounce jar roasted red bell pepper, drained and chopped - 1/­­2 cup sliced pimiento-stuffed green olives - 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley - Heat the oil in a large saucepan or Dutch oven over medium heat. Add the onion and cook for 5 minutes to soften. Add the garlic and cook 1 minute longer. Stir in the broth, saffron, paprika, bay leaf, oregano, red pepper flakes, and tomatoes and their juice. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat to medium. Season with salt and pepper to taste, cover, and simmer for 8 minutes. Stir in the peas, chickpeas, cooked rice, artichoke hearts, roasted red bell pepper, olives, and parsley. Cook 3 to 5 minutes longer, stirring gently, to heat through. Taste and adjust the seasonings, if needed. Serve hot. Recipe from Cook the Pantry (C) 2015 by Robin Robertson. Photo by Annie Oliverio. Used by permission Vegan Heritage Press LLC. The post Vegan Paella from the Pantry appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Vegan Wellington with Mushrooms, Lentils, Veggies

December 15 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Wellington with Mushrooms, Lentils, VeggiesMushroom lentil Wellington. Easy Vegan Wellington for the Holidays and potlucks. Puff pastry wrapped lentil walnut mushroom loaf.  Vegan Recipe. Make into a loaf to make gluten-free.  Another week done and another 2 to go. Lets make this fabulous puff pastry wrapped lentil mushroom walnut roast to celebrate. The lentil mushroom mixture is fabulous on it its own. You can make it into patties or a loaf and serve with gravy. I made 2 loaves and wrapped them in puff pastry for a wellington style loaf. The buttery crisp pastry makes it festive and decadent.  Onion, garlic, walnuts gets toasted on the skillet, then mushrooms cooked down, then combined with lentils, veggies, herbs and flavoring. The mixture is packed into a puff pastry and baked to golden. Slice and serve with gravy , mashed potatoes, side salad. Sunlight fades too quickly these days so I made a quick wrap with slits. Use lattice or other pastry wrap designs to make it prettier. To make it gluten-free, make the mixture into patties or a glazed loaf.Continue reading: Vegan Wellington with Mushrooms, Lentils, VeggiesThe post Vegan Wellington with Mushrooms, Lentils, Veggies appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Mediterranean Brussels & Beans

December 11 2017 Meatless Monday 

Dress up winter’s favorite miniature cabbage with sweet sun-dried tomatoes and protein-packed cannellini beans. Feta cheese and thyme lend Mediterranean flavors to this simple dish. This recipe comes to us from Sarah of So Hungry I Could Blog. Serves 2 - 15 medium-large Brussels sprouts - olive oil - sea salt or kosher salt - 1 - 1 1/­­2 cups cooked cannellini beans (about 1 can) - 1/­­2 cup sun-dried tomatoes, sliced thin - 1/­­2 cup feta cheese, crumbled or cubed - leaves from 2-3 sprigs of fresh thyme - pepper Rinse the Brussels sprouts in a colander. Trim the ends of the Brussels and cut in half, length-wise. Remove the outer leaves and discard (these leaves will usually fall right off after cutting the sprouts in half). In a glass or tin baking dish, toss the Brussels in a few teaspoons of olive oil and a few pinches of salt. Roast at 400 degrees for 15-20 minutes. Toss the sprouts and roast for an additional 15-20 minutes, or until browned and slightly crisped. While the sprouts are cooking, combine the beans, feta, tomatoes and thyme -- tossing carefully so as not to break up the cheese too much. Add the warm Brussels sprouts to the bean mixture and gently combine. Drizzle with a little extra olive oil and a sprinkle of fresh pepper before serving. Makes about 4 servings as a side dish. The post Mediterranean Brussels & Beans appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Black Bean Brownie Bites

December 8 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Black Bean Brownie Bites The moment I placed these brownies in the oven, I started whining like a disgruntled teenager because Luise had persuaded me to only sweeten them with dates and mix a whole can of black beans into the batter. “They are going to taste like sh*t” might have been the carefully formulated phrase I used. Baking brownies was my idea to start with and I usually don’t complain about healthy desserts, but I was tired that day and my mind was set on the caramel-tasting brownies from the bakery across the street. More than the flavor, it was their texture I wanted to recreate. The crusty top and caramel fudge center that you only can achieve with sugar, butter and flour. I knew these would be far from that. And in my mind that was all Luise’s fault. The whining escalated into a discussion (aka argument) and by the time the timer on my phone rang, things were, well, kind of tense between us. I cut off a corner piece of the baked brownie and quickly realized that they weren’t as awful as I had expected. Of course when Luise asked me, I did what any 36-year old teenager would do and grunted: “They were okay I guess”. In reality, they were actually pretty good. They didn’t have that crusty texture or typical sugar taste but they were still sweet, gooey but not heavy, chocolatey, energy packed and rich. I added frosting to make them a little more sassy - using dates as sweetener and avocado and coconut oil for an ultra lush and creamy consistency. They turned out really beautiful and jam-packed with good stuff. Rather than a dessert, I’d say that this is more like an energy bar-style brownie, and I found myself sneaking back to the fridge several times that day for another bite. We’re sharing the recipe and some notes below. But first, check out this little video from our youtube channel where we demonstrate how to make them. Since that first batch of brownies, there have been at least six more batches. A few vegan attempts and various flavor and texture variations. I have gathered a few notes that might come useful in case you want to give them a try. - We use very soft fresh dates that we buy in card board boxes and they are pretty affordable compared to loose weight or medjool dates. Sizes differ so use a scale if you want to be exact. - If you can’t find fresh dates you can use dried dates that you soak in water for a couple of hours. Drain the water before mixing. However, I wouldn’t use dried dates for the frosting as they need the dates to be super soft to achieve a smooth consistency. Try maple syrup instead. - If you arent used to sugar free desserts, you can add a couple of tablespoons maple syrup, honey or sugar to the batter. We have tried this recipe both with and without additional sweetening and they taste good both ways. It all depends on what you are used to and your expectations are. - We use a quite mild olive oil and it works really well with the chocolate flavor (not strong at all). However, if you don’t like olive oil, you can use, coconut oil, rapeseed oil or butter instead. - We have also tried a vegan, egg-free version using aquafaba (chickpea water) that we are sharing at the bottom of the recipe. We also tried making aquafaba using black bean water (because it’s a rest product of the beans in the recipe). It didn’t firm up as much when whisked but it did work as a binder. However, it looked kinda gross and added more bean flavor so we decided to stick with chickpea water instead. - We add coffee to the frosting to disguise the avocado flavor. If you dont like coffee, you can use almond butter or peanut butter instead to give it a flavor twist. - Sea salt flakes are great on top and we love the salt + chocolate combo, but desiccated coconut would also look good. - If you are allergic to nuts, you can mix toasted sunflower seeds into a flour and use instead of almond flour. And use pumpkin seeds instead of walnuts. Black Bean Brownie Bites with Chocolate Avocado Frosting Makes 24 bites These taste sweet but not overly so, see notes above if you prefer to make them sweeter. Vegan version below. 20 soft dates (approx 230 g /­­ 8 oz) 1 1/­­2 cup /­­ 185 g cooked black beans (rinsed) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml olive oil or other neutral oil 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml plant milk or regular milk 3 eggs 1/­­2 cup /­­ 50 g oat flour (or same amount rolled oats, mixed into a flour) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 50 g almond flour 6 tbsp cacao powder 1 tsp baking powder 1 pinch salt 1 handful crushed walnuts (optional) Chocolate Avocado Frosting 6-8 soft dates 3 tbsp coconut oil 2-3 tbsp strong coffee 3 tbsp cacao powder 1 avocado Sprinkle with Sea salt Preheat the oven to 180°C /­­ 350°F. Pit the dates and add them to a food processor along with the rinsed black beans. Mix on high speed. Add oil, milk and eggs (leave out if you are vegan) and mix until smooth. Add almond flour and oat flour (you can make oat flour from rolled oats by simply blending them in a food processor or grinding them in a mortle and pester), cacao powder, baking powder and salt and pulse until everything is mixed. Stir in walnuts (and whipped aquafaba if you are making the vegan version). Place a baking paper in a 28 x 20 cm /­­ 11 x 8 inch rectangular baking dish and bake for 30 minutes. Remove the brownies from the oven once they are firm to touch and leave until completely cool. Make the frosting by mixing all the ingredients in a food processor until completely smooth. Taste and adjust the flavors, adding more dates (or maple syrup if you want it sweeter) and more cacao powder if you want it richer. Spread the frosting over the brownies, sprinkle with sea salt flakes and cut into bite-size pieces. Store in the fridge. To make them vegan: Use 3 tbsp more oat flour. Leave out the eggs and whisk 1/­­3 cup aquafaba (chickpea water) into soft peaks that you stir into the mixed batter together with the walnuts. The vegan version needs approx 45-50 minutes in the oven and will come out slightly stickier but firms up once it cools.

Crispy Fried Cauliflower Wingz

December 5 2017 Vegan Dad 

Crispy Fried Cauliflower Wingz This recipe is perfect for your upcoming holiday party! Or tuck it away until the Super Bowl. An indulgence, to be sure, but you deserve it. Ive been meaning to work up a recipe like this since the cauliflower wings craze hit the interwebs a while ago, but I never got around to it. These are crispy and flavourful, and remain so even when they are no longer hot. The boys doused theirs in Buffalo hot sauce, while the rest of us stuck to a sweet BBQ sauce. Delicious!  INGREDIENTS - 1 large head of cauliflower, cut into florets Brine - 2 cups cold water - 1 tsp garlic powder - 2 tsp onion powder - 2 tsp smoked or seasoned salt - 2 tsp paprika - 1 tsp poultry spice Batter - 2 cups all purpose flour - 1 cup panko crumbs - 1/­­2 cup chickpea flour - 1/­­2 cup tapioca flour/­­starch - 1 tbsp each: onion powder, garlic powder, paprika, Italian seasoning - 1 tsp white pepper - 2 tbsp apple cider vinegar - 3 cups plain soy milk (more if needed) METHOD 1. The day before: mix together the brine ingredients (I use a blender). Pour into a large freezer bag, then add the cauliflower florets. If your cauliflower is very large, you can make a 1.5 recipe of the brine.  2. Remove as much air a possible so the brine is making maximum contact with the brine. Refrigerate for at least 12 hours, rotating the bag as needed for even brining.  3. The Day of: drain cauliflower in a colander. Heat oil in a deep fryer to 350 degrees. 4. While cauliflower is draining, whisk together the dry ingredients for the batter (i.e. flour to white pepper).  5. Dredge the cauliflower in the flour mixture in batches until coated. Shake off all excess and place on a baking sheet. 6. In a separate bowl, whisk together vinegar and soy milk. Add enough of the soy mixture to the remaining flour mixture to make a thickish batter. Add more soy milk if needed. 7. Add some pieces of cauliflower to the batter. Turn to coat. Leave the cauliflower in the batter for a few minutes to allow the batter to soak into the dredging flour. 8. Shake off excess batter and transfer to a cooking tray or plate.  9. Fry in oil, 3-4 minutes per side, until deep golden brown. Make sure your oil is not too hot or the outside will burn before the cauliflower is cooked. 10. Drain on paper towels and serve while still hot. NOTE 1: while one batch is frying, add another to the batter so it can soak. Repeat. NOTE 2: add more soy milk to the batter, if needed. The dredging flour will thicken the batter a bit, so just thin it down again. 

Aloo Gobi

December 4 2017 Meatless Monday 

Chunks of potato and cauliflower soak up the rich flavors of toasted cumin, turmeric and dried coriander in this traditional dish. Try serving this curry with basmati rice or the flatbread naan for a quintessential Indian feast. This recipe comes to us from Prerna of Indian Simmer. Serves 2 - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 1 teaspoon cumin seeds - or - 1 teaspoon mustard seeds - 1/­­4 onion, chopped - 2 tablespoons dried coriander - 1 teaspoons red pepper powder - I teaspoon turmeric - 1 teaspoon curry powder - 1 medium cauliflower, cut into bite sized florets - 1 potatoes, peeled and cut into 1 inch cubes - 1 tablespoon cilantro, chopped Place the oil in a medium wok or frying pan over medium-high heat. Add the cumin or mustard seeds and cook for 1-3 minutes, or until they start popping. When the seeds pop, add the onion. Cook for 3-5 minutes, or until the it turns golden. Season the onion with the dried coriander, red pepper powder, turmeric and curry powder, taking care to stir and ensure all spices are evenly distributed. Add the cauliflower florets and potato cubes. Stir, cover with a lid and turn heat down to medium low. Cook, stirring occasionally, for about 12-15 minutes or until the potatoes and cauliflower are al dente. Uncover, stir and cook 4-7 minutes more, or until the vegetables are fully cooked. Divide into 2 portions, sprinkle with cilantro and enjoy! The post Aloo Gobi appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Sweet Potato Galette with Magic Green Sauce

November 29 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Sweet Potato Galette with Magic Green Sauce I love galette. It really is the lazy wo/­­man’s pie. I love that galette crust requires the least amount of fuss of all the crusts, and that the messier it looks, the better. I love that galette filling can be any good combination of vegetables, fruit and herbs, and that it can be as minimal or grand as one wants. This sweet potato version falls on the minimal side of the galette spectrum, yet it is completely lovely and delicious. There are layers of caramelized onions, thinly sliced sweet potato, and sage, all enveloped by a rustic spelt dough. We love to eat it with our favorite, magic green sauce, which is a savior for any leftover herbs in your refrigerator that are fated to end up in the trash or compost.  The green sauce is something I make every week. It’s sort of a cross between pesto and chimichurri, but made with pumpkin seeds as a more affordable alternative to pine nuts, and umami-fied with a bit of miso. You can make it with pretty much any herbs you have on hand. I usually make mine with parsley, but it also does well with the addition of cilantro, basil, tarragon, sage, and even rosemary. You can add in things like carrot or radish tops, too, which normally get thrown away, but are perfectly good to eat. I don’t discriminate against soft herb stems in this sauce either, and whirl them all in. For instance, if I’m using parsley leaves for a recipe, I’ll save the stems for this sauce instead of throwing them away. I’ll do the same with most other herbs. The sauce is a nice brightener for pretty much any savory dish. It’s great on toast, in pasta, on roasted vegetables, with eggs, and it’s absolutely delicious on this galette. I hope you’ll give it a try :) Sweet Potato Galette   Print Serves: two 7 galettes Ingredients for the filling 1 large yellow onion - halved and sliced lengthwise about 3 tablespoons melted neutral coconut oil - divided 1 medium sweet potato - mandolined or thinly sliced into rounds sea salt and freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons chopped sage leaves for the dough 1½ cups (150g) sprouted spelt flour or whole spelt flour, plus more for rolling the dough 1 teaspoon coconut sugar pinch of sea salt 3 tablespoons melted neutral coconut oil ½ cup plus 2 tablespoons hot purified water 1 tablespoon finely chopped sage Instructions to caramelize the onions Start by caramelizing the onions. Heat 1 tablespoon of coconut oil in a sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add the onions and sauté until translucent, for 3-5 minutes. Add a pinch of salt, turn down the heat to medium low and cook the onions, stirring periodically, for 30-40 minutes, until caramelized and golden brown. Make the dough while the onions are caramelizing. to make the dough While the onions are caramelizing, place the flour in a medium mixing bowl, add the sugar and salt, and mix with a fork to combine. Make a well in the center of the flour mixture, and pour in the oil. Pour the hot water over the oil, stirring with a fork and slowly incorporating the flour into the liquid. Add the chopped sage and mix it in. When all the flour has been incorporated, turn out the dough onto a floured surface and knead with your hands until smooth. Add more water, 1 teaspoon at a time, if the dough appears too dry. Take care not to add too much water, give the flour a chance to absorb the initial amount of water first. Divide the dough in half. Flatten each piece into a round disc, wrap them in plastic wrap or place into a floured bowl and cover with a damp kitchen towel. Let rest at room temperature for 30 minutes. to assemble and bake Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Line a large baking sheet or two medium baking sheets by covering them with parchment paper. Roll out the dough on a floured surface, one portion at a time, into ⅛-thick circular sheets, about 9 in diameter. Place one sheet of dough on the prepared baking sheet, keeping it to one side to make room for the second galette (if you are using two baking sheets, you dont have to worry about this). Brush the dough with the remaining melted coconut oil and sprinkle it with about ½ tablespoon of chopped sage. Arrange half of the caramelized onions in the center of the sheet of dough, followed by half of the sweet potato slices (arrange those in a spiral or any other pattern you prefer), leaving a 1-2 inch border of dough all around. Brush the sweet potato slices with melted coconut oil as you arrange them, in small sections, making sure that they are well oiled. Once arranged, generously sprinkle the sweet potato with sea salt and pepper, and another ½ tablespoon of chopped sage. Fold over the edges of the galette, working circularly, until the galette has a folded border. Brush the edges with melted coconut oil. Repeat this process with the second portion of the dough and remaining sweet potato and sage. Drizzle any leftover melted oil over the filling of both galettes. Trasnfer the baking sheet(s) to the oven and bake for about 45 minutes, until the potatoes are cooked through and golden. Remove the galettes from the oven, let them cool slightly, slice and serve with the magic green sauce (recipe below). 3.5.3226     Magic Green Sauce   Print Serves: about 1½ cups Ingredients 1 large or 2 small bunches of parsley - roughly chopped, including stems 7 or more sprigs of sage - roughly chopped, including stems ½ cup toasted pumpkin seeds 2 tablespoons lemon juice (from about half a lemon) ¼ cup olive oil 1 heaping tablespoon white miso generous pinch of red pepper flakes sea salt - to taste splash of red wine vinegar (optional) 1 clove garlic - roughly chopped (optional) Instructions Combine all the ingredients in a high-speed blender or a food processor until smooth. Keep the sauce refrigerated in an air-tight container, it will last for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Raw Colour Wheel Wraps Peach and Raspberry Summer Tart and a Guest Post for Scandi Foodie Tahini Ice Cream Bars with Miso Caramel and Chocolate - Ice Cream Sund... Welcome Summer Multigrain Salad with Strawberries and Asparagus .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Sweet Potato Galette with Magic Green Sauce appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Roasted Pumpkin Orange Quinoa Salad

January 1 2018 Meatless Monday 

Quinoa is infused with fresh squeezed orange juice and vegetable stock, while pumpkin is tossed with shallots, orange wedges and chickpeas. Tangy feta cheese stands out on a warm backdrop of toasted walnuts and slow roasted orange, all dressed with a reduced balsamic. This recipe comes from Trudy of veggie.num.num. Serves 6 - 1 cup quinoa, rinsed - 1 1/­­2 cups low sodium vegetable stock - juice from 1 orange - 1 orange, peeled and cut into wedges - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 2 pounds pumpkin, diced into 1 centimeter cubes - 1 cup chickpeas, cooked or canned and rinsed - 5 shallots, quartered - 1/­­4 cup walnuts, roughly chopped - 1/­­2 cup balsamic vinegar - 2 cups rocket lettuces - 7 ounces feta cheese*, crumbled *optional Preheat an oven to 400 degrees. Place the quinoa, vegetable stock and juice from one orange into a medium pot over medium-high heat and bring to a boil. Turn heat down to medium-low, cover, and simmer for 10-15 minutes, or until the liquid has been absorbed. Set aside. Cut the remaining orange into wedges. Toss the orange wedges, pumpkin pieces, chickpeas and shallots with the olive oil. Place on a baking sheet and put in the oven. Cook for 20-25 minutes, or until chickpeas are crisp and pumpkin is tender. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool slightly. Place a sauté pan over medium-high heat. Toast the walnuts for 2-3 minutes, or until golden. Remove to a bowl and set aside. Place the balsamic vinegar in a small saucepan and heat over medium heat. Allow the vinegar to come to a simmer. Whisk for 4-5 minutes, or until the balsamic has reduced by half and the vinegar is syrupy. Set aside to cool. Place the quinoa in a large bowl. Add the roasted orange pumpkin mixture, toasted walnuts and rocket lettuces. Crumble the feta cheese on top, if using. Dress the salad with 2-3 tablespoons of balsamic reduction, or to taste, and toss well to combine. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Place equal portions in 4 bowls atop extra rocket lettuce. Sprinkle with a little more balsamic reduction if desired and enjoy. The post Roasted Pumpkin Orange Quinoa Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

One Pan Brussels Sprout and Red Lentil Pie with a Root Vegetable Crust

December 27 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. Since this is our last recipe of 2017, we wanted to make sure that it’s a special one. It needed to check all the boxes we usually try to check with our recipes: nourishing, delicious, seasonal, beautiful, convenient, and a little bit unexpected. This veggie and lentil-centered one pan pie is all of those things. It’s very cozy and fun to prepare, too. If I had a choice, most of my savory dishes would be one-pan dishes :) Convenience is hard to beat. That little bit of initial effort you put into assembling all the ingredients for a single-pan dish pays off incredibly well when you end up with a big meal, plus a ton of leftovers for the week, having only used one pan or pot in the process. This one-pan dish is something like a vegetable pot pie, but the crust is made up of thinly mandolined winter roots – potatoes, sweet potatoes, and celery root. The filling is shredded Brussels sprouts, mushrooms, and red lentils (you can add barley, too, for a grain component) that cooks in a mixture of healing spices and coconut milk. The whole thing is packed with a great variety of plants. It’s perfect for those looking to up their intake of vegetables after the holidays, but still wanting to keep their cooking hearty and cozy. The ingredient that takes this dish into the complete meal category are the red lentils. Vegetable dishes are great on their own, but adding any kind of pulses (lentils, beans, chickpeas, dry peas) to your plant-centric meals will up their nutrition and ability to satisfy quite a bit. Pulses are incredibly nutrient-dense, like superfoods, but they are also very affordable, unlike most other superfoods, so it’s a win-win all around. Try adding about a half a cup of pulses to your meals a few times a week – your cooking will greatly benefit from them, and you’ll be on your way to discovering a whole new world of deliciousness (of you haven’t already, of course). Head here for more of our recipes using pulses, and be sure to check out Half Cup Habit. Happy New Year! Thank you so much for visiting GK, trying out our recipes, and reading up on the self-care series. It all means so much to us .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post One Pan Brussels Sprout and Red Lentil Pie with a Root Vegetable Crust appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Rice and Potato Cutlets

December 23 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Rice and Potato Cutlets These Rice and Potato Cutlets are a tasty treat as a tea time snack or you can also serve them as an appetizer. They are crispy outside and soft inside. This is a quick and easy recipe and a good way to use left over rice. - 1 cup rice (cooked) - 1 cup potatoes (boiled, peeled, and shredded) - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 1 Tbsp green chili (chopped) - 1 tsp ginger (finely chopped) - 2 Tbsp cilantro (finely chopped, hara dhania) - 1/­­4 tsp fresh lemon juice - In a bowl mash the rice, rice should be semi mashed add potatoes mix it well now add all the other ingredients, salt, cumin seeds, green chilies, ginger, cilantro and lemon juice. Mix should be firm and will be consistency of a sticky dough. - Grease your palm and divide them into 12 pieces I wanted to make them in small size. Roll them in patties. - Heat the oil in a frying pan on medium high heat. Frying pan should have about 1 of oil. Oil should be moderately hot. Test the oil putting a small piece of mix, this should up right of way. Drop the cutlets slowly into it, taking care not to overlap them. - Fry the cutlets until they are golden brown, turning occasionally. This should take about 5 minutes. Take them out over a paper towel. - For best taste serve them hot. Cutlets taste great with cilantro chutney. - Potatoes should be not over cooked, that will make mix soft and cutlets can break in the oil while frying. - If oil is not hot enough cutlets will be greasy. Rice and potato min should not be very soft otherwise cutlets will break in oil. The post Rice and Potato Cutlets appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

VegReady: A Ready-To-Eat Vegan Meal Delivery Service Coming To Your Plate Soon!

December 21 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

We are excited to share VegReady, a vegan meal delivery service. A lot of people want to make a change to a plant-based lifestyle, but give up because they find it too hard. VegReady wants to make that lifestyle easier, and more exciting. VegReady carefully sources ingredients, cooks them to perfection, and delivers meals right to your door. Every meal is ready to eat, and easy to travel with. Great for a busy lifestyle! VegReady meals are always plant-based, non-GMO, and gluten-free. VegReady focuses on healthy ingredients sourced from four regions of the world. Their meals contain perfectly cooked quinoa, sautéed greens and savory vegetables. They are currently running a Kickstarter crowdfunding campaign that will bring these meals to market. With their goal of $25,000, VegReady can further develop their meals to give their customers the best possible vegan experience. Check out their inspiring video here:     By pre-ordering VegReady meals in this early stage you have the opportunity for huge savings. VegReady meals are customizable and come in many flavors such as mango & jalop?no, artichoke & hearts of palm, zucchini, peppers & onion and many more. Using recipes endorsed by doctors and derived from medical studies, their […] The post VegReady: A Ready-To-Eat Vegan Meal Delivery Service Coming To Your Plate Soon! appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Sweet Potato Challah

December 17 2017 Vegan Dad 

Sweet Potato Challah Ive been meaning to post this recipe for ages. Sweet potato is my new favourite way to replace eggs in enriched bread dough recipes. It makes the final loaf nice and soft, and adds colour to the dough that     mimics the many egg yolks of non-vegan challah. This is a version of Peter Reinharts recipe from Artisan Breads Everyday, but I use a blender to incorporate the potato into the liquid ingredients. You can let the dough rise in the fridge, then shape and bake the next day as he calls for, but I usually just do everything in the same day because I dont have the time or the fridge space to follow his method. The recipe produces reliable results every time. Trust me: I make at least two recipes a week so the kids have buns for school lunches. Makes 2 loaves, or 16 buns INGREDIENTS All measurements are weight, not volume - 17oz warm water - 2.5 oz oil - 4 oz cooked sweet potato (see note* way below) - 3 oz sugar - 14 g instant yeast - 19 g salt - 2 lb 3 oz bread flour - soy milk for brushing METHOD 1. Place water, oil, sweet potato, sugar, yeast, and salt in a blender. Blend until smooth. 2. Add liquid to flour in a large bowl and bring into a dough. Knead until smooth.  3. Shape into a ball and let rise, covered, in a large oiled bowl until doubled in size.  4. From here, YouTube is your friend. Determine how many braids you want in your loaf (the pic above is a 6 braid) and find a video for how to braid it. Remember that the recipe makes two loaves. 5. Place braided loaves on a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper (ideally both loaves on one big sheet). Brush with soy milk. 6. Leave to rise, uncovered, in a warm place until almost doubled in size (about 1 hour). Keep brushing with soy milk every 15 mins or so, to keep the dough from drying out and to build up layers of soy milk (this will give the loaf that glossy finish when baked).  7. While dough is rising, preheat oven to 350.  8. Bake for 20 mins, then rotate the pan and bake for another 15-20 mins, until the loaves are evenly browned and sound hollow when thumped on the bottom. A convection oven really helps get an evenly browned loaf.  A NOTE ON BUNS This is also my go to recipe for buns--it makes 16 buns that I do as a 4x 4 batch bake on a large sheet pan. Brush them with soy milk like the loaves, but bake at 400 for 15-17 mins, rotating the pan half way through. Or, space them apart, slash the tops before baking, and sprinkle with sesame seeds after the last brushing with soy milk (as pictured below). Or do hot dog/­­sausage buns.  *Note: I prick the skin of a sweet potato a few times with a fork, then cook it in the microwave on the potato setting. Its fast and makes for a sweet potato that is not too wet. 

Bright & Grounding Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale Soup

December 13 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Bright & Grounding Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale Soup This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. Here’s a simple, nourishing soup that will help ground you through any holiday craziness or, really, any kind of stress you might be experiencing. Pureed soups offer such an easy way to get lots of veggies into your diet, and the possibilities for pureed soup recipes are endless. Think of them as warm, savory smoothies, and you’ll see that almost anything goes. I love a smooth soup, but sometimes I crave a little more texture within that creamy format. Enter this Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale soup, which has it all in terms of texture: a smooth and silky base, with satisfying chunks of chickpeas and kale throughout. Root vegetables are the perfect thing to be eating right now, when our bodies require more high-quality fuel to keep warm. They gather all their energy underground, where they grow to become nutrient and calorie-dense. Roots are grounding in the most literal sense. Parsnips, carrots, sweet potatoes, celeriac, beets, rutabaga, and any other root veggies you can think of, will make for a great addition to your winter meals. This soup highlights parsnips, the roots that look like albino carrots and have the loveliest sweet and earthy flavor. They are pureed together with warming spices like turmeric and coriander, as well as home-cooked chickpeas, which make this soup even more hearty, and satisfying enough to be eaten as a light lunch. Whole chickpeas and ribboned kale are then warmed in the pureed mixture, to make for the perfect balance of creamy and chunky. Have you tried adding half a cup of pulses, like the chickpeas in this soup (along with beans, lentils and dry peas) to your meals throughout the week yet? We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: they are the perfect, nutrient-dense and affordable building blocks for healthy, hearty and sustainable meals. Head here for more of our recipes using pulses, and be sure to check out Half Cup Habit. Bright & Grounding Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale Soup   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients 1 cup dried chickpeas - soaked overnight in purified water with a pinch of acv 2 bay leaves (optional) 2-inch piece of kombu seaweed (optional) sea salt 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 1 onion - chopped 1 tsp fennel seeds 1 tsp ground coriander 1 teaspoon ground turmeric pinch of red pepper flakes 3 garlic cloves - sliced 1 lb parsnips - peeled and roughly chopped black pepper - to taste 5 cups chickpea broth + more if needed (recipe below) 1 bunch kale - finely chopped zaatar, herbs/­­sprouts and nuts/­­seeds - for serving Instructions Drain and rinse the chickpeas. Combine them with 8 cups of purified water, bay leaves and kombu, if using, in a medium pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to a simmer, and cook, partially covered for about 30 minutes, or until the chickpeas are completely cooked. Add salt at the end. Discard the bay leaves and kobmu, then strain, reserving the chickpea broth. Warm the coconut oil in a medium soup pot over medium heat. Add the onion, fennel, coriander, turmeric, red pepper flakes, and a pinch of salt, and sauté for 7 minutes, until the onion is translucent. Add the garlic and sauté for 1 more minute, until fragrant. Add the parsnips, 1 cup of the cooked chickpeas, more salt and black pepper, and 5 cups of the chickpea broth to the same pot. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to a simmer, and cook, partially covered, for about 15 minutes, or until the parsnips are completely cooked and soft throughout. Puree all the contents of the pot in batches in an upright blender. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Return the pureed mixture to the same pot. Add the kale to the pot and stir it in. If the soup is too thick at this point, add a little more of the reserved chickpea broth to achieve the desired soup consistency. Bring the soup to a gentle boil once more, and simmer, stirring often, for 10 minutes. Add the remaining cooked chickpeas and stir to warm them through. Serve the soup warm, sprinkled with zaatar and any herbs/­­sprouts or nuts/­­seeds of choice. 3.5.3226 You might also like... No-Recipe Healing Soup Sweet and Savory Energy Bites, What to Do with Leftover Nut Milk Pulp Spring Vegetables with Smoky Chickpea Croutons and Avocado Aioli Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Bright & Grounding Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale Soup appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Sasha Swerdloff

December 10 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Sasha Swerdloff Sasha Swerdloff is a Certified Ayurvedic Consultant and blogger at Tending the Table, where she shares plant-based recipes and writes about sustainability, health, and wellness. We love Sasha’s thoughtful approach to cooking, breathtaking photography, and Ayurvedic advice. In this interview, Sasha tells us about her morning, bedtime and exercise routines, as well as self-care as a type of non-violence, addressing the root cause of health-related imbalances, the breathing technique she uses during stressful times, skincare, nourishment, yoga, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Routine is super important for me. Without it I tend to feel scattered, flustered and irritable. I think this has a lot to do with my constitution. I know that I tend to struggle with uncertainty so having a routine makes me feel a little more in control and a little less terrified. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I usually wake up around 7am, do my morning stuff (scrape my tongue, do neti, wash my face etc.) then try to drink a big mug of hot lemon water. I like to listen to NPR and snuggle on the couch with my pups while I drink my morning matcha latte. Then I do yoga before making breakfast. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Ive struggled with insomnia a fair amount but paying attention to my stress level and having a solid bedtime routine has helped a lot. A hot bath and self massage with plenty of herbal oil especially on my head works wonders. I also really love sipping on some warm almond milk with spices before bed. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast - Sautéed greens, a fried egg from the chicken ladies in the backyard, and sourdough toast. Lunch - Soup or a big bowl of roasted veggies with some sort of cooked grain, some protein, and a half an avocado. Snack - Apple and almond butter Dinner - Soup, roasted veggies, salads, veggie tacos with beans, roasted sweet potato, cabbage slaw and avocado. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Ive never been able to drink coffee or black tea without getting super jittery but it took me years to finally listen to what my body was telling me. Instead of coffee I drink a matcha latte with almond milk and raw honey every morning. --  Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? Not having sweet stuff around is the only way to stop me from eating a whole bar of chocolate or way too many cookies. --  Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? Im not a fan of taking lots of herbs or supplements for long periods of time. Its easy to take a pill but its a lot harder to address the root cause of an issue and make diet and lifestyle changes to address that imbalance. In the long term though, addressing the root cause through diet and lifestyle is a whole lot more affordable and leads to long term results. I do take Ashwagandha and Vit D regularly to support my nervous system and to keep me sane through the dark winters here in Seattle. Exercise --  Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I try to practice at least an hour of yoga daily. I also walk a fair amount and jog every once in a while. In the winter I cross country ski as much as I can. Ive noticed that the forms of exercise I enjoy most incorporate some sort of rhythmic, repetitive motion which I find to be super calming and meditative. Also, any time I can get outside Im happy. --  Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? Both. There are days when I dont exercise or get outside but I try to not beat myself up about it. Its too easy to get into a pattern of negativity and its much more beneficial long term to practice having compassion for yourself. The things that motivate me to get on my mat each day are my physical and mental health, someone else (my husband) holding me accountable, and the respect and admiration I have for my yoga teacher and the Ashtanga lineage. Beauty --  What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Confidence is beautiful to me. I feel more beautiful when I stand up straight and hold my head high. Im slowly learning that its less about how I look and more about how I feel. --  What is your skincare approach – face and body? My skin has always been sensitive and problematic and Ive always had negative body image issues associated with it. Im finally starting to get a handle on it by going off of hormonal birth control and eliminating sugar and dairy. I also have a pretty strict routine that helps keep my skin free from breakouts. In the morning I wash my face with warm water and moisturize with January Labs Revitalizing Day Cream or Osmia Organics Purely Simple Face Cream . In the evening I cleanse and exfoliate with Beauty Counters Charcoal Cleansing Bar and the Clarisonic skin brush then moisturize with grapeseed oil and Living Libations Dew Dab which helps prevent breakouts and combat hyper pigmentation. In the summer I spritz my face with rose water to help me cool down. --  Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I started taking a zinc supplement a few months ago for my skin and it has helped a ton. Overall though, I notice that cutting out sugar and dairy from my diet makes the biggest difference. --  Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Like I said before, for me, diet makes a huge difference. But I also love my Clarisonic skin brush. It seems like a weird gadget but it has made all the difference for me. Stress, etc. --  If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Making sure not to get too over stimulated or overcommitted helps me stay grounded but if I do get spun out I practice Nadi shodhana breathing and take some Anxiety Soother to take the edge off. I also like to do Yoga Nidra . Getting some fresh air and planting my feet on the ground or pulling out the watercolors always helps too. --  What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I usually mega dose on Echinacea and Sambu Guard then take a hot bath and bundle up. I also try to slow down since for me, colds are often the result of stress. If I slow down my body can usually heal itself. Motivation --  Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I like to think about yoga philosophy and the eight limbs. The first limb is yama. The yamas are a set of five precepts that help us interact with the world in an ethical manner. The first yama is ahimsa or non-violence. This means non-violence towards all living things, including ourselves,  in thoughts, words and actions. For me self-care is a type of non-violence towards my physical and mental being. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I take a break from whatever it is that Im struggling with and do something else to clear my mind. Knowledge --  What was your path to studying Ayurveda and yoga and how do you incorporate that knowledge into your everyday?  I first learned about Ayurveda from my yoga teacher, Christine Hoar . I had been practicing yoga with her for a year or so and was struggling with some health problems so decided to do an Ayurvedic consultation with her to see what she could recommend. Her simple diet and lifestyle recommendations completely changed things for me. I felt like all of a sudden, all of the issues I had struggled with throughout my life made sense and fit into a bigger picture of who I am. I continued studying Ayurveda with Christine and then after college completed an Ayurvedic Certification program and Kripalu. For me, Ayurveda provides a framework from which to view the world and my place in it. Im constantly thinking about the qualities of the foods I eat and the things I do or experience from an Ayurvedic perspective. Ayurveda helps me understand and take control of my health. --  Do you practice a certain type of yoga, and why did you choose that particular branch?  I practice Ashtanga Yoga. I sort of stumbled into it. A college friend told me about a summer special at a nearby studio and suggested I sign up. I did and I went to class there every day for a month. After the month was up I just kept going. I was hooked. I think a big part of why Ive stuck with Ashtanga is because of my teacher. Shes pretty incredible and has been a huge influence in my life. The method of Ashtanga also really resonates with me. I enjoy the repetition, the meditative quality of the breath, the focus and concentration required, the rigor of it and the tradition. --  Do you have any recommendations for someone who wants to establish a daily yoga practice but doesnt know where to begin? Find a teacher you connect with. Finding the motivation to practice on your own is challenging but if you have a teacher you admire and respect and a community of fellow students who are counting on you, youll show up every day. --  Your recipes are so beautiful, approachable and inventive. What is your process when it comes to developing recipes? Thank you! Sometimes Im inspired by meals Ive had while travelling but mostly I draw inspiration from whatever produce I have on hand. I love combining flavors and experimenting with spices and herbs to elevate something simple and make it unique. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Im excited to be incorporating more Ayurveda and wellness themes into my work. Its a big part of my life and I want to share it with others so they can feel empowered to heal themselves. Ill be teaching my first Ayurvedic workshop in the Spring here in Seattle which should be a lot of fun. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I love a good pedicure or a trip to the Korean spa for a soak and body scrub. But more often I find myself going for a walk or taking myself out to tea if I need a boost. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book - Mary Oliver New and Selected Poems Song/­­Album - No Hard Feelings The Avett Brothers Piece of Art -  Satsuki Shibuya -- What are your favorite places to eat in Seattle? We dont eat out all that often, but when we do we usually head to Delancey , Seawolf , The Whale Wins or Frankie and Jos . -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? -Earplugs – Anxiety Soother -A headlamp -Licorice tea -A big scarf – Lip balm -A snack (always) -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Jessie Snyder of Faring Well Photos by Sasha Swerdloff and Renee Byrd You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Sasha Swerdloff appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Lentil Moussaka

December 6 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegan Lentil Moussaka This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. As our new cookbook release date approaches and we enter a really busy season of our lives (more on that soon!), we count on hearty and sustainable meals like this lentil moussaka to see us through periods of tiredness or stress. If you are feeling any kind of holiday season-related pressure, it might just be the perfect, comforting dish for you, too. I love casserole-style dishes – they take some initial effort to put together, but afterwards they turn into a meal that just keeps on giving. This moussaka is definitely like that – the portion is big enough to have dinner or lunch taken care of for a solid few days, it keeps well and only gets better with age, can be eaten hot or cold, and can even be re-imagined as, say, a toast topping, if its initial layered charm ever wears off.  Moussaka is cooked in numerous countries in the Middle East and the Mediterranean, and the recipe varies from region to region, but it usually involves layers of ground meat, eggplant or potatoes, and a béchamel or egg custard blanket on top. In our vegan version, protein-rich lentils take place of the ground meat. Once they are cooked in a mixture of mushrooms, carrots, onion, herbs, and crushed tomatoes, and layered with silky roasted eggplant, it’s incredible how savory and satisfying they become. We went with mashed potatoes for the top layer, in place of the custard or béchamel, which takes this dish even further into the cozy and wintery meal territory. The mashed potato blanket also gets the most incredible, crispy, golden crust on top after some time in the oven, which makes the whole thing even more irresistible. I suggest roasting the eggplant, making the mashed potatoes, and maybe even cooking the lentils in advance, that way assembling the moussaka will feel like a breeze. All the ingredients in this recipe are very affordable and widely available, and it’s amazing that such a satisfying meal can be made with just lentils and veggies. I generally make sure to keep a big jar of French lentils in my pantry, because they are very versatile and perfect for adding substance to all kinds of plant-based meals. Lentils fall under the category of pulses, together with chickpeas, beans and dry peas, which are all perfect vehicles for sustainable and nourishing meals. We’ve been having a ton of fun working with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada on creating accessible recipes, centered around pulses, as part of their Half Cup Habit initiative. Try adding a half cup of pulses to your meals a few times a week – they will up your whole healthy cooking game, I promise. For more of our pulses recipes, head here, as well as to the Half Cup Habit website. Enjoy :) Vegan Lentil Moussaka   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients 3 medium-large eggplants - sliced in ½ inch thick rounds 4 tablespoons neutral coconut or olive oil - divided sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1 cup dried French lentils - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of acv 4 medium Yukon gold potatoes - peeled and quartered 2 tablespoons olive oil or ghee, plus more for brushing the mashed potato layer 1 large yellow onion - chopped 2 medium carrots - sliced 1-2 celery ribs - sliced (optional) pinch of red pepper flakes 1 teaspoon each fresh or dried thyme, oregano and/­­or marjoram (optional) 3 garlic cloves - sliced 1 lb baby bella or crimini mushrooms - sliced 1 28 oz can of box of crushed tomatoes 1 tablespoon tomato paste ½ tablespoon smoked paprika ½ teaspoon cinnamon (optional) ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg (optional) handful of toasted pine nuts (optional) chopped parsley and dill - for garnish (optional) Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare two parchment paper-covered baking sheets. Arrange the eggplant slices on the baking sheets in a single layer, oil with 2 tablespoons of coconut oil/­­olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and roast for 20 minutes. Flip the slices and roast for another 15 minutes, until silky. Set aside. Lower the oven temperature to 375° F (190° C). While the eggplant is roasting, drain and rinse the lentils. Cover them with purified water in a medium pot, and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 10-15 minutes or until cooked, but not mushy. Add salt at the end. Drain over a colander and set aside. Place the potatoes in the same pot you used to cook the lentils, cover with purified water and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook until soft throughout. Add salt at the end, then drain, reserving ¼ cup of the cooking water. Return the potatoes to the same pot. Mash them with 2 tablespoons of olive oil or ghee, black pepper and ¼ cup of the reserved cooking water. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Continue to mash until smooth. Set aside. Warm the remaining 2 tablespoons of coconut oil/­­olive oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, carrots, celery, if using, salt and pepper, red pepper flakes and oregano/­­thyme/­­marjoram, if using. Sauté for 7 minutes, until the vegetables soften up. Add the mushrooms and sauté for another 8 minutes, until the water released by the mushrooms evaporates and they begin to brown. Add garlic and stir around for another minute. Add the lentils, crushed tomatoes, tomato paste, smoked paprika, cinnamon and nutmeg, if using, to the pot with the mushrooms. Stir to combine, then cover and cook for 5 minutes for the flavors to incorporate. Arrange half of the eggplant slices on the bottom of a 9 x 9 baking dish. Top with half of the lentil mixture, followed by the remaining eggplant slices and lentils. Spoon the mashed potatoes on top, evening them out with a spoon into a smooth layer. Brush more olive oil/­­ghee over the potato layer and place the dish in the oven. Bake for 30 minutes. Remove from the oven, sprinkle with the pine nuts and herbs, if using, and serve. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans Roasted Pepper Lasagna Italian-Style Lentil and Mushroom (Not)Meatballs from Pantry to Plate Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes and Black Rice .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Vegan Lentil Moussaka appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Spicy Bok Choy with Noodles and Peanuts

December 4 2017 Meatless Monday 

Wilted bok choy and peanuts fill a flavorful, savory broth alongside chewy noodles for a hearty one-dish meal. Look for fresh rice noodles in the pasta or Asian food section of most grocery stores. This recipe comes to us from Sharon Palmer, The Plant-Powered Dietitian. Serves 4 - 1 teaspoon sesame oil - 1 tablespoon peanut oil - 1 red onion, sliced - 2 cloves garlic, minced - 1 tablespoon peanut butter - 3 tablespoons soy ginger dressing - 1 tablespoon reduced-sodium soy sauce - 2 tablespoons orange juice - red pepper flakes, to taste - 1 (12 ounces) package fresh rice noodles - 6 (6-ounce) heads baby bok choy - 1/­­4 cup peanuts Place the oils in a large skillet or wok over medium-high heat. Add the onion and garlic and sauté for about 5 minutes, or until the vegetables soften and become fragrant. Add the peanut butter, dressing, soy sauce, orange juice, red pepper flakes and 1-1/­­2 cups water to the skillet. Stir until bubbly and smooth. Cover and cook while you prepare the noodles. Bring a medium pot of water to a boil over medium-high heat and cook the rice noodles according to package directions. Drain and rinse with water. Transfer the cooked noodles to the skillet and stir to combine. Add the bok choy and peanuts to the pan and let cook for 1 minute, or until the bok choy is slightly wilted. Enjoy! The post Spicy Bok Choy with Noodles and Peanuts appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Black Bean Truffles

November 30 2017 Veganpassion 

Black Bean Truffles The best gift you can give someone is something home-made. With this black bean truffles you are going to please everyone the health freak just as the sweets lover. Making truffles from black beans might not be the first thing that pops in mind when thinking about a delicious treat but trust me they're worth a try! Makes 25 truffles Ingredients: 1 can /­­ 4 cups (250g) cooked black beans 2 tbsp (25g) oats 4 tbsp (40g) cocoa 4 tbsp coconut blossom sugar 2 tbsp (60g) coconut oil Cocao powder for coating Rinse the black beans. Grind oats, cocoa and coconut blossom sugar in your mixer. Add in melted coconut oil and beans and mix until it forms into a smooth batter. Form 25 truffles, toss them in cocoa powder and store in an airtight container to prevent from getting dry.

Broccoli Strascinati with Raisins & Nuts

November 15 2017 VegKitchen 

Broccoli Strascinati with Raisins & Nuts When I lived in New York, I had a flatmate who told me a story about how shocked she was when, during a trip to Italy, she saw her host mother cooking the life out of broccoli. I had never seen anything like it before! she said. She cooked it until almost mushy, with tons […] The post Broccoli Strascinati with Raisins & Nuts appeared first on VegKitchen.


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