coffee - vegetarian recipes

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Vegan Roasted Cauliflower Macaroni and Cheese

Vegan Lemon Poppy Seed Donuts

Grilled Vegetables and Halloumi Cheese Salad

Crispy Tofu Sandwiches with Ginger Peanut Sauce










coffee vegetarian recipes

Vegan Gingerbread Pear Bundt Cake

October 15 2018 Oh My Veggies 

I wanted to create a cake that embraced the season and its rich flavors. Bold gingerbread, sweet pears, a little caramel sauce swizzled over the top to bring it all together. Something that would work well as a mid-morning snack cake alongside a perfectly brewed cup of coffee, but would also be well-received by all as a special occasion dessert (Thanksgiving, anyone?) Initially, I thought of a few go-to vegan baking ingredients. Flax eggs. Almond milk. Coconut oil. But then my mind turned to one of my very favorite cakes, a cake I enjoyed often growing up, a cake I had no idea was vegan until a few years ago. It’s a rich, moist chocolate number called Wacky Cake, though growing up, we called it Crazy Cake – and we always enjoyed it with a dollop of whipped cream. So much for being vegan. Wacky Cake was reportedly created during the Great Depression, when staples such as eggs and milk were in short supply. Enterprising cooks dreamed up a cake that utilized vinegar and baking soda instead, creating bubbles that help the cake to rise. I thought I’d borrow that naturally vegan cake’s formula for this gingerbread version. Other than omitting the […]

Best Vegan Restaurants – Seattle

October 12 2018 VegKitchen 

Best Vegan Restaurants – Seattle Are you getting ready for a night on the town or just looking for a quick bite to eat? If youre vegan, it isnt as simple as walking into your nearest eatery. Fortunately, restaurants that cater to vegans are on the rise, and theres no better place to indulge than the hip city of Seattle. Seattle may have made its mark with coffee, but the citys vegan cuisine is nothing to scoff at, either. Check out some of the citys best vegan restaurants. 1. Plum Bistro For a sophisticated vegan take on comfort food favorites, locals love going to Plum Bistro. Handmade pizzas, gourmet burgers, and tempting entrees make this mouth-watering eatery a must visit when in the Seattle area. Dont miss out on the BBQ glazed plant loaf. This probably isn’t your mothers meatloaf, but it tastes just like home. Plum Bistro may not be one of the absolute best vegan restaurants Seattle has to offer, but it is a strong contender due to their numerous comfort food options. 2. Kati Vegan Thai If youre craving a little southeast Asian cuisine, you may want to head down to Kati Vegan Thai. The masterminds at Kati blend traditional Thai cooking methods […] The post Best Vegan Restaurants – Seattle appeared first on VegKitchen.

Best Vegan Restaurants - San Jose

October 11 2018 VegKitchen 

Best Vegan Restaurants - San Jose The San Francisco Bay Area is one of the best places in the US to be a vegan. The variety of vegan restaurants, cafes, bakeries, and eateries is stunning. Many non-vegan places also have vegan options on their menus. Where are the best vegan restaurants? San Jose has some of them. 1. Happiness Cafe Happiness Cafe is one fine eatery that ranks among the best vegan restaurants San Jose has to offer. It is located on Hostetter Road and is open every day of the week. This place is exclusively vegan and offers a wide range of delicious dishes. The drinks on the menu include a wide range of smoothies, freshly pressed juices, cold drinks, coffees, teas, and more. The food menu is made up of vegan sandwiches, snacks, rice and noodle meals, pasta, and salads. House specials include the waffle nugget and Phish and Fries--a vegan take on the classic fish and chips recipe. 2. Curry Up Now If youre up for Indian and Mexican street food, be sure to drop by Curry Up Now. The place is located on Zanker Road and opens up at 11:30 AM. They also take catering and online orders. Though primarily vegan/­­vegetarian, Curry […] The post Best Vegan Restaurants - San Jose appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegan Roasted Cauliflower Macaroni and Cheese

October 8 2018 FatFree Vegan Kitchen  

Vegan Roasted Cauliflower Macaroni and Cheese Last Monday morning, I was checking my blog comments, as I always do, when I found a new comment on my Easy Vegan Macaroni and Cheese: I was so surprised I nearly choked on my coffee. Not only had my darling daughter made my recipe, but she’d taken the time to leave a comment. And she’d correctly used a comma! This seemingly small thing meant  a lot to me as a mother, a food blogger, and a former English teacher.(...) Read the rest of Vegan Roasted Cauliflower Macaroni and Cheese (1,073 words) (C) svoisin for FatFree Vegan Kitchen, 2018. | Permalink | 9 comments Post tags: Casseroles, Cauliflower Magic Tricks, Pasta, Weight Watchers Points The post Vegan Roasted Cauliflower Macaroni and Cheese appeared first on FatFree Vegan Kitchen.

Soft and Chewy Granola Bars

September 21 2018 VegKitchen 

Soft and Chewy Granola Bars Here’s an easy-to-make vegan bar filled with chewy granola in a soft dough. It’s a kind of a cross between a granola bar and a blondie bar. Perfect as a mid-afternoon snack with coffee or tea, an on-the-go breakfast, or to pack in the lunchbox. Adapted from The Vegetarian Family Cookbook. Makes: 8 bars 3/­­4 cup whole wheat pastry flour 2 tablespoons hemp seeds, ground flaxseeds, or wheat germ 1/­­2 teaspoon baking soda Pinch of salt 2/­­3 cup applesauce 1 heaping tablespoon nut butter, optional 1 cup granola of your choice (homemade or store bought) 1/­­2 cup raisins or currants 1/­­2 cup vegan chocolate chips Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Combine the first 4 (dry) ingredient in a mixing bowl and stir together. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour in the applesauce and optional nut butter. Stir together until the wet and dry ingredients are completely mixed. It will be a stiff batter. Stir in the granola, raisins, and chocolate chips. Pour the batter into a lightly oiled 9- by 9-inch pan. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, or until a knife inserted into the center tests clean (aside from the melted chocolate). […] The post Soft and Chewy Granola Bars appeared first on VegKitchen.

Restaurant Highlight: Cloud Cakes In Paris

August 10 2018 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Walk down any road in France and your eyes will feast on an exciting array of pastries, tarts, cakes, and croissants of all shapes, colors, and sizes. The decadent scent of the French traditional pâtisseries can be heaven to the nose, but they can also be torture to minds of those who follow strict vegan diets. However, since Cloud Cakes was created in Paris, plant-based tourists can have their cake and eat it too while visiting France. Cloud Cakes is a purely plant-based coffee shop tucked into the trendy second arrondissement that specializes in vegan baking. During my month in Paris, this shop was a go-to for sweet tooth days. The first sunny afternoon that I arrived, my jaw dropped at the wide selection American-style desserts, from lemon berry cupcakes to Oreo cookie cake to strawberry-topped cheesecake. Sunlight streamed into the open doors, luminous on the chill blue walls and comfy couches, where visitors relaxed. I wondered, how did this little slice of fluffy decadence arrive in the city of foie gras? I spoke with the shops friendly owners, who explained that the shop originated as a once-monthly sweets stand in a vegan tent of a local market. Co-owner Aelita […] The post Restaurant Highlight: Cloud Cakes In Paris appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Kichadi: The Realistic Reset

January 16 2018 My New Roots 

Kichadi: The Realistic Reset Happy 2018 dear friends! I hope that you all had a restful and relaxing holiday, and that youre ready to take on the new year. As most of you know, the past few months have been all-over-the-place (literally) for my family and I, so Ive been giving myself plenty of freedom when it comes to what Im eating and how often Im exercising. With my regular routines out the window, Ive felt an immense sense of liberation - its great to let go once in a while! - but now its gotten to the point where my body is really craving some stability and grounding, especially after the holidays. Sometimes I like to go drastic and embark on a 10-day juice fast or something like it, but my body and my mind arent feeling a hard-core anything at the moment, so Im turning to kichadi to gently ease my way back into eating with more balance. Kichadi, sometimes called and spelled khichdi, kitchari, kitcheree or khichri, is the famous one-pot wonder Indian dish that combines rice and lentils or quick-cooking pulses or legumes, such as mung beans. Its best known in Ayurvedic tradition as a cleansing and complete protein meal, very easy to digest, and a cinch to make! It is delicious, super comfort food, and even if youre not down with eating the exact same thing for every meal for several days in a row, youll be thrilled to learn its also the perfect thing to tuck into on a cold winter night. Because of its simplicity and ease, many people find that doing a kichadi “mono-diet” is very pleasant and far less of an ordeal than a juice fast for example (although I need to be clear that a juice fast is far deeper and more effective). Taking three to seven days to eat this dish exclusively gives the digestive organs a serious break since kichadi is very easy to break down and assimilate. And because digestion is at the core of human health, putting a practice in place that supports this essential process makes room for the miracle of self-healing: something the body is constantly striving for, but often distracted from by poor dietary and lifestyle choices. When we forgo processed foods, alcohol, caffeine, and common allergens for a few days, we give our bodies the space it needs to do what it naturally does anyway: clean itself up! I like to eat a kichadi diet in the colder months when the weather is unfriendly and I need some reassuring, grounding, warm food - and juicing sounds about as fun as a hole in the head. Its also a wonderful way to glide yourself into the process of cleansing if youve never tried it before. Since it doesnt involve abstaining from food, most first-timers find it totally do-able, and dare I say it, enjoyable! Ive just completed three days of eating kichadi for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and Im feeling sooo much more balanced, clear-headed, and energized - the ways I would like to feel at the beginning of a brand new year! I hope that this simple and realistic reset is up your alley, and that you give it a go. First things first, youre going to need to do a bit of planning for the kichadi diet. Set a realistic goal for yourself - ideally youll be eating this dish for at least three days, up to seven, but if one is all you can handle, that is okay too. Since youre eating throughout this practice, going about your regular life is usually fine, but if you want to go the extra mile and give yourself a real treat, do the kichadi diet over a long weekend or break from work so that you can focus on some other cleanse-enriching experiences, such as a massage, a sauna visit, daytime napping, reading an actual book, and maybe even going offline completely. Gasp! I started my kichadi diet on a Monday and carried out my normal routine with work and family life, and just made sure to give myself lots of juicy personal time in the evenings (essential oil bath, yin yoga sesh, early lights out etc.). Aside from a cleanse-classic mood swing on the last day, no one around me even noticed what I was doing. Since they were too busy eating pizza.    Before you begin youll want to start by cutting back on alcohol, caffeine, sugar, meat, dairy, processed foods, and anything else you know is throwing you off balance. If you abstain from these things for at least a couple of days before you begin, your experience will be much smoother, as you won’t be distracted by gnarly withdrawal symptoms while you’re trying to chill. You can also add any bad habits you have to your hit list, and reduce or eliminate the daily practices that arent making your life extra groovy. Whatever day you are starting the kichadi on, soak the rice and pulses /­­ legumes together the night before. This step is important for improving the digestive qualities of kichadi, but if you are really pressed for time or you forgot, get them in water as soon as you can. Remember that even soaking for an hour is better than nothing! Cook the kichadi daily if possible, since the fresher the food is, the more energy, or prana it contains. My recipe makes about six servings for my appetite (eight for people who eat less) and I can easily stretch one batch over two days if no one else in my family wants it. Regardless, youll have to make at least two batches if youre going for three days, and I would not recommend keeping kichadi around for longer than that. Freezing is an option, but freeze it in the portion size youd want to eat so that youre not heating more than you need at one sitting.        Daily routine The night before: soak the rice and pulses together in plenty of filtered water overnight. Morning: upon rising, drink a large glass of warm water with freshly squeezed lemon juice, followed by another glass of pure water. Make your first batch of kichadi, and enjoy it for breakfast. Store leftovers in the fridge. Midday: Drink a couple large glasses of water at least 30 minutes before eating. Heat your desired amount of kichadi and enjoy it for lunch. Evening: Drink a couple large glasses of water at least 30 minutes before eating. Heat your desired amount of kichadi and enjoy it for dinner. Night time: Drink a cup of herbal detox tea if desired, enjoy something that nourishes you (bath, meditation, stretching) and go to bed early. Repeat for three to seven days. Kichadi Reset tips 1. Eat when youre hungry. This may seem like an obvious one, but many people eat according to the clock, instead of listening to their bodies. Take these days to really tune in and see when your body actually desires food, and how much you need to eat to feel satisfied. When you feel real hunger, your body is giving you the signal that it is actually ready to receive. 2. Cook mindfully. Remember that cooking is something to be grateful for. If you normally approach cooking from a lets get this over with standpoint, use this opportunity to make your meal prep a ceremony, and see it as a gift to yourself. Take your time washing and cutting vegetables, delight in the sound of the spices popping, the scent that wafts up while youre peeling ginger. The attention and intention you put into your food will come back to you, and nourish you in ways that you never thought possible. 3. Keep things interesting, by adding a squeeze of lime instead of lemon to your kichadi. You can use parsley instead of cilantro, and adjust the spices to suit your personal taste. If you really need some variety, top the kichadi with some of your favourite sprouts, grated raw carrot, or fold in some spinach while its still hot. 4. Cravings are normal, especially when youre knowingly depriving yourself! If you feel a craving coming on, first identify what the craving is. Be curious...maybe it has nothing to do with the food, but more your emotional or mental state. If you really cant shake the feeling, drink water first, then try a piece of fruit, or some raw veggie sticks. 5. Drink a lot of water. The body functions optimally when properly hydrated. It is especially important when were resetting, since were letting go of things that need to be flushed out. Water is essential to this process, but it will also prevent cravings, combat fatigue and brain fog, and keep the bowels moving. Remember to drink water away from mealtimes for optimal digestion (30 minutes before eating, 2-3 hours after unless youre very thirsty). Other beverages, even if they are mostly water like coffee and tea, are not water. Only water is water. After the Kichadi diet Although it is extremely tempting to celebrate and indulge after denying oneself certain things, this is not the best time to do so. Even though this process keeps your digestive system humming along, your body is still in a sensitive place. Introduce new foods slowly, and keep combinations small and uncomplicated (i.e. dont have a meal with 20 different foods together). Limit meat, dairy, sugar, and processed foods for as long as possible. That congratulatory slice of cake should wait until youre pretty much back to normal, or maybe even find an alternative ; )     Print recipe     Simple and Cleansing Kichadi Serves 6-8 Ingredients: 1 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee 1/­­2 Tbsp. cumin seeds 1/­­2 Tbsp. mustard seeds 1/­­2 Tbsp. coriander seeds 1/­­2 tsp. ground turmeric 1 cinnamon stick 1-2 Tbsp. minced ginger (to taste) 1 large tomato, chopped (optional) 2 medium yellow onion, diced 2 medium carrots, chopped 1 small /­­ 250g sweet potato (or other seasonal root veggie), chopped 1 cup /­­ 200g brown rice 1/­­2 cup /­­ 110g mung beans or brown lentils 1 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1 cup /­­ 140g green peas, frozen or fresh 4 cups /­­ 1L water (or more, as needed) a couple handfuls finely chopped cilantro lemon to garnish Directions: 1. If possible, soak the rice and pulses together overnight, or for 8-12 hours. Drain and rinse very well. 2. Melt the oil in a large stockpot. Add the cumin and mustard seed and fry just until the mustard seeds start to pop. Add the remaining spices, stir and then add the tomato and ginger (if youre opting out of the tomato, simply use a few splashes of water). Fry for a couple minutes until fragrant. 3. Add the onion, carrots, sweet potato, brown rice, mung beans, salt, and water. Bring to a boil, reduce to simmer and cook for about 45 minutes, until the rice and beans are soft. About five minutes before serving, add the peas whether fresh or frozen, and cook until they are warm. Add more water for a stew-y consistency, or if the pot becomes dry while cooking. 4. Serve kichadi hot, garnished with cilantro and a squeeze of fresh lemon juice. Give thanks and enjoy. I hope that many of you try the kichadi diet out, and rejoice in the fact that there is no need to do something radical and overly deprivational during the winter. This is a time for closing in, for being quiet and gentle, and nourishing oneself in a tender way. And remember, you can enjoy this delicious kichadi even for a day, and any season of the year when you need to find your equilibrium once again. Its a tasty way to come back to center, every time, anytime. In health, vibrancy, and abundance for the year ahead, Sarah B. Show me your kichadi on Instagram: #mnrkichadi The post Kichadi: The Realistic Reset appeared first on My New Roots.

Self-Care Interview Series: Satsuki Shibuya

December 17 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Satsuki Shibuya Satsuki Shibuya is an artist and spiritual thinker based in L.A. We are in awe of Satsuki’s intuitive watercolors, her constant willingness to go deeper, and her incredibly thoughtful approach to work and life as a whole. In this interview, Satsuki tells us about her morning, bedtime, and exercise routines, as well as love as a form of self-acceptance, what it’s like to see the energy of others, her unique approach to her life schedule, her mother’s universally wise beauty advice, the lifestyle change that helped clear up her skin, nourishment, stress, and so much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I find myself being right in-between, but veer on the side of things being more open and free within a loose schedule. It is dictated not so much by a 9-5 setting, but more dependent on what my body is communicating for the day. I’ve found that the more I am able to flow naturally, without resistance, better work is produced. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. My mornings are usually the same -- wake up sometime between 7 and 7:30am, wash up, meditate/­­journal/­­read for about an hour or some light gardening. Around 8:30am, start preparing breakfast for the household and eat while catching up on some articles online. By 10am, I am warming up to start the work day. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Not a bedtime ritual, per se, but I do find my biological clock the happiest when I am in bed by midnight. Any later and I will wake up feeling groggy. Unfortunately, some of the best messages come through from the Universe around this time and find myself writing clear into the witching hour. -- We read that you have a unique approach to your work schedule. Can you tell us about it and why it works for you? Sure. It’s not so much as my work schedule, but life schedule as a whole. As I am quite sensitive to energies, especially from people, as much as I love being with others, I also need a lot of down time to recharge, otherwise, burn out. The best balance I’ve found thus far is to have a point system where each time I am interacting with another, depending on the intensity, receives a particular number of points. For example, going to a doctor’s appointment would be 1/­­2 a point since there is not much interaction, overloading of the sensory system, and is one-on-one contact, which doesn’t require too much processing of different energies. On the other hand, if I am scheduled to do a talk or to meet people at a large gathering, it would be 2-3 points. The points correlate with how many days it might take me to recover and recharge. 1/­­2 point would be half a day of recharging afterwards whereas 2-3 points would be two to three days of recharging necessary after the event. Then, I go week by week and figure out how many points are available for social interactions. If a week is only 3 points maximum, then that might mean 1 meeting and 1 doctor’s appointment (1/­­2 point + 2.5 points) and the rest would be downtime, meaning minimal outside interaction. Depending on where my entire being is (body, mind, soul), the weekly points, or I usually go monthly, will fluctuate. If I am getting over a cold, there may only be so many points available to a week, but if balanced, there may be more available. When I first started this system, it was more rigid, but now, relaxed as it has become second nature. This helps not only to keep a balance, but also to set boundaries in order to create space in my heart. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Something light, centered upon veggies and fruits with some grains. I usually opt for some gluten free toast, an avocado with hummus, and either dried or freshly cut fruit or miso soup with rice. Light and simple. Lunch – The heaviest meal of the day and usually containing either a plant-based or animal-based protein. It can be anything from a rice bowl to a large salad, but usually a variety of ingredients. Snack – I have a soft spot for chips or crunchy nibbles so like to have something around 3:30pm and/­­or a piece of fruit. Dinner – A medium sized meal, usually Japanese-based, but other times adventure elsewhere. Mostly veggies and some protein, usually not much carbs as it tends to make the digestive system a bit sluggish before going to sleep. Some tea afterwards while doing dishes is always a treat. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I am not able to partake in caffeine as it makes my heart pitter-patter like no other, but do love the smell of coffee or English Breakfast tea.  -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to have a horrible sweet tooth where if I did not have at least one thing sweet each day around tea time, whether cake or a sweet bean bun, I would be the crabbiest crab of the land! I’ve since stopped eating sugar (going on 4 years now) due to health reasons and thankful for the difference in my health -- it is night and day! -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I see a Naturopathic Doctor regularly and through her, work with supplements, herbs, and tinctures/­­tonics, which do truly help to keep my body in balance. Otherwise, on my own, I find meditation, working with crystals, burning incense specifically from Ry?an-ji temple in Kyoto, and spraying Aura Cleanser from Botanical Alchemy works wonders for my overall well being and energy. I do know this formula may be different for each individual due to our aura body make-up, but currently, this program seems to work best. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I wouldn’t say I’m a gym bunny, but do love the feeling of working with the body/­­mind simultaneously and yoga seems to fit the bill quite nicely. Still a long ways to go, but hoping to be able to integrate yoga into my morning preparations for the day. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I wish I could say I love to exercise, but in truth, it does take a lot of willpower to get myself to do physical activities. I’ve never been very competitive in nature and therefore sports did not appeal as a possible opportunity for exercise, but since meeting yoga, feel I’ve finally found something that speaks to my spirit. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I believe the internal comes through to the external in all aspects -- if our organs are taken care of, our skin clears, if our emotions are balanced, our smiles appear, and when our soul is nourished, our being glistens. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Simple seems to be the way my entire being prefers things, including skincare for face and body. I’ve been a huge advocate for natural skincare and use one that consists of face wash, toner, moisturizer, Balancing Oil for night time and eye cream. Sometimes spot cream for blemishes and face scrub/­­face pack a few times a week. For body, I use a 5-ingredient, shea butter bar soap. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? No sugar. This alone has cleared up my blemish-prone skin considerably. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Nothing much, except for beauty advice my mother has shared since I was young, “Invest in your skin, trim your hair often, and moisturize your elbows.” I continue to follow her advice. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? I try my best to keep a balance in my schedule, not overload it with activities and make time to tune into my higher self. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? To close my eyes and tune into my breath. Speak slower. Concentrate on one happening at a time. To hide away in the bathroom for a few minutes and catch my breath. Check-in internally and focus on my root chakra. Ground my energies into Mother Earth. Also, to understand that nothing is permanent and the stressful situation, too, shall pass. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Eat shiitake mushrooms, drink a hot tea of lemon with manuka honey, down some bio-available vitamin C, up the liquids including broths, and consciously raise my energy. Also, lots of sleep. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? Work/­­life balance is key to my well-being. I continue to let go of rules that I have placed upon myself in order to feel complete in the world and instead, tune into what makes me feel whole. Saying yes to what resonates and no to the things that do not fulfill my spirit. My approach is to tune into my intuition and let it be the guide towards where I need to go next. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself. The simple answer to this is love. Not so much the cliché love we think of, but of accepting oneself for where we are currently and not force ourselves to be someone we are not. With acceptance, comes letting go and by letting go, we are able to fill in our space with a being entirely made up of our true selves. When this can be done, we are able to share love with ourselves and in turn, share love with others. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? To not worry about success in terms of monetary gain, but of spiritual awareness. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Allowing the lack of inspiration and procrastination to take me where I may go. Not to try and stop it, but to experience it fully and understand where it is originating. I don’t necessarily think it is a bad thing -- sometimes we need rest to appreciate our next step. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming a painter? After being on hiatus for a year and a half due to an unexplainable illness, I received a message to paint. After reconnecting back to my childhood self, of sensing and seeing beyond the physical realm, leaning into this part of my being opened up new ways of communicating beyond and through this, the message came through. -- Intuition plays a key role in your watercolor work. Why do you find it to be crucial to your approach? The medium has shown the necessity of letting go, trusting the process and understanding that there is more than what we can see in the physical realm. By approaching my work intuitively, it becomes almost meditative, channeling energies beyond and appearing as is, without any manipulation. -- Can you tell us a bit about the energy readings that you do? When did you discover that you have the ability to feel an individual’s soul energy and aura? It was by accident. I’ve always been able to read others’ energies and since young, would do so to the detriment of my own health. I found myself at the doctor’s office, when often, every other week, to which many times, no illness could be found. During my year and a half of being ill, I began to understand what I was sensing since young and honing in, began to receive messages in code. After deciphering many of these messages in my journal, I decided to share my internal self with my mother, who was in the dark about this internal world, to which she was extremely shocked. It took her a good week, after speaking with many of her friends who have known me since I was born, to figure out that she was actually the only one  not recognizing this ‘other self’. After coming full circle with my mother, during a gathering consisting of elder buddhist practitioners, which I attend with my mother from time to time, I shared my spiritual insights with the group. A woman sitting next to me whom I met for the first time that day, asked if I could read her energy. I’d never explicitly read another’s energy before and did not know what to expect, but agreed as I, too, was curious as to what would come forth. I saw images, colors, movie-like scenes, shapes, sensed emotions, all flashing, happening and shared, as if a translator, all I was seeing, experiencing simultaneously to her. After finishing, she looked at me and said, “How do you know all these things about me?” To which I said, “I don’t know. I just said what I saw.” Since then, I’ve done many energy readings and now have a better understanding of what happens during a session. I liken it to a translation of the other’s energy, subconscious, and higher self; sometimes beyond. What is important to note, though, is that all the things I see, sense, and share are things the individual already knows, whether consciously or subconsciously. I just bring it to the forefront and at times, help word it in a way so that the message can understood in the best possible way. -- Besides being a painter, you also write poetry, play music and make books. Do you feel that all these disciplines are interconnected for you, or do you treat them as separate entities? Yes, they are all interconnected, all coming from the same source, just expressed differently. I would say painting is the most direct form of expressing what I experience internally, without translation. The next being words -- a way of describing what I am experiencing. Music being another translation, although not as intuitive as painting or writing. Books are my passion and feel it is a way to leave energies in this world even after passing onto the other side. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I love watching Japanese comedy shows and dramas, while eating chips. In an ideal world, though, instead of chips, I would be eating a fruit tart. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Untethered Soul by Michael A. Singer Song/­­Album – All Things Must Pass by Rourourourous Movie – Laputa by Studio Ghibli Piece of Art – Any of the older pieces created by Agnes Martin -- What are your favorite places to eat in LA? Rice in Manhattan Beach -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? For carry-on: - a comfortable eye mask - slippers and socks - pressure point bands - iphone for listening to music and audio books - bottled water purchased after passing through security For suitcase: - jeans - sneakers - flat shoes that are a bit more dressy, but still comfortable - small travel pillow as I have a sensitive neck - food stuffs for my dietary needs (I have a many food allergies) - book, journal, pencil case - tshirts, long shirts, under shirts, and extra underwear - a warm top - and anything that allows me to be comfortable while still feeling in line with my own style - slippers for usage in room - warm socks as my feet tend to get cold - pajamas - room wear - pyrex for heating up my own food - liquid dish soap for washing dishes/­­utensils - one set of semi-dress up clothes, in-case  -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Rei Kawakubo. Artwork by Satsuki Shibuya. Photos by Sisilia Piring and Women With Superpowers /­­ Tasya Van Ree + Nitsa Citrine. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Satsuki Shibuya appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Sasha Swerdloff

December 10 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Sasha Swerdloff Sasha Swerdloff is a Certified Ayurvedic Consultant and blogger at Tending the Table, where she shares plant-based recipes and writes about sustainability, health, and wellness. We love Sasha’s thoughtful approach to cooking, breathtaking photography, and Ayurvedic advice. In this interview, Sasha tells us about her morning, bedtime and exercise routines, as well as self-care as a type of non-violence, addressing the root cause of health-related imbalances, the breathing technique she uses during stressful times, skincare, nourishment, yoga, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Routine is super important for me. Without it I tend to feel scattered, flustered and irritable. I think this has a lot to do with my constitution. I know that I tend to struggle with uncertainty so having a routine makes me feel a little more in control and a little less terrified. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I usually wake up around 7am, do my morning stuff (scrape my tongue, do neti, wash my face etc.) then try to drink a big mug of hot lemon water. I like to listen to NPR and snuggle on the couch with my pups while I drink my morning matcha latte. Then I do yoga before making breakfast. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Ive struggled with insomnia a fair amount but paying attention to my stress level and having a solid bedtime routine has helped a lot. A hot bath and self massage with plenty of herbal oil especially on my head works wonders. I also really love sipping on some warm almond milk with spices before bed. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast - Sautéed greens, a fried egg from the chicken ladies in the backyard, and sourdough toast. Lunch - Soup or a big bowl of roasted veggies with some sort of cooked grain, some protein, and a half an avocado. Snack - Apple and almond butter Dinner - Soup, roasted veggies, salads, veggie tacos with beans, roasted sweet potato, cabbage slaw and avocado. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Ive never been able to drink coffee or black tea without getting super jittery but it took me years to finally listen to what my body was telling me. Instead of coffee I drink a matcha latte with almond milk and raw honey every morning. --  Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? Not having sweet stuff around is the only way to stop me from eating a whole bar of chocolate or way too many cookies. --  Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? Im not a fan of taking lots of herbs or supplements for long periods of time. Its easy to take a pill but its a lot harder to address the root cause of an issue and make diet and lifestyle changes to address that imbalance. In the long term though, addressing the root cause through diet and lifestyle is a whole lot more affordable and leads to long term results. I do take Ashwagandha and Vit D regularly to support my nervous system and to keep me sane through the dark winters here in Seattle. Exercise --  Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I try to practice at least an hour of yoga daily. I also walk a fair amount and jog every once in a while. In the winter I cross country ski as much as I can. Ive noticed that the forms of exercise I enjoy most incorporate some sort of rhythmic, repetitive motion which I find to be super calming and meditative. Also, any time I can get outside Im happy. --  Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? Both. There are days when I dont exercise or get outside but I try to not beat myself up about it. Its too easy to get into a pattern of negativity and its much more beneficial long term to practice having compassion for yourself. The things that motivate me to get on my mat each day are my physical and mental health, someone else (my husband) holding me accountable, and the respect and admiration I have for my yoga teacher and the Ashtanga lineage. Beauty --  What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Confidence is beautiful to me. I feel more beautiful when I stand up straight and hold my head high. Im slowly learning that its less about how I look and more about how I feel. --  What is your skincare approach – face and body? My skin has always been sensitive and problematic and Ive always had negative body image issues associated with it. Im finally starting to get a handle on it by going off of hormonal birth control and eliminating sugar and dairy. I also have a pretty strict routine that helps keep my skin free from breakouts. In the morning I wash my face with warm water and moisturize with January Labs Revitalizing Day Cream or Osmia Organics Purely Simple Face Cream . In the evening I cleanse and exfoliate with Beauty Counters Charcoal Cleansing Bar and the Clarisonic skin brush then moisturize with grapeseed oil and Living Libations Dew Dab which helps prevent breakouts and combat hyper pigmentation. In the summer I spritz my face with rose water to help me cool down. --  Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I started taking a zinc supplement a few months ago for my skin and it has helped a ton. Overall though, I notice that cutting out sugar and dairy from my diet makes the biggest difference. --  Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Like I said before, for me, diet makes a huge difference. But I also love my Clarisonic skin brush. It seems like a weird gadget but it has made all the difference for me. Stress, etc. --  If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Making sure not to get too over stimulated or overcommitted helps me stay grounded but if I do get spun out I practice Nadi shodhana breathing and take some Anxiety Soother to take the edge off. I also like to do Yoga Nidra . Getting some fresh air and planting my feet on the ground or pulling out the watercolors always helps too. --  What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I usually mega dose on Echinacea and Sambu Guard then take a hot bath and bundle up. I also try to slow down since for me, colds are often the result of stress. If I slow down my body can usually heal itself. Motivation --  Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I like to think about yoga philosophy and the eight limbs. The first limb is yama. The yamas are a set of five precepts that help us interact with the world in an ethical manner. The first yama is ahimsa or non-violence. This means non-violence towards all living things, including ourselves,  in thoughts, words and actions. For me self-care is a type of non-violence towards my physical and mental being. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I take a break from whatever it is that Im struggling with and do something else to clear my mind. Knowledge --  What was your path to studying Ayurveda and yoga and how do you incorporate that knowledge into your everyday?  I first learned about Ayurveda from my yoga teacher, Christine Hoar . I had been practicing yoga with her for a year or so and was struggling with some health problems so decided to do an Ayurvedic consultation with her to see what she could recommend. Her simple diet and lifestyle recommendations completely changed things for me. I felt like all of a sudden, all of the issues I had struggled with throughout my life made sense and fit into a bigger picture of who I am. I continued studying Ayurveda with Christine and then after college completed an Ayurvedic Certification program and Kripalu. For me, Ayurveda provides a framework from which to view the world and my place in it. Im constantly thinking about the qualities of the foods I eat and the things I do or experience from an Ayurvedic perspective. Ayurveda helps me understand and take control of my health. --  Do you practice a certain type of yoga, and why did you choose that particular branch?  I practice Ashtanga Yoga. I sort of stumbled into it. A college friend told me about a summer special at a nearby studio and suggested I sign up. I did and I went to class there every day for a month. After the month was up I just kept going. I was hooked. I think a big part of why Ive stuck with Ashtanga is because of my teacher. Shes pretty incredible and has been a huge influence in my life. The method of Ashtanga also really resonates with me. I enjoy the repetition, the meditative quality of the breath, the focus and concentration required, the rigor of it and the tradition. --  Do you have any recommendations for someone who wants to establish a daily yoga practice but doesnt know where to begin? Find a teacher you connect with. Finding the motivation to practice on your own is challenging but if you have a teacher you admire and respect and a community of fellow students who are counting on you, youll show up every day. --  Your recipes are so beautiful, approachable and inventive. What is your process when it comes to developing recipes? Thank you! Sometimes Im inspired by meals Ive had while travelling but mostly I draw inspiration from whatever produce I have on hand. I love combining flavors and experimenting with spices and herbs to elevate something simple and make it unique. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Im excited to be incorporating more Ayurveda and wellness themes into my work. Its a big part of my life and I want to share it with others so they can feel empowered to heal themselves. Ill be teaching my first Ayurvedic workshop in the Spring here in Seattle which should be a lot of fun. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I love a good pedicure or a trip to the Korean spa for a soak and body scrub. But more often I find myself going for a walk or taking myself out to tea if I need a boost. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book - Mary Oliver New and Selected Poems Song/­­Album - No Hard Feelings The Avett Brothers Piece of Art -  Satsuki Shibuya -- What are your favorite places to eat in Seattle? We dont eat out all that often, but when we do we usually head to Delancey , Seawolf , The Whale Wins or Frankie and Jos . -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? -Earplugs – Anxiety Soother -A headlamp -Licorice tea -A big scarf – Lip balm -A snack (always) -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Jessie Snyder of Faring Well Photos by Sasha Swerdloff and Renee Byrd You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Sasha Swerdloff appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Gingerbread Biscotti (Vegan & Gluten-Free)

December 6 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Here’s a treat from Something Vegan that will really get you in the holiday spirit — gingerbread biscotti! This crunchy, sweet snack goes perfectly with a nice mug of hot cocoa or coffee. It’s also an easy food to send as a gift to someone you love! We love that Something Vegan not only made this vegan, but also gluten-free. This recipe is a definite crowd pleaser! Check out the video below to see how to make your very own gingerbread biscotti: Read the full recipe in the video description here. The post Gingerbread Biscotti (Vegan & Gluten-Free) appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Best Vegan Scones Recipes

November 29 2017 VegKitchen 

Best Vegan Scones Recipes Here are some delicious vegan scones recipes that will make your next brunch a hit! The post Best Vegan Scones Recipes appeared first on VegKitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan

November 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan Chi San Wan is a creative consultant, mama, entrepreneur and author based in London. We love Chi’s beautiful cookbook, her aesthetic, and down-to-earth approach to wellness, and we were very excited to get a peak at her everyday routine. In this interview, Chi tells us about her morning and bedtime routines, her ways of dealing with stress, the simple beauty tricks she’s learned from her mother, making space for the occasional cake and wine, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I enjoy routine, especially in the mornings. Before Marloe came along, routine was the only thing keeping me grounded. I have all sorts floating around in my head, and working for myself means one day can be very different to the next, so I need my mornings to be predictable in order to get me in the right mind-set for the rest of the day. However, now that those routines are governed by Marloe, our one year old, things are somewhat less predictable, and I have learnt to let go of the importance of routine a little. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. They vary slightly from day to day, depending on whats on the agenda, but in an ideal and average world my morning would be waking up around 6am, do some stretching, then 20 mins of meditation. Around 6:30am Marloe wakes up and we like to cuddle in bed together as a family (shes really into giving kisses at the moment). We get out of bed around 7am and take turns to shower whilst the other one plays with Marloe, makes lemon hot water and preps breakfast. We sit down together for breakfast between 7:30am-8am and have our mornings chats – most of the time theres food throwing involved. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I like to stop any computer work by 9pm, make myself a small hot drink and climb into bed to do some reading – usually self-help or study. I try to sleep by 10pm latest, but sometimes me and my boyfriend just end up chatting about the day until 11pm or midnight… Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Typically… Breakfast – multi-grain porridge with almond milk, topped with whatever seasonal fruits are around and some nut butter Lunch – quinoa, roast veg, salad, some kraut, some seaweed – usually leftovers Snack – sourdough and avocado, or an apple with cheese /­­ nut butter, whatever I find on my travels Dinner – salmon and veg, or daal /­­ curry with rice, yoghurt and lots of freshly chopped herbs -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? If I have the time, I will make myself a matcha latte in the mornings or for a snack. If we have eggs, maybe I will have an Earl Grey tea or some fresh juice. I only ever drink coffee when I fancy a croissant! Then it would have to be a flat white with fresh almond milk or oat milk.  -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I never used to! But somehow, during pregnancy and since Marloe was born, I have developed a sweet tooth! Maybe its to keep energy up? As the weather is colder now in London, I have been obsessed with searching for the best hot chocolate (always disappointing and not chocolatey enough!). When I get the urge for something sweet, its usually something very specific, not any old sweet thing will suffice, and I will have to go on a hunt for it. Though usually after dinner, I am happy with a piece of raw chocolate from the fridge.  -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I try and have a wide and varied diet to keep things in check, and food is the first thing I look to when trying to manage my general wellness. I try and listen to my body, even if sometimes its asking for wine or cake! Usually, it needs just that and feels much better for it. In terms of taking anything else, since pregnancy and the birth of Marloe I have taken a high DHA Omega 3 supplement and probiotics daily (just in case I dont get the chance to eat it in food form). Once a week I will make some water steeped in goji berries, longan (when my mum visits, she will always leave me some) and any dried herbs I have on hand and sip on that. I have some adaptogenics on hand too – chaga, cordyceps, reishi, ashwaghanda, schisandra – but I dont make a habit of taking them everyday, only when I need to. -- What is your approach to feeding your daughter? Do you try to guard her from all unhealthy/­­processed foods, or are you more relaxed about it all? Do you have any advice for parents who want to raise their kids to be comfortable with real, whole foods? For her first year I was a little precious about what I gave her to eat – everything was made at home and organic produce only. I went with baby led weaning which is so messy, anyone who knows me knows I cannot handle mess so this was, and still is, a learning curve for me. But it gives me great pleasure watching Marloe enjoy her food, and try anything I give her. She has days where she is super picky, but generally she is a happy eater. I am more relaxed and realistic about what she consumes now, because I cant always control where we are – she has predominately home made food, but when we are out she will have bits of whatever we are eating, and its fun to watch her try new things! I really recommend baby led weaning. If you read up on it, it makes a lot of sense to get kids to eat real, whole foods this way – who wants to eat mush? It could be anything! Real food looks and tastes much more exciting and it makes them more adventurous with food, and less fussy. Eating together at the table is important to me as well, and for Marloe to have what we are eating – she knows if we have given her a different meal and will shout until we feed her some of ours.  Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I love to fit yoga in when I can and I walk a lot (at a very fast pace), but other than that, its chasing the baby around. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I dont do any form of exercise that I find torturous, such as spin or anything high adrenaline; it doesnt work for me. I enjoy yoga – dynamic or kundalini, and walking in nature a lot.  Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I think if youre comfortable in your own skin, that is beautiful. But for everyone, that could be down to many different factors and it will chop and change with time. Someone who is confident but grounded with integrity – their beauty will shine through. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Its pretty simple and not that exciting! I try and dry-brush when I can, I use Dr. Bronners Baby soap for the body, and then after a shower, whilst the body is wet, I will rub a concoction of almond oil, sesame oil and essential oils that I fancy, all over. For my face, I take the day off with coconut oil and rose water (I make my own with 3/­­4 organic rose water and 1/­­4 colloidal silver). For my morning shower, I will use a thin flannel to scrub the face and spray with rose water, followed by a tiny bit of Nucifera, The Balm – a recent find in LA. Its been amazing for the change in weather in the UK.  -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Water, water, water. Not eating so much dairy, wheat and sugar, but consuming more good fats like avocado, coconut and ghee. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My mum looks so good and youthful, but she has never drank much, never smoked, never wore make-up...thats her trick! I have never smoked, I drink less now naturally, as I am breastfeeding and I’m too busy to do any make-up, so usually a go at the eyelash curlers will do for the day! Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  I think fitting in meditation everyday greatly reduces stress for me and puts things into perspective. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Acupuncture. Talking it out with my boyfriend and friends. Knowing that ‘this too shall pass’. Treating myself to whatever food and drink I desire (within budget of course).  -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I take Wellness tablets. I make sure to be hydrated and wrap up warm at all times, especially the throat and chest. I make congee or daal, something warming and easy to digest so the body can rest.  -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? At the moment, I am very much governed by my daughters day to day antics, and I try and fit everything else around her. This does stress me out at times, but then I try and remember to enjoy these first years with her. I am lucky to have this time together with her, because I am freelance. I just try and plan my time carefully (shared iCal helps!), but not everything always goes to plan – which I am learning to let go of.  Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Things generally fall better into place when I take time to be kind to myself, so I just keep reminding myself that self-care is important, especially for a working mum. Setting routines like bed times for myself etc helps with this and saying no to some friends, projects, events etc when you just need the time to sort stuff out, so that everything else can run more smoothly. Obviously there is room for spontaneity, thats what keeps me feeling alive!  -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Meditation. Making the time for it. It keeps me feeling focused, rested and puts things into perspective. Its a form of self-care and love for myself, and is incredibly nurturing. I dont always do it every day twice a day, but when I do, it helps immensely. I learnt from Jacqui at The Broad Place in the summer and, hands down, they’re the best teachings of meditation I have come across, because its real and it works.  -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Its easier said than done, but I try not to stress about it, and just trust the process rather than sit and wallow. Ill meet up with friends and my peers and we chat it out – usually its something that is felt by a few people, and I find that it usually reverberates between similar minds, like theres something going on with the energy around us. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I cant pinpoint one thing, its a zeitgeist thing, its in the air...maybe because we are entering a revolution, the age of Aquarius. I am constantly  inspired and influenced by the people I surround myself with, the internet, social media, so books /­­ movies /­­ classes suggested through those mediums are naturally the ones I gravitate to.  Knowledge -- You co-authored A Simple Table, a beautiful cookbook that focuses on fresh and simple meals. What was the key message that you aimed to communicate with the recipes and lifestyle tips in the book? Thank you. The key message was that everyday nourishment neednt be difficult or a chore. It could be simple acts of kindness to yourself, or simple recipes that dont require crazy expensive ingredients. Its to encourage the reader to explore what makes them feel good inside and out, as everyone is different and there is no one formula. Most of all, it was to enjoy the simple pleasures.  -- Tell us a bit about the fresh almond milk company that you co-founded, The Pressery. What inspired you to start it and what did you learn from having that business? I felt a change in me, and the start of a movement back in 2013 when I became a little disillusioned working in fashion, and more excited about food and drink and the effects it has on us. I have always been a food fanatic, so it was natural for me to explore this familiar and yet unknown territory. My business partner had been feeling the same for a while, so it felt like the right time to launch a small business in something we were both passionate about. I was already making almond milk at home, and after some research we settled on focusing on making the one product the best we could. There is a lot to learn through starting a business from nothing (I was a freelance fashion stylist before that), and building a brand from scratch – we started selling at a market and then got into Selfridges, and I grew the social media following from 0 to 22k organically in 2 years. Ive met many people through the business, with whom I am still good friends now and work with today, as a creative consultant. It was a natural progression for me and I wouldnt be where I am now if it wasnt for The Pressery.  Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I like to have a glass of red wine, make dinner with my boyfriend and possibly have a candle lit bath with Epsom salts and essential oils.  -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – salt. by Nayyirah Waheed, there is always a piece that speaks to me at any point in my life Song/­­Album – I will never tire of Your Hand In Mine by Explosions In The Sky Movie – In The Mood For Love has been a long favourite – the soundtrack, the colours, the feelings… Piece of Art – anything by Agnes Martin really does feed and soothe my soul, when the exhibition was at the Tate Modern, I went about 5 times! -- What are your favorite places to eat in London? Leilas  for breakfast, Esters  for brunch, Towpath  for lunch, Granger & Co Kings Cross  for work meetings, Violet  for cake and tea, P. Franco  for wine and small dishes and for dinner – Primeur , Campania and Jones , Uchi , Westerns Laundry , Legs , Luca ...too many!  -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list . What are some essential objects that would be in yours? – comfy t-shirt and shorts for sleep – current book  – Nucifera The Balm – rose water spray – essential oils to mix – Weleda lip balm – Dr. Bronners Baby soap (which doubles up as shaving foam) – x2 pairs of jeans (one boyfriend, one flares) – x1 sunglasses – x1 rucksack, x1 fancy bag, x1 tote bag – x1 black trousers (usually wide culottes) – x3 different style tees – x1 cashmere sweater – x2 white shirts  – x1 jumpsuit /­­ playsuit  – x1 dress for day or evening – x2 sandals (one Birkenstocks, one Isabel Marant) – x1 trainers – x1 smart shoes (for me, its Doc Martens) – x1 jacket or coat (depending on the destinations temperature) – x1 light cashmere scarf -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Id love to hear from Julie from Rudy Jude, Rosa from Cereal Magazine, Serena Mitnik-Miller from General Store and Holly from The Acey. Photos taken by Jessica MacCormick, Emma Lee and Chi San Wan. 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Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips

November 12 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips Lacy Phillips is an LA-based manifestation advisor and founder of the blog Free & Native, an amazing resource for all things to do with emotional and physical wellbeing. Lacy’s manifestation approach is truly unique and rooted in psychology just as much as it’s based on spirituality. With her clients, she focuses on pinpointing the true self, which ultimately leads to the discovery of one’s personal freedom. We’ve been reading Free & Native for years, and it’s opened our eyes to so many new ideas – from the concept of self-worth, to the recipe for the nettle and raspberry leaf infusion that helps our hair grow like crazy. In this interview, Lacy tells us about her favorite transformative supplement as of late, her number one cold cure, exercising smart not hard, as well as her morning and bedtime routines, her approach to beauty and stress, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I LOVE routine. But when I have a free day, I’ll only schedule one or two things tops because I love the freedom to do whatever I want or process in my head all day alone. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. My mornings are pretty much the same. Right now, when I wake up, I sip my Chinese herbs, bone broth with gelatin, and then I have breakfast (always within an hour of waking because I’ve suffered from endocrine and blood sugar issues). That usually looks like sprouted GF oatmeal with honey and almond butter – something that I could NEVER do in the past until I had some massive healing on my endocrine and blood sugar issues, for I would have had to have animal protein to keep my blood sugar stable. It was quite a fete when I didn’t need to do that anymore. I credit all of this to my healer Anthony Cahill in LA. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Yes, as you’re probably gathering my endocrine and hormones are very sensitive. So a rule that I had to implement in our house is no screens in the bedroom after 9p. And all screens are always on F.lux or “nighttime mode” to do away with blue light, which was severely messing with my melatonin production. Instead, I light beeswax candles in the room to suggest that red/­­orange sunset light that produces melatonin. Nightly I also practice Haley Wood’s nighttime intuitive cleansing and lymph massage technique. And I’ll usually take some time out to get quiet and grateful for the day. I’m religious about my sleep cycle which is 10p-6a. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Sprouted oatmeal or a scramble with ferments or leftovers Lunch – Leftovers or I’ve gotten terrible at ordering lunch and dinner lately which usually consists of Honey Hi, Cafe Gratitude, Dune, Botanica, Sage Bistro… Snack – Usually a smoothie in the summer or a tonic in the winter -- Do you partake in caffeine? Because of my adrenals, I had to kiss caffeine goodbye four years ago. Along with cacao and sugar. I know, what’s the point of living? Thank God for bananas and avocado. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I do when I’m extra estrogenic (estrogen dominant), which is typical for those with endocrine issues. I’m pretty good about getting that balanced now, but I can always tell when I’ve gone too estrogenic because I get very anxious and I crave a lot of sugar. Due to giving up sugar, for me, a treat is usually a date with almond butter or a smoothie. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful to your energy level and general wellness? Oh man, it’s long. So I drink three teas a day from raw herbs prescribed to me by my acupuncturist Dr. Dao, and a supplement that has been transformative for me lately is Gold Genesis which Shiva Rose gifted me. Those are the two universal ones that can benefit everyone. However, the others are genuinely tailored to my issues based on blood work. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I do. Three times a week I do HIIT, cardio three days a week, and I’m just now starting to do pilates and yoga again. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset to keep up with it?  I do. But I don’t kill myself with it. I can only exercise 20 mins a day, or I tax my adrenals, so I’m very gentle with all of them. I’m all for exercise smart, not hard. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Completely internal. In my work with my clients, it’s all about raising your subconscious worth to project magnetism. There is indeed nothing more radiant or prosperous. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Uncomplicated and hypernatural! Less is more. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Absolutely! My hair started growing like crack when I began swapping water for nettle herbal infusions in search of all of those bio-available minerals and vitamins. Herbal infusions, to me, are a real beauty secret that not enough people do! -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. It’s interesting. I grew up with a mom that is very tough, androgynous and Irish. She washes her face once a week with Ivory soap. Skincare wasn’t something I was taught. I had to go out and learn. I think I’ve tried it all in the wellness realm now, and I do have to say that since my skin is extra dry two factors have been transformative: cleansing with oil and using a washcloth to wipe it off, which also exfoliates. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines to avoid stress? The BIGGEST is Vedic Meditation twice a day, which I learned from Jac of The Broad Place. Second is the reprogramming techniques that I teach my clients and community. Third has been Gold Genesis as it’s loaded with adaptogens. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Saying no to outside events or invitations so that I can be alone to gather my energy and ground. A lot of inward moments. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? The truth – which works every single time – the moment I feel even the slightest, I do a coffee enema, then I hop right in bed and rest. Without fail, I always wake up the next morning healthy since I flushed the liver and drained the lymph. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? I do. I’m getting MUCH better at it. This next year, I’m cutting back immensely on one-on-one energy and making my offerings more accessible to everyone through new digital options which are much more affordable. Such as my UNBLOCKED classes and my entire Manifestation Formula and Reprogramming Video Workshop launching in mid-December. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Well, a lot of it has to do with my Manifestation work. So much of that is welcoming our darkness, looking at the patterns showing up in our lives, using it as a map to get into our subconscious limiting beliefs, and shifting those to get closer to our authentic essence which is our genuinely magnetic state. I’m the person that’s like, Oh wow, I’m so excited that these “issues” are showing up. Because I know exactly what to do with them and how they will turn into magnificent opportunities that connect me with what I’m calling in. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Working for myself. Only saying yes to what feels right. It’s what creates balance for me. And it took me a loooooonnnnggg time to get here. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I get out in the world and find it again. At galleries, in garments, weaves, cinema, literature… There’s more than I can consume in this lifetime. Always something. And I pull from it all. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Life experiences. They are what allowed me to discover my manifestation formula, which is hinged on self-worth = your manifestation. Knowledge -- What was your path to starting Free & Native and creating your manifestation formula? They were rather parallel. At the same time I said I’d never work for another person again, was the exact year that I threw away all of the superstitions that I head learned through New Age manifestation culture (and I had explored it all). I realized I was an incredible manifestor but never in the ways that those books and teachings suggested. And I also realized that I was worth more than I was being treated in previous jobs. I tossed them both away and decided to follow and note what works for me when. And here we are today. -- In your practice, you put a lot of emphasis on raising one’s self-worth and expanding beliefs. Why are those such key points in your formula? I realized that anytime I wouldn’t accept being small anymore, and then I wouldn’t settle for the small opportunities coming in after, while doing work on myself, bam my manifestations would come through. It all finally channeled through to me. The entire process. And I finally realized that The Universe’s only intention for us is to grow into our whole, authentic selves. Everything it does or gives us, good or bad, is to keep us on that trajectory. The gift that I realized I have is channeling those messages, and my claircognizance ability to spot energetic patterns. The third gift I have is taking the abstractness of energetic patterns and boiling them down into actionable steps and work. And now after helping hundreds of people and seeing result after result, I realized why I had to suffer through loads of superstitions and life-struggles. -- You seem to seamlessly marry psychology and spirituality in your work. Can you speak a bit about how you are able to achieve this balance? Absolutely. I always say manifestation is very easy; we’re complicated. We manifest from our subconscious beliefs rather than our thoughts. I always joke in my workshops by saying, “if only we were that powerful (manifesting from our thoughts). We think in such polarity all day long; our lives would look like a shit show.” Psychology is a means to our subconscious. Accessing it and shifting it. -- Are there any books that you recommend that are in line with your manifestation formula? I wish there was! This is a question I get all the time. In fact, I never intended to write a book, but I’m having to now as it just simply doesn’t exist. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Watch TV shows. We are avid show bingers. It’s one of the only ways that I can thoroughly check out as I’m so Aquarius and vata. I just transport to another world and completely disconnect with all the pressure I’m responsible for in this one. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Right now… Book – The Awakened Family Song/­­Album – Alice Coltrane, “Om Shanti” Movie – Lady Bird Art – Ryan Snow -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? A cozy wool sweater, boots, jeans, Gold Genesis, eye mask, and a book. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Shiva Rose and Meredith Baird. Photos courtesy of Free & Native and Serafina LoGiacco. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh

October 29 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh Ally Walsh is a model and co-founder of Los Angeles-based organic coffee company, Canyon Coffee. Though we’ve never met, we love Ally’s easy-going approach to wellness, her beautiful instagram, and what her and her partner are doing over at Canyon. It’s an all-around girl crush :) In this interview, Ally tells us about her transition from a vegetarian diet to a feel-good, intuitive diet, the tonic she always takes before bed, the books she’s found to be instrumental to her well-being, exercise, beauty, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I love routine, but that probably has a lot do to with the fact that my schedule is constantly changing! I really enjoy my morning routine, waking up early and making coffee at home. But its always nice to switch things up and come back to that. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning.  I definitely try to ease into my morning. I used to grab my phone first thing when I woke up--now I keep it out of the bedroom. Instead, the first thing I do when I wake up (on a good day!) is sit upright and do a 20 minute meditation. To me, theres no better way to start off the day. Meditation is always followed by some Canyon Coffee. At home, I typically make a pour-over, which is another little opportunity to be mindful as I start my day. On a day off its so nice to sit outside on the porch with some friends and read and have coffee together. We get the New York Times delivered to our house on Sunday mornings and I could spend the whole day reading and relaxing outside in the sun. Its honestly one of my favorites things to do. If I’m shooting though, or out of town for a job, most days start early and end late. The schedule for modeling is often last minute--I sometimes dont know my schedule until the day or night before. In contrast, its nice to have Canyon, where I make my own schedule. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I make a glass of calm/­­magnesium before bed every night! I take that with me wherever I go--security always pull me aside at the airport to ask about what this white powder is ha :) Aside from magnesium, Ill sometimes make a warm tonic with some ashwaganda. And reading always helps me to fall asleep. I guess I wouldn’t call it a ritual, but I do love watching a show or movie before sleep, too. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast: I have a cup of black coffee and almond butter or avocado toast with gluten-free bread every morning. Im a creature of habit... I have my favorite go-tos, and Im happy eating them every day. If I have to work super early sometimes i like to make overnight chia seed oatmeal. Ill mix in some oats, chia seeds, almond milk, maca and flax seeds, and then in the morning top it off with some fruit and almond butter. Lunch:  Usually a salad with quinoa, avocado, kimchi, roasted seasonal vegetables, seeds, lemon and different oils like grapeseed, olive, and white wine vinegar. I would also be very happy with just roasted kabocha squash and pesto :) Snack: Cashews, pumpkin seeds, Dates and almond butter, green juice, avocado toast, and currently addicted to Honey Mamas Chocolate! -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Well, it kind of comes with starting a coffee company ;) Some people are surprised to learn, though, that I only drink one cup of black coffee in the morning! Thats pretty much it. I cant do too much caffeine. Only on rare occasions, like when Im on vacation, will I have an afternoon espresso or cortado. I was in Copenhagen and Stockholm recently, and fell in love with oatmilk cortados! Definitely pushed my caffeine limit there! -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I honestly don’t! I love raw chocolate, but Im really sensitive to sugar! So Im kind of weird in that I really dont love sweets. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? In addition to magnesium at night (for sleep), Ill take ashwaganda at any time of the day for my adrenals, and probiotics daily. I feel such a difference when I take b12, too. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Yes. Yoga has been such an important practice to me, for years. I usually go to a class a couple times a week. I intersperse that with hiking in the Santa Monica mountains and walks on the beach. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I actually look forward to exercise. I dont really partake in any forms of exercise that arent enjoyable. For example, Ive never really gotten into spinning or boot camp-style workouts. I love getting out in nature for hikes, and I find an hour-and-a-half in the yoga studio to be very meditative. After a long work day, I really look forward to being able to do something nice for my body. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I really think the most beautiful people are those that feel confident in their skin and are who they want to be--not what society expects them to be. Someone thats naturally comfortable in any setting. As a model, so much emphasis is put on the external, and thats important for a photograph or video. But in person, beauty really does come from within. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I think the most important thing for healthy skin is to eat and drink clean. Especially drinking lots of water. As for products, I use the most natural that I can find. I love Earth tu Face, True Botanicals, Osea and Linne! I use oils for moisturizing and just use water to wash my face in the morning. I love using Bodha and CAP Beauty rose water spray, too. Ill try to do a face mask once a week from Wildcare while taking a bath! Its very relaxing :) -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Water! I also think getting a good night of sleep is just as important! -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Stay hydrated. My mom is 59 & has the most beautiful skin – not one wrinklel! And she swears by drinking lots of water! Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Im trying to get better at this, but acupuncture has been a life saver! Its a place to relax and reset. I see Maria at Elysia Life Care and she is life-changing! I think getting into a regular routine of acupuncture and meditation can help so much with stress. After having a consistent routine with both, you start to notice things that used to stress you or make you upset no longer have the same power or effect on you. You can laugh it off, or just observe it and not be affected by it. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Going on a walk always helps. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Lycopene vitamin C packets, lots of ginger and tea tree oil (usually just put it in my water!) -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? This has been a learning process for me, how to balance everything. Modeling, Canyon Coffee, relationship with my partner, my friends, and time for myself. Especially with starting a company with your partner, that start-up grind can be all-consuming because theres always more work you can do! So weve had to learn how to turn off- and make sure to make time for a date night! Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? My goal is to maintain a state of love (as opposed to state of stress, or lack, or anger, etc.). I was lucky to learn from a qi gong master named George Falcon for a couple years before he passed, and I feel like his teachings provided me with tools to help stay in this mindset throughout the stressors and obstacles of daily life. One of the big ones is to take responsibility for our actions and state of being. Its easy for us to blame, to say he, she, or it made me feel this way. But really its our decision. Of course, we sometimes fall out of that consciousness of love. When Im not feeling well, my first step is to take a break. To meditate, listen to a recorded guided meditation of George, go on a walk or a hike. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Ive made different changes throughout my life that have been substantial in terms of my wellness. I stopped eating meat when I was 19, then introduced fish (mainly salmon!) back in years later. Acupuncture has perhaps been the most substantial in helping me maintain balance and wellness. All of these changes or decisions are really informed by just listening to my body. You can get caught up in the mindset and identity of, say, Im vegan. But its important to check in with yourself and ask, Am I feeling good? Is this helping live a balanced and vibrant life? If not, then its important to make a change! -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. So many books! If I had to pick two, Id say Anatomy of the Spirit by Caroline Myss and Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert. Anatomy really opened me to the power of our bodies to heal and self-nourishment. It helped me connect my mental and spiritual state to my health and well-being. Its a book you can go back to, re-read and continue to learn from over time. Big Magic was instrumental in motivating me to start Canyon Coffee. It made me feel like I had more to give, creatively, and pushed me to start something with a greater purpose. It brought clarity to the creative process for me, breaking it down in a way that makes it approachable and applicable to my own life. Its one of those books that really inspires you to follow your dreams, and what could be more important for self-nourishment? Knowlegde -- You run Canyon Coffee together with your boyfriend, Casey. What was your path to starting your own coffee company? Personally, I was feeling uninspired. I felt like I wasnt making the most of my creativity and talents. Ive always been grateful for my modeling career, but I had also always wanted to start something of my own, and I was feeling that itch. Casey and I had both fallen in love with coffee over the years... through making it at home together and visiting coffee shops in our travels and around LA. Casey actually started working in the coffee industry, and we became friends with a roaster, James. Eventually, our passion for it grew to the point that we had the thought: why not start our own company? It really was a natural culmination. The moment we decided we wanted to do it, we just never looked back. -- What is your process when choosing beans for Canyon Coffee? Are there certain growing practices, flavor profiles, or geographical locations that are important to you? The universal practice of tasting different beans is called cupping. It involves preparing small roasted samples of different beans exactly the same way and trying them at the same time. For Canyon, our parameters narrow down our options. We usually decide on a country first, and then see what organic, seasonal beans grown at high altitudes are available through the network of importers near us in California. Then we order samples, cup, and choose the bean that smells and tastes best to us. High altitude is important because the elevation makes the coffee plant grow slower and put more energy into producing cherries. The slow growth results in cherries (and coffee beans) that are much more flavorful and vibrant. To start Canyon, we focused on Latin American coffees and wanted to find amazing-tasting beans in the chocolatey /­­ caramel flavor profile. We went with beans from Guatemala and Colombia first, because theyre known for these flavor profiles and they have great infrastructure for small coffee producers to process and export their beans. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I love going to the movies :) And a nice dinner out before or after. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Anatomy of the Spirit .. anything from Krishnamurti & Ram Dass Song/­­Album – Paul Simon – Graceland, Feist – Let it Die, Lord Huron – Lonesome Dreams Movie – Beginners Piece of Art – Robert Lango Men In the Cities, Alfred Stieglitz’ Portraits of Georgia OKeeffe -- What are your favorite places to eat in LA? Gjusta/­­ Gjelina, Honey Hi, Amara Kitchen, Pace, Botanica, Necco, Destroyer, Erewhon -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? Im actually in the process of moving out of my house right now! Were taking advantage of the end of our lease to do some traveling and try out living in some new neighborhoods. As a result, Im having to put a lot of my stuff in storage. Its been really nice to get rid of a lot of things and simplify to the essentials. But as far as traveling goes, I always have with me.. – new book and magazines – headphones – Jesse Kamm pants – Nikes – journal – Bodha rose water spray – probiotics – magnesium and ashwaganda  – sparkling water – ursa major rings – eye mask – almond butter packets -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Emily LAmi of Bodha, and Lacy Phillips at Free & Native! Both these women are a constant inspiration! You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Quick Three-Grain Brown Bread

September 28 2018 VegKitchen 

Quick Three-Grain Brown Bread Pop this easy vegan quick bread into the oven while your favorite soup is simmering on the stove. It’s made with wheat and rye flours, plus cornmeal. Or, serve it with jam to accompany your favorite warm beverage -- coffee, tea, or cocoa. You’ll love this moist loaf! This makes one loaf, about 10 to 12 slices. Photos by Hannah Kaminsky. Save Print Quick Three-Grain Brown Bread Author: Nava Recipe type: Quick bread Cuisine: Vegan /­­ healthy Prep time:  15 mins Cook time:  40 mins Total time:  55 mins Serves: 10 to 12   Pop this easy vegan quick bread into the oven while your favorite soup is simmering on the stove. Its made with wheat and rye flours, plus cornmeal. Ingredients 1 cup whole wheat pastry flour ¾ cup rye flour ½ cup cornmeal 1½ teaspoons baking soda ½ teaspoon salt 1 cup plain nondairy yogurt, preferably coconut ⅔ cup unsweetened nondairy milk, or as needed ⅓ cup maple syrup, molasses, or barley malt syrup 2 tablespoons safflower oil Instructions Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Combine the first 5 (dry) ingredients in a large mixing bowl and stir together. Combine the remaining ingredients in another mixing bowl and whisk together until smoothly blended. Make […] The post Quick Three-Grain Brown Bread appeared first on VegKitchen.

ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

August 29 2018 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on KickstarterThe Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA just launched on Kickstarter! watch the video: PRE-ORDER the ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2NrnNXl This year I traveled to Ethiopia in the weeks before Easter - one of several special times of fasting, when the majority of the country eats entirely vegan! I explored the central cities, traveled overland to the north, went trekking in the highlands and stayed with families in remote villages. As with all my travels and culinary research, I am extremely grateful for the privilege to learn, share & exchange, and be guided & supported by many families and professional cooks who invited me in their kitchens and shared amazing meals with me. Since returning to Berlin, I’ve been cooking Ethiopian and Eritrean food practically non-stop, recreating recipes and dishes, constantly inviting friends and guests to my cooking studio for lunch and dinner parties. Abebech showing me traditional village cooking in the Ethiopian Highlands. Making Injera for the first time in Ethiopia The Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA is my newest cookbook with original recipes, artwork, photography and stories inspired by these latest culinary adventures. It includes over 70 recipes based on the mouth-watering meals in bustling cities & towns, at road-stop eateries, and in rural highland villages. As with my previous 5 cookbooks, I have written, illustrated, cooked, photographed, and designed this book myself. The Lotus and the Artichoke is the ultimate combination of my passions: art, travel, vegan cooking, and photography. The ETHIOPIA Cookbook at a glance: - My 6th cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide - 140 pages with 70+ recipes and over 60 full-page color photos - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by my travels and culinary adventures in East Africa - Also based on experiences with international communities of Europe (London, Paris, and Berlin) and North America (Philadelphia, New York, and Washington D.C.) and over 25 years of vegan cooking - Ethiopian & Eritrean classics, familiar restaurant & family favourites, delicious delights, wonders & surprises, and creative culinary experiments - Discover new flavors, tasty spices, and cooking skills - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients (Cook everything, anywhere!) - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Doro Wat – spicy seitan stew Spinach Dinach Butecha – Chickpea “Egg” Salad Minchet Abish – spicy soy mince & walnuts Duba Wot – pumpkin stew Shimbra Asa – chickpea “fish” Asa (Jackfruit) Tibs Fosolia – green beans & carrots Pizza Lalibela Ingudai Tibs – spicy mushrooms Shepherd’s Pie – lentil filling & mashed potato topping Ambasha – sweet bread Recipes in The Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA - Traditional Berbere spice mix (simple + advanced) - Nitir Qibe – spiced butter/­­oil - Mitmita – extra hot spice mix - Yewot Qimen – black pepper spice mix - Shiro – chickpea/­­bean spice mix - Data (Yekarya Delleh) – roasted chili, garlic, onion & herb sauce - Traditional Injera – Ethiopian sourdough crepe - Quick Injera - Ambasha - sweet raisin bread - Doro Dabo – baked stuffed bread - Difo Dabo - spiced bread - Pizza Lalibela - with tomato sauce & roasted potato topping - Sambosa – savory pastry with lentil filling - Senig Karia – roasted spicy stuffed chilies - Injera Firfir – traditional flatbread with spicy tomato sauce - Yesuf Fitfit – chopped injera & lemon sunflower seed dressing - Kita (Injekita) – sweet breakfast flatbread & jam - Chornake /­­ Pasty – fried bread - Genfo – roasted wheat & barley porridge - Selata - super simple salad - Selata Delux - with mango, dates, avocado mixed greens & lentils - Butecha - chickpea “egg” salad - Selata Timtim - tomato salad - Selata Dinich - potato salad - Selata Bekarot - carrot salad - Telba - roasted flax dressing - Shiro Wot - chickpea puree - Misir Wot – red lentils - Doro Wot – spicy seitan - Soy Tibs - spicy soymeat strips - Ingudai Wot - spicy mushrooms - Bamia - spicy okra - Minchet Abish - spicy soy mince & walnuts - Shimbra Asa – spicy chickpea “fish” - Kik Alicha – yellow lentils - Atakilt Alicha – cabbage, carrots & potatoes - Keysir - beet root - Duba Alicha - pumpkin stew - Tikr Gomen - greens with garlic - Spinach Dinich - spinach & roasted potatoes - Fosolia – green beans & carrots - Asa Tibs – lemon pepper jackfruit fritters - Tofu Alicha - batter fried tofu in mild garlic & onion sauce - Ingudai Alicha – mushrooms w/­­ creamy cashew, lemon, pepper, thyme, parsley - Peppers & Potatoes - garlic ginger stir-fry - Inkulal Firfir – spicy tofu scramble & tomatoes - Ful – fava beans - Ayib – cottage cheese - Bedergan – roasted eggplant - Vegetable Lentil Soup - Vegetable Pasta – spaghetti with mixed chopped vegetables - Macaroni Firfir – noodles with garlic onion tomato sauce on injera - Shepherd’s Pie – lentil filling & mashed potato topping - Ethiopian Mashed Potatoes - Traditional Coffee Ceremony - Spiced Black Tea - Roiboos tea with lemon, ginger &cardamon - Mango Moringa Banana Smoothie - Injera w/­­ dates - Banana Bread - Fasting Muffins - Rooibos Tea Ice Cream Video: Justin P. Moore Music: Nils Kercher Nanfulle from Ancient Intimations (live) (C)2016 Ancient Pulse Music PRE-ORDER the ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2NrnNXl The post ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Caramelized Onion White Lentil Hummus

June 14 2018 My New Roots 

Caramelized Onion White Lentil Hummus If there is one trick Ive learned in all of my years cooking, both at home and in restaurants, it is this: caramelized onions can make almost anything taste amazing. Theyre the ridiculously simple, yet magical ingredient that turns an ordinary dish into something so rich-tasting and satisfying that people go ...oh hi excuse me, this is incredible. I think the simple reason that caramelized onions taste so good, is because they are a labour of love. Not like an all-day stirring the pot kinda deal, but most definitely a food that you cant just leave on the stove and dive into an Instagram vortex. No. Caramelized onions take care and attention, at least for the better part of half an hour, and the results are so worth it I bet youll catch yourself multi-tasking at the stove tonight just to have some on hand to gussy up your omelet this weekend (boss move there, by the way). The more accurate reason that caramelized onions taste so good however, isnt technically caramelization - its called the Maillard reaction. The Maillard reaction is a browning reaction similar to caramelization, but with one distinct difference: caramelization is a chemical reaction between reducing sugars, while Maillard is a chemical reaction between reducing sugars and amino acids (proteins). And yes, there is enough protein in an onion to elicit this response - how thrilling for us! Although the Maillard reaction is very complex and complicated, what we do know is that it requires heat to transform and rearrange sugars and amino acids to create new and fantastic flavour molecules in and on your food, making it even more delicious. If youve ever eaten a golden slice of toast, enjoyed a rich cup of coffee, or nibbled on a grilled vegetable, youve experienced the pure pleasure that all of this this chemical commotion is responsible for. Science! Harnessing the power of the Maillard reaction can make you a better cook, because things that are browned properly taste more intensely, more complex, and well, better. Without even being aware of it, its the reason youll reach for the roasted veggies with the crispiest edges, or the reason that you prefer a fried egg over a boiled one (no judgement!). There are a couple ways of making this spectacular series of chemical reactions work for you, and the first is high heat. Maillard will not occur at very low temperatures, especially in situations where the food is not in direct contact with the heat, like it is on a skillet or grill for instance. When youre roasting veggies, make sure the oven is at least 400°F /­­ 200°C. When youre making pizza, you can crank it up even higher, to get those beautifully blistered crust edges that make your mouth water. The second way is to keep the food youre cooking on the dry side. For instance, have you ever noticed how if you wash mushrooms (which you should actually never do), theyll never really get brown and crusty? Too much moisture! Instead, brush those fungi gently to remove any dirt or debris, then put them in a screeching hot pan with some ghee and dont stir them. I talk more about this technique here. This is the same reason you need a large pan for these caramelized onions, since theyll need the space to allow the water to evaporate around them. If the onions are too close together, theyll only steam each other. Eew. If you’re oven roasting vegetables for dinner, cut them in the morning and leave them out all day uncovered so that the surface water will evaporate, and the veggies will brown more easily. Yes, this seems like a bit of a hassle, but the culinary nerd in me admits that its cool because it works. So, where does the hummus come into this story? Well, hummus is pretty much a food group in my world. Ive made so many variations with so many kinds of legumes, spices, alt seed butters, toppings, and stir-ins, that I could hardly believe I had never tried it with the ingredient that could single-handedly save humanity: caramelized onions. I knew that deep richness of the onions would meld perfectly with the creamy dip, and make the flavour even better. I wasnt wrong! The only thing that I wanted to improve upon, was the protein content - not because Im obsessed with protein, but simply because I thought it could be higher. To do that I simply swapped out the traditional chickpeas for white lentils, or urad dal. We not only get more protein from this change-up, but almost double the fiber, with less sodium, less fat, and less sugar. Sweet. This dip is the perfect, rich compliment to all the crisp and light, early summer veggies popping up. I went to my friends farm and picked some seriously beautiful radishes and young carrots, which paired so well with the caramelized onion flavour. I also had some Life-Changing Crackers on hand, which always make dipping more delicious. One thing I changed from the first version to the third, was the onions on top. Instead of blending all of them into the dip, I used about a third of them on top, which allows you to scoop a few tender morsels up with each bite. This delivers even more caramelized onion flavour and texture, which, let us be reminded, is the whole point of this exercise. Even though this hummus keeps well for at least five days in the fridge (you can even freeze it!), it is best eaten freshly made at room temperature, since the flavour is at its peak then. And because you’re wondering, you can find white or ivory lentils at Indian grocers, Middle Eastern markets, or some natural food stores. They are the skinned and split version of urad dal, which is black, so make sure you buy the huskless version! If you cant find them at all, simply use chickpeas - it will be just as delicious.     Print recipe     Caramelized Onion and White Lentil Hummus Makes about 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup raw white lentils (huskless split black mapte beans /­­ urad dal dhuli), soaked if possible 1 small clove garlic 3 Tbsp. tahini 3 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tsp. balsamic vinegar 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­4 tsp. ground cumin heaping 1/­­4 tsp. freshly cracked black pepper 1 batch caramelized onions (from the recipe below) cold-pressed olive oil, for garnish Directions: 1. Start by cooking the lentils. If youve soaked them beforehand (even an hour helps!) drain and rinse them very well. If youre starting from raw, place the lentils in the cooking pot, cover with plenty of water and vigorously swish them around with your hands. When the water becomes murky, drain and repeat until the water is clear, or mostly clear (this can take 3-4 rounds). Place lentils in the cooking pot and cover generously with water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to simmer and cook partially covered for about 20-30 minutes, depending on whether or not you soaked them. The lentils should be cooked until mushy. If the pot becomes dry during cooking, simply add more water. Once cooked, drain the lentils if there is any remaining water. Set aside to cool. 2. In a food processor pulse the garlic until finely minced. Add the tahini, lemon juice, balsamic, salt, cumin and pepper, then blend until combined. Add the cooked lentils and blend on high until smooth. Lastly, add about two-thirds of the caramelized onions, and pulse to incorporate them into the dip. Taste and adjust seasoning if desired. 3. To serve, spoon the hummus into a serving bowl. Make a small divot in the center of the dip and spoon in the remaining caramelized onions. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with your toppings of choice (I used toasted black sesame and chive flowers for a splash of colour, but this is totally optional). Serve with crispy fresh veggies and crackers or toasted flatbreads. Enjoy. Caramelized Onions Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. neutral-tasting coconut oil or ghee 1 lb. /­­ 500g yellow onions 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt Directions: 1. Peel the onions and slice them as evenly as possible into half-rounds. 2. Melt coconut oil or ghee over medium heat in the largest skillet you have. Add the onions, then salt, and stir well to coat. Once the onions are coated, turn the heat down to a medium-low, stirring occasionally - more often towards the end - until theyve fully caramelized, about 25-30 minutes. If the pot becomes too dry during cooking, reduce the heat a tad, or add a teeny bit of water adn stir well. In the end, youre looking for soft, silky, and golden brown goodness! Store leftovers in the fridge for up to four days, or freeze for 3 months. If it’s your first time caramelizing onions and you’re feeling intimidated, here is a stellar step-by-step tutorial from Bon Appétit. It varies ever so slightly from my method, but you’ll get the picture! Big love and happy hummus, Sarah B. Show me your hummus on Instagram: #mnrcaramelizedonionhummus  *   *   *   *   * Hello dear friends! There are only a few spots left for our January 2019 Wild Heart High Spirit retreat and we’d love to see you in Bali!  Join us along with 15 other women to unwind, reconnect, and find the inspiration to ignite you on your health journey. Our thoughtfully-designed program will awaken and nourish your entire being – body, mind, and spirit! This is a true celebration of life, and we get to do it together in paradise! Come see what all the magic is about.  Much love, Sarah B, Mikkala and the Golden Circle Retreats team The post Caramelized Onion White Lentil Hummus appeared first on My New Roots.

Self-Care Interview Series: Beth Kirby

January 7 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Beth Kirby Beth Kirby is a photographer, cookbook writer, entrepreneur, and the creator of Local Milk, her food, travel, and lifestyle blog. We are endlessly amazed by Beth’s ability to present her work with both authenticity and style, and we were completely blown away by each one of her thoughtful and inspiring answers in this interview. It’s a true gem. In this dialogue, Beth tells us about self-care as the foundation for happiness, having a schedule as a way to avoid stress, why she doesn’t believe in the idea of work-life balance, and how her routine has changed since becoming a mother, as well as her newfound love for weight training, the adaptogens and herbs she incorporates into her everyday potions, beauty, motivation, sustenance, and much more. There’s some amazing business advice here, too! Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Routine is so very important to me. Routines ensure that time is carved out for the important things in my days & life. Im super flexible with my routines so theres no such thing as failing, but the closer I adhere to the routine, the more impact I tend to make in my day. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I actually just wrote a little guide to a slow morning routine that details mine! I usually wake up when my baby wakes up, between 6:30-7:30 AM. The first thing I do every morning is make the bed because I feel this sets the tone for the rest of my day. My husband takes the baby to give me 10 minutes to meditate (I love the Headspace app) and do a few sun salutations to wake my body + mind connection up. After that I brew my morning elixir, a simple lemon, ginger, and turmeric tea, and then I do some journaling while I drink it. After that comes breakfast & a matcha potion, a shower & getting dressed for the day, a quick tidy of my space if I need it, and then Im down to work! I dont always do every single thing, but the more of them I hit, the better my morning! -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Im so exhausted at the end of the day, I dont usually need much help sleeping! I love making moon mylks with sleep promoting herbs as a little night time luxury. We keep the bedroom a sleep only zone with no television or computers, so its quite easy to pass out once Im in my own bed (or whatever bed I happen to be in!) -- How has your routine changed since you had your daughter? Its gotten a lot more flexible! If shes having a bad morning, things like preparing breakfast can take a lot longer or maybe I skip the shower (truth time!), but in a lot of ways, its made me more routine because if I dont have a plan and stick to it, the day can slip away a lot more easily when you have kids. I kinda floated through my days doing whatever I wanted whenever I wanted before she was born because I had all the time in the world. Now its make hay while the sun shines or forget having any hay! Haha. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast –  Miso Soup, 7 minute veggie & egg steam, and rice. After spending a fair amount of time in Japan, this has become my breakfast of choice. I keep dashi in the fridge for a quick miso soup so it takes literally minutes, and I steam a few veggies, whatever is on hand, in my steamer with an egg in its shell for 7 minutes. It all, including the egg, comes out perfectly! We cook rice in a rice cooker or donabe depending on where we are. I usually have a little miso dressing in the fridge to dip my veggies and eggs in and enjoy them alongside the rice & soup. Its so comforting and healthy, but its also really quick and easy as long as you throw the rice in a rice cooker and have dashi on hand. Lunch –  Smoothie! I usually hit my work stride during midday, and I dont like to take a massive amount of time (or make a big mess!) for lunch, so my favorite thing to do is whip up a super food adaptogen rich smoothie. I love pineapple and avocado as a base, and if its after a workout I make sure to throw some hemp & moringa in there for a plant based protein punch. Snack –  Ume plum onigiri. I almost always have leftover rice on hand, so I make rice balls with pickled plums in the center and wrap them with toasted nori for a quick snack. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Coffee makes me crazy, so I only have it on special occasions (like if Im near a really, really amazing café I might have a cappuccino), but when Im at home Ive started making a morning matcha potion.   -- Do you have a sweet tooth? I used to! But its lessened over the past couple of years as I cut back on candy & sweets. I love sugar, but I like to save it for feast days like holidays and celebrations instead of consume it as part of everyday life. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I incorporate adaptogens & tonic herbs--particularly rhodiola, ashwaghanda, he shou wu, astragalus, maca, and reishi--into a lot of my food like smoothies, mylks, and matchas. I also love Wooden Spoon Herbs tinctures, especially Anxiety Ally (anxious lady over here!) as well as her Green Protein Powder after workouts. Ive also recently discovered tocos and MCT oil, which I work into either my smoothie or matcha each day. -- Youve spent significant amounts of time in both Japan and France. How have those cultures influenced your cooking? For sundry reasons, Japan has definitely had a bigger impact on my cooking than France even though we live in Paris about half the year. I love to eat French food, but I find a lot of it is richer than I care to eat on a daily basis, and because I cook vegetarian at home 99.9% of the time, Japanese cuisine is, in my experience, much easier to adapt to that. And I just love Japanese flavors. I would say I cook Japanese inspired meals more than anything else (even when in Paris!) -- What is your approach to feeding your daughter? Weve done baby led weaning which simply means offering solids around 6 months and letting her decide what and how much shed like to eat of what we offer. We try to make sure shes offered a wide variety of whole food options, and dont worry about it after that. She eats what we eat, and at 16 months shes still breastfed, and thats fine by me. We are super, super laid back about it. She eats what and when we eat, and she can still have mom milk whenever she wants. That said, those organic baby food pouches are a lifesaver on the go because she can hold them! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I see a personal trainer for an hour a day, five days a week. On my days off I do one day of cardio and one day of rest. I do mainly resistance training with weights and bodyweight and a little cardio. I think a lot of women do a toooonnn of cardio and are afraid of weights because they think theyll bulk up when in reality getting big is incredibly difficult. Instead weights make you stronger, toned, healthy, and able to eat more…which I love! Before Eula I ate very few calories and did lots of cardio, and while I was thin, I never felt healthy. Now I eat as much healthy food as I want when Im hungry and lift weights. While Im not where I want to be post-baby yet, Im on the road! -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I freaking hate cardio. Especially running. I dont run. Unless something is on fire. I actually like weight lifting and resistance training. Its hard, but the time flies, and I can feel my body getting stronger. Having a trainer, while an investment, has been the trick for me. I need that accountability, and I needed to feel like someone who knew my goals for my body was guiding me towards them as opposed to me just randomly doing things. What motivates me is freedom from issues around food, being fit for the first time in my life, being a good example to my daughter, keeping up with my fit husband, and getting a toned butt! Haha! Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? This is probably cliché but confidence. When someone is confident in their own skin and in who they are as a person, confident about where they are in the journey whether theyre only beginning or years down the road, that is beautiful. When you love yourself inside and out, you glow. Easier said than done, I know, but when we work towards banishing self loathing we arent only more beautiful to ourselves, we are more beautiful to others as well.   -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? As for my face, I keep it super simple: I wash and exfoliate with Aesop, and then I tone with Thayers Rose Tonic and hydrate with Evan Healy moisturizer. I love her formula because its natural and it isnt greasy like so many. It goes on so light. I also get a HydraFacial every couple of months. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I drink tocos daily in my smoothie or matcha, as its amazing for skin. He Shou Wu is another herb I take for beauty, again usually stirred into tea or a smoothie since I have one of those two things almost every day. I also take an ultra collagen supplement by Reserveage.   -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Dont wash your hair everyday! This strips hair of its oils and can dry it out and make it brittle. I wash mine once every 3-4 days, and I use a dry shampoo by Oribe on the days in between as needed. And if nothing else, if I can throw on a bit of Benefit Porefessional, mascara, and do my brows, I feel done. But the truth is, I hardly ever do my make up unless I have an event or am going to be on camera. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Not taking on more than I can handle, delegating, saying no as often as needed, having a schedule, and planning help me avoid stress. As a very DIY spirited entrepreneur, I constantly have to fight the temptation to just do it myself, and as a person who really likes to do what I feel like doing when I feel like doing it, I have to fight the urge to float through my days working on whatever catches my eye. Instead, batching days and time blocking (i.e. Mondays are for marketing & meetings, Tuesdays are for client work, Wednesdays are for editing & writing, Thursdays for content creation, Fridays are for finance, Saturday is for family, and Sunday is for weekly food prep, etc...) helps keep me on track. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Meditation is my not-so-secret weapon. And exercise. And sleep. If Im meditating, sleeping at least 7 hours a night, and getting my work-outs in, I can field whatever stress comes my way with reasonable grace. And it does come. I also find the simple belief that everything happens for a good reason calms down the stresses of life, big and small. Whether Im stuck at a red light when Im running late, or I didnt get something I thought I wanted, this belief frames it as a blessing. I choose to believe the universe knows better than I do what should happen and when. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Garlic! I immediately start sucking on cloves of garlic. More than 50% of the time this knocks it out. It smells strong, but hey, it works! It has antibiotic properties (they called it Russian Penicillin during the war!), and it can kill bugs. I also start drinking a lot of herbal tea. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? This may sound strange to say, but I dont believe in work life balance. Balance implies everything has equal weight all the time. I believe in boundaries, but not balance. I dont believe anything great was ever created meting out time to it in a stingy way. Passion is going all in. Its long days and late nights. Its a pendulum swing. Whats important to me is not living these perfectly balanced days where everything gets equal weight, but rather in knowing when to swing back. You have to define your non-negotiables, and then the rest of your time is fair game. My non-negotiables are my weekly workouts, morning routine (though I shorten it as needed depending on the day), and an hour or so at the end of the day to cuddle and connect with my family. When Im in a season of intense work, say launching something new or writing a book, people know they will see less of me. I will spend less time on other things. And when I need a break or when its complete, I will just the same pour myself all into to rest and enjoying the people I love. Its about knowing your own limits, setting boundaries so that the priority gets to be the priority, pushing it to the boundary, and then stepping back when its time. Thats my approach. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself. When you truly, fully grasp that if you dont take care of yourself all the other things you want will forever remain out of your grasp, then it becomes really easy to stay motivated and prioritize yourself. We all have different goals and dreams, but what most people have in common is that they quite simply want to be happy. You can make seven figures and be perfectly miserable if you dont take care of yourself. Its the foundation the rest is built on. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Working out, specifically weight training. I have spent my entire life avoiding exercise. I always really hated it, and it felt like a waste of time when I could be working. Which was so silly! It gives me more energy, better focus, elevates my mood, and helps me make better food choices because when you make one good choice it becomes easier to make others. Also, full disclosure, it really helps with libido! As a woman who is crazy about her husband but definitely suffered from sloth like tendencies post baby, this has been awesome! Intimacy is such a priority for me, and working out has totally reenergized our relationship. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Ha! Story of my life. Honestly, I lean into it. What those periods mean, usually, is that Im burnt out or theres some big issue in my life or business that isnt working, and Im not dealing with it. In those periods, I let myself rest. And I take a look at whats not working, and I try to develop a solution. If Im simply burnt out, a good rest will leave me totally inspired. And if theres something that isnt working in my life or business, taking time to figure it out becomes the priority. Once the problem is solved, motivation and inspiration return. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Tools of Titans, The One Thing, and Essentialism are all books that deeply influenced my routines and my general philosophy on life. While largely geared towards entrepreneurs, I think their principles can apply to anyone. Knowledge -- Your home birth story was incredibly inspiring and touching. How did you come to the decision to have a natural home birth? Do you have any resources to recommend to future parents thinking of doing the same? Well, Id actually planned to give birth at the hospital for the majority of my pregnancy. I decided to have a home birth weeks before she was due! It was kind of crazy. In the process of writing my birth plan, I realized how against the grain I was going for a hospital birth by simply wanting no medication or unnecessary medical interventions. I didnt want to be swimming upstream while doing the hardest thing I would ever do. If someone is thinking about doing the same, I would say do a lot of research on the quality of midwifery care in your area. Not every area of the world is created equally when it comes to available care. The Farm Midwifery Center has lots of great resources for people considering the option! -- Do you have any tips for surviving or minimizing jetlag, and for dealing with a jetlagged baby? I actually have a whole blog post on traveling with baby! If you are traveling across many, many time zones and its at all possible, build a few extra days into your schedule to take it easy and recover from jetlag. When she was under one year old, we took turns getting up with her those first few nights, and tried to keep her awake as long as possible near bed time. And while I know a lot of people might not be comfortable with this, once she was over one year old we gave her a small, weight appropriate dose of benadryl the first two to three nights to help reset her clock. It was an amazing life saving discovery that our pediatrician approved, and we felt comfortable with after lots and lots of research. If you dont want to do that, you can try melatonin or herbal remedies like No Jet Lag. In the end whether you use anything or not, the baby adjusts much quicker than the adults in my experience! -- Youve masterfully created your own brand, and your photography style is instantly recognizable, yet weve read that you are completely self-taught. What was your path to building such a successful lifestyle brand? What advice would you give to someone who is just starting out? Oh man! I have WAY too much to say about this. Im writing e-courses for 2018 that deal with this very topic. So! My path was to embrace the public learning curve. I didnt wait until I had it all figured out to start. I just started, and I got better as I went along. The better I got, the more readers and opportunities I had. There was no overnight success. There was passion, hard work, and showing up everyday for years. I have ALWAYS focused on two things above all else: content and relationships. I dont deal in mediocre and always strive to produce the best content I possibly can, and I aim to treat everyone I come in contact with love and respect. Those are the foundations, in my estimation, of any successful enterprise. The advice I would give to someone starting out, the short version, is this: First, you need to figure out what youre passionate about and be super specific, start with one thing. For me, that was cooking. You can branch out into other niches later, but start with one. Then you need to figure out the core values of your brand. For instance beauty, mindfulness, and authenticity are some of the core values of Local Milk. This is going to set the tone for all that you do. The next thing, the most important thing, you need to figure out is who youre talking to. Who is you dream customer, client, audience? What do they love? What are their hopes, dreams, fears, struggles? How can you make their lives better? This is where youll get ideas for content, revenue streams, copywriting, and everything. Its so important. You cant skip it. You cant hit a target you arent aiming for, and you need to know what your target audience looks like (eg: is it magazine editors or stay at home moms? or both? why?) and responds to before you go on to create your brand. I could keep going! But Ill leave the nitty gritty details for the e-course! The biggest advice I can give is: Just start! There is ALWAYS room at the top, and NO ONE starts there. -- You are a true believer in the fact that a dream life and dream job is achievable for anyone, even those at their lowest point. Can you tell us a bit more about how you were able to come to this realization? Well, Im living proof, so its an easy thing for me to believe. I spent the first decade of my adult life in the throes of bipolar and drug addiction. Im a high school AND college drop out. I started this business when I was 29 on VERY little money. The only thing Id ever done before this was wait tables. I had to heal myself before I could start this journey, but once I did that, I didnt quit, and I didnt look down. Every small win felt like a huge win to me. I was grateful for the first $20 I was ever paid for a photo. And to be honest, it was probably only worth $20. I have the unshakeable belief that if you work hard at something youre truly passionate about, you cannot fail. But you have to work hard. And you have to be passionate, you have to love it. Before you can do any of it, however, you must take care of yourself spiritually and physically. That was the key to all of my success. Ten years of failure because I could not and would not take care of myself. Once I started, it all just flowed. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? In no particular order: sailing anywhere with clear blue water, Netflix and chill with my husband, and playing Warcraft. Haha! I try to make it to the sea at least once a year, and I love to hang out with my husband doing anything or nothing. When work is done for the day, I like to relax with a good series. And Warcraft is my secret pleasure. Especially when Im really burnt out, and I just need to get away”. I absolutely love video games, specifically WoW, and while I cant play full time anymore, whenever Im taking one of those breaks from work to rejuvenate, Ill get on there for a few days. Im hoping to find time soon to play! Its great because it has NOTHING to do with work. And when you have a lifestyle brand, EVERYTHING can be turned into work! But I think its safe to say the World of Warcraft remains and always will remain firmly off brand! -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Nabokovs Lolita (topic notwithstanding its some of the best writing in the world) Song/­­Album – Songs of Leonard Cohen Movie – The Empire Strikes Back (its my favorite movie, so you know...it sure feeds my soul!) Piece of Art – anything by Cy Twombly -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are a few essential objects that would be in yours? This is actually labeled my minimalist packing list in my evernotes! camera laptop external hard drive phone earphones passport/­­visas wallet medicine dry shampoo brush Cosmetics aesop face wash + exfoliant thayers rose tonic deodorant toothbrush + paste underwear black boots blockshop scarf sunglasses 1 oversized necklace 1 pair earrings 1 hat 2 trousers 2 elizabeth suzann linen tunics 1 over sized sweater 1 silk shift dress 1 pair black tights lauren manoogian capote coat socks -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Heidi Swanson, Jenna Kutcher, Alison Wu, and Melyssa Griffin are my current woman crushes. Photos by Beth Kirby. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Beth Kirby appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Food Under A Bridge

December 14 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

As they say in real estate: Location, Location, Location. While touring around London, I passed by a vegan café in an unlikely place; right under a rail station. Quaintly placed below the stations bridge, The Fields Beneath is a phenomenal little spot to enjoy a coffee or latte and watch the world pass by. I brought a non-vegan friend along with me to share in the experience (and so that I could secretly show him how amazing vegan food is) and he was blown away by the entire scene. This bustling little café was packed to the brim, whipping up plant-based milk lattes left and right. One of the café attendants put together some of their culinary specialties and we couldnt believe the sight of everything when it arrived. We started off with their mind-blowing sweet beet burrito and a veggie burger with homemade cinnamon applesauce on it. Thats right: applesauce. The food was phenomenally flavored, fresh as can be, and as unique as Id ever seen. All coming out of a tiny kitchen under a bridge. We finished up with a pumpkin chia pudding and the best turmeric latte that Ive ever had and headed off to the city. […] The post Vegan Food Under A Bridge appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Black Bean Brownie Bites

December 8 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Black Bean Brownie Bites The moment I placed these brownies in the oven, I started whining like a disgruntled teenager because Luise had persuaded me to only sweeten them with dates and mix a whole can of black beans into the batter. “They are going to taste like sh*t” might have been the carefully formulated phrase I used. Baking brownies was my idea to start with and I usually don’t complain about healthy desserts, but I was tired that day and my mind was set on the caramel-tasting brownies from the bakery across the street. More than the flavor, it was their texture I wanted to recreate. The crusty top and caramel fudge center that you only can achieve with sugar, butter and flour. I knew these would be far from that. And in my mind that was all Luise’s fault. The whining escalated into a discussion (aka argument) and by the time the timer on my phone rang, things were, well, kind of tense between us. I cut off a corner piece of the baked brownie and quickly realized that they weren’t as awful as I had expected. Of course when Luise asked me, I did what any 36-year old teenager would do and grunted: “They were okay I guess”. In reality, they were actually pretty good. They didn’t have that crusty texture or typical sugar taste but they were still sweet, gooey but not heavy, chocolatey, energy packed and rich. I added frosting to make them a little more sassy - using dates as sweetener and avocado and coconut oil for an ultra lush and creamy consistency. They turned out really beautiful and jam-packed with good stuff. Rather than a dessert, I’d say that this is more like an energy bar-style brownie, and I found myself sneaking back to the fridge several times that day for another bite. We’re sharing the recipe and some notes below. But first, check out this little video from our youtube channel where we demonstrate how to make them. Since that first batch of brownies, there have been at least six more batches. A few vegan attempts and various flavor and texture variations. I have gathered a few notes that might come useful in case you want to give them a try. - We use very soft fresh dates that we buy in card board boxes and they are pretty affordable compared to loose weight or medjool dates. Sizes differ so use a scale if you want to be exact. - If you can’t find fresh dates you can use dried dates that you soak in water for a couple of hours. Drain the water before mixing. However, I wouldn’t use dried dates for the frosting as they need the dates to be super soft to achieve a smooth consistency. Try maple syrup instead. - If you arent used to sugar free desserts, you can add a couple of tablespoons maple syrup, honey or sugar to the batter. We have tried this recipe both with and without additional sweetening and they taste good both ways. It all depends on what you are used to and your expectations are. - We use a quite mild olive oil and it works really well with the chocolate flavor (not strong at all). However, if you don’t like olive oil, you can use, coconut oil, rapeseed oil or butter instead. - We have also tried a vegan, egg-free version using aquafaba (chickpea water) that we are sharing at the bottom of the recipe. We also tried making aquafaba using black bean water (because it’s a rest product of the beans in the recipe). It didn’t firm up as much when whisked but it did work as a binder. However, it looked kinda gross and added more bean flavor so we decided to stick with chickpea water instead. - We add coffee to the frosting to disguise the avocado flavor. If you dont like coffee, you can use almond butter or peanut butter instead to give it a flavor twist. - Sea salt flakes are great on top and we love the salt + chocolate combo, but desiccated coconut would also look good. - If you are allergic to nuts, you can mix toasted sunflower seeds into a flour and use instead of almond flour. And use pumpkin seeds instead of walnuts. Black Bean Brownie Bites with Chocolate Avocado Frosting Makes 24 bites These taste sweet but not overly so, see notes above if you prefer to make them sweeter. Vegan version below. 20 soft dates (approx 230 g /­­ 8 oz) 1 1/­­2 cup /­­ 185 g cooked black beans (rinsed) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml olive oil or other neutral oil 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml plant milk or regular milk 3 eggs 1/­­2 cup /­­ 50 g oat flour (or same amount rolled oats, mixed into a flour) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 50 g almond flour 6 tbsp cacao powder 1 tsp baking powder 1 pinch salt 1 handful crushed walnuts (optional) Chocolate Avocado Frosting 6-8 soft dates 3 tbsp coconut oil 2-3 tbsp strong coffee 3 tbsp cacao powder 1 avocado Sprinkle with Sea salt Preheat the oven to 180°C /­­ 350°F. Pit the dates and add them to a food processor along with the rinsed black beans. Mix on high speed. Add oil, milk and eggs (leave out if you are vegan) and mix until smooth. Add almond flour and oat flour (you can make oat flour from rolled oats by simply blending them in a food processor or grinding them in a mortle and pester), cacao powder, baking powder and salt and pulse until everything is mixed. Stir in walnuts (and whipped aquafaba if you are making the vegan version). Place a baking paper in a 28 x 20 cm /­­ 11 x 8 inch rectangular baking dish and bake for 30 minutes. Remove the brownies from the oven once they are firm to touch and leave until completely cool. Make the frosting by mixing all the ingredients in a food processor until completely smooth. Taste and adjust the flavors, adding more dates (or maple syrup if you want it sweeter) and more cacao powder if you want it richer. Spread the frosting over the brownies, sprinkle with sea salt flakes and cut into bite-size pieces. Store in the fridge. To make them vegan: Use 3 tbsp more oat flour. Leave out the eggs and whisk 1/­­3 cup aquafaba (chickpea water) into soft peaks that you stir into the mixed batter together with the walnuts. The vegan version needs approx 45-50 minutes in the oven and will come out slightly stickier but firms up once it cools.

Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford

December 3 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford Trinity Mouzon Wofford is the founder of GOLDE Turmeric, a line of high-quality turmeric blends for golden milk, lattes, and more. We are in love with everything GOLDE, and were so excited to get a peek at its radiant founder’s wellness routine. In this interview, Trinity tells us about her rule-free approach to self-care, her path to self-acceptance, and the importance of giving the body exactly what it’s craving, as well as a Geisha-approved moisturizer that works wonders for her skin, her number one cold remedy that’s likely in your kitchen right now, exercise, beauty, stress, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I think having some form of a routine is crucial to your mental health when you run a business from home. It’s been sort of tricky as of late because we’re in transition from our home in Upstate New York to moving back down to Brooklyn. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. On an ideal day, I’m up around 6:30am and checking my phone for email and GOLDE‘s social media. Following that, I’ll do a bit of stretching to loosen up, and then hop in the shower. After I’ve gotten ready, I’ll sit down to work and make a to-do list for the day -- this is crucial for me. I forget things and get really anxious about what I’m forgetting if I don’t bother to organize my thoughts and tasks in advance. I’ll usually dig into whatever those tasks are for an hour or so before pausing for breakfast. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? My partner, Issey, and I always make sure to have a cut-off time for work, barring emergencies. Once that point rolls around (it varies day-by-day), I’m usually catching up on the news or my favorite blogs while Issey preps dinner. We’ll eat together and then usually end off binging some TV show. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Issey’s miso soup with tons of mushrooms and seaweed. He makes it completely from scratch using his mom’s recipe. Lunch – Lunch is usually whatever is leftover from dinner that week  -- lately its a lot of hearty stews. Snack – We’ll do a little crudite plate with raw veg from the farmer’s market: carrots, turnips, radishes, persian cucumbers. Always with some cheese and seed crackers. Sometimes also with wine. Dinner – Tibetan food from our favorite spot in Jackson Heights, Queens. It’s a lot of dumplings (momos), noodles, and warming soups. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I can’t, really. I love the taste of coffee, but it turns me into a shaking, anxious mess. I always start the day with a turmeric tonic made with one of our blends -- usually cacao or original because the matcha also makes me a bit hyper. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? Yes, yes, yes. I try not to “keep it in check” so much as listen to it with a variety of foods. Sometimes it’s fruit or homemade popcorn with coconut sugar. Sometimes it’s half a box of Dots eaten while laying on the couch. Refined sugar is trash for your system, but so is getting too regimented with your foods. I keep it light (emotionally) and eat what I’m craving. When junk food isn’t off limits, you’re not going to crave it every day. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? Well, turmeric, of course. It makes such a difference in my skin and immunity. Issey loves it for instant allergy relief. There are apparently over 10,000 medical studies on its effects on the body --it’s really incredible. We’re also huge proponents of ashwaghanda in our household. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Upstate New York is not exactly the land of boutique fitness, so it can be more challenging to get in a sweat on the regular. I focus mostly on stretching and going on walks/­­hikes on the weekend. I think I’ve probably gained a bit of weight since I’ve been up here because I’m not moving as much as I did in NYC, but I don’t really mind. It’s okay for your body to fluctuate with your circumstances, as long as you’re treating it with respect. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? It varies. I really like working out as a method to clear my head, so often I do look forward to it. But that said, I don’t really try to push myself too much. If you want to be a world-class athlete, then by all means, train 2+ hours a day. I’m just looking to keep my body and psyche in good health, so if I don’t feel like making it to my workout, I don’t feel the need to punish myself later. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I grew up black in a very white town, so I’ve had a lot of really emotional moments coming to terms with what beauty means for me. At the moment, I like to keep things really natural with my curls out and minimal makeup. It took a while to accept my looks for exactly what they are, so now I’m really openly embracing it. I feel more beautiful now than I did 5 years ago, mostly due to opening myself up to the concept that I’m perfectly fine just as I am. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I try to keep my routine relatively simple. I’ll wash my face with raw African black soap or something gentle like Cerave. I love Drunk Elephant products, and I apply their C-Firma and B-Hydra serums every day. They help a lot with keeping my skin clear and getting rid of dark marks. After that I’ll moisturize with raw shea butter, or a cream that has that. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Turmeric, again. Because it’s anti-inflammatory, I’ve found it to be really helpful in clearing up redness or breakouts. Besides that, I try not to get too bogged down with a ton of supplements. I focus mostly on eating a variety of plants every day. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Shea butter is amazing for my skin. My partner’s Japanese mother recently put me on to this cream called Secret de Maiko. It contains shea butter and a few other natural, organic ingredients. Apparently this is what young Geisha girls would use as a moisturizer/­­makeup base. This cream is better than pure shea butter because it won’t leave you greasy at all. I use it twice daily. It’s great for keeping your skin clear and calm. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Well, cannabis helps. I use a vaporizer pen so there’s no smoke-related health detriments/­­lingering smell. I really want to try the Hmbldt pen because I’m a sucker for sharp design. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? There’s going to stress sometimes. I try to deal in healthy ways like going for a walk to clear my head, or talking to a close friend about whatever I’m dealing with. But life isn’t perfect, so sometimes you just end up being a bit tense for a few days. I think that’s normal and natural -- I try not to fight it too much. You have to let yourself feel it so that you can process it and move past it. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Garlic!! At my old job, everyone in the office knew about this because I would practically through bulbs of raw garlic at anyone who complained of illness. Nothing works better for immediately beating a bad cold. If I feel something coming on, I take 2-3 whole cloves (swallowed like horse pills) with a ton of water. That can save you in just a couple hours -- it’s crazy. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? I really like to work, so what I consider to be a healthy work/­­life balance might not be the right approach for someone else. I genuinely enjoy spending my free time dreaming up new campaigns, product ideas, or designs for GOLDE. I guess that’s the benefit to doing your own thing -- it doesn’t always feel like work. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I’ve gotten a lot better with this with age. I try not to have any food or exercise rules. Being militant about your body is not self-care, and it can really easily spiral into disordered behavior that veers on the edge of “orthorexia.” I mostly just listen to my body and allow itself what it wants, whether that has to do with food, movement/­­exercise, socializing vs. indulging my natural introvert, etc. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? I really think doing away with rules (re: food, etc.) has been the most important change I’ve made. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with avoiding gluten or dairy because it upsets your stomach or causes breakouts, but don’t complicate your life with structure that does not serve you. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Usually moments like these mean I need to re-focus myself. I’ll start by making to-do lists, and go from there. Knowledge -- What was your path to starting GOLDE? I was pre-med at NYU, with plans to practice holistic medicine. By my senior year of college, I wasn’t so sure about spending more time and money on schooling, and sort of fell into a marketing role at a tech startup. I really loved the creative aspects of marketing, and found that GOLDE was a way of combining my interests in sharp branding with making holistic health more accessible. The interest in turmeric actually came from my mom, who has Rheumatoid Arthritis. She noticed a huge difference in her overall levels of inflammation when she started incorporating it into her daily routine -- that’s when I started paying attention. -- How do you approach the sourcing of your ingredients for GOLDE? We actually just started sourcing all of our turmeric with a company called Diaspora Co. They focus 100% on supporting ethical and high-quality spice trade that empowers rather than disenfranchises the people of color who have been growing and ingesting medicinal plants like turmeric for generations. The turmeric that we’re going to be using is an heirloom variety with almost twice the typical amount of curcumin. It’s grown on a fourth-generation, family-owned farm in India, and farmers are paid 6X the standard commodity prices to ensure truly fair wages. We’re really excited to be featuring a product that’s not only incredibly high-quality, but also works to re-build lingering inequality left in the wake of colonialism. -- What’s your favorite way to use your wellness blend? I love to have it just with hot water and raw honey in the morning. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Heading to the Union Square Greenmarket is one of my favorite activities. When I’m in the city, I like to go every Monday morning when it’s not too crowded. It’s mostly just you and the chefs (or their assistants?) shopping for what they’ll be preparing that day. I also love infra red sauna. I go to Higher Dose in the East Village. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Americanah – Chimamanda Ngozie Adichie Song/­­Album – Songs in the Key of Life – Stevie Wonder -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I am nowhere near as regimented as our dear Joan. Usually my suitcase is packed haphazardly with whatever clothing is clean and well-suited for the weather. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? More people of color, please! A few of my favorites: Diane Chang Yaminah Mayo Dr. Tiffany Lester Latonya Yvette Nikisha Brunson Alex Elle Lauren Ash Sana Javeri Kadri Photos by Sana Javeri Kadri, Issey Kobori and Nico Behnzukeh. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

punugulu recipe | how to make andhra punugulu with idli dosa batter

November 26 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

punugulu recipe | how to make andhra punugulu with idli dosa batterpunugulu recipe | how to make andhra punugulu with idli dosa batter with step by step photo and video recipe. traditionally these tasty fritters recipes are prepared as a street food especially in andhra and tamilnadu beaches. basically it is consumed as popular evening snack with a cup of masala chai or with a filter coffee. but i personally enjoy this as a side dish to my dal rice or rasam rice combination for my weekend lunch. Continue reading punugulu recipe | how to make andhra punugulu with idli dosa batter at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Simply Sweet Elegance At Simply Raw Bakery

November 13 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Simply Raw Bakery is simply a delight for anyone with a healthy sweet tooth and a taste for aesthetic splendor. Located on the winding cobbled streets at the heart of Viennas historic inner center, the restaurants stylish exterior blends in with the citys effortless old-style elegant appeal. On late summer days, youre sure to see locals happily sipping coffee over a leisurely lunch while basking in the sun. Yet upon closer examination, youll see that these lunch-goers have quite a different palate than the stereotypical Viennese meat-heavy tastes (think Wienerschnitzels and sausage-filled gulasch stews). Simply Raw brings full flavor to the table with the use of only vegan, gluten-free, organic, and raw wholesome ingredients. The bakery was born from a collaboration of a mother-daughter pair whose original expertise was in textile company management and graphic design, respectively. The artistic backbone of this family affair oozes from the pores of the restaurants interior. From the vintage cozy couches to the overhanging crystal chandelier to the modern piano jazz jams to the glamorous presentation of the plant-based charming creations on dainty china plates, Simply Raw feels like youve stepped into an alternate era of sweet elegance. Most importantly, the attention to artful […] The post Simply Sweet Elegance At Simply Raw Bakery appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Maple Cornbread Biscuits

October 30 2017 Meatless Monday 

The hearty taste of cornbread in a flaky biscuit treat, with banana added for an extra boost of nutrition. Dunk these maple breakfast pastries in coffee and start your day off right. This recipe comes to us from Lindsay of Happy Herbivore. Serves 6 - 1/­­2 cup whole wheat pastry flour - 1/­­2 cup yellow cornmeal - 2 tsp baking powder - 1/­­4 tsp salt - 1/­­2 banana, cold - 1/­­4 cup non-dairy milk - 2 tbsp maple syrup Preheat oven 425 F. Grease a cookie sheet and set aside. In a food processor, combine flour, cornmeal, baking powder and salt and process for about 10 seconds. Add banana and allow and process until flour is pebble-like. Transfer to a mixing bowl and combine mixture with milk and maple syrup, stirring until well combined. Use a spoon to drop 6 biscuits evenly spaced on the cookie sheet. Bake about 7-8 minutes or until edges are just crisp and slightly brown. The post Maple Cornbread Biscuits appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Grandma’s Danish Apple Cake

October 26 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Grandma’s Danish Apple Cake I know what you are thinking. Where is the cake and what is that red sauce? In most other countries this would be called a trifle or a parfait, but in Denmark we call this an old-fashioned apple cake (although our version is modernized). I have the fondest memories leaning over a huge bowl of Gammeldags aeblekage at my grandmother’s kitchen table. It’s made of smooth apple sauce (our version is red) topped with crushed cookie crumbles and whipped cream and it was my favorite dessert in the world. Me and my twin brother spent every other weekend and school holiday at my grandmother’s house. She was the warmest and calmest person we knew, always smiling. My memories are fading but whenever I think of her I can smell the cigarillos she loved to smoke and the hair spray she always wore. And I remember her huge black & white marble coffee table that we often sat around and her warm hugs. She had a big house and rented out one room in the basement, one on the top floor and one in the garden to various tenants. On weekends she baked for everyone in the house. Large batches of spiced pound cake, chocolate cake or her famous (in my world) old-fashioned apple cake. I never thought of it back then but - damn! - she must have been the best landlord. When my twin brother and I were 10 years old she sadly passed away, two days after Christmas, and she left a big hole of emptiness in me. I have been thinking about her so much lately as I have been making this recipe for our kids and telling them stories about her. So this cake and this video is for you grandma. /­­Luise We have actually changed quite a few things from my grandmother’s recipe. We ditched the sugar in the apple sauce (because it’s really not needed if you use sweet apples), replaced cookie crumble with a simple nut and date crumble and used whipped coconut cream on top to make it vegan. But it still tastes a lot like the ones she made. And the texture is ace! It’s sweet and tangy and soft and rich and crunchy. And it’s pretty easy to make as well. 1) Cook apple sauce (or use readymade). 2) Chop toasted nuts and mix with sticky dates. 3) Whip cream. 4) Layer. 5) Dive in. While testing the first version of the recipe, David’s main concern was that it didn’t look pretty enough (typically him). I peeled the apples and didn’t blend the sauce so it did look rather yellow/­­brownish. But he figured out that by using the most deep red apples we could find, kept the peel on, cooked on low heat and then blended the sauce, it got a beautiful pink/­­red color. I’ve never seen an apple sauce looking radiant like that before. Make sure to cook a double batch of the sauce. It’s crazy good on top of yogurt and porridge bowls. We are definitely not experts on whipped coconut cream. We have failed at making it numerous times as different brands behave differently and some simply don’t work at all. Key is keeping it chilled to get the cream to separate from the liquid and the chilling is also essential when whipping. Usually, the cream solidifies so you scoop it out with a spoon, but when making the video above, we used a brand that separated without solidifying so we could simply pour the cream into the bowl while the rest of the liquid stayed at the bottom of the can. If you want to learn more about Whipped Coconut Cream (and which US brands that work best), go read Ashlae’s post on Coconut Whipped Cream. I should also mention that if you are not vegan or too fond of coconut cream, regular whipped cream is just as delicious. Grandma’s Danish Apple Cake Serves 4 If you cant find red apples like ours, you can add a little pomegranate juice or grated beetroot to the apple sauce while mixing to make it more red. Red Apple Sauce 1 kg /­­ 2 lb red apples (use local produce if available) 250 ml /­­ 1 cup water 1 tbsp fresh ginger, grated 1/­­2 tsp ground vanilla powder 1 tsp ground cinnamon (or cardamom) 1 tbsp lemon juice Date & Nut Crumble 180 g /­­ 1 cup almonds 100 g /­­ 1 cup walnuts 8 dates Whipped Coconut Cream (or regular cream) 1 can coconut milk, placed in the fridge for a few hours (or coconut cream or heavy cream) Rinse the apples and chop them in bite size pieces, discarding the core. Place in a large sauce pan along with water, fresh ginger, vanilla powder and cinnamon. Let simmer on low heat for approx 20 minutes or until soft. Meanwhile, place the nuts on a tray and roast at 150°C /­­ 300°F for approx 15 minutes. Remove the stone from the dates and use a knife to chop them or a fork to mash them. Chop the nuts medium fine, reserve a handful a nuts for topping and mix the rest with the date paste into a crumble. Set aside. When the apples are done, use a hand (immersion) blender to mix into a smooth apple sauce. Stir lemon juice into the sauce,  leave to cool or scoop into a large jar and place in the fridge. Scoop out the solid cream from 1 can of chilled coconut milk. Use a hand mixer to whip the coconut cream until it’s fluffy and forms soft peaks. If it feels too runny, place the bowl in the freezer for 10-15 minutes and then try whipping again. If you like it sweetened, you can fold in some maple syrup or vanilla into the cream after it is whipped. If using regular cream, simply whip it until soft peaks form. Place apple sauce as bottom layer in 4 glasses or jars (or use 1 big glass bowl). Top evenly with nut and date crumble and then scoop over whipped cream. Sprinkle chopped nuts on top. Enjoy! They sit quite well in the fridge so they can be prepared a few hours ahead. PS! Yesterday also happened to be Noah’s first birthday! Happy day little man! David usually post a little letter to the kids here on their first birthday but he’s been a little busy lately but promises that he will write it in a later post. Oh, one more thing! The Dutch edition of Green Kitchen At Home has been nominated for Cookbook of the Year in Holland. There are two awards, one is decided by a jury and the other is people’s choice. We’d be super happy if our Dutch readers (or anyone) would like to vote for us. It only takes 30 seconds. Here is the link!


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