compote - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Couscous Salad with Tangy Dressing

Peanut butter cookies recipe | eggless peanut butter biscuits in cooker

Atta ladoo recipe | atta besasn ladoo | wheat laddu recipe

Caribbean Greens and Beans Soup










compote vegetarian recipes

Spring Picnic Bread

April 16 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Spring Picnic Bread Picnic season is finally upon us and we have been kicking it off with two new favorite things. The first one is a bike and the other is a bread. We have been dreaming of a Danish cargo bike for years and years, and last month we finally splurged on this one. It’s the perfect vehicle for us because we can fit all three kids in it with seatbelts and all. It’s ideal to bring home heavy grocery bags with. And it’s environmentally friendly. All practicalities aside, it is also so much fun to ride around with and we are roaming from playground to picnic spots without a hitch. Just packing a few blankets, a big smoothie, a rhubarb compote and this beauty of a bread. We created this recipe for all type of picnic situations. We wanted something spring-y and savory that tasted awesome and could manage a bumpy bike ride. It’s basically like a savory muffin that we bake in a sheet pan. It serves many, is easy to make, super moist and flavorful and you can make lots of variations on it (although I love the look of thinly shaved asparagus on top). Needless to say, this is also ideal for a brunch or or other weekend gatherings. Just like a foccacia, the bread acts as a base and you can play around with all kind of toppings. Here are a few variations: o Swap some of the potatoes in the bread with grated carrots, parsnip or swede. o A teaspoon of mustard in the batter adds some complexity to the flavor. o Any fresh herbs can be mixed into the batter. o Olives or capers could be good on top. Spinach could also be used instead of asparagus. o You can use a dairy free yogurt instead of buttermilk and leave out the feta cheese if you prefer it dairy free. o We havent tried a vegan version but replacing the eggs with chia eggs (1 egg = 1 tablespoons chia seed + 3 tablespoons water) has worked for us on similar recipes. Asparagus & Potato Picnic Bread Serves 12 Dry Ingredients 100 g /­­ 1 cup oat flour (or the same amount rolled oats, blitzed into flour in a food processor) 100 g /­­ 3/­­4 cup rice flour (or buckwheat flour or spelt flour) 1 1/­­2 tsp baking powder 1 tsp sea salt flakes Wet Ingredients 3 free-range eggs 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup olive oil or coconut oil, at room temperature 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup cultured buttermilk (or yogurt or plant-based yogurt) 1-2 spring onions 3-4 potatoes (2 cups /­­ 250 g grated) 1 handful fresh parsley, finely chopped 100 g feta cheese Topping 3 raw asparagus 1/­­3 cup pumpkin seeds 2 tsp quality olive oil 2 tsp honey a handful chive Preheat the oven to 180°C /­­ 350°F bake mode and grease a 30 x 22 cm /­­ 12 x 9 inch tray or line it with parchment paper. Add all the dry ingredients to a large mixing bowl and stir until combined. Make a well in the centre and set aside while preparing the wet ingredients. Whisk eggs in a separate bowl, then add oil and buttermilk. Finely chop the onion. Peel the potatoes, grate them coarsely and add them to the wet mixture along with the onion and parsley. Crumble in half of the feta cheese. Give it a good stir and then pour the wet mixture into the bowl with the flours. Use a wooden spoon or spatula to combine the batter and then pour it onto the tray. Use a peeler to shave the asparagus into thin ribbons and spread them out over the batter. Crumble the remaining feta cheese on top. Combine pumpkin seeds, oil and honey and sprinkle them on top as well, along with the chive. Bake for approximately 40 minutes or until golden and a skewer inserted in the centre of the cake comes out clean. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool slightly in the tin before transferring to a wire wrack to cool completely. Store the cake at room temperature in an airtight container and it will keep for a few days. Great to bring on a picnic and serve with a tangy rhubarb compote or chutney. Enjoy!

Green Peanut Butter Sandwich + Smoothie

November 21 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Peanut Butter Sandwich + Smoothie Hey! First of all, thanks for all your cheering words on the news of our marriage. That was fun! Secondly, I promised a lot of persons on instagram that we would share a chocolate recipe which currently goes by the working name Taco Brownies. But all the interest in them made me a little anxious so I’m heading back into the kitchen today to test another round before we’re ready to post them. Here is something to snack on while you wait. A peanut butter sandwich and a green smoothie. Technically, a sandwich hardly qualifies as a recipe. But what we want to say with this point is really just that you should try peanut butter on a savory sandwich. I love all kind of nut butter sandwiches and even if I usually top it with sliced bananas, apples, strawberries or a sweet compote, this savory version is my most recent addiction. Crispy lettuce and cucumber add a nice textural contrast to the sandwich without competing with the peanut butter flavor. The cottage cheese makes it moist and yummy and the chickpeas ... well I don’t know why the chickpeas are there actually. I guess I just like chickpeas inside my sandwiches. This sandwich is yummy, sticky, crunchy, rich and yet fresh somehow. We usually make it with a good quality rye bread but anything goes. I just realized that this is a green sandwich without avocado so we should perhaps call it “the-death-of-avocado-sandwich-sandwich” or something catchy like that. Anyway, it’s good. And it’s not impossible that you already have the ingredients at home. So, try it! For the other recipe, I’ll let Luise do the talking. It was her idea to pair the sandwich with a smoothie and since she is queen Latifah of green smoothies I am sure she has something clever to say. /­­David Here’s something clever for you. Make this smoothie. It’s that good. It has lots of green vegetables and a mild and fresh taste with tones of lemon and ginger. Just the way I like it. Also, using frozen vegetables makes the smoothie creamy and more nutritious and you can skip the ice. It also works really well paired with a sandwich as well because (most of) you have two hands and now you can have a good snack in each hand. We actually wrote a “In The Other Hand” chapter for our smoothie book with lots of great snacks, but we couldn’t fit it in the book. Lots of love! /­­Luise Green Peanut Butter Sandwich Makes 2  Just one note on peanut butter. Read the ingredient list in the supermarket and go for the brands that only list peanuts (and maybe salt). You can of course use other types of nut butters as well, I’d especially recommend cashew butter for this, but it’s usually a lot pricier. 4 slices rye bread 4 tbsp peanut butter a few leaves crispy lettuce 5 cm /­­ 2 inches cucumber 4 tbsp cottage cheese 4 tbsp chickpeas /­­ garbanzo beans 2 tsp olive oil  pea shoots thyme Spread peanut butter on each bread slice. Rinse the lettuce and cucumber. Tear the lettuce into smaller pieces, slice the cucumber thinly and place both on top of each peanut butter sandwich. Top with cottage cheese, chickpeas, a drizzle of olive oil, pea shoots and thyme. Put the sandwich together, wrap with sandwich paper and dig in. Broccoli & Ginger Smoothie 2 normal glasses or 1 very large If you don’t have a super powerful blender, start by mixing all ingredients except broccoli and banana (because they are thicker and will slow down the blender blades). When mixed until smooth, add the last ingredients and mix again. If you like it a little sweeter, you can add a fresh date or more banana. 4-5 florets frozen broccoli (or frozen cauliflower) 1 large banana 1 large handful fresh spinach 1 large handful fresh kale 1 large knob fresh ginger 1 slice lemon, peeled 1-2 cups plant milk, (oat milk /­­ rice milk /­­ almond milk) Add all ingredients to a high speed blender and mix until smooth. Taste and adjust the flavor and consistency if needed. Pour into two glasses or bottles.

Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin

October 11 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin Amy Chaplin is an author and chef, whose approach to whole foods and cooking is endlessly inspiring. Her cookbook is nothing short of a kitchen bible to us. We had the pleasure of meeting up with Amy in NYC a few years ago and had the best time chatting about our favorite subjects like sprouted flours, cookbook publishing, and acupuncture. Needless to say, we were excited to get a peak at her self-care routine. In this interview, Amy tells us about the valuable self-care tips she learned from her mother, her favorite meals made with pantry staples, the skincare brand she’s been using since she was a teenager, her approach to exercise, stress, and so much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I like both. I like to have a morning routine and create a work routine for whatever project Im working on but I also like to have time for free thinking and spontaneously connecting with friends. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I get up early, 6 am  is the usual time but sometimes eariler depending on what Im working on. I make warm lemon water, light a candle and mediate for 10 to 15 minutes. In late summer the sun is coming up just as I finish and I usually sit for a bit and often reply to messages from Austrlia (they are going to bed around that time). Then I feed our two dogs (my wife takes them out on a long morning walk) start making breakfast and make sencha tea. Sometimes I skip the sencha and have a matcha latte after breakfast but I try not to have too much caffeine, as much as I love it! If Im working on recipes from home, I quickly shower, dress and get started right away....sometimes before breakfast but it depends on what Im testing :) -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I stop working on the computer before dinner and leave it closed. I leave my phone downstairs so its far from my bedroom. I get into bed and usually read cookbooks or watch an episode of any series Im currently obsessed with :) Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast –  soaked oats + chia (recipe is in my book) or activated grain porridge with homemade nut milk, cardamom and berries. I usually eat grains once a day and its usually in the morning. Lunch – Beans of some kind --depending on recipes Im testing. Kraut or other fermented veg, greens--salad or steamed depending on weather. I usually add some toppings too: hemp seeds, toasted seeds, sunflower sprouts, scallions anything to make it tasty Snack – Seeded crackers and nut butter/­­avocado/­­bean pate or chia pudding or coconut yogurt Dinner – An egg or tempeh, avocado, steamed veg and a dressing of some kind--this is often quite small as Im not always hungry if I have a good lunch or if Im testing and sampling recipes. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Yes. I love green tea. Sencha is my favorite for its fresh, grassy umami taste. Rishi Tea First Flush Sencha is sublime. I also love their ceremonial grade matchas with foamed, homemade almond milk. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to but I havent eaten sugar on a regular basis for years. If Im craving something sweet I eat a few spoons of Anitas coconut yogurt--it has a naturally sweet flavor from coconut with no sweetener. If I have a berry compote around Ill have some of that with it but I never sweeten them as Ive gotten used to just the sweetness of the berries. Of course there are times when Im testing recipes for cakes and muffins and I do enjoy tasting them and the same goes for good raw chocolate. Im not rigid about it as its part of being a chef but I dont seek out sugar on a daily basis. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I change depending on what my acupuncturist recommends in the way of Chinese herbs. I have been taking spirulina to increase protein and greens lately. I take a vitamin D. Ive been adding maca powder to my breakfasts for years so dont really consider it a supplement. I like adding locally grown ashwagandha (from Furnace Creek Farm) and reishi or chaga mushroom powder to hot cacao drinks. I drink nettle tea everyday because I love it, especially when you can get it fresh from the farmers market. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  With my job being so physical, these days I gravitate towards Qi Gong and yoga--the gentler classes. I also tend to exercise by default. Walking everywhere, long dog walks, biking and general schlepping around the city and up and down stairs with heavy bags of veggies! -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I used to push myself with torturous classes and long runs but now I do less and enjoy it more. I know that I am more productive when I make time for movement but it has to be mindful.  I do yoga at home and love it when I have the time for long luxurious classes...especially restorative. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Beauty to me is an inner glow that comes from something beyond what and how we take care of our bodies. Mostly it comes with time and a spiritual sense of oneself, our path, the world and other beings around us. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Ive used Dr. Hauschka since I was a teenager. I have a huge respect for biodynamic growing practices and love the way they preserve their products naturally. I think its one of the most difficult things with natural skin care products--preserving. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Local organic veggies, lots of greens, seeds… -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. I notice a difference in my skin when I use a warm compress of essential oils (Dr. Hauschka calls them bath oils). You put a few drops in warm water and soak a face cloth, squeeze it out and press it into your skin. I use lemongrass in the morning and lavender at night. Then you cleanse and use the same water to wash the cleanser off. They smell so good and your skin feels really clean and enlivened afterwards. Its my mothers beauty secret, she looks amazing! :) Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Mainly daily meditation and breathing. I dont feel as clear or grounded without it. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Hot shower and miso soup :) -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Make miso soup with lots of ginger and scallions and I also take Woodstock C & F Seasonal Support. It always helps with a sore throat or when Im feeling under the weather. Gargling sea salt with warm water. Colloidal silver spray. Hot lemon drink with grated ginger and turmeric. Bath and sleep. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? They definitely overlap. I love what I do and have found comfort in the kitchen for as long as I can remember. Of course there are days when work completely takes over but even when my schedule is jam packed, I try and make time to spend with my partner, cuddle the dogs and see family--it just means well be eating recipes that are being tested and theyre grilled for feed back! Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I aften find myself saying “everything is working out for my highest good and remembering that everything is perfect as it is. I grew up with Louise Hay books. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Over time my lifestyle and diet has improved and I have a much more balanced approach. I used to be quite strict at times and I know that its not the way to great health for me anyway. I think now I have better overall health so I dont get thrown off on a regular basis. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Paul Pitchford’s “Healing with Whole Foods has been in my life for over 20 years and I still consult it. It always gets me in the mood for pure, simple temple-like food. My self care is also influenced by my mother. She has a deep connection to nature and a daily ritual of foot baths, lemon water in the morning and making a nightly hot water bottle (in the cooler months) Ive carried on these rituals...but dont seem to get the foot baths in as often as she does. Knowledge -- Your recipes are so well thought out and always turn out delicious, as well as incredibly nourishing. What is your process when it comes to recipe development? Thank you so much! My recipes all begin with what I crave, which is mostly deeply nourishing food with clean uncomplicated flavors. They have to make sense to me and not only be healthy but also be visually beautiful. Nature and beauty are what inspire me most. When I am developing recipes I want the steps to be clear and thorough. I spend a lot of time with new recipes before they are published. Theyre all tested over and over again by myself, friends, family and recipe testers. I feel a lot of responsibility to readers who spend time and money and a lot of effort making my recipes...they have to work and taste delicious! -- You are a big proponent of keeping a well-stocked pantry. What are some of your favorite meals that you like to throw together with pantry ingredients? Simple wraps with nori, fermented veggies, avocado (not really pantry but I always have a few of varying ripeness around). Barrys tempeh, which is made from white beans and adzuki beans and sold frozen, it tastes amazing just panfried in coconut oil. In Australia you can get fresh fava bean tempeh and Im missing it so much! Red lentil soup with lemon and spinach from my cookbook. That is perfect for right now when the weather is getting cooler and if you dont have much in the way of veg. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Drive to the country with my wife, play with my nephew, drink tea and sit in the morning sun. Have a pedicure. Travel and be in nature. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – “The Power of Intention” by Wayne Dyer Song/­­Album – Blue by Joni Mitchell Movie – I recently saw Lion and was so moved Piece of Art – Yoko Onos simple, whimsical pieces -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in NYC? ABC V, Via Carota, Ilbuco Alimentari, De Maria -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? – Good tea selection + strainer for infusing – Activated or toasted nuts – Spirulina – Pajamas and cosy sox (no matter the season) – Large scarf/­­shawl – Cardigans -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Luise from Green Kitchen Stories, Henrietta Inman, Elenore from Earthsprout, Emma from My Darling Lemon Thyme..... Photos by Amy Chaplin and Stephen Kent Johnson. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King

September 17 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Today’s self-care dialogue is with LA artist and meditation teacher, Lauren Spencer King. We first learned about Lauren a few years ago, when we came across her bimonthly moon writings that ring incredibly true and clear up a lot of things for us every month. Since then, we’ve fallen in love with Lauren’s art and meditation work, which is centered around breath work and her extensive knowledge about the healing powers of minerals. Lauren was kind enough to open up a space for us in her 4 day online meditation workshop for stress and anxiety, and we had the most lovely and calming time following her techniques and suggestions, which we often use to this day. Lauren’s self-care routine is as inspiring as it is down to earth, with a focus on finding the wisdom in the inner self. In this interview, Lauren tells us about the Ayurvedic cleanse she’s on, what minerals she keeps next to her bed, her ideas about exercise and beauty, why she sees the concept of a work-life balance as a myth, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I think in my everyday things do feel open and free, its part of the benefit of being an artist and working for yourself. But, I do find routine within that freedom. Days are also made up of habits (good and bad), and trying to prioritize things that are important and meaningful. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I like to have a few hours to wake up and start my day. I like the quiet of the mornings, the possibility of a new day. Sometimes if I happen to wake up really early for some reason, like 5:00am, I like to read in bed for a bit, or watch a scary movie early in the morning. Its weird... I know. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? On good nights I am in bed early and read before I go to sleep. I love reading in bed, there is something about it that feels so intimate. On a not so good night I will work too late, and fall asleep to a movie. I do like to sleep with a few minerals next to my bed, some make their way under my pillow at certain times: purple fluorite to relax my mind, danburite for sweet dreams, aquamarine for calming, a piece of dream quartz, and a piece of shungite that is next to my phone (on airplane mode). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: I am on an Ayurvedic cleanse right now. I have been working with this great Ayurvedic practitioner, her name is Meredith Carter. Years ago I did panchakarma (here), and if I could afford it I would do it annually. Its incredible. What I am doing now is like panchakarma lite! Breakfast – In the morning I make homemade almond milk. I will warm the almond milk and mix in my herbs and adaptogens, sometimes I will add fresh turmeric. I have been obsessed with making sweet potato toasts. I will top them with tahini and a cooked fruit compote (been loving cherry, wild blueberry, or pear ginger), with some pistachio nuts or pumpkin seeds. If I need some protein then I will eat two eggs toped with basil, and a tangerine. Lunch – I make fresh dahl with special non-heating spices and ghee, all of which I get from Surya Spa, they have the best mung beans and spices. Dahl is very healing. I will have a bowl full with some steamed chard or beet greens, black lava sea salt, toasted pumpkin seeds and lots of parsley or coriander on top. Snack – right now cherries are in season and they are making me so happy, I will have a bowl full of them with a handful of pistachios (lets be honest, like 1/­­2 a bag, I love pistachios). And some fresh ginger tea. Or I will make some beet hummus and have that with my favorite almond crackers. Dinner – I have been getting really into making soups! My two favorite are a green soup made with celery /­­ chard /­­ beet greens /­­ asparagus /­­ Japanese sweet potato. And a kabocha /­­ carrot /­­ginger soup. Or I will cook a big artichoke and dip the leaves into a melted ghee, lemon dip. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? None, I have never even had a cup of coffee. I usually have a huge jar of warm water with lemon or fresh ginger in the morning. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to when I was younger, until I developed all sorts of health problems because of it, some that I still deal with even over a decade later. I was living in Paris and eating nothing but delicious breads and sweets! It really took a toll on my body and since then I have cut both out. But, I still dream of flaky French almond croissants. Maybe in another life I will get to enjoy them again. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I love eating a spoonful of Chyawanprash in the morning. My good friend who runs Rebbl and develops all of their delicious drinks sent me a wellness mixture, it has very high grade reshi, ashwaganda and maca in it. I have that every morning. I love QuintEssentials 3.3 minerals. I also swear by Alexis Smarts flower remedies, she is amazing! I also almost always tend to all ailments physical and emotional with a homeopathic remedy from her. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I have an aversion to most forms of exercise, especially any kind of class where an instructor is wearing a headset and yells things at you like, Its almost swimsuit season, ladies. But sometimes I get into a routine where I go to yoga. I like to take hikes and go on walks, and I love to dance. But, my favorite is swimming. Recently I was swimming laps, and was having one of those days where I was feeling very unkind and judgmental of my body, and there was this older man in the lane next to me, he was a very serious swimmer, he might have even been a swim coach at some point, you could just tell. And I stopped to catch my breathe and he asked me how I had such a strong breaststroke. I told him it was because I was on swim team for years as a kid and maybe because I was tall. We talked for a bit about it and then I got back to my laps. And I started to think that in day to day life what I criticize most about my body in other contexts I use to my advantage. In this case, that my un-slender legs and bigger hips and butt actually made me a stronger swimmer and made my stroke more powerful. It really changed the way I thought about my body. I try to remember this. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I really love natural beauty, which to me means being whole and owning all of who you are. You know, there are times when I see someone crying, and they dont maybe look their best, but they are so beautiful to me, because they are so present and authentic. Bodies arent meant to be perfect, thats not why we have them. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I love oils and go through different phases of them on my face and body. Right now at night I use a hazelnut or arnica oil from a Paris apothecary for my face. I am also completely obsessed with Sans Ceuticalss Activator 7 Oil. I use it everywhere – body, face and hair! I dont really wear make up but when I do it is from RMS. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I either dry brush or do abhyanga massage with basil oil every day, its more for the internal lymphatic system, but it makes my skin really nice. Eating well and drinking enough water are also key. And a little sun is always nice. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. I love using my jade face roller to refine the tone of my skin as well as relieve some tension I carry in my jaw. I also am into my second year of no bra, for the most part. For a few reasons, one of them being that they actually arent good for your body. No products with chemicals. My mum was a natural beauty, she really taught me what that was, she had a style that was all her own. She was radiant from the inside out. I sometimes think this is something you are born with. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Stress is often what I teach most about in class, because it has been the biggest teacher to me. I feel I am always at a growing edge with it. I try not to over schedule myself. Rest is a big part of being healthy for me. I have gone through some very difficult periods in my life of having sever adrenal fatigue, which comes from stress of all kinds. So, I have to listen really carefully not to push myself too hard, despite at times wanting to ignore my limitations. Recently I have been working with someone to understand the deeper level of stress that I unconsciously take on from people around me and from living in a city. It has been fascinating. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Yes, sometimes stress can not be avoided, like when I have a show, or need to be on the computer all day, or travel. Those are the big ones for me. I have to really work hard to stay grounded. Its really all sorts of little things, that when I do them really add up. And I just do the best I can, its not about perfection. Even stopping to dance the stress out of my body for five minuets really helps. Stress is more physical than we think. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Stop everything. Get into bed in something comfy with socks. Sleeping as much as I can. Raw garlic. Olive Leaf supplements. Colloidal silver. Apple Cider Vinegar if I have a sore throat. Hot shower (or bath) with eucalyptus oil. Thieves oil on my chest and throat. Lots of water. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? I honestly think this idea of work /­­ life balance is a myth. At least it is for me. Sometimes its only about working on Fields of Study, sometimes I am all about being in the studio, sometimes its more relaxing and I can see friends and go on a trip or a weekend getaway. There is balance within the year if I am lucky. I recently just let this idea go, I was making myself feel so bad trying to make that ideal happen on a daily or even weekly timeline. I am also a bit of a workaholic, never feeling like I am doing enough. Thats something I am trying to work on. But, this pressure for balance seems like a modern day version of the women can have it all mantra. There are always compromises and I think its more empowering if we own that and voice it and have conversations about it. Instead of silently thinking that there is something wrong with us. Motivation -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Its not one single thing, but if it was it would be learning to listen to my body. My health and understanding of health has come from a bumpy road of making lots little shifts. I dont believe in a one size fits all mentality for health. I think we are all different and in every moment we need different things. I am wary of the companies and self proclaimed health gurus out there right now that give sometimes ill informed blanket recommendations. I think it is up to us to empower ourselves and take the time to learn about our bodies and ourselves. Its important to have support and create a team of people that can help you. I have an amazing doctor, a homeopathist, an Ayurvedic practitioner, a woman who I do energy work with, and a therapist that have all at different times saved my life in various ways. It can take time, but finding the people that resonate with your understanding of health is key. I have learned so much about my body and what health and healing is from working with all of them. And remembering that deep and true healing takes time. Its always a process. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. What came to mind was this movie Agnes Martin made called Gabriel. Its terribly long and boring. It is about the boy on a walk in nature, and it is very stripped down and minimal, no dialog and most of the movie is silent, it has one tiny part with music. But, I think it relates to the way I think about self-care in a way because it is about listening to the subtleties, and how all of that gets lost when there is a lot going on. Once I really started refining my diet, routine, relationship to my energy, my intuition, etc... I started to really be able to notice those subtle changes and messages my body was sending me, and as time goes on I keep going deeper and deeper. Its like in Martins paintings, when color is introduced, it feels monumental. Like for me, bananas are just too sweet now. Knowledge -- You are well-versed in so many amazing practices! Could you tell us a little bit about each of them: – Your art (would love to know more about your process on the mineral paintings) After graduate school I started making my own watercolors out of historical pigments, mostly from minerals and some earth pigments. I taught myself how to make paints the way they were made for centuries before there were synthetic colors. The mineral monochromes are just one aspect of the work I make, and they are about many things. But, the main ones are a redirection of how we think about representation. I think of them as representational paintings, as they are made of the very thing they are depicting: malachite, azurite, agate, epidote... They are also about an interest in the healing powers of art. They are made with the intention that the viewer and the space receive the same healing properties of the minerals and the earth from which they are sourced. I usually pair them with a highly rendered graphite drawings or watercolors. –  Fields of Study and mineral meditations Some years back after teaching meditation for a bit I was longing for an alternative to what I was seeing in the ways of spiritual teachings and mediation work, both in approach and aesthetic. I wanted to support people and teach them tools they could use in their every day life, while also creating a container for all the things I was interested in and all the things that I brought into my own spiritual practice, which I feel I am always shaping and discovering. Something that would allow for a deep conversation that also had breadth, and was based in every day life and could be accessible. Something that could be malleable and evolve as I did. And Fields of Study was born. I originally wanted to open up a non-profit space that would be like a modern day community center with classes and workshops for the community, as well as have a little shop and a residency space. And someday this might happen. But for now its just me – working to change the world, one person at a time. I say this with some humor, but its also a very real desire to be in service and help instigate change. The same goes for how I teach about minerals, I want to present an alternative, something that resonates with me and represents how I grew up with minerals in my home because of my mother, who was a silversmith. The goal of all those workshops is really to show people that they know more than they think they do, about most things, minerals included. And its not really about helping people feel like they know everything, but showing them that when they ask and they trust themselves they can source the answers. The participants really end up teaching the workshop, which I think is pretty amazing. – Your Moon writings I have been writing about the moon twice a month for about six years now. It really came out of a desire to understand its energy on a deeper level, and also to check in with myself about what I was feeling on a bimonthly basis. Its hard to take credit for the writing as I feel I have gotten to a place with it where I just sit down to write and something comes through me. As out there as that sounds, thats really what happens. I just listen as best as I can, I have gotten pretty good at listening. Writing in this way has really strengthened my intuition, its really incredible. Its also nice to get conformations from people when they write to tell me how right on it was for them. It reminds me that we are all connected. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Swimming in the ocean. The hot springs in Ojai or a trip to Joshua Tree. A bad movie. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Golden Bough and She by Robert A Johnson Song/­­Album – Gamelan Orchestra music, JD Emmanuel, and Neil Youngs album Harvest Moon, particularly Natural Beauty. Its my favorite song. Movie – The Color of Pomegranates Piece of Art – Fragonard, Brancusi, and John McCracken. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? Funny enough I just re-read this essay from The White Album where she talks about her packing list related to her being a journalist. At the very end she mentions that the one thing she never had was a watch, which she supposes is some reflection of the climate of the late 60s. But, a watch is the thing I always have, perhaps that says something about me and the times we are living in now. When I travel I also always wear this gold Victorian compass. You never know when you will have to find your way home. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? My Ayurvedic practitioner – Meredith Carter, my Homeopath – Alexis Smart, or anyone of the ladies on the @onigiriemoji Instagram feed I am a part of. Its a feed where a group of friends post what they are cooking and eating. Also, I wish you could have interviewed my mum, she was the best cook, I wish I learned more about cooking from her. Photos by Lauren Spencer King, Claire Cottrell and from Lauren’s shop. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Cherry Blueberry Crisp – No Bake

August 7 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Cherry Blueberry Crisp – No BakeEasy 1 Pot No Bake Cherry Blueberry Crisp. Seasonal Berries cooked to a compote and topped with Toasted Crisp Oat crumble. Serve with favorite ice cream. Vegan Berry Crisp Recipe. Can be gluten-free, nut-free. It has been hitting 90s this past week in the PNW. Who wants to bake in this heat! I made these stove top No Bake crisps the other day and they worked out amazingly. I generally use whichever berries I have on hand. For this post I used cherries and Wild blueberries.  The blueberries add an amazing color and flavor with the tangy cherries. Use any seasonal berries of choice. The crisp is Easily made gluten-free with oat flour or other gluten-free flour. You can also bake the mix for 30 to 40 minutes. Easy, Gorgeous and perfect to use up all the fruit. 1 Skillet and 30 Minutes to Berry Bliss. Continue reading: Vegan Cherry Blueberry Crisp – No BakeThe post Vegan Cherry Blueberry Crisp – No Bake appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Make & Freeze Quinoa Pancakes with Strawberry Compote

January 15 2017 Oh My Veggies 

These fluffy pancakes are made with a mixture of quinoa and whole wheat pastry flour, and served with a slightly sweet strawberry compote. The best part? Everything is freezer friendly!

Blueberry Brownies

August 8 2016 Vegan Richa 

Blueberry BrowniesDouble Blueberry Brownies. Dark Chocolate Brownies with blueberries and almonds. Blueberries cooked to a compote in the wet and blueberries added with chocolate chips in the batter. Vegan Brownie Recipe. Easily made gluten-free. Pin this post for later! Loads of gorgeous juicy blueberries in the house this summer = Blueberries in brownies! These brownies have blueberries in the wet as a compote As well as whole fresh blueberries folded into the brownie batter! Its a chocolate brownie + blueberry muffin + decadence all rolled into one. Depending on the moisture content of the berries, the brownies can turn out caky if the compote is not cooked long enough. Cook the compote to thicken, melt chocolate in it, fold in the dry, drop into a brownie pan and bake. Cool, slice, serve with vegan ice cream of choice. I served these with So delicious mocha almond fudge. mmm, so good! The brownies get fudgier and blueberrrier after sitting for a few hours. Use any seasonal berries or cherries of choice for variation.  And since it is warm, don’t forget the vanilla ice cream on top while attending to the puffball named chewie.  Continue reading: Blueberry BrowniesThe post Blueberry Brownies appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops with a Chocolate Core

July 31 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops with a Chocolate Core This week, I wanted to re-create my favorite Ben & Jerry’s ice cream flavor, making it vegan (though B&J came out with their own non-dairy ice cream, which is so awesome) and nutritious with the addition of a few energizing superfoods. Another thing I know people can’t get enough of in B&J’s ice cream are their decadent cores, so I went ahead and gave these Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops a chocolate core to really drive the point home. If you’re wondering why the pops are minty-colored, it’s due to the addition of spirulina, along with other nutritionally dense ingredients like hemp hearts and cacao nibs. A bonus – no ice-cream maker is needed for these. Moving to the U.S. from small-town Russia in the 90s and going to a Ben & Jerry’s ice cream shop for the first time was completely mind-blowing because a) back home, we did not have dedicated ice cream shops, b) ice cream flavors I grew up with were very basic and I had never seen so many extensive flavor options c) they sold little tubs of ice cream to take home, which was unheard of in Russia at the time d) everything tasted incredibly decadent and delicious. So here’s my B&J tribute, as a thanks for opening my eyes to possibilities I didn’t know existed. Read on for some weekend links and have a peaceful Sunday. Kids Taste-Test the New Ben & Jerry’s Vegan Ice Cream  Essentials – since we get many questions about our chosen kitchen and photography tools, we’ve made a page with links to all our favorite and most-used products – Kitchen Tools here, Photography here (also working on a round-up of favorite health-related books/­­cookbooks and natural beauty!) The Sad, Sexist History of Salad – Americans, in particular, strongly associate healthy or light foods, such as salad, chicken, and yogurt, with women, and unhealthy or heavy foods, such as beef, potatoes, and beer, with men, both men and women preferred unhealthy foods with masculine packaging and healthy foods with feminine packaging. Fascinating. The World’s Most Innovative Companies in 2016 – according to Fast Company Julia Turshen on the One Part Podcast – loved this, especially her point on asking for credit/­­compensation – if you don’t ask, you will never know what the possibilities are. You may know Turshen from co-authoring Gwyneth Paltrow’s cookbook, along with many others. Cannot wait for her own cookbook to come out. Meryl Streep: A League of Her Own, also, Taste of Streep!? Obama After Dark – how one can average only 5 hours of sleep a night AND run the country is beyond me, also Obama Sets the Record Straight on His 7-Almond Habit :) About Us – we’ve updated our about page a bit, with very important info like our zodiac signs ;) Snapchat – follow @golubkakitchen for all behind-the-scenes Superfood Cherry Garcia Pops with a Chocolate Core   Print Serves: 7-10 pops Ingredients for the cherries 1 heaping cup cherries - pitted and halved 1 tablespoon maple syrup 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder 1 tablespoon water for the spirulina mix 1½ cup raw cashews - soaked for 2-4 hours 1 cup canned unsweetened full fat Thai coconut milk 3 tablespoons maple syrup or more to taste ½-1 tablespoon spirulina powder ½ tablespoon vanilla extract ½ teaspoon xanathan gum or 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder (optional) 1 tablespoon shaved dark chocolate or raw chocolate 1-2 tablespoons cacao nibs for the chocolate core ⅓ of the spirulina mix 2 tablespoons shaved dark chocolate or raw chocolate 3 tablespoons raw cacao powder for the pops 7-10 tea cups, small glasses or pop molds neutral coconut oil for oiling the cups spirulina mix (recipe above) chocolate core (recipe above) 7-10 wooden sticks - soaked for 2 hours or overnight hemp hearts cacao nibs Instructions to prepare the cherries Combine cherries with maple syrup and bring to a boil in a small saucepan. Reduce the heat to a simmer and simmer for 2 minutes. Combine arrowroot powder with water in a small bowl and add to the saucepan, while stirring. The cherry compote should thicken slightly. Remove from heat and let cool. to make the pops Make the spirulina mix. Drain and rinse cashews and put into an upright blender, preferably high-speed. Add coconut milk, maple syrup, spirulina, vanilla, and xanathan gum/­­arrowroot powder, if using and blend until smooth. If not using a high-speed blender, optionally strain mixture through a fine-mesh strainer for the most smooth and velvety texture. Spoon about ⅓ of the spirulina mix into a medium, heat-proof bowl and set aside. Add shaved chocolate and cacao nibs to the blender with the remaining ⅔ of the spirulina mix and pulse to combine briefly. Transfer the mixture into a separate bowl, then fold in the cherries. Make the chocolate core. Place the reserved ⅓ of the spirulina mix onto a double boiler, add chocolate and let it melt, stirring to incorporate. Remove from the heat, add in cacao powder, mix to combine and let cool. Make the pops. Oil your cups/­­molds generously with coconut oil and spoon the spirulina-cherry mix in, leaving a well in the center for the core. Spoon the chocolate core into the well. Even out the surface and insert the wooden stick. Repeat with the rest of the pops. Freeze until completely firm. Prepare a plate with cacao nibs and hemp hearts for coating, along with a parchment paper-covered surface for placing pops onto. Take cups with pops out of the freezer and place into a dish with hot water for a minute, for easier removal. Remove popsicles from cups, pulling them out by the sticks. Dip the top of each pop into the prepared hemp/­­cacao nib mixture and press gently to make the pieces stick. Place onto a parchment paper-covered surface and keep frozen until ready to eat. Take the popsicles out of the freezer 5-10 minutes prior to eating. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Barley Tomato Salad Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream -- Ice Cream Sunday Mung Bean Falafel Bowl with Pickled Rainbow Chard Rose and Lavender Parfait and a Breakfast with Friends .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops with a Chocolate Core appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Pittsburgh Joins Meatless Monday Movement

May 9 2016 Meatless Monday 

Pittsburgh Joins Meatless Monday MovementFor a city once enamored with hot sausage sandwiches, pierogis, and 25-cent wings specials, Pittsburgh has just made a huge leap. Understanding the impact that reducing meat consumption has on sustainability, the environment, and public health, Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto has recently signed an official proclamation recognizing every Monday in 2016 as Meatless Monday! This comes on the heels of a Meatless Monday proclamation in November of 2015. Pittsburgh now joins millions around the globe in the Meatless Monday initiative founded by Sid Lerner and Johns Hopkins University to promote cutting out meat one day a week. As part of the citys Live Well Pittsburgh program, the proclamation has given added boost not only for locals to think more about wellness but also for chefs to get more creative. Although Meatless Monday first kicked off in 2003, most Pittsburghers hadnt been aware of it. To change that, a small group of dedicated citizens, including Leila Sleiman of Justice for Animals, Natalie Ahwesh of Humane Action Pittsburgh, and Christin Bummer of Beans not Bambi, gathered together to inspire more veg options in mainstream restaurants as well as at cafeterias in schools, universities, and hospitals throughout the Steel City. Already on board is an impressive group of partners, including Carnegie Mellon University, University of Pittsburgh and Live Well Allegheny (a county-wide initiative to educate residents about making healthier lifestyle choices). The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Passavant, continually recognized as one of Americas Best Hospitals, now features Meatless Monday options and other affiliates are expected to follow. In September, 2016, schools in Mt. Lebanon are also planning to launch Meatless Monday. Though Pittsburgh had generally been a meat-and-pierogi kind of town, thousands of Pittsburghers did show up for the citys first annual Pittsburgh VegFest in August, and more are expected this summer for 2016! Pittsburgh is a progressive city, says Sleiman.  So many people are ready to make changes, and want to be healthier and more environmentally friendly- they just didnt know where to start. Some Pittsburgh restaurants have already welcomed the proclamation with inventive expertise. Mexi-Casa, a Tex-Mex restaurant in Dormont, long devoted to fresh and healthy ingredients, has initiated a new Meatless Monday menu loaded with vegetarian and vegan options. Café Phipps, located at the Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens and recognized by Food & Wine magazine as one of the Best Museum Restaurants, has added Meatless Monday options to its already local, organic, and sustainable menu, featuring vegetables and herbs from its own rooftop garden. The Meatless Monday Pittsburgh Facebook page regularly showcases other local restaurants bursting with Meatless Monday creativity. Some of the best, offered at the Chateau Cafe & Cakery, include: the “Berry Manilow, a triple berry compote with toasted almonds and Brie cheese options on sweet onion bread, and the “Brussel Crowe, a panini packed with shaved Brussel sprouts and caramelized onions. Who said Pittsburghers cant combine healthy and humor? We want to make it as easy as possible for our fellow citizens to live compassionate, healthful lives, Ahwesh says. It just seemed like the right time to introduce it citywide. We are so happy the Mayor was supportive. Want to get Meatless Monday going in your community or city? Learn how to start a campaign here or contact us at info@meatlessmonday.com. The post Pittsburgh Joins Meatless Monday Movement appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Plum Compote Apple Crumble

August 11 2015 Vegetarian Times 

1 | Preheat oven to 325°F. Brush 9-inch square baking dish with 1 tsp. butter. Add apples and Plum Compote to baking dish, and stir to combine. Pour 1 tsp. butter over top. 2 | Whisk together almond flour and confectioners sugar in medium bowl. Stir in remaining melted butter until mixture clumps together. Sprinkle over plum mixture. Bake 30 minutes, or until crumble is browned. Let stand 15 minutes before serving

Teen Chefs Win Scholarships with Meatless Monday Recipes

June 8 2015 Meatless Monday 

Teen Chefs Win Scholarships with Meatless Monday RecipesCareers through Culinary Arts Program (C-CAP) is a national non-profit thats been transforming lives for 25 years, helping prepare high school students for college, and careers in the restaurant and hospitality industry. Several years ago C-CAP teamed up with Meatless Monday to create a contest for high school seniors across the country aspiring to be future famous chefs: create innovative meatless recipes and win college scholarships. This years challenge was to create a recipe that turns a traditionally meat-based dish into a healthy plant-based dish. Students became head chefs in their classrooms, working with their culinary arts teachers to convert meat-based recipes by exploring and applying new cooking techniques and using vegetables, grains, and legumes as the basis of their dishes. Many were inspired to transform their family’s favorite meat dishes into healthier vegetarian options. The recipe submissions were judged on originality, flavor, healthfulness, ease of preparation, and writing ability. The judges evaluating the submissions for the C-CAP Meatless Monday Makeover Recipe Contest were: o  Kelvin Fernandez: Executive Chef, La Marina restaurant NYC o  Jason Weiner: Executive Chef, Almond, NYC and Bridgehampton o  Diana Rice, RD, Meatless Monday Recipe Editor o  Scott Uehlein, Corporate Chef, Canyon Ranch. And the 1st prize, a $5,000 scholarship went to... Jenna Kraus! For her Spaghetti and Meatballs Take #2. Jenna, a senior at Barry Goldwater High School in Arizona, used spaghetti squash as an alternative to pasta and replaced the ground meat with walnuts. The walnuts provided a similar texture and meaty aspect while making the dish vegetarian. In addition to the scholarship, Jenna and her teacher also won an all-inclusive stay at Canyon Ranch in Tucson, Arizona, where theyll be able to experience healthy cooking practices first-hand from Corporate Chef Scott Uehlein. 2nd prize, a $3,000 scholarship, went to Jacob Trinh from Delaware County Technical School in Philadelphia. His Cajun-plant Tacos are a spin on the classic fish tacos, only he replaced the fish with meaty eggplant. 3rd prize, a  $2,000 scholarship, went to Jonathan Hernandez from DuVal High School in Washington, D.C.  Jonathans Quinoa Veggie Burger with a Sweet Tomato Compote was a twist on the classic American hamburger, only using the high-protein grain quinoa instead of beef. “Through this contest, student chefs were guided by their teachers on recipe writing and development and were able to showcase their talent creating exciting meatless recipes,” enthused C-CAP president Susan Robbins. “We greatly appreciate The Monday Campaigns providing high school seniors with the opportunity for scholarships while promoting healthy eating in high schools and communities throughout the nation.” Sid Lerner, founder of the Meatless Monday movement, reiterated his support for the contest. We’re thrilled to team up with C-CAP for the annual recipe contest. Our goal is to motivate aspiring chefs to create tasty and healthy meatless meals. This year, we challenged C-CAP students to convert traditional meat-based dishes into meatless versions. We are excited for America to taste the winning C-CAP students’ imaginative meatless renditions.” Make these delicious recipes from the talented young chefs part of your Meatless Monday by clicking here. And youll be able to say, when they go on to become famous chefs at exclusive restaurants, that you sampled some of their earliest work. Acknowledgment:  Thank you to Ronzoni for its product contribution to the schools. The post Teen Chefs Win Scholarships with Meatless Monday Recipes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

3 x Breakfast Oatmeals & Copenhagen

July 9 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

3 x Breakfast Oatmeals & Copenhagen Even though we have posted countless porridge recipes on this blog - baked, soaked and cooked - we recently realized that we never have posted one of our standard breakfast oatmeals. Oatmeal is one of the most common breakfasts for us on early weekday mornings. It’s quick to make and you only need one ingredient for the most basic recipe. But it can also be prepared in endless varieties depending on season and preference. You can cook oats with water, fruit- or vegetable juice or any kind of milk. And you can either stick to just rolled oats or mix them with quinoa flakes, rye flakes, chia seeds, linseeds or any other kind of seed. We have shared three different set-ups here. One with oat and rye flakes cooked on carrot juice, one standard oatmeal cooked with coconut milk and the last one has egg added to the oatmeal for a protein boost. We have also used different toppings on them. Berries, dried fruit, seeds, nibs, compotes, nut butters and even vegetables are often added to our oatmeals. Remember that the actual oatmeal is only 45 percent of the experience. The most important part are the toppings. So don’t be shy, build mountains of different toppings. We’d love to see your oatmeal creations on Instagram. Hashtag it  #gksbreakfast so we wont miss out on anything. To be on the safe side you could also tag either David:  @gkstories or Luise:  @luisegreenkitchenstories.  Were looking forward to see what you come up with! We were inspired to do this post about oatmeals after our recent visit to the Copenhagen porridge restaurant Gr?d. They serve both sweet and savory porridges and going there feels just like coming home, as they share our love for these warm grainy bowls. The carrot oatmeal further down is similar to something we had there. We have also put together a list of our other favorite places in Copenhagen, in case some of you plan a visit during the summer. Copenhagen Eating Guide The A la Menthe - Morroccan cafe with amazing vegetarian lunch or dinner platters and of course fresh mint tea. R?dhusstraede 5 (near Str?get) 1466 Copenhagen K Bang & Jensen - Cool cafe with traditional danish food with a trendy twist. Istedgade 130, 1350 Vesterbro Höst - Beautiful restaurant with a modern nordic cooking style - N?rre Farimagsgade 41, 1364 Copenhagen K 42 Raw - Our favorite Raw food cafe in Copenhagen with great food, breakfast, desserts, smoothies and juices. Pilestraede 32, 1112 Copenhagen K Simple Raw - Cute little Raw food cafe with delicious food. Try their brunch or lentil burger. Oehlenschlaegergade 12, 1663 Vesterbro Morgenstedet - Organic cafe at Christiania, great homemade food! Christania, 1440 Copenhagen K Parterre - Cute little cafe with danish and french pastries, lunches and cakes, beautiful location by the water. Ovengaden Oven Vandet 90, 1415 Christianshavn Gr?d - A cafe that only serves porridges, sweet and savory. Very delicious and top quality. Jaegerborgsgade 50, 2200 N?rrebro or Torvehallerne, Linnésgade 17, 1362 Copenhagen K Atelier September - Old antique store turned into a cafe. The food is simple tasty danish/­­french food. Freshly squeezed juices and good coffee. Gothersgade 30, 1123 Copenhagen K Rist Kaffebar - A coffee shop with a great atmosphere and nice food. Vaernedamsvej 4b, 1619 Vesterbro Café Granola - Charming cafe in the most charming street in Vesterbro. Try their brunch. Vaernedamsvej 5, 1619 Vesterbro Isvaerket - Organic ice cream bar. Stefansgade 15, 2200 N?rrebro Laundromat - A cafe where you can also bring your dirty laundry. They also have a large play corner for kids. Elmegade 15, N?rrebro or ?rhusgade 38, ?sterbro or Gammel Kongevej 96, Frederiksberg C Anne’s Gademad – Homemade take away dinner. Vegetarian option every day. Enghavevej 3, Vesterbro L?L? – Vietnamese restaurant with great vietnamese food with a modern twist. Vesterbrogade 40, 1620 Vesterbro   Oatmeal – 3 ways Protein Boosted Oatmeal Serves 2 1 cup rolled oats (certified gluten-free if you prefer) 2,5 cups water 2 eggs 1/­­2 tsp ground vanilla 1 pinch sea salt Topping: avocado, sliced raspberries, fresh or thawed frozen hemp seeds chia seeds quark yogurt Place oats, water, eggs, vanilla and salt in a small saucepan and bring to a simmer on medium to low heat. Stir to combine. Let simmer until the water is just absorbed and the porridge has thickened, about 3-4 minutes. Serve in bowls with with plant milk and toppings. Carrot & Rye Oatmeal Serves 2 1/­­2 cup old-fashioned rolled oats 1/­­2 cup old-fashioned rolled rye 1,5 cup carrot juice 1 cup water 1 pinch sea salt Topping: raisins flax seeds unsweetened apple sauce with grated fresh ginger (cook chopped apples, a little water and grated ginger until tender) cacao nibs Place oats, rye, carrot juice, water and salt in a small saucepan and bring to a simmer on medium to low heat. Stir until the water is just absorbed and the porridge has thickened, about 3-4 minutes. Serve in bowls with with plant milk and toppings. Sweet Coconut Oatmeal Serves 2 1 cup rolled oats (certified gluten-free if you prefer) 1,5 cup coconut milk 1 cup water 1 pinch sea salt Topping: almond & cacao nut butter (mix nut bitter and cacao powder) toasted desicated coconut toasted pumpkin seeds and sunflower seeds strawberries, fresh or thawed frozen raw hazelnuts, chopped goji berries Place oats, coconut milk, water and salt in a small saucepan and bring to a simmer on medium to low heat. Stir until the water is just absorbed and the porridge has thickened, about 3-4 minutes. Serve in bowls with with plant milk and toppings. Tip: For grain free options use rolled flakes of whole buckwheat, millet or quinoa.

Vegan Black Forest Shake

August 13 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Black Forest ShakeBlack Forest Shake. Summer Ice cream Blizzard with layers of Vanilla and Chocolate shake with cherry compote. Vegan Gluten-free Recipe. Can be nut-free. Add protein powder to make into black forest smoothie.    The heat has been creating all kinds of problems in the PNW, mainly trapping the smoke from the wildfires up north, which adds to the breathing issues. I think the oven has stayed off for about 4 weeks now which is a record.  No cookies or cakes means they get needed in alternate forms. Cookie Dough Blizzards or this Black Forest Shake.  Chocolate ice cream, frozen non dairy milk and some cherries blended in to make the chocolate cherry layer. Vanilla ice cream blended in for the creamy vanilla layer. Add some cherry compote between the 2 and boom! The shake can be easily made into smoothie or protein shake for breakfast with frozen banana instead of ice cream, some protein powder and seasonal fruits frozen. Easy and Amazing! Whats your favorite Summer Dessert?Continue reading: Vegan Black Forest ShakeThe post Vegan Black Forest Shake appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegan Almond Butter Mousse Strawberry Parfaits

May 11 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Almond Butter Mousse Strawberry ParfaitsVegan Almond Butter Mousse Strawberry Parfaits. Almond or peanut butter thickened into a mousse and layered with strawberries. 6 Ingredient PB & J parfaits. Vegan Peanut Butter Mousse, Gluten-free, Grain-free Coconut-free Recipe.   Right in time for Mothers Day! These parfaits are like peanut butter and jelly mousse cups. I use smooth almond butter to make a 5 ingredient mousse and layer it fresh strawberries and some graham cracker crumbs. Serve these with a drizzle of melted chocolate or a caramel sauce. So Good! You can also use some strawberry or other berry compote in combination with the fresh berries. The mousse is lightly sweet, so use ripe fruits or add a drizzle of vegan caramel. I was planning to make a peanut butter mousse pie and was wondering about how to reduce the fat in the mousse. To get that rich and creamy consistency, the options would be to blend good amount of soaked cashews or coconut cream with the nut butter or blend it with silken tofu. I accidentally heated up my test cup of nut butter mixed with almond milk instead of the chai cup and it thickened into this thick creamy and still a bit light mixture. So that is what makes the mousse layer in these parfaits. The mixture of nut butter and nondairy milk thickens on heating and sets beautifully when chilled.  These parfaits are perfect served layered or made into a bowl with chia seeds, other fruits and a chocolate or caramel drizzle. Make these your own. Easy, Delicious and Summery.Continue reading: Vegan Almond Butter Mousse Strawberry ParfaitsThe post Vegan Almond Butter Mousse Strawberry Parfaits appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake

September 21 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Concord Grape Fruit and Nut CakeThis post was created in partnership with Nuts.com I have a whole lot of cozy fall and holiday recipe ideas bouncing around in my mind, even though it’s still warm out and even though we are still enjoying the sweetest of summer tomatoes daily (I swear the yellow cherry tomatoes truly taste like candy this year). This transitional time is always exciting to me – all the fall produce brings back so many new or forgotten possibilities. I think autumn is much more of vegetable territory than summer – all the stone fruit and berries come in a quick, bright and happy flash, and before we know it, we are left with squash, roots, and sturdy winter greens. But there are still a few sweet gems like apples, pears, figs (fig recipe hopefully coming next week), and grapes to grace our fall cobblers, salads and such, and I plan to take full advantage of them this fall. If you’ve been sticking around this space for a while or have my cookbook, you might know about my love for Concord grapes. I can never resist them at the store or market, being completely mesmerized by the stunning, cloudy berries. Their flavor is lovely too – deep and concentrated, much like the color. The main issue with Concord grapes lies in their prominent seeds. There is no way around them, so I usually end up making juice or compote with Concords – anything where the seeds can be strained out. I did so for this fruit and nut cake, where a myriad of dried fruit is gently cooked in Concord grape juice to soften the fruit’s skin and infuse them with the grape flavor. It’s worth mentioning here that, in the absence of Concord grapes, you can use all kinds of fruit juice for this cake – regular grapes, oranges or even apples would make for a fine juice substitute. This cake is dense and punctuated by comforting flavors of toasted nuts, along with aromatic sweetness from dried fruit and Concord grape juice. A small slice goes a long way. There is no added sugar, as the dried fruit and grape juice bring plenty of sweet to the plate. This is the kind of cake that can serve many purposes. It would make for a perfect edible holiday present, whether brought whole to a festive potluck, or divided into smaller, rectangular cakes, wrapped, tied with a ribbon and gifted. Little squares of this cake would also make a nice addition to a fancy cheese plate, if you’re into that kind of thing. Or it can simply be enjoyed as a dessert at home – it keeps well refrigerated for a good amount of time, and a slice makes for a good component to a kid’s school lunch (or adult’s work snack!). You can get crazy with the decorating like I did here, or not decorate it at all, depending on the occasion. I’ve been shopping on nuts.com for years (since the days when they were still called nuts online) and was thrilled to collaborate on a post with them. All the dried fruit and nuts in this cake came from their online store, which made for extra-delicious results, because their products are consistently fresh and delicious. If you aren’t familiar with nuts.com, they are a family-owned, premium bulk nut and dried fruit supplier, and so much more than that, really. The business has been in the family for three generations now, starting with a stand at a farmer’s market back in 1929,  and they’ve built up an amazingly extensive catalogue of natural bulk foods. In addition to nuts/­­dried fruit, they carry grains, beans, flours, teas, snacks, superfood powders, spices, and more. I feel like a kid in a candy store when I’m on their website. Their dried fruit are the juiciest I’ve ever gotten anywhere, and both Paloma and I are hooked on their dried mango. They also freshly roast their nuts the same day they are shipped out to customers, which is just so cool. The best news is that Nuts.com has a great offer for GK readers – follow this link and choose four free gifts (like chia seeds, goji berries, hemp protein powder, habanero pistachios and more) to receive together with an order of $25 or more. Enjoy :) Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake   Print Serves: one 10 cake Ingredients for the cake (inspiration from At Home in the Whole Foods Kitchen) 4 cups mixed dried fruit - figs, prunes, apricots, raisins - chopped (no need to chop raisins) 4 Medjool dates or 6-8 regular dates - pitted and chopped 1½ cups freshly squeezed Concord grape juice or other fruit juice - hot 1 teaspoon cinnamon ¼ teaspoon nutmeg other spices such as ground cardamom, cloves and allspice - to taste (optional) 1 tablespoon vanilla extract (optional) 1¼ cup toasted almonds - ground ½ cup toasted hazelnuts - chopped ½ cup toasted pecans or walnuts - chopped neutral coconut oil or other vegetable oil for oiling parchment paper for the decoration (all optional) cashews pumpkin seeds pistachios pecans dried apricots dried lemon slices dried cantaloupe dried mango Instructions to make the cake Preheat oven to 300° F (150° C). Place 1½ cup of mixed dried fruit and all the dates into a medium bowl. Pour hot Concord grape/­­fruit juice over them, cover and let soak for 15 minutes. Place the remaining 2½ cups of dried fruit into a medium saucepan and set aside. Drain the soaked fruit into a strainer, over the saucepan with the dried fruit, pouring the soaking juice into the saucepan. Bring contents of the saucepan to a boil over high heat, adjust the heat to a simmer and cook until most of the juice is absorbed, about 8-12 minutes. Transfer the cooked fruit into a food processor, add spices and vanilla extract, if using, and blend until smooth. Transfer into a large bowl, add ground almonds and mix to combine. Stir in soaked fruit, chopped hazelnuts and pecans/­­walnuts, mixing well. Line a 10 cake pan with well-oiled parchment paper and press the fruit-nut mixture into the pan, evening it out with a spoon. Optionally, decorate with nuts and dried fruit to your liking. Bake for 1 hour, until firm. Let cool completely before slicing. The cake stores very well refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 2 weeks. Notes 1. In the absence of Concord grapes, any other grapes, oranges or apples can be used to make juice for this cake. 2. If you dont have a juicer for juicing grapes, blend them in a blender and strain through a fine mesh strainer to get rid of any seeds and skins. 3.5.3208 You might also like... 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Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops with a Chocolate Core - Ice Cream Sunday

July 31 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops with a Chocolate Core - Ice Cream Sunday This week, I wanted to re-create my favorite Ben & Jerry’s ice cream flavor, making it vegan (though B&J came out with their own non-dairy ice cream, which is so awesome) and nutritious with the addition of a few energizing superfoods. Another thing I know people can’t get enough of in B&J’s ice cream are their decadent cores, so I went ahead and gave these Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops a chocolate core to really drive the point home. If you’re wondering why the pops are minty-colored, it’s due to the addition of spirulina, along with other nutritionally dense ingredients like hemp hearts and cacao nibs. A bonus – no ice-cream maker is needed for these. Moving to the U.S. from small-town Russia in the 90s and going to a Ben & Jerry’s ice cream shop for the first time was completely mind-blowing because a) back home, we did not have dedicated ice cream shops, b) ice cream flavors I grew up with were very basic and I had never seen so many extensive flavor options c) they sold little tubs of ice cream to take home, which was unheard of in Russia at the time d) everything tasted incredibly decadent and delicious. So here’s my B&J tribute, as a thanks for opening my eyes to possibilities I didn’t know existed. Read on for some weekend links and have a peaceful Sunday. Kids Taste-Test the New Ben & Jerry’s Vegan Ice Cream  Essentials – since we get many questions about our chosen kitchen and photography tools, we’ve made a page with links to all our favorite and most-used products – Kitchen Tools here, Photography here (also working on a round-up of favorite health-related books/­­cookbooks and natural beauty!) The Sad, Sexist History of Salad – Americans, in particular, strongly associate healthy or light foods, such as salad, chicken, and yogurt, with women, and unhealthy or heavy foods, such as beef, potatoes, and beer, with men, both men and women preferred unhealthy foods with masculine packaging and healthy foods with feminine packaging. Fascinating. The World’s Most Innovative Companies in 2016 – according to Fast Company Julia Turshen on the One Part Podcast – loved this, especially her point on asking for credit/­­compensation – if you don’t ask, you will never know what the possibilities are. You may know Turshen from co-authoring Gwyneth Paltrow’s cookbook, along with many others. Cannot wait for her own cookbook to come out. Meryl Streep: A League of Her Own, also, Taste of Streep!? Obama After Dark – how one can average only 5 hours of sleep a night AND run the country is beyond me, also Obama Sets the Record Straight on His 7-Almond Habit :) About Us – we’ve updated our about page a bit, with very important info like our zodiac signs ;) Snapchat – follow @golubkakitchen for all behind-the-scenes Superfood Cherry Garcia Pops with a Chocolate Core   Print Serves: 7-10 pops Ingredients for the cherries 1 heaping cup cherries - pitted and halved 1 tablespoon maple syrup 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder 1 tablespoon water for the spirulina mix 1½ cup raw cashews - soaked for 2-4 hours 1 cup canned unsweetened full fat Thai coconut milk 3 tablespoons maple syrup or more to taste ½-1 tablespoon spirulina powder ½ tablespoon vanilla extract ½ teaspoon xanathan gum or 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder (optional) 1 tablespoon shaved dark chocolate or raw chocolate 1-2 tablespoons cacao nibs for the chocolate core ⅓ of the spirulina mix 2 tablespoons shaved dark chocolate or raw chocolate 3 tablespoons raw cacao powder for the pops 7-10 tea cups, small glasses or pop molds neutral coconut oil for oiling the cups spirulina mix (recipe above) chocolate core (recipe above) 7-10 wooden sticks - soaked for 2 hours or overnight hemp hearts cacao nibs Instructions to prepare the cherries Combine cherries with maple syrup and bring to a boil in a small saucepan. Reduce the heat to a simmer and simmer for 2 minutes. Combine arrowroot powder with water in a small bowl and add to the saucepan, while stirring. The cherry compote should thicken slightly. Remove from heat and let cool. to make the pops Make the spirulina mix. Drain and rinse cashews and put into an upright blender, preferably high-speed. Add coconut milk, maple syrup, spirulina, vanilla, and xanathan gum/­­arrowroot powder, if using and blend until smooth. If not using a high-speed blender, optionally strain mixture through a fine-mesh strainer for the most smooth and velvety texture. Spoon about ⅓ of the spirulina mix into a medium, heat-proof bowl and set aside. Add shaved chocolate and cacao nibs to the blender with the remaining ⅔ of the spirulina mix and pulse to combine briefly. Transfer the mixture into a separate bowl, then fold in the cherries. Make the chocolate core. Place the reserved ⅓ of the spirulina mix onto a double boiler, add chocolate and let it melt, stirring to incorporate. Remove from the heat, add in cacao powder, mix to combine and let cool. Make the pops. Oil your cups/­­molds generously with coconut oil and spoon the spirulina-cherry mix in, leaving a well in the center for the core. Spoon the chocolate core into the well. Even out the surface and insert the wooden stick. Repeat with the rest of the pops. Freeze until completely firm. Prepare a plate with cacao nibs and hemp hearts for coating, along with a parchment paper-covered surface for placing pops onto. Take cups with pops out of the freezer and place into a dish with hot water for a minute, for easier removal. Remove popsicles from cups, pulling them out by the sticks. Dip the top of each pop into the prepared hemp/­­cacao nib mixture and press gently to make the pieces stick. Place onto a parchment paper-covered surface and keep frozen until ready to eat. Take the popsicles out of the freezer 5-10 minutes prior to eating. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Peach, Honey and Thyme Lemonade Popsicles - Ice Cream Sunday Ramp Flatbread Pizza with Garlic Cream Black Sesame and Ginger Ice Cream Wild Blueberry Daisy Cake and a Cookbook Giveaway .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops with a Chocolate Core - Ice Cream Sunday appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits -- Ice Cream Sunday

June 5 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits -- Ice Cream Sunday This Sunday’s flavors are lavender, chocolate and tahini. I’ve talked about my love for lavender on this blog quite a lot, and it’s hard not to sound like a bit of a broken record, but this small flower really does hold a special place in my heart (I cannot wait to make this milkshake and tart sometime this summer). I’m sharing my go-to vegan lavender ice cream recipe with the addition of rich and decadent chocolate-tahini bits. It has a creamy, luxurious texture, which combines so well with the refreshing flavors of lavender and chewy, bittersweet pieces of chocolate. Read on for some weekend links + a few more snaps, and enjoy your Sunday. Rachel Roddy’s Instagram – author of the Five Quarters cookbook shares snaps from her very Italian kitchen. Love the ‘real’ photography style and all the beautiful produce/­­dishes (also, her recipes at The Guardian). Aquafaba – have you tried cooking with it yet? I haven’t, but gearing up to. Olafur Eliasson – loved this feature on him and cannot wait to check out his cookbook, Food is more important than art. You die from not having food. You die from not having art, too--just not as fast. Ingredients in an all natural banana do not sound as natural as one would think – a fun infographic, plus blueberry and coffee bean Claire Cottrell on Apiece Apart Woman – enjoyed this interview and photos (love her Instagram as well) I found this to the point Q&A about antibiotic resistance to be very clear and helpful Things the world’s most and least privileged people say – for some perspective Blog Love – turmeric honey almond butter, vegan onigiri, white chocolate mousse with strawberry compote Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients for the chocolate tahini bits ½ cup dark chocolate chips or chopped chocolate ¼ cup tahini pinch of salt for the lavender ice cream 2 cans full fat Thai coconut milk ¼ cup plus 1 teaspoon dried lavender flowers ¼ cup maple syrup ½ teaspoon xanthan gum or 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder handful blueberries - for color (optional) Instructions to make the chocolate tahini bits In a double boiler, combine chocolate, tahini and salt. Gently heat to melt and stir to achieve a smooth mixture. Prepare a parchment paper-covered tray or cutting board. Spread the chocolate over the parchment in a thin layer. Place in the freezer to harden until ready to use. to make the ice cream In a medium saucepan, combine coconut milk and ¼ cup lavender. Bring to a boil over a medium-high heat, reduce to a simmer and let cook for 5 minutes. Remove from heat, let cool to a room temperature and strain. In a blender, combine the lavender milk with the remaining 1 teaspoon of lavender flowers, maple syrup xanthan/­­arrowroot, blueberries if using, and blend until smooth. Place the mixture in the refrigerator and let cool thoroughly, preferably overnight. Process in an ice cream maker for 20 minutes or according to the manufacturers instructions. When the ice cream is almost done, remove the hardened chocolate out of the freezer and chop. Add to ice cream machine with the motor still running. Spoon ice cream into a container. Serve immediately as soft serve or place the ice cream in the freezer for 4 hours/­­overnight to harden. Remove from freezer 5-10 minutes before serving to let soften. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Melon Basil Summer Rolls Raw Summer Fruit Samosas and a Guest Post for My Sweet Faery Kohlrabi Avocado Salad Raw Chocolate Layer Cakes with Black Cherry and Orange .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits -- Ice Cream Sunday appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

8 Reasons Why You Skip Breakfast (and Recipes to Help You Stop)

September 22 2015 Vegetarian Times 

8 Reasons Why You Skip Breakfast (and Recipes to Help You Stop)As you read in our article, 15 Reasons You Should Be Eating Breakfast, the first meal of the day really is important. Yet, 31 million Americans are skipping breakfast every day, according to The NDP Group. We get it. There are plenty of reasons why you ditch breakfast. Whatever your excuse, you’ll love these recipes that can solve all of your problems and get your breakfast routine back on track. Problem: Im short on time in the morning. You’re rushing to get to work or busy getting the kids off to school, and you don’t have a lot of time to make breakfast. Solution: Check out these tasty recipes that take less than 30 minutes to make. Southwestern Tofu Scramble Southwestern Tofu Scramble Black Bean Breakfast Burrito with Plantains and Mango Salsa Problem: No really - I have zero time. Solution: Okay, not a single second to spare? Make a batch of these muffins in advance, and eat them all week. Banana-Flax Breakfast Muffins Morning Muffins with Quinoa and Flax Summer Squash and Applesauce Muffins   Problem: I get up and go – no time to eat at home.  Solution: Make these wraps the day before, and take your breakfast to go. Fruity Peanut Butter Wraps   Breakfast Pita with soy sausage and shredded soy cheese   Problem: Breakfast foods seem to be loaded with gluten, and I’m trying to eat gluten-free. Solution: Try these scrumptious recipes that won’t make you miss gluten at all! Gluten-Free Blueberry Muffins  Gluten-Free Brown Rice Waffles   Problem: Im just not hungry in the morning. Solution: If you aren’t hungry when you wake up, opt for something small and light. One idea is to whip up a quick smoothie. Try… Blueberry-Cucumber Smoothie   Avocado Mango Smoothie   Problem: Im not into breakfast foods. Solution: Pancakes, cereal, and muffins are great, but there’s much more options you can call breakfast fare. Try these unique breakfast alternatives. Sinangag (Filipino Garlic Fried Rice) Classic Israeli Salad Problem: Im trying to cut calories and lose weight, and breakfast is an easy cut.  Solution: If you read our blog post on why you need to eat breakfast, you know that studies show people who do eat a healthy breakfast are more likely to maintain a healthier weight than those who don’t. Try these low calorie breakfasts instead of skipping it completely: Two Breakfast Tacos with Cheesy-Hemp Scrambled Tofu (Less than 325 calories) Breakfast Tacos with Cheesy-Hemp-Scrambled Tofu   Lemony Quinoa Breakfast Bowl with Earl Grey Strawberry Compote (Only 263 calories) Problem: Breakfast foods are just boring. Solution: Boring? Tell that to Breakfast Pizza or this bold, flavorful Breakfast Burrito. Breakfast Pizza   Breakfast Burritos   What suggestions do you have for those who don’t stick to eating breakfast?

Rhubarb is the New Strawberry {Rhubarb Ice Cream}

June 9 2015 seitan is my motor 

Rhubarb is the New Strawberry {Rhubarb Ice Cream} Last year, when my father visited us in Dresden, he brought a box of strawberries from a grocery store around the corner. “Those aren’t good. You should not buy them,” I said. He tasted a berry and replied that they weren’t too bad. “But they are terrible compared to those we can get at home in our village!” I guess ten kilograms of childhood memories came out with that sentence. When we were children my dad would buy fresh strawberries on Sundays. Sometimes we helped him wash and slice them, sometimes he would even let us whip the cream. Nothing was better than those fresh strawberries. We ate them straight from the plant if we got the chance. For example during our bike rides, when we picked some at the edge of a field. Or when we emptied the patches in our neighbour’s garden. All these memories came back when I told my father that the strawberries here in the city weren’t good. He disagreed. He told me that the fruits back home weren’t that much better anymore. He even thought they were worse. I didn’t believe a word of what he said. That simply couldn’t be true. During this years Pentecost vacation F and I made a trip to my parents’ place. My father picked us up from the main station in Bremen. On our car ride to my parents’ village, we drove by several strawberry fields. I got exited and mentioned something about eating them for breakfast every day. My father said I should probably find something else to eat. They had changed the breed a couple of years ago, he elaborated. Those berries weren’t worth the trouble anymore. Yes, they kept well but most of the flavour was gone. Why would he say that? Some weird berry conspiracy theory? Did he not remember how we all loved to eat strawberries together? That he always would pick them up for us? The next day F and I prepared lunch. Suddenly my father stepped into the kitchen with a box of strawberries in his hand. I smiled. I told F that this would make such a wonderful dessert. Then I looked at the strawberries. They looked vary pale. I  asked my father, “Why did you bring these? Were the good ones sold out?” “No,” he replied. “They do all look like that now. I thought that if you tasted them you would finally believe me.” I was still in denial. I gave one to my daughter. “Taste it! The best strawberries you can get.” She tasted and then looked at me disgusted. I said: “But those are good.” It wasn’t true. I didn’t believe what I just said. I think I just wanted to share an important childhood memory with my daughter. But there was nothing to share. I was disappointed and those strawberries were just pale, sour, and watery. Okay, okay. Maybe this is all in my head. Maybe I am turning into one of these “everything was better in the old days” person now. Or maybe it was just the beginning of the season and I need to give those strawberries some more time to grow. There are other childhood memories to share or to improve. Like my relationship with rhubarb. This vegetable/­­fruit was something I mostly ignored when I was a kid. At least when it came to baked goods.  Our neighbours made tons of rhubarb cakes and many grown ups tried to trick me into liking it. They pretended it was great in desserts. They pretended it was sweet. But it wasn’t. There was never enough sugar in those cakes and a kilogram of whipped cream could not change that. Back then I thought those neighours wanted us to give up our sweet tooth. But that wasn’t true. Nobody tricked us. Rhubarb was something we did not appreciate very much.  We spent our afternoons stuffing our face with strawberries instead. Now that those strawberries are disenchanted I can finally appreciate the tartness of rhubarb. It’s now my daughter who refuses to eat it. But you can make very sugary things from rhubarb, too. Sugar can be used as a preservative, for example in jams. Or syrups.They are very simple to make and they can be kept in the fridge for 1 or 2 weeks. I made a batch for my ice cream recipe, but it’s also a base for refreshing lemonade. (Simply dillute it with (sparkling) water.) If you want something tarter, rhubarb compote is a great choice, depending on how much sugar you add. For my ice cream I didn’t use too much sugar, but if you want to pair the compote with oatmeal or grießpudding, you can double the amount of sugar used. Just adjust it to your taste. There are a couple of wonderful methods to make vegan ice cream, but I like to try something new from time to time. I admit it’s definitely not the easiest and fastest method to make ice cream. But I’ll also talk about a couple of  shortcuts in a minute. This version calls for whipped chickpea brine (called aquafaba), which improves the texture a lot and makes the ice cream light and easy to scoop. In fact, even after over a week in the freezer, this batch still had a consistency similar to soft serve. Since we’re  without an ice cream machine rightn now, I used my blender method for this recipe. That is a bit involved, but it will produce similar results to ice cream from a machine. If you thing this all sounds to complicated, I have a couple of ideas for you: You can leave out the aquafaba and make this into a “regular” coconut based ice cream. You can also use an ice cream machine, if you have one. If you wanto to use a machine and include the whipped aquafaba, churn the coconut milk and syrup mixture  and fold in the whipped chickpea liquid once the machine is done. Then proceed to freeze it, add the compote, and freeze until solid. If you don’t have an ice cream machine or a blender, make a simple semifreddo by combining the coconut milk and syrup mixture and the compote. Pour it into a container and freeze it until solid. Instead of scooping it out, you can slice it for serving. Another tip is to split up the workload and prepare both the syrup and the compote a day in advance. Print Rhubarb Ice Cream Ingredientsrhubarb syrup recipe only very slightly adapted from this recipe - For the syrup 500 g (4 cups) sliced rhubarb 240 ml (2 cups) water 250 g (1 1/­­4 cups) sugar juice from 1/­­2 lemon vanilla seeds scraped from 1 bean For the compote 200 g (1 2/­­3 cups) sliced rhubarb 100 g (1/­­2 cup) sugar For the ice cream 1 400 ml can full-fat coconut milk 2 tablespoons melted coconut oil or canola oil 50 g (1/­­4 cup) sugar 240 ml (1 cup) rhubarb syrup (see above) 60 ml (1/­­4 cup) brine from a can of chickpeas 50 g (1/­­4 cup) sugar a splash of lemon juice 1/­­2 a batch of rhubarb compote (see above) InstructionsTo make the syrup, combine sliced rhubarb and water in a small pot. Bring to a boil and cook until the rhubarb falls apart, about 5-10 minutes. Strain the liquid through a fine sieve and pour back into the (cleaned!) pot. (Discard the rhubarb pulp left in the sieve.) Add sugar, lemon juice, and vanilla. Boil for 10 minutes and make sure the mixture doesnt boil over. Let cool and pour into a sterilized jar. (Store leftovers in the fridge for up to two weeks.) To make the compote, combine rhubarb and sugar in a small pot and bring to a boil. Cook until the rhubarb falls apart. Set aside and let cool completely. To make the ice cream, combine coconut milk, oil, and sugar in a bowl and whisk. Add syrup and whisk again. Transfer to a shallow container such as a brownie pan and place in the freezer. Freeze for 2-3 hours, or until mostly solid. Once the coconut milk mixture is frozen, combine the chickpea brine and the remaining sugar. Whip the mixture with a hand held mixer or in a stand mixer until very stiff. This may take up to 10 minutes. You can add a splash of lemon juice to speed up the process. Cut the frozen coconut milk mixture into smaller pieces and transfer to a high speed blender. Blend until it has the consistency of soft serve. Pour into the chickpea fluff and fold the fluff into the coconut mixture until everything is smooth. Make sure to do this slowly and carefully. You dont want the chickpea foam to collapse too much. Pour into a container and freeze for another 2-3 hours. Fold in the rhubarb compote and freeze until solid. 3.1 http:/­­/­­www.seitanismymotor.com/­­2015/­­06/­­vegan-rhubarb-ice-cream/­­ Copyright (C)2015 All rights reserved. www.seitanismymotor.com Rhubarb is the New Strawberry {Rhubarb Ice Cream} is a post from: seitan is my motor

VegKitchen’s Ashkenazic Passover Favorites

March 19 2015 VegKitchen 

VegKitchen’s Ashkenazic Passover FavoritesVegKitchen’s vegan Passover Seder recipes and menus (great for vegetarians too) focus on the fresh produce of early spring. Here’s a full menu for Ashkenazic (Eastern European)-style recipes, from matzo ball soup to dessert. If you want even more choices, go to our Vegan Passover Seder Recipes and Menus. That’s where you’ll find tips for putting together a plant-based Passover Plate, as well. First up, and central to the celebration, Spring Vegetable Soup with Vegan Matzo Balls. Passover Mock Chopped Liver (made with cashews and mushrooms) can be served on matzo along with the soup, or before the meal as an appetizer. Eastern European-style Haroset (sometimes spelled charoset) is a sweet condiment served as part of the Passover Seder served with matzo. Its made essentially of apples, walnuts, and wine. Spinach, Leek, and Potato Matzo Gratin is a casserole main dish that’s mild and flavorful. Other vegan main-dish options: Eggplant Matzo Mina (similar, but more Sephardic inspired) and Passover Quinoa Pilaf. Serve any of the main dish options with a colorful salad of spring veggies. You can wing it, of course, but if you’re looking for an idea, try this refreshing Orange and Cucumber Salad with Spring Greens. Consider adding another holiday favorite to the plate if you want a slightly sweet touch. Passover Carrot-Apple Pudding is a holiday favorite. Another option is Sautéed Carrots with Almonds, which is more Sephardic-inspired. You might be too full for dessert, but there’s always room for a light fruit finale like Apple and Pear Fruit Compote. Serve with store-bought or homemade Chocolate Matzo Brittle. Happy Passover, happy spring, and enjoy!


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