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concentrated vegetarian recipes

Vegan Baked Apple Cider Donuts

November 2 2018 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Baked Apple Cider DonutsBaked Apple Cider Donuts. These Cider donuts have amazing spiced flavor with concentrated cider. Perfect for fall. Vegan Soyfree Recipe. Nutfree Refined Sugar-Free Oilfree Glutenfree option  Jump to Recipe   These Apple Cider Donuts are perfect for fall or any time of the year for that matter. The key to all the fall flavor is reducing the cider! Apple Cider gets cooked for a bit to concentrate all that amazing flavor of apples and spices. Concentrated cider, flour, more spices all baked into a flavorful spiced donut! Toss in cinnamon sugar or drizzle icing of choice. These will be a hit with everyone. 15 mins of Active time, no refined sugar! The donut batter does not use yeast, so it can also be baked into regular size muffins or mini muffins as well. Add some finely chopped apples to the batter, top with a streusel and they are ready for to go breakfast. Lets make these! Continue reading: Vegan Baked Apple Cider DonutsThe post Vegan Baked Apple Cider Donuts appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegan Herb Frittata (Kuku Sabzi)

September 5 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegan Herb Frittata (Kuku Sabzi) I have a subscription to Bon Appétit, and I haven’t been able to get this Persian frittata recipe out of my head ever since I saw it in one of their issues this past year (there’s also a video of Andy Baraghani expertly making it here). The frittata is called kuku sabzi and is often served during Persian New Year that is celebrated on spring equinox, welcoming spring with the abundance of herbs in the dish. I’m obsessed with any food that requires a ton of herbs, and this frittata is loaded with parsley, dill, and cilantro. I also like making vegan ‘frittatas’ with chickpea flour, since I’m completely in love with socca, and chickpea frittatas are like socca x 100. Since this vegan version of kuku sabzi is taken out of context and tradition, I thought we could add our own spin on the meaning here. Instead of a welcome-spring dish, it can be a farewell-summer one. Herbs are still abundant at the farmer’s market where I live, and I see them as such a gift of summer. At the same time, I’m noticing all these subtle signs of fall creeping in. The days seem a tiny bit shorter, there’s often a chill in the air in the evenings, and some trees are already beginning to yellow. This time of year is so abundant, but also very fleeting, which makes it even more beautiful and worth savoring. So let’s load up on local, sun-fed herbs while we can. Since fresh herbs are so readily available to many of us, we might take them for granted as a commonplace food. In truth, herbs are our everyday superfoods. Just think of the intense flavor that they provide – that intensity also signals their concentrated, nutritional power. I live in a city with windows that never get sun, but one of my biggest intentions is to soon live somewhere where I can have an herb garden (and beyond). Sprinkling fresh herbs on everything is a always a great idea, but this recipe really packs them in at 4 1/­­2 cups! Just a reminder that if you have a high-speed blender or grain mill, you don’t have to buy chickpea flour. You can just grind up dried chickpeas, which will also save you a few bucks. All in all, this recipe is pretty easy. The biggest effort you’ll have to make is chopping up all of the herbs and veggies. The rest is basically just mix and bake. I served this frittata with market cucumbers and sun gold tomatoes, topped with the tzatziki sauce from Simply Vibrant. You can also eat it on its own, or topped with coconut yogurt or cashew cream. Hope you enjoy this one :) Vegan Herb Frittata (Kuku Sabzi)   Print Serves: 1 9-10 frittata Ingredients 2 cups chickpea flour 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast 1 teaspoon sea salt 1 teaspoon turmeric powder pinch of red pepper flakes a few grinds of black pepper 3 tablespoons avocado, olive, or neutral coconut oil, plus more for oiling the pans 2½ cups purified water 1 onion - finely chopped 1 large leek - thinly sliced into half-moons 2 garlic cloves - minced 1½ cups chopped cilantro 1½ cups chopped parsley 1½ cups chopped dill Instructions Preheat oven to 500° F (260° C). Prepare a 9-10 pie or tart dish by oiling it well. In a large bowl, mix together the chickpea flour, nutritional yeast, sea salt, turmeric, red pepper flakes and black pepper with a fork. Gradually pour in the oil and water, whisking them in as you pour. Mix until smooth and let sit while preparing the vegetables. Heat a glug of oil in a medium sauté pan over medium heat. Add the onion and leeks along with a pinch of salt, and cook, stirring occasionally for 10 minutes, or until soft and cooked through. Add the garlic and cook for another minute, until fragrant. Add the sautéed vegetables to the bowl with the batter, along with the cilantro, parsley, and dill. Fold everything in, making sure that the ingredients are dispersed well throughout the thick batter. Transfer the batter to the oiled pie/­­tart dish, patting it down with a spoon to form an even layer. Bake for 2o minutes. Open the oven door slightly to let any steam escape and proceed to bake for another 10 minutes, or until the top of the frittata is solid to the touch and nicely browned. Let cool, slice, and serve with yogurt or your favorite creamy sauce. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Late Summer Oat Milk Smoothie with Figs and Grapes Peach and Zucchini Smoothie Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage Gluten-Free Winter Squash Gnocchi .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Vegan Herb Frittata (Kuku Sabzi) appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Peanut Butter Cauliflower Bowl with Roasted Carrots

January 9 2018 Vegan Richa 

Peanut Butter Cauliflower Bowl with Roasted CarrotsPeanut Butter Cauliflower Bowl with Roasted Carrots. Cauliflower tossed in peanut butter sauce and roasted, carrots tossed in hot sauce and roasted. Vegan Recipe, Gluten-free option.   You know whats better than a peanut sauce veggie stir fry or peanut sauce drizzled on a bowl? Peanut Sauce baked on Cauliflower! The PB sauce gets Concentrated on baking and you get all the amazing flavor and then more. Add the cauliflower or other veggies to a bowl with greens and roasted carrots and some more peanut sauce to dress. Damn. So good. Try it! This bowl comes together very quickly. Blend up the peanut butter sauce (use sunbutter for nut-free), add a tbsp or so flour to thicken, dip cauliflower in the sauce and bake. Add to salad bowl, wraps, or serve as a side with grains or spiced chickpeas. Easy, Delicious, Satisfying, and fun.Continue reading: Peanut Butter Cauliflower Bowl with Roasted CarrotsThe post Peanut Butter Cauliflower Bowl with Roasted Carrots appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Travel Notes: Italy (Rome and the Amalfi Coast)

October 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Travel Notes: Italy (Rome and the Amalfi Coast) We went to Italy earlier this month and visited the Amalfi Coast and Rome. Having visited the Abruzzo region a few years ago, I continue to be amazed at how different Italy is from region to region. They are almost like separate, tiny countries. It was a great trip – we lucked out with the weather, all our extensive train, plane, bus and boat journeys went pretty smoothly, and we got to see so many breathtaking things. The only complaint we had is a classic one – not enough time there. Below are some photos from the trip, as well as some notes and suggestions that we hope will be useful to future travelers :) Amafli Coast Our first impression was that this is an amazingly beautiful area that’s been completely overrun by tourism. That being said, there are still ways to enjoy it less like a tourist and more like a visitor, and it’s honestly so breathtaking that it’s very worth the visit. We stayed in Vettica, a quiet village right next to Amalfi, in a tiny Airbnb with a big terrace overlooking the cliffs and the sea. For us, it was the best of both worlds. We saw close to no tourists in Vettica, and instead got to see how people lead their lives in such an amazing setting. We watched locals going to church, to the market, feeding their cats, and being completely unaffected by the copious amounts of stairs in their cliffside neighborhoods (we were out of breath every time). Yet Amalfi was close enough (still a 45 minute walk or a stressful bus ride, but totally doable) that we had access to the boats and buses that shuttle people to Capri, Positano, and other beautiful places on the coast. It was really nice to have some distance from Amalfi, because it’s incredibly crowded with tour groups on any given day, but you have to go through it to get pretty much anywhere on the coast. Capri Once we got to Capri, we were wishing that we could spend the night there. There’s so much to do and it’s so incredibly beautiful. Take the chairlift up to Monte Solaro, the highest peak, to see the insane panorama that opens up. Walk around both Capri and Anacapri. Capri is better for partying and Anacapri – for quiet walks on tiny streets. Visit the Church of San Michele in Anacapri to see the intricate, hand-painted floor. Eat torta caprese and caprese sandwiches in the spirit of true tourism :) A complete must is a visit to the Villa San Michele, a villa built by Axel Munthe, the Swedish physician and author. Munthe was a collector of classical artifacts, so the whole villa is tastefully decorated by objects from the antiquity, some of which were found right on site during the construction of the villa. There is a lush garden, a breathtaking panorama of the island and the sea, and every inch of the place is pristine and photogenic. Positano Although Positano is an incredibly beautiful town with stunning architecture, we concluded that we would have been better off having a second day in Capri instead of coming here. The reason: it is swamped with tourists and touristy shops in a way that feels quite forced and concentrated (Capri, though also very touristy, had a more spread out feel). Maybe we went to the wrong places? If you have more than four days on the Amalfi coast, which is all we had, we would still recommend coming here. It also largely depends on your goals for your travels, of course :) Ravello We went here mainly because the host of our favorite Russian travel show visited the town in one of the episodes, and it looked totally breathtaking. Ravello is a town very high in the mountains, and the bus ride up took us on some of the tightest serpentines we’ve ever seen. The views from the top are the pay off, and the air feels different – very much like the freshest mountain air. Another beautiful villa to visit is the Villa Cimbrone in Ravello, full of ancient structures, fountains, sculptures, a beautiful garden and yet another breathtaking panorama. Food We were surprised to learn that the region is actually not known for its food, and finding a good, authentic meal isn’t easy because large amounts of tourists equal large amounts of tourist trap restaurants. It is Italy however, where even bad food is decent. We did manage to find some gems, but Rome really took the prize over Amalfi in the culinary department. Here are a few favorites: Pizzeria Da Nino, Conca dei Marini A charming, small restaurant in the town neighboring Vettica, with home-cooked food and a super charming owner (Nino!) that greets you at the door and is easy to understand even when you don’t speak a word of Italian. Go for the fresh-made pasta. Al Pesce d’Oro, Vettica A restaurant at a bed and breakfast in Vettica with good pizza. We went for the zucchini and squash blossom one and were pleasantly surprised at how solid and tasty it was. Da Ferdinando, Positano An outdoor restaurant right on the beach in Positano, with a really fun atmosphere and tasty dishes. La Vecchia Cantina, Ravello When visiting Ravello, lunch presented itself as a problem, because we didn’t research anything beforehand. We wandered off the central square and into this restaurant, and ended up having a pretty solid meal with very nice service. Bar Ferraro, Anacapri Went here when visiting Capri to try the mandatory torta caprese. It was very good, and so were the little frozen ricotta shortbread cookies. Rome We are so completely in love with Rome. We only had three days there, which is nothing! It was hard to cover everything we wanted, but we tried our best. We stayed in a really cool Airbnb near Campo de Fiori, which is a centrally located square that’s busy at all times of the day. Luckily, our actual location was on a very quiet, narrow street, so it was the best of both worlds. We visited the main historic sites (the Forum, Colosseum, Pantheon etc.), as well as the Jewish Ghetto, Trastevere, Testaccio and Monti. Below are some favorites. Sites The obvious: the Forum, the Colosseum, Ponte Sant’Angelo, Piazza del Popolo, Piazza Navona, the Pantheon. Even though the Pantheon was incredibly crowded, it was still super impressive. This inscription on Raphael’s burial is still in my mind: ‘Here lies Raphael, by whom nature herself feared to be outdone while he lived, and when he died, feared that she herself would die.‘ Wow. Churches: Santa Maria del Popolo, Santa Maria Sopra Minerva, San Luigi dei Francesi, Santa Maria in Trastevere, it’s endless really :) Food La Montecarlo A really fun place that serves Roman-style thin crust pizza and more, crowded with locals at any given time. They casually line each new customer’s table with white paper in place of a tablecloth, and write out the check on the paper at the end of the meal, from memory. The service is fast and efficient. We liked the super thin-crusted pizza (endless topping options), the pesto pasta and mushroom pasta, and of course, the arancini (fried rice balls served as an app). Roscioli If you’ve ever watched any food & travel shows about Rome, chances are Roscioli was featured as a mecca for everything delicious in the center of the city. Roscioli has a whole cluster of eateries right near Campo de Fiori: a deli/­­restaurant, a cafe with a coffee counter and bite-sized pastries, a bakery, and a full-on pizza restaurant called Emma. The coffee at the cafe is excellent. At the bakery, get any of the delicious by-the-slice pizzas that they are putting out all day, as well as the bread. We liked the bread so much, we smuggled a loaf home in our luggage. If you go to Emma, definitely try the pizza, since it’s the specialty there, and apparently a whole lot of effort went into developing the pizza dough recipe. If you go to the restaurant/­­deli, Katie Parla has some great advice on navigating the menu there. Antico Forno Cordella (or Urbani) If you find yourself in the Jewish Ghetto in the morning or afternoon, stop in here for a slice of their delicious, thin and crispy pizza rossa. Pianostrada A fun dinner place with neat decor and a more modern, deconstructed take on Roman classics. Urbana 47 If you go to the Colosseum, you might as well stop here for lunch, as it’s about a 10 minute walk away. They focus on local and seasonal ingredients, and we really loved every pasta dish we ordered here. (Thank you Pauline for the recommendation!) Sant’Eustacchio il Caffe We really enjoyed sitting at an outside table here with a cappuccino and a cornetti (both very good), watching the morning world go by. Go here on your way to the Pantheon and/­­or Piazza Navona, both are super close. Don’t miss the church Sant’Eustachio that’s right there, with a beautifully sculpted deer head on the facade. Volpetti If you are in the mood to visit a serious deli, check out Volpetti in Testaccio. They carry an overwhelming amount of cheeses, meats, olives, marinated veggies, pizza by the slice, and fried snacks. They are also able to vacuum wrap anything you buy, so that you can put the stuff in your luggage with little fear of it being taken away at the airport. Sack Food Another really interesting delicatessen that carries really unusual cheeses and meats. If you are anything like us and gift food as travel gifts to your omnivore friends, this place is great. You might also like... Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Givea... Travel Notes: Chicago Market Berry Salad and a New York Weekend Saveur Magazine Best Food Blog Awards, Golubka in Special Interest .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Travel Notes: Italy (Rome and the Amalfi Coast) appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Bhuna Masala Sauce – 30 minute 1 pot

January 25 2017 Vegan Richa 

Bhuna Masala Sauce – 30 minute 1 potEasy Bhuna Masala Sauce for Indian curries. 1 Pot 30 Minute Masala Sauce. Bhuna means roasted. Use this roasted masala simmer sauce for quick curries. Add non dairy milk or cashew cream or yogurt. Vegan Gluten-free Recipe. Vegan Masala Sauce to make 15 minute curries for weeknight dinners.  This Easy Masala Sauce is handy to keep around for quick meals. To make the sauce, just blend everything and cook down until well roasted. Store in the refrigerator or freeze. Bhuna means roasted. The sauce is cooked down to a concentrated form reducing 40 to 50 minute prep + cook time when you want to make a quick masala curry.  To use this masala sauce, blend 2 to 3 tbsp of the roasted sauce with 1 to 1.5 cup non dairy milk (for 2 to 3 serves). Add to a saucepan with veggies or crisped tofu. or add lentil/­­veggie balls after the sauce has simmered for a bit. Add salt to taste. Cover and cook for 10 minutes or until veggies are cooked to preference. Taste and adjust salt and sweet and serve over rice or with flatbread. You can also blend it with water or broth for a thinner sauce, or with thin cashew cream or cashew milk for creamy curry or non dairy yogurt for a tikka masala-ish sauce. More ways to use it below.Continue reading: Bhuna Masala Sauce – 30 minute 1 potThe post Bhuna Masala Sauce – 30 minute 1 pot appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake

September 21 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Concord Grape Fruit and Nut CakeThis post was created in partnership with Nuts.com I have a whole lot of cozy fall and holiday recipe ideas bouncing around in my mind, even though it’s still warm out and even though we are still enjoying the sweetest of summer tomatoes daily (I swear the yellow cherry tomatoes truly taste like candy this year). This transitional time is always exciting to me – all the fall produce brings back so many new or forgotten possibilities. I think autumn is much more of vegetable territory than summer – all the stone fruit and berries come in a quick, bright and happy flash, and before we know it, we are left with squash, roots, and sturdy winter greens. But there are still a few sweet gems like apples, pears, figs (fig recipe hopefully coming next week), and grapes to grace our fall cobblers, salads and such, and I plan to take full advantage of them this fall. If you’ve been sticking around this space for a while or have my cookbook, you might know about my love for Concord grapes. I can never resist them at the store or market, being completely mesmerized by the stunning, cloudy berries. Their flavor is lovely too – deep and concentrated, much like the color. The main issue with Concord grapes lies in their prominent seeds. There is no way around them, so I usually end up making juice or compote with Concords – anything where the seeds can be strained out. I did so for this fruit and nut cake, where a myriad of dried fruit is gently cooked in Concord grape juice to soften the fruit’s skin and infuse them with the grape flavor. It’s worth mentioning here that, in the absence of Concord grapes, you can use all kinds of fruit juice for this cake – regular grapes, oranges or even apples would make for a fine juice substitute. This cake is dense and punctuated by comforting flavors of toasted nuts, along with aromatic sweetness from dried fruit and Concord grape juice. A small slice goes a long way. There is no added sugar, as the dried fruit and grape juice bring plenty of sweet to the plate. This is the kind of cake that can serve many purposes. It would make for a perfect edible holiday present, whether brought whole to a festive potluck, or divided into smaller, rectangular cakes, wrapped, tied with a ribbon and gifted. Little squares of this cake would also make a nice addition to a fancy cheese plate, if you’re into that kind of thing. Or it can simply be enjoyed as a dessert at home – it keeps well refrigerated for a good amount of time, and a slice makes for a good component to a kid’s school lunch (or adult’s work snack!). You can get crazy with the decorating like I did here, or not decorate it at all, depending on the occasion. I’ve been shopping on nuts.com for years (since the days when they were still called nuts online) and was thrilled to collaborate on a post with them. All the dried fruit and nuts in this cake came from their online store, which made for extra-delicious results, because their products are consistently fresh and delicious. If you aren’t familiar with nuts.com, they are a family-owned, premium bulk nut and dried fruit supplier, and so much more than that, really. The business has been in the family for three generations now, starting with a stand at a farmer’s market back in 1929,  and they’ve built up an amazingly extensive catalogue of natural bulk foods. In addition to nuts/­­dried fruit, they carry grains, beans, flours, teas, snacks, superfood powders, spices, and more. I feel like a kid in a candy store when I’m on their website. Their dried fruit are the juiciest I’ve ever gotten anywhere, and both Paloma and I are hooked on their dried mango. They also freshly roast their nuts the same day they are shipped out to customers, which is just so cool. The best news is that Nuts.com has a great offer for GK readers – follow this link and choose four free gifts (like chia seeds, goji berries, hemp protein powder, habanero pistachios and more) to receive together with an order of $25 or more. Enjoy :) Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake   Print Serves: one 10 cake Ingredients for the cake (inspiration from At Home in the Whole Foods Kitchen) 4 cups mixed dried fruit - figs, prunes, apricots, raisins - chopped (no need to chop raisins) 4 Medjool dates or 6-8 regular dates - pitted and chopped 1½ cups freshly squeezed Concord grape juice or other fruit juice - hot 1 teaspoon cinnamon ¼ teaspoon nutmeg other spices such as ground cardamom, cloves and allspice - to taste (optional) 1 tablespoon vanilla extract (optional) 1¼ cup toasted almonds - ground ½ cup toasted hazelnuts - chopped ½ cup toasted pecans or walnuts - chopped neutral coconut oil or other vegetable oil for oiling parchment paper for the decoration (all optional) cashews pumpkin seeds pistachios pecans dried apricots dried lemon slices dried cantaloupe dried mango Instructions to make the cake Preheat oven to 300° F (150° C). Place 1½ cup of mixed dried fruit and all the dates into a medium bowl. Pour hot Concord grape/­­fruit juice over them, cover and let soak for 15 minutes. Place the remaining 2½ cups of dried fruit into a medium saucepan and set aside. Drain the soaked fruit into a strainer, over the saucepan with the dried fruit, pouring the soaking juice into the saucepan. Bring contents of the saucepan to a boil over high heat, adjust the heat to a simmer and cook until most of the juice is absorbed, about 8-12 minutes. Transfer the cooked fruit into a food processor, add spices and vanilla extract, if using, and blend until smooth. Transfer into a large bowl, add ground almonds and mix to combine. Stir in soaked fruit, chopped hazelnuts and pecans/­­walnuts, mixing well. Line a 10 cake pan with well-oiled parchment paper and press the fruit-nut mixture into the pan, evening it out with a spoon. Optionally, decorate with nuts and dried fruit to your liking. Bake for 1 hour, until firm. Let cool completely before slicing. The cake stores very well refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 2 weeks. Notes 1. In the absence of Concord grapes, any other grapes, oranges or apples can be used to make juice for this cake. 2. If you dont have a juicer for juicing grapes, blend them in a blender and strain through a fine mesh strainer to get rid of any seeds and skins. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Raw Fruity Panna Cotta, Easter Style Raw Greenylicious Herb Soup and BBQ Grissini by Earthsprout Raw Lady Apple and Cranberry Cookies Simple Spicy Strawberry Gazpacho .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Essential Vegan Foods To Bring While Traveling

June 6 2016 Vegetarian Times 

Essential Vegan Foods To Bring While Traveling We asked best-selling cookbook author and passionate vegan chef Julie Morris to give us her best tips for traveling as a vegan. Were thrilled to partner with Julie on our exciting new online course, Go Vegan! 30 Days to a Plant-Based Lifestyle. This intensive, interactive course features vegan cooking skills, tips on getting proper nutrition and thriving on a vegan lifestyle, and more than 70 recipes for a vegan meal plan to get you started. Check it out now. TWV, or Traveling While Vegan, may not be a trending hashtag acronym yet, but at the rate of increasing popularity of a vegan diet, its only a matter of time before its a well-known term! Its a situation I understand well. I travel a good bit for my job, and remember the anxiety I faced during my early days as a vegan when it came time to hit the road. Although enjoying a vegan diet has always been easy within the security of my own kitchen, a different city (or country) doesnt always offer the same safety net of healthy plant-based options. Dont get me wrong -- theres a surprising amount of vegan food in the world to enjoy (hint: most of the time its not called vegan food, its just food ... that happens to be vegan!), but for the occasions when time or patience runs out, I rely on a few things that Ive actually brought with me. Packing a light, pared-down kit of key vegan foods while traveling can make all the difference in how you feel on a trip: You wont have to compromise your energy, health, or values. Over the years Ive refined my kit into a system that covers all the fundamental vegan bases in a hyper-condensed form.  So the next time you pack a suitcase, you consider bringing a small supply of these Plan B essential vegan foods: Energy Bars: As a condensed mini-meal, an energy bar can feel like its truly saving the day. Look for varieties that contain as many natural ingredients as possible, or for best results (and significant financial savings), make your own! Homemade energy bars are surprisingly easy to create using a food processor, and can be cut into bars and wrapped in plastic or parchment for single servings. Pack one for each day. Something Green: Fresh green foods are a foundation of any healthy diet, but can be surprisingly difficult to find when traveling to a new city. This is where green powders or tablets can be your best energizing friend! Made out of freeze-dried nutritious greens, such as kale, broccoli, wheatgrass, or spirulina, these superfoods are hyper-concentrated (a little goes a long way). You can bring spirulina tablets (a few for each day), or single-serve packets of your favorite green powder blend to add to a bottle of water. Something Protein: While its getting easier to find great-tasting vegan meals, not every restaurant offers a good nutritional balance. Traveling with vegan protein can help satisfy cravings and allow you to be more relaxed with other meals (bonus points if it includes vitamin B12). Bring a stash of vegan protein powder that you can shake inside of a water bottle for a quick smoothie. Or just make sure the energy bars you choose are high in protein - look for 10 grams or above. Crackers & Almond Butter: While its easy to grab the sweet stuff, packing a little something savory is good for both your taste buds and your health! A box of crackers can help satisfy an unruly stomach, while a little bit of nut butter makes this snack more nutritionally balanced with healthy fats and easy-to-digest protein. Look for crackers that are made of nutrient-dense whole grains and seeds (they will be the most satisfying), as well as single-serve pouches of nut butter that are perfect for packing. A Treat: TWV is an enjoyable and easy experience 99% of the time. On the rare occasion that its not quite as epic from a delicious standpoint (hello, airplane food), having a treat you can look forward to can be a complete game-changer in your mood! Keep a small stash of one of your favorite treats, such as a go-to chocolate bar, a bag of fruit gummies, or homemade cookies. This little pick-me-up is a great reward for sticking to your values.

Vinegar 101: Types of Vinegar, Health Benefits, and How to Cook With It

November 16 2015 Vegetarian Times 

Vinegar 101: Types of Vinegar, Health Benefits, and How to Cook With It Derived from the French vinaigre (meaning aged wine), vinegar is a staple in most pantries worldwide. With dozens of varieties readily available, you can use your favorite type to elevate nearly any meal – by creating marinades, emulsifying vinaigrettes, seasoning dishes to brighten flavors, or even making reductions. How its made The process of producing vinegar includes inoculation, fermentation and aging. An alcoholic liquid is acted upon by the Acetobacter bacteria to form an acidic solution. It evolves into a self-preserving substance due to its high acidity. Fermentation of wine into vinegar is triggered by a mother, or other ambient bacteria, transforming sugars into alcohol into acetic acid; a vinegar mother is a harmless cellulose structure produced by acetic acid that occurs naturally in unpasteurized vinegars. The process may take from 20 hours up to several months, depending on a variety of factors. Types of Vinegars Rice: With a 4% acidity, rice vinegar is great for pickling, dressings, or seasoning sushi rice. (Check out our Garlic and Kale Soup that uses Brown Rice Vinegar.) Balsamic: Made from the concentrated juice of white Trebbiano grapes and aged in casks, balsamic works well in glazes, reductions and marinades with its 6-8% acidity. (Try our Sicilian-Style Roasted Vegetables with Balsamic Syrup.) Apple Cider: With a 5% acidity, this ones best for seasoning more subtle dishes, as an infusion, or drizzled over grain or bean salads. (Use it to make Carolina-Style Barbecue Sandwiches.) Wine: With a 6-8% acidity, this vinegar adds a touch of umami, and works well wherever a stronger flavor is desired. (Make Minestrone with Sun Dried Tomatoes and White Beans.) Coconut: Made from fermented coconut water or sap, coconut vinegar has a 4% acidity, and is perfect for a splash of brightness when making nut-based cream sauces or a stone fruit chutney. Health Benefits Unpasteurized and unfiltered vinegar is a natural probiotic and can be used to help the body break down fats. Unfiltered apple cider vinegar is used to treat sore throats and upset stomachs, as well as topically for some skin conditions; it is also a natural liver cleanser. In addition, vinegar can get digestive juices flowing and increase appetite, which makes it a great addition to starter courses like salads and chilled soups. (Check out our article: Apple Cider Vinegar: Healing Foods) How to Buy Be sure to carefully examine labels and ingredient lists, and purchase varieties free of additives and artificial coloring. Keep in mind that aged vinegars have stronger flavors. Gradually stock your kitchen with different types of vinegars to determine which you like best for different applications. Culinary Uses Reductions: Reduce over medium heat until mixture coats the back of a spoon. Serve over fresh berries, or when plating an entrée or salad course. (Top Red Pepper Soup with a Balsamic Reduction.) Herb Infusions: Blanch herbs like tarragon, dill or basil, blend with vinegar, and allow to steep for a few days in the fridge. Marinades: Use to tenderize and flavor vegetables like mushrooms, zucchini and eggplant before grilling, along with fresh garlic, ginger and herbs. Quick Pickle: Add three parts vinegar to one part water to a small saucepan and bring to a boil, adding a splash of sweetener of your choice, a pinch of salt, and red chili flakes for extra spice.  Pour over cut produce and allow to sit for at least 30 minutes, or overnight in the refrigerator. (Try our Hot-and-Sour Celery Pickles.) Baking: Can be used as a leavener, eliciting a chemical reaction to produce carbon dioxide to give cake batters a lift. Poaching eggs: Adding a tablespoon to the cooking water with prevent eggs from spreading. Ceviche: Mix with oil, garlic and herbs, and toss with mushrooms or avocado for a refreshing twist. Serve with tortilla crisps. Enhance color: Vinegar brightens reds and purples, like cabbage and beets or red pearl onions. Chef Olivia Roszkowski is a graduate of NGIs Chefs Training Program and a full-time instructor. Olivia holds a Bachelors degree in Neuroscience and Behavior from Columbia University and has worked at various well-known NYC restaurants, including The Mercer Kitchen and Momofuku Ssam Bar. Olivia is a master at root-to-frond cooking.       

Lavender Milkshake and Chamomile Latte

July 20 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Lavender Milkshake and Chamomile Latte Cooking with edible flowers has been one of my greatest pleasures in the kitchen. Floral infusions provide amazing flavor and can add beneficial, healing properties to any dish or drink. My favorite was the Rose Ice Cream and Rose Petal Mille Feuille I made a few years ago with organic rose petals and the purest essential rose oil from my perfume maker friend. The oil was so concentrated that a tiny drop turned a portion of ice cream into a magical bowl of aromatherapy. Here are two refreshing drinks we’ve been enjoying this summer, featuring some of the most loved, calming culinary flowers – lavender and chamomile. Chamomile is an amazing little flower, and its oils are anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antifungal and antiallergenic. It has long been used as a sleep aid all over the world. Having a cup of chamomile tea before bed has become one of my daily rituals – it really does the job of getting me ready for some wholesome rest. Lately, I’ve been loving this creamy chamomile latte. My favorite way to enjoy it this summer is cold, but it also makes for a comforting warm drink for the cooler parts of the year. Lavender, with its own share of antiseptic and anti-inflammatory properties, is king of the aromatherapy world – even the smallest whiff sends a relaxation signal to the mind. This milkshake combines lavender and blueberries, as the two are a match made in heaven. Drink it as a refreshing mid-afternoon snack after some time in the sun or even as dessert after dinner. The most important variable when cooking with dried edible flowers is their freshness. If a flower is freshly dried, a little of it will go a long way, while older dried flowers have likely lost their potency. It’s also important to remember that the best way to extract the beneficial oils from herbs such as chamomile and lavender is gently heating them in a double boiler for longer periods of time. Directly pouring boiling water over the herbs is a harsher method, which kills off many of their benefits. We are off to Sochi for the last stretch of our Russian vacation. Black Sea, here we come. Chamomile Latte serves 2 1 1/­­2 cups water 4 tablespoons dried German chamomile flowers – make sure to get them from a store with a good rotation 1/­­2 cup almond milk (I like homemade unsweetened) honey to taste – optional Combine water with chamomile in a small, heatproof bowl. Place the bowl into a heavy bottomed pot or pan. Add water to the pan, making sure that water level in the pan is lower than the bowl. Bring water in the pan to a simmer and simmer for 15 minutes. Let cool enough for safe handling. Strain chamomile tea, mix with almond milk and honey, if using. For an extra creamy and foamy consistency, blend the tea and almond milk in a blender. Drink warm or chilled in the fridge. I like it best cold and unsweetened. Lavender Milkshake serves 2 1 1/­­2 cups almond milk or other plant milk (I like homemade unsweetened almond milk) 1 tablespoon edible dried lavender flowers (make sure to get them from a store with a good rotation – flowers should be lavender, rather then grey in color, with a fresh, strong aroma) 6-8 scoops of your favorite vanilla, blueberry or lavender ice-cream handful of fresh or frozen blueberries – optional, for color handful of ice cubes – optional, for smoother texture splash of maple syrup – optional, to taste seeds of 1 vanilla bean or splash of vanilla extract – optional Combine almond milk and lavender flowers in a small saucepan and bring to a boil. Remove from heat, cover and let cool. Strain and chill in the refrigerator. Combine lavender milk and the rest of ingredients in a blender and blend to a smooth and thick milkshake consistency. If your lavender flowers are very fresh and aromatic, you can skip the infusion step and simply blend almond milk, 1/­­2 tablespoon (or to taste) lavender and blueberries, in a high speed blender until completely smooth. Then add the rest of ingredients and blend to a smooth and thick milkshake consistency.  

Movie on a Mission: Inside the Garbage of the World

May 4 2015 Vegetarian Times 

Movie on a Mission: Inside the Garbage of the WorldPhoto: Carillo Films When you learn that an average American discards 4.5 pounds per day of trash, you realize we are the problem because we are not aware of where our trash is going and what it does to the environment and ultimately to our health, says Philippe Carillo, co-director and co-producer--with his wife, Maxine--of the documentary Inside the Garbage of the World. The film aims to correct this lack of awareness by showing the scourge of plastic pollution. Here, Philippe passionately responds to questions the film prompts. How would designating plastic as hazardous waste--which the film advocates--be a game changer? When plastic will finally be considered hazardous material, then plastic manufactures will be forced to come up with a safe material for human consumption and for the environment. We should have a totally independent organization, a pro-consumer organization, which should do all the testing of any product before it goes to market. But today that is far from the case. Big corporations have way too much power, and they are not ethical in regards to public safety. Californias ban on plastic bags, set to start this summer, is on hold since an industry-backed referendum qualified for the November 2016 ballot. What would you say to the states voters? I challenge anybody who is voting to overturn the ban to go to the beach every morning like I do and clean it of plastic. Believe me, they will start to understand. Have them ask scientists about the dangers of plastic, learning what it does little by little to their health, and to the fish and marine mammals who are dying all over the world because their stomachs are full of plastic bags. Ask them to visit one of the first beaches where plastic has concentrated, such as Kamilo Beach in Hawaii, and see if they can apprehend the future and how we are killing ourselves. We cannot leave our future in the hands of greedy organizations. Our future depends on us. Where would you suggest people start to get involved? In any vote that may occur in your vicinity, vote for your future and the future of your children. Also, vote with your pocketbook. That is your great power. You are the one who chooses what grocery stores sell. Remove plastic from your life, even if its step by step: Bring along your own fabric bags when you shop. Stop buying water in plastic bottles; there are alternatives such as glass bottles, or carry your own water container if you have a good water filter at home. Use your own mug when you buy coffee; buy bamboo or camping utensils to avoid using plastic utensils; use your own stainless steel container for takeout food. After a while you will see a change. We are the change! What about you? How are you reducing single-use plastic in your life?

Healthy Holiday Gingerbread Cookies

December 15 2014 My New Roots 

Healthy Holiday Gingerbread Cookies Hey guys. Remember how I like pretending that baking is easy? Well, I’ve done it again! I actually wanted to make a gingerbread recipe last year. I even went out and bought a cute set of cookie cutters for the occasion as soon as they appeared in the stores. Let me just preface this by saying, this was at the very end of my pregnancy and pre-baby. Bahahaaa! How I thought that I would have time, energy, or sanity after giving birth to make cookies is beyond me, but I can at least laugh at my extraordinary naiveté. So, fast-forward to the present moment: my mental wherewithal mostly in tact after the first 12 months of motherhood, and the desire to be involved in some kind of holiday tradition tugging at my heart strings. I was actually so excited to make gingerbread, once and for all, and blog about how easy it was. If you follow me on Instagram, you will recall a certain Michelin-man-shaped gingerbread puddle that I posted last week. Yea. Like I said, I forgot that baking is not easy when you’re silly enough to invent recipes of which you have zero experience, under crushing time pressure. Okay, well, no big deal. Roll up my sleeves and start again, right? To rectify the poofing, I decided to eliminate the baking soda, baking powder and all liquid. Genius! Instead of a puffed up puddle, the cookies were rock hard and greasy. Gingerbread: 2, Sarah B: 0. At this point, in a frustrated frenzy, my husband chimed in for the pep talk. Hun, you know that this happens every time you bake. Its science! And youre bad at science (Im paraphrasing). Just give it one more try and I bet youll nail it, because in the end you always do (he forgot about the carrot cake debacle, bless his heart). So this morning began in the kitchen, sleeves rolled up, and ready to face this worthy opponent with a veritable village of gingerbread casualties in my wake. Except this time, I won. Everything Youve Ever Wanted to Know About Molasses Isnt it ironic that the waste product of manufacturing white sugar, is a nutrient-rich, low-glycemic syrup? I’m talking about molasses. That gooey, rich, unmistakably black-brown nectar with a rather divisive flavour. There are a few varieties of molasses, but to understand how they vary, lets first look at how molasses is made. Molasses is created from either sugarcane or sugar beets (but because the molasses made from beets can be quite bitter, sugarcane molasses is the most common variety available for human consumption). These plants are harvested, and then cut, crushed, and mashed so that the juice is extracted. Fancy Molasses is the first product to be made, but is in fact the only type of molasses that is not a by-product of sugar processing, but instead a direct product from sugar cane. This type is super sweet and is most commonly enjoyed as the syrup straight on pancakes or waffles, and as an ingredient in baked goods. Varieties of Molasses The real deal molasses comes from boiling the juice of sugar cane down to crystallize the sugars, producing a concentrate, the first of which is called First Molasses, First Strike Molasses, Barbados Molasses, Light Molasses, Mild Molasses, or Sweet Molasses. This comes from the first boiling of the sugar. It is light in colour and mild in flavour. Some people also enjoy this type directly on their food, like fancy molasses. It is about 65% sucrose. Next up is Second Molasses, Second Strike Molasses, Dark Molasses, or Full Molasses. As you may have guessed, this is made from the second boiling of the extracted cane juice, a process that extracts even more sugar, producing a darker, thicker syrup typically used as a cooking ingredient in sauces, marinades and baked beans. It is about 60% sucrose. Blackstrap molasses is likely the one all you health foodies out there know and love. This type of molasses is made by boiling the cane syrup a third time, which extracts even more sugar and concentrates the flavour. By this point, the sucrose content is so low (about 55%) that the syrup no longer tastes sweet, but slightly bitter. The colour is nearly black, and the consistency is very thick and viscous. Blackstrap molasses is used in baking, sauces, stews and even as a food supplement due to its high nutrient content. Nutritious and Delicious Blackstrap molasses is highly concentrated in essential minerals, such as iron, calcium, selenium, manganese, potassium, copper, and zinc. As I mentioned above, this type of molasses is sometimes used as a dietary supplement or tonic. One tablespoon stirred into warm water is a food-based way to boost mineral levels, especially iron, as this small amount contains a whopping 20% of your RDI. You can also enjoy it in foods such as smoothies, tea, warm cereal, or dressings, sauces and stews. Remember to eat iron-rich foods with vitamin C to enhance its absorption. I like to use a little lemon juice. Blackstrap molasses is one of the few sweeteners that is low on the glycemic scale with an index classification of 55. This means that it metabolizes slowly in a controlled way, demands less insulin production and wont cause a spike in blood glucose levels. All in all, blackstrap molasses is a fantastic, healthy sweetener to which I enthusiastically give a thumbs up! Buying and Storing When purchasing molasses, read the label to ensure that what you are buying is 100% pure molasses (some companies will cut blackstrap molasses with corn syrup to make it sweeter) and that it is unsulfured. Sulfur dioxide can be added to all grades of molasses to help preserve it, as it prevents the growth of bacteria and mould. From a health perspective, sulfur can cause reactions in sensitive people (you can read more about that here). Sulfur dioxide also has a very bitter flavour, and can drastically alter the flavour of the dish you are making. Look for organic molasses whenever possible too. Store unopened molasses in a cool, dark place for up to one year. Opened containers must be stored in the fridge and will last for up to six months. So this gingerbread, this is really it. Its deeply spiced, perfectly balanced in sweet and salt, and super addictive. I love the special flavour and richness that molasses brings to the cookies as well. Its a must-have component of this recipe for sure, and should not be substituted with other sweeteners due to its properties in the baking itself. The cookies are totally vegan (!!!), made with whole spelt flour and natural sweeteners. But the coolest part of this recipe? If you like a chewy cookies, bake them for 7 minutes, and if you like a crispier version, bake it for 10. Science! I tried two versions with this batch of cookies, and although I prefer the chewy ones, my husband really likes the crunch of the longer-baked variety. I am really, really proud of my gingerbread, especially after persevering through three rounds of total uncertainty and insanity. Although the first two recipes, according to some were just fine, I couldnt post a recipe here on My New Roots that is just fine. Never! I want everything I put out into the world to be my best, and this, I am so pleased to say, (finally) qualifies. Whew. As I was very anxiously waiting for this last trial to bake, I whipped up a Cashew-Cacao Butter Icing to decorate the little guys with (I got it on the first try too!). As I was making it however, I used honey to sweeten it, and then promptly delivered myself a swift forehead slap realizing that the rest of the cookie recipe was vegan! Argh. So, if you dont want to use honey to sweeten this icing, I am confident that maple syrup or coconut nectar would work in its place. I havent tried making this recipe in a regular blender, only a Vitamix, so I know that the icing consistency may be a little grainy if you dont use a high-powered machine.     Print recipe     Healthy Holiday Gingerbread Makes at least 2 dozen medium-sized cookies Ingredients: 2 1/­­2 /­­ 350g whole spelt flour 1/­­4 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1/­­2 tsp. baking powder 1 Tbsp. ground ginger (or less if you prefer more mild gingerbread) 1 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cloves 1/­­2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg 5 Tbsp. coconut oil, melted 1/­­2 cup /­­ 70g coconut sugar 1/­­2 cup unsulfured blackstrap molasses 3 Tbsp. unsweetened applesauce 1 tsp. vanilla extract Directions: 1. Sift the dry ingredients together. 2. In a small saucepan, melt the coconut oil, then whisk in the molasses, applesauce, and vanilla. 3. Pour the wet ingredients over the dry, and fold to combine - you may need to use your hands to mix this, but dont overwork the dough. Fold just until the ingredients come together evenly. Turn dough out onto a piece of plastic wrap, make a ball, then flatten into a large disc. Wrap and place in the fridge for at least 1 hour. 4. Preheat oven to 350°F /­­ 175°C. Remove dough from the fridge, unwrap and cut in half. Wrap one half and return it to the fridge. Place the other half of the dough between two pieces of baking paper and roll out (if it is very stiff, you may need to let it warm up just slightly). Remove top half of the paper and cut out desired shapes with a cookie cutter or a knife. Slide a knife or thin egg lifter under each shape and place on a lined baking sheet. Ball up the scraps of dough, roll it out between the parchment and start again. Once the dough becomes too warm, return it to the fridge and repeat the entire process with the other half of the chilled dough. 5. Place cookie sheet in the oven and bake for 7-10 minutes (7 minutes produces a softer, chewier cookie, while 10 minutes produces a crispier one). Remove from oven and let cool on pan. Decorate with the Cashew Cacao Icing if desired (recipe follows). Cashew-Cacao Butter Icing Makes about 3/­­4 cup Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup /­­ 65g cashews a few pinches of sea salt 3 Tbsp. /­­ 40g cacao butter, melted 1 1/­­2 Tbsp. raw honey (or liquid sweetener of your choice) 1/­­2 vanilla bean, seeds scraped 3 Tbsp. hot water Directions: 1. Soak cashews with sea salt for four hours, or overnight. 2. Drain, rinse and place cashews in the most powerful blender you have along with all other ingredients. Blend on high until as smooth as possible. 3. Pour into a piping bag and store in the fridge until it firms up, about 2 hours, then use. Store leftovers in the fridge or freezer. If you do not have a piping bag, you can also use sandwich bag with a teeny corner snipped off, which is what I did! For those of you living in Copenhagen, Ive only found one shop that carries molasses and its the Super Brugsen on N?rrebrogade. I know at least one of you is going to ask! And finally, I want to say a HUGE Happy Holidays to everyone out there. I hope that your days are filled with wonder and delight, family and friends, and above all, delicious food. I can’t help myself – it’s what I live for! All love and sparkling winter holidays, Sarah B. Show me your gingerbread on Instagram: #MNRgingerbread

Sweet Pea & Pearl Onion Pesto Smothered Zucchini Noodles

February 19 2014 My New Roots 

Sweet Pea & Pearl Onion Pesto Smothered Zucchini Noodles I have such a special treat for you today. Since I am in the final stretch of writing my manuscript (!!!), Ive asked Julie from the Alkaline Sisters to take over this week. Shes created a gorgeous spring recipe for all of you who really need a bite of brightness (I figure that is anyone who has survived the polar vortex, am I right?). I’ve been a fan of Julie’s site for a long time now, but we met in person for the first time last summer and the serendipitous sparks flew! We’ve been online pals ever since. She is an expert on achieving alkalinity, and Ive asked her to give us the low-down on this very topic. After curing her own health issues with an alkaline diet, she is sharing her inspiring journey and culinary creations on her beautiful blog. She also has a book in the works and I know it is going to be absolutely amazing! Can’t wait. I will be back very soon, but in the meantime lets all sit back and learn something from this very wise woman. Thank you Julie, for sharing your knowledge with us! What a blessing. *   *   *   *   *   * I’m so pleased that I could support Sarah by sharing a recipe with you today as she nears completion of her book.  I can only imagine the juggling that is happening as she cares for her wee babe in between wielding her heavy camera and cooking up some tasty business to style and photograph, not to mention the writing required to explain the recipe.  Lord knows I understand the process since I just recently handed my cook book manuscript in to my publisher, phew! When we had lunch last summer we realized that we were both working with the same publisher, what are the chances of that?  We’ve both been feverishly working away on our cook books but I certainly didn’t give birth to a newborn baby as I worked thru the chapters of my book!  I swear Sarah has somehow acquired super powers as she’s hardly missed a beat here on the blog!  She’s managed to continually inspire you and I with a fabulous new recipe pretty much every week since she started the book, save for popping out a beautiful baby boy!  That’s more than I can attribute to since I took a bit of a hiatus from my blog to work on my book while caring for my family of 4, trying to stay sane and enjoy the journey. So here I am, happily giving her a bit of relief so she can wrap up the final details of her book. Now she can focus, take good care of her precious family, knowing that you are inspired for yet another week. So lets do this:) With Spring making it’s way here I can’t wait to begin tasting the seasonal flavours that I have missed since last year.  Sweet green peas always make me think of brighter sunnier days and the bursting greens of budding trees.  I may be jumping the gun on the spring pea season here, just a little, hehe but you’ll be glad I did if you are a fan of sweet peas!  I’m cheating with frozen peas so please forgive me for my enthusiasm with the lead up to my favourite time of year.  Because my horoscope is Aries, I come by it honestly:) This tasty dish is a little bit raw and a little bit cooked, keeping as many nutrients in tact as possible. It’s kind of a nice combo for this in between time of year. And guess what? It’s alkalizing too....well of course!   This Alkaline Sister here is happy to inspire you with a recipe that will help you balance your alkalinity.  (If you are keen for a wee bit more information about the alkaline lifestyle read on below the recipe.) This is a quick and easy recipe to pull together, even for lunch. The pea pesto is made with a generous portion of peas that are action packed with phytonutrients that provide us with key antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits. Peas also contain an impressive amount of health promoting omega-3 fats in the form of alpha-linolenic acid or ALA as well as omega-6 fats called linolenic acids.  One cup has about 30 milligrams of omega-3 and 130 milligrams of omega-6.  As for protein and fibre, green peas pack about 8-10 grams per cup.  These two macronutrients keep your blood sugar levels well regulated since they support the break down of the natural sugars and carbohydrates as they pass through your digestive track. Once thought of as being a starchy vegetable peas are proving to be much more than that. They are effective in lowering our risk of chronic health issues related to inflammation.  And studies show that inflammation is at the root of most health issues, so eat your peas!  While you’re at it, eat your zucchini and some onions too!  All of these alkalizing vegetables in this recipe provide the body with beneficial cancer-preventive nutrients.  You can’t go wrong here so give this recipe a whirl and see how you like it.     Print recipe     Sweet Pea & Pearl Onion Pesto smothered Zucchini Noodles Makes 1 large serving or 2 servings as a light lunch or as a side dish Ingredients: 2  6″ zucchinis, julienned or spiral cut, preferably organic 24 fresh pearl onions, peeled (substitute frozen if need be) 2 cups organic frozen peas 3 tbsp fresh mint, roughly chopped 1/­­4 cup extra virgin olive oil 1 tbsp fresh lemon juice 1/­­2 tsp maple syrup or 3 drops liquid stevia pinch himalayan salt or good sea salt freshly ground black pepper Directions: 1. Using a spiral noodle slicer or a julienne peeler make your noodles from the zucchinis.  Place in a medium sized bowl and set aside. 2. Place the pearl onions in a covered steamer basket over boiling water and steam for 8-10 mins till layers just begin to separate and they appear translucent. (If using frozen pearl onions your steam time will be a little less). Add frozen peas and steam for 2 minutes longer, stirring at the one minute mark to ensure even cooking. 3. Remove from heat and pour half the mixture into a small bowl and the other half into your food processor–be sure to divide the onions evenly. 4. To the food processor, add the olive oil, lemon juice, mint, salt, pepper and maple syrup. Process until creamy but not completely smooth, leaving a little texture. 5. Now lets put it altogether.  Pour the creamy pea and onion pesto over the noodles, scraping the bowl clean with a spatula.  Using two forks toss the noodles well to coat. Transfer to serving dish or divide into two bowls.  Top with remaining steamed peas and pearl onions. Garnish your bowl(s) with fresh mint and freshly ground pepper. Enjoy:) Note: This is yummy as is, with the mildly warm pea and onion pesto but it’s also delish at room temperature.  If this dish stands for more than two hours the zucchini will release some of it’s juices and become a little more tender. It’s still quite tasty this way but is best if eaten within one hour.  Store the pesto separate from the noodles if you are making it ahead. And...if you share this dish between 2 servings maybe top it with some sliced avocado to round it out a little more. Enjoy:) Thank you kindly Sarah, for trusting me to share a nourishing alkaline recipe with your treasured readers that you take such good care of.  It’s been an honour and I am grateful for the opportunity to share my alkaline message with your loyal followers. Here’s an extra special mini lesson on alkalinity and how it can be of benefit to your healthy lifestyle: The most alkaline foods are green and of high water content as in cucumber, celery, broccoli, and greens like kale, chard, romaine etc. Lemons & limes are also highly alkaline once metabolized even though they are acidic outside the body before you ingest them.  This chart shows the degree of alkalinity of many foods to give you a better idea.  On this chart you’ll also notice the list of foods that are acidic and their scores that you can pay attention to with regard to the ratio that you include in your daily meals. Pretty much any food that is a concentrated food with low water content, is highly processed or contains sugar–including fruit, is acidic to the body and should be consumed in approximately a 20-30% daily proportion.  If you are seriously ill this ratio will be more like 0-5%.  Please remember to always consult a medical professional when considering a drastic lifestyle change. Choosing alkaline foods in a  70 to 80% ratio with the balance of acidic foods allows you to  still enjoy some of the wholesome foods you are accustomed to. A visual measurement for each meal or over the period of the day is all that is necessary to maintain a balanced intake of alkaline foods.  No weighing or counting of calories is necessary. And guess what?  By following a highly alkaline lifestyle you’ll discover that a bonus side effect is weight loss or a return to your natural body weight. You may already be very conscientious with your healthy lifestyle but with a bit of tweaking in the alkaline department you might find you have even more energy, fewer colds and any nagging symptoms slowly dissipate. To increase your alkaline foods intake it’s as easy as 1, 2, 3...a,b,c… 1. add a green smoothie to your morning or a green juice 2. add a big salad to your lunch or make it your lunch 3. add a salad and steamed veggies to your dinner And we all know that we need to.... a. drink more water— 3-4 litres of filtered, hopefully alkaline water each day- to flush acids and hydrate the body b. exercise to flush your lymph, blood and tissues of acidic matter c. stay on top of your stress levels and find ways to deal with negative thoughts- meditation, yoga etc. (stress causes acids to form within the body) By slowly adapting your lifestyle and following these basics along with doing a seasonal detox you will keep disease at bay and the cold and flu bugs will leave you for good! Six years ago, with a dramatic shift to this alkaline lifestyle, I resolved the excruciating pain that I was experiencing from a seriously herniated disc that stopped me in my tracks from living my life. This lifestyle shift resulted in a welcome side effect of easily and quickly dropping 40lbs of post baby excess weight that I was struggling with. Our modern diet is often overly acidic even if we consider it to be healthy thus many of us suffer from a myriad of illnesses that are directly related to an overly acidic body.  But the good news is..... that you can turn your health around by flooding the body with alkalinity. A green smoothie cheers to your good, alkaline health Julie the Alkaline Sister

Chana Chaat (Spicy Snack)

May 8 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});   Chana Chaat Chana Chaat is a healthy and delicious snack. I am using kala chana for this recipe. Kala chana looks like chickpeas, but brown in color. This is a delightfully sweet and tangy snack. Channa Chaat will also make a very enjoyable lunch box meal. - 1 cup kala chana - 2 Tbsp oil (Canola, or vegetable oil) - 1 Tbsp ginger (finely shredded) - 1 Tbsp green chili (finely chopped) - 1 Tbsp coriander powder (dhania) - 1/­­4 cup tamarind pulp (this is available in India grocery store or you can make it at home soaking the tamarind and squeeze the pulp. But not the concentrated tamarind) - 1 tsp red chili powder - 1 tsp salt - 1 tsp black salt - 1 Tbsp sugar - 2 tsp roasted cumin seed powder (bhuna jeera) - 1 cup potato (boiled peeled and cut in small pieces) - 1/­­2 cup cucumber (chopped in small pieces) - 1/­­2 cup tomatoes (chopped in small pieces) For garnishing - 1 Tbsp ginger (finely chopped) - 1 Tbsp green chilies (finely chopped) - 5-6 wedges of lemon - Wash and soak kala chana in approx. 4 cups of water, for at least 4 hours. The kala chana will double in volume after soaking. - In pressure cooker cook kala chana with 2 cups of water over medium high heat. As pressure cooker starts steaming turn the heat down to low medium and cook for about 15 minutes. Close the heat and wait until steam has stopped before opening the pressure cooker. Chana should be soft and tender. - Drain the water and save it for later use, this water is high in protein and can be used for making the soup or dals. - Heat the oil in a sauce pan over medium high heat. Add the chana, stir for few seconds. Add ginger and green chili, coriander powder, sauté for about 1 minutes. - Add salt, black salt, red chili powder, and sugar, add tamarind pulp. Cook for 3-4 minutes over low heat. If needed use few spoons of water, Chana mix should be moist. Turn off the heat. - Assemble the Kala Chana Chaat, add chopped potatoes, tomatoes, and cucumber, drizzle the roasted cumin seeds powder and mix it well. If desired garnish with sliced ginger, green chilies and drizzle the lemon juice. Prep Time of 10 minutes does not include soaking time. Suggestions You can serve chana chaat without adding the veggies, it tastes delicious. You can always adjust quantity of veggies to your choice. Also adjust the green chili and red pepper to your choice. After spicing the chana mix with cooked plain rice to make spicy delicious meal.   The post Chana Chaat (Spicy Snack) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Pumpkin Sage Goat Cheese Lasagna

December 12 2016 Meatless Monday 

If you couldn’t resist stocking up on winter squash as the farmers’ market season comes to a close, this is the recipe you need to use it all up. Seasoned with sage, coconut milk and white wine, it’s a satisfying winter meal that’s fit to feed a crowd! This recipe comes to us from Lauren of The Salty Tomato. Serves 6 For the sauce: - 2 cups pureed orange pumpkin/­­squash or 2 cups chopped orange hard squash like butternut, kobocha or spaghetti - 1 sprig fresh sage (3-4 leaves) - 8 ounces coconut milk - 1-3 cups water - 1/­­4 cup white wine - 1 tablespoon concentrated vegetable stock or 1 bullion cube - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1/­­4 teaspoon ground black pepper For the lasagna: - 12 whole wheat lasagna sheets (whole wheat is really tasty in this recipe) - 11 ounces fresh goat cheese, crumbled - 8 ounces (1 large ball) mozzarella, sliced - 1 sprig sage (optional garnish) Combine all sauce ingredients in a pot. Add enough water to cover all ingredients. Bring to a boil and then reduce heat to simmer for 30-45 minutes. If using raw squash simmer until squash is fork tender. Remove sage sprig. Blend sauce with an immersion blender or in a stand blender until smooth. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Grease a 9 x 13 inch dish with olive oil. Bring a large pot of well salted water to a boil with a splash of olive oil. Cook lasagna in 3 batches. Add 4 lasagna sheets to boiling water and cook for 4 minutes. (See notes) Coat bottom on dish with sauce. Top with 1/­­4 of the crumbled goat cheese. I use a fork to scrape goat cheese from package. Place lasagna sheets on top of sauce in line with the short side of dish. Coat lasagna sheets with sauce. Layer with half of the mozzarella. Top with 1/­­4 of crumbled goat cheese. Repeat boiling lasagna sheets, sauce, mozzarella, goat cheese. Top will final layer of boiled lasagna sheets. Cover with sauce and sprinkle with crumbled goat cheese. Place sage sprig in the middle of the dish for garnish. (Optional) Bake for 40 minutes Allow to rest on counter top for at least 10 minutes. Enjoy! The post Pumpkin Sage Goat Cheese Lasagna appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Jujube Ginger Tea

September 11 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Jujube Ginger Tea A friend of mine is from Korea and frequently has a pot of Jujube tea simmering away in her office kitchen. It sends the most enticing and comforting, sweet and spicy aroma around the whole space and creates the warmest atmosphere – I always have a hard time leaving. She hands out a little cup of the tea to all her customers, which is such a thoughtful little detail of her endless hospitality. Everybody loves it. Of course, I asked her for the recipe the very first time I tried the tea and have been making it ever since. Jujube dates are also know as red/­­Chinese/­­Korean/­­Indian dates and are a bit different from the dates we are accustomed to in the Western world. They’re smaller and stouter than regular dates, with deep red skin, and come from a tree belonging to the buckthorn family, thus they’re quite nutritious. Jujube are widely used in Chinese medicine for regulating blood pressure, aiding sleep, digestion and more. This tea is made by Koreans and Chinese alike, with small variations depending on the culture, and takes on many of the health benefits of the jujube. My friend adds cinnamon and ginger to the tea and garnishes it with pine nuts, which is a Korean twist. The result is a subtly sweet, gingery and slightly spicy tea that just smells of happiness. Jujube tea is especially great in the fall and winter, since it’s based on cinnamon and ginger, but I also love to drink it iced, for a more refreshing beverage. Jujubes are not that hard to come by – they are widely available online and in Asian/­­Indian markets, so I encourage you to try out this gem of a drink, I know you will love it. Read on for some weekend links and have a chill Sunday :) The 21st Century’s 100 Greatest Films – a list by BBC. Have you seen them all? I’ve seen a good bunch, but still have a lot of cultural catching up to do (still haven’t watched No Country for Old Men!) Kenzo Perfume Ad – a perfume ad making fun of perfume ads, directed by Spike Jonze The New Jock – a whole bunch of workout routine interviews with all kinds of people, if you’re ever in need of some moving motivation Mia Chaplin’s Paintings – .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Jujube Ginger Tea appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Sweet Spicy Gochujang Chickpea Lettuce Wraps

June 2 2016 Vegan Richa 

Sweet Spicy Gochujang Chickpea Lettuce WrapsSweet Spicy Gochujang Chickpea Lettuce Wraps. Easy Wraps with Korean Gochujang Sauce and Chickpeas. Use lentils, white beans or other beans for variation. Serve as lettuce wraps or in tacos or top a salad bowl. Vegan Gluten-free Recipe. Pin this post.  Gochujang (hot pepper paste) is a savory, spicy, and pungent fermented Korean condiment made from red chili, glutinous rice, fermented soybeans, and salt. Depending on the brand you have, it can vary in heat. It can be a pure concentrated gochujang paste or mixed with ingredients to make sauce which is not as hot.  Gochujang can be used to make glazes and sauces that make the meal very flavorful and appetizing.  I used the paste with garlic, sesame oil and a bit of sweet to make a sauce in which chickpeas were simmered until they pick up the flavor. Add veggies of choice and serve in wraps, lettuce leaf wraps, tacos or over rice or cooked grains. Or Make a Bibimbap bowl with the gochujang chickpeas, rice, kimchi, some roasted veggies, sprouts and more gochujang. Make these simple Gochujang Chickpeas to try out this sauce!  Continue reading: Sweet Spicy Gochujang Chickpea Lettuce WrapsThe post Sweet Spicy Gochujang Chickpea Lettuce Wraps appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Ask the Nutritionist: What Do You Think About Juice Cleanses?

July 22 2015 Vegetarian Times 

Ask the Nutritionist: What Do You Think About Juice Cleanses? Q: What do you think about juice cleanses? Are they worth it? A: That depends on why and how youre doing a juice cleanse. If you need the discipline of a juice cleanse to reset your eating habits, one- to three-day cleanses are the perfect dose. A cleanse is the process of clearing the accumulated toxins in your body that can come from the additives and chemicals used in processed foods. Freshly pressed juice, consisting primarily of greens, sends a surge of nutrients into your body; it provides an injection of vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients you might not otherwise be getting. Juice cleansing is a conscious effort to reduce your intake of toxins while increasing your intake of nutrient-rich foods. Make sure the juice is organic, otherwise the concept of cleansing is out the window. Nonorganic juices can be laced with a plethora of pesticides, typically in concentrated amounts, because you would juice more produce than you would eat in a single sitting. In addition, your body needs fiber. Fiber is essential for keeping your digestive system regular and also for cleansing. Fiber binds onto toxins and clears them from your body. Juices dont contain fiber--including the prebiotic fiber essential for healthy gut flora, which enable your bodys eliminative organs, such as the liver, kidneys, and colon, to function properly. Thats why juice cleans- ing isnt recommended for longer than three days. Alternatively, you may want to add fiber-rich foods, such as chia or flaxseeds, to your cleanse. I personally love green juice made with kale, Swiss chard, cucumber, celery, and ginger. Its my liquid chlorophyll drip that I add daily to my overall diet.  Our bodies are working on overdrive to detoxify and neutralize all the stress they undergo on a daily basis. The best way to show them some love is to eliminate harmful substances and add an abundance of nutrients. Eating clean and organic on a regular basis does this.   Q: Should I avoid no-stir peanut butter? Is natural-style nut butter that separates more healthful for me? A: Nut butters can be grouped into two camps: the stir kind and the no-stir kind. How can you tell? Check the ingredients label. If you see just one ingredient--peanuts, almonds, sunflower seeds, or whatever type of legume/­­nut/­­seed tickles your fancy-- thats the most natural kind. As a result, the oil rises to the top. Falling into the no-stir camp are the smooth, creamy nut butters that many of us grew up with. The no-stir convenience of these butters is due to the hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oils, or trans fats, youll find listed on the ingredients label. Meet the author: Peggy Kotsopoulos is a Registered Holistic Nutritionist. She is author of the book, Kitchen Cures, which is available in August.   

Why You Should Eat More Nuts (+ How to Shop for Them!)

July 14 2015 Vegetarian Times 

Why You Should Eat More Nuts (+ How to Shop for Them!) Tree nuts are one of the best sources of good quality fats, fiber and protein, and in some cases even Omega 3, the anti-inflammatory powerhouse. With a rich taste, satisfying texture and culinary versatility on their side, what could be easier than adding a handful of hazelnuts, pignoli or pistachios to your meals? Just a quick scan across the globe shows them in every culinary tradition, from Syrian muhammara and Italian pesto to Galician gazpacho and Middle-Eastern dukka. You could, without a doubt, make a tree nut-based recipe every day of the year, tapping into the myriad health benefits of nuts. But raw, shelled, blanched or toasted - which kind should you buy? How to Shop For Nuts Because nuts are concentrated sources of healthy fats, theyre also prone to rancidity – light, heat and oxygen being their biggest enemies. Ideally, I always buy nuts in their raw state, so I can capitalize on their versatility - whether making nut milk with raw nuts, or toasting them for other recipes. If, for whatever reason, Im not buying the raw kind, I buy blanched or toasted nuts from a store with good temperature control and a high turnover (meaning they rotate and replace their stock regularly). Be sure to taste the nuts when you first bring them home from the store so you know what they should taste like – and when theyre past their prime. Raw or cooked, tree nuts will likely keep for 2-3 months in your freezer, refrigerator or in a cool, dark, dry place. They may still be edible, but not necessarily fresh tasting. Unless youre taking advantage of bulk pricing, eat what you buy, dont just squirrel them away. Here are some easy everyday ideas for incorporating nuts into your diet: o sprinkle toasted tree nuts onto salads, cooked grains or vegetable side dishes o soak a quarter-cup of tree nuts overnight and blend into your morning smoothie o press half-inch thick fish filets into finely chopped tree nuts, then pan sear each side until golden Lately, Ive been making a monthly batch of Trinkles (tree nut sprinkles!) to toss onto everything from savory oatmeal to sweet fruit salads, roasted vegetables, dinner grains and everything in between. A jar or bowls worth on your countertop or at your desk can be a gentle reminder to enjoy them every day. Trinkles 2 cup assorted tree nuts, roughly chopped 4 Tablespoons chia seeds or sesame seeds 1/­­4 teaspoon sea salt Mix nuts and seeds together and toast in a 325? F degree oven for 12-15 minutes until golden. Remove from oven, toss with sea salt, and cool completely before eating or storing in airtight container. Meet the author: Celine Beitchman is a chef instructor at Natural Gourmet Institute. She is a graduate of NGIs Food Therapy Program, where she studied under the schools founder, Dr. Annemarie Colbin. She holds an Advanced Certificate from the Wine and Spirit Education Trust and has a lifetime of apprenticeship experience beginning at Le Dome in Paris. Chef Celine is committed to promoting sustainable, health-supportive food, and loves training the next generation of chefs. She is also a private chef, nutrition counselor, and avid globetrotter.

4 Reasons Why You Should Start Juicing

April 24 2015 VegKitchen 

4 Reasons Why You Should Start JuicingContributed by Garrick Dee Tan. When it comes to staying healthy and fit, a lot of health experts like dieticians and doctors would say that you should eat a lot of fruit and vegetables. How much? It varies. For instance if youre a 35 year old male who does not exercise a lot, you should eat at least 2 cups of fruit and 3 cups of vegetables. This handy tool from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) will calculate how much you should eat depending on your age, sex and physical activity level. What counts as a cup? According to the CDC a whole small apple can be considered as a cup, a large banana is considered a cup, half a cup of sweet potato + half a cup of green beans is considered a cup. Heres the full chart. Eating all that vegetables and fruit really fills up your stomach which is great because itll leave less room for junk food but the digestive system gets overwhelmed. One option that will help health conscious folks like you and I consume more fruits and vegetables is juicing, and Ill share with you 4 reasons why you should consider incorporating this practice into your diet. - Allows you to consume more fruits and vegetables Like what I said earlier in this article depending on your age, sex and physical activity level you need to consumer 5 to 6 cups fruits and vegetables. Juicing helps you consume more because the process separates liquid from pulp. Whats left is a liquid brimming with live enzymes and nutrients get absorbed by the body without having to be digested by the gut. This in a way helps rest the digestive system. - Helps treat certain types of ailments like diabetes Diabetes is an epidemic that affects over 30 million Americans with over 1.5 million new cases per year. One of the best natural remedies used with success by a number of people to control diabetes is bitter melon. This (you guessed it) bitter fruit contains four ingredients that is known to help the bodys capability to absorb and process sugar. These four ingredients are vicine, polypeptide-P, charantin and lectin. It is so potent that doctors and health practitioners have warned against combining this with diabetic medication because it could cause hypoglycemia or a condition where the blood sugar falls to dangerously low levels. Dosages vary but the maximum you can safety take is around 2 bitter melons per day. If youve tasted bitter melon, it is very bitter and I doubt no matter how good the chef is you wont be able to eat a whole piece. An alternative is to juice bitter melon. This removes all the pulp and what you get is a concentrated drink that has helped thousands of people reverse type-2 diabetes. If pure bitter gourd is too bitter for your taste you can try adding these ingredients. Important note: If youre under medication, consult with a physician first before incorporating this into your diet because like what Ive said combining this with diabetic medication can cause hypoglycemia. And when you do take this regularly monitor blood glucose levels - if it falls within normal levels ask your doctor if you can discontinue medication. - Helps you lose weight No, Im not talking about a juice fast where youll eat nothing but juice. Im talking utilizing juicing into your diet in order to reduce hunger pangs. While a juice fast can work for the short term and Ive read a lot of success stories, the truth is it isnt sustainable for an extended period and can be dangerous if you do it the wrong way. What Im suggesting here is a solution where you dont need to starve yourself. The solution involves drinking fresh juice before a meal or in-between meals in order to curb the hunger pangs that normally would occur if we dont eat snacks in between meals. Health experts agree that eating smaller portions is the key in losing weight and keeping it off but if what you are eating in between meals is rich in fructose then this method can also work against you, which is why drinking juice or a smoothie /­­ juice combo is a better option. Not only will your body get the nutrients it craves for thus reducing appetite, it also lessens the carb and sugar intake. This will result in weight loss minus the nutrient deprivation. If you dont believe me, try some of these recipes before any meal and see if it helps in reducing hunger pangs. Some of these recipes have ingredients that help in weight loss like Avocado and Grapefruit. - Improves digestion A health digestive system is important to our overall health, in fact a third of our immune system is found in the digestive tract and research confirms this. Juicing helps indirectly by providing you with a healthier alternative to store bought juices. Fruits like lemon also help with the digestive system by lubricating the digestive system and softening the stool. Drinking a cup of warm lemon water in the morning will help improve in fact will help digestive health by stimulating the liver to produce bile which is a fluid needed to flush out waste from the gut. Another ingredient you can add to your juices to improve digestion is ginger. Eating a thumb of ginger is just plain impossible but juicing it is not and adding it adds a nice spicy contrast. Next week, Ill cover the most common mistakes a lot of people make when juicing. One of them is a key contributor in people gaining weight so please stand by for that. - For more juicing tips, visit Juicing with G.

8 Delectable and Healthy Vegan Muffins

October 6 2014 VegKitchen 

8 Delectable and Healthy Vegan MuffinsThese pretty streusel-topped Double-Orange Chocolate Chip Muffins are not only delectable, but contain a dose of Vitamin C from fresh orange juice as well as concentrated orange juice. The concentrate also contributes sweetness as well as color.  Orange-Cranberry Muffins make for a lively flavor combination in baked goods. If Im in the mood to make muffins for a weekend brunch, this is one of my  top choices! And for holiday baking or giving, this batter is nice made into mini-loaves.   Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Muffins might seem a little odd at first, but the flavors of pumpkin (or other orange winter squash, especially butternut) and chocolate are surprisingly compatible. They just could become a fall favorite to serve with tea or nondairy hot cocoa.    The classic zucchini muffin in a vegan rendition--try it as an alternative to a sandwich for brown-bag or school lunch, or as a healthy snack. For these Zucchini-Raisin Muffins, the chocolate chips and walnuts are optional, but I like to use them both! These light and healthy Quinoa, Apricot, and Oat Muffin Clusters boast an irresistible creamy, crunchy sweetness. Apricots are rich in iron, potassium, vitamin A and fiber. Also, these muffin clusters are flourless and gluten-free! Enjoy these yummy and good for you treats ... they are nutrient-rich and delish! Carrots and orange juice concentrate pair up in these moist Vegan Carrot-Walnut Muffins, providing a dose of vitamins A and C, as well as an enticing golden color. Make them in the evening; enjoy a warm muffin for your evening snack, then the next day for an on-the-go breakfast. Or, pack a couple in your or your kids lunch box with fresh fruit for a change of pace from a sandwich. For these Gingery Peach or Nectarine Muffins make sure to use perfectly ripe peaches or nectarines--lush and sweet, but not too soft--for these late-summer vegan muffins that have more than a hint of ginger!  Filled with plenty of fresh apple, these muffins are so moist and good (and theyre good for you, too). Yummy Apple Muffins are great as a weekend snack or as an addition to the school or office lunch box. - For lots more features on healthy lifestyle, please explore VegKitchens  Healthy Vegan Kitchen  page .


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