clove - vegetarian recipes

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Vegan Pizza Waffles

Palak Kadhi (Spinach Ki Kadhi)

Pineapple Curry

Everyday Pull-Apart Chick’n Seitan










clove vegetarian recipes

Big Hugs Chickn & Rice Soup

January 25 2021 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Big Hugs Chickn & Rice Soup Serves 4-6 Call me an iconoclast but, but I prefer Chickn & Rice Soup to Chickn Noodle! Especially buttery jasmine rice. This soup has all the huggy ingredients: celery, dill, poultry seasoning with sage and thyme and, of course, garlic and onion. As it cooks your kitchen will fill up with the most nurturing aromas, like someone you love is cooking for you. And that someone, dear reader, is you. I used homemade Chickn Seitan, but you can use whatever vegan chicken you like. Or even thinly slice tofu or yuba. Just make sure to brown it nicely first. I also use some vegan butter here, for body and richness, but use all olive oil if you prefer. Its gonna be good! Recipe notes: ~ If the pot youre cooking in is wide enough, like a dutch oven, you should be able to brown the chickn in there before preparing the rest of the soup. Save yourself a dish, plus create little crispy bits that get swept up into the soup when you saute everything else. If youre using a stainless steel pot that is more tall than wide, its probably wiser to saute the chickn in a skillet and prepare the soup separately. Ingredients 1 tablespoon olive oil 2 cups chickn seitan, pulled into 1 to 2 inch pieces (8 oz) 2 tablespoons vegan butter (I used Miyokos) 1 medium yellow onion, thinly sliced 2 cups carrots, in 1/­­2 inch chunks 2 ribs celery, thinly sliced 3 cloves garlic, minced 1 teaspoon poultry seasoning 1 teaspoon salt Fresh black pepper 1/­­2 cup white jasmine rice, rinsed 8 cups broth 1/­­4 cup fresh dill, chopped, plus extra for garnish Directions Preheat a 4 quart pot over medium heat. Saute chickn in olive oil with a pinch of salt until nicely browned. Remove from pot and set aside.  Saute onion in butter with a pinch of salt for about 5 minutes, until translucent. Add carrots and celery and cook for about 5 minutes. Add garlic and saute until fragrant, about a minute, using a little extra butter if you like. Add poultry seasoning, salt and pepper and saute a minute more. Add rice and broth. Cover and bring to a boil. Once boiling, bring down to a simmer, and let cook for about 15 more minutes, until rice is cooked and carrot is tender. Stir in the chickn and dill and taste for salt and pepper. This definitely tastes better the longer you let it sit, but it can be enjoyed right away, too. Garnish with extra dill and serve!

Cabbage and Lemon Risotto

January 20 2021 Golubka Kitchen 

Cabbage and Lemon Risotto I find risotto to be incredibly fun to cook. I like to have something nice to sip by my side, some good music on, and all the ingredients measured out in advance. It’s a preparation process that really gets you in the zone, an almost meditative state of tending to the rice, and watching it magically transform from dry to beautifully creamy. Risotto has a reputation of being fussy, and although it requires constant attention, the ingredients it calls for couldn’t be more modest: alliums like onions and garlic, rice, wine, hot broth, and whatever other items you’d like to add to make it your own. In this recipe, it’s cabbage and lemon, both abundant in the depths of winter. Once you get the hang of it, the preparation becomes second nature as well. We gently stew the cabbage in lemon juice until incredibly tender, so much so that it completely melts and disappears into the risotto. It’s a great way to eat a whole head of cabbage almost without noticing. The bright and assertive flavors from the lemon juice and zest complement the starchiness and richness of the rice really nicely. A small warning: this risotto is quite lemony, so if you’re sensitive to sour flavors, I recommend reducing the amount of lemon (this is detailed in the recipe as well). Also, the lemon mellows out as it sits and in the leftovers. Since this is a vegan recipe, there’s no cheese, but we throw together a quick, ‘cheesy’ cashew dust, a cashew Parm of sorts, and stir it through the risotto. The result is so incredibly cozy and comforting, we hope you’ll give it a try one day this winter! Cabbage and Lemon Risotto   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients ¼ cup raw cashews 1 teaspoon nutritional yeast sea salt freshly ground black pepper olive oil 1 medium head white cabbage, thinly sliced with a knife or mandoline zest and juice from 2 small lemons (see note) 1 yellow onion, diced 4 garlic cloves, minced 1½ cups Arborio rice ¼ cup dry white wine 6 cups hot vegetable broth, plus more if needed parsley or other herbs for garnishing (optional) Instructions Pound the cashews in a mortar and pestle or process in a mini food processor, until finely ground. Add the nutritional yeast, a generous pinch of salt, and plenty of black pepper. Mix to combine. Set aside for now. Heat a large skillet over medium heat and add enough oil to generously coat the bottom. Add the cabbage and a pinch of salt, and cook for 10 minutes, until the cabbage is just wilted. Add the juice of 1 lemon and stir it in. Turn the heat down to low, and cover the skillet. Cook the cabbage, covered, for 45 minutes, stirring periodically, until very soft. Transfer the cabbage to a bowl and wipe the skillet if needed. Heat the same skillet over medium heat and add more oil to coat the bottom well. Add the onion and a pinch of salt, saute for 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the garlic and stir it around until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the rice and mix well to coat it with the oil. Cook, stirring constantly, until the rice grains are translucent, about 3-5 minutes. Add the juice of 1 remaining lemon and the wine, bring it up to a simmer and cook, stirring often, until the liquid is completely absorbed, about 2 minutes. Start adding the hot broth, one ladleful at a time. Bring the broth to a simmer and let it absorb into the rice, stirring often, about 2-4 minutes. Once absorbed, add another ladleful of broth and keep repeating this process of letting the broth absorb, then adding more. Stir the rice frequently and vigorously - this will help develop the starches/­­make the rice creamy. Add about half of the cabbage during the 4th addition of broth. Add the rest of the cabbage at the next addition of broth, and continue cooking, until the rice is creamy and al dente, and until the cabbage has collapsed completely into the risotto. The whole cooking process should take 25-30 minutes total from the first addition of broth. Turn off the heat, mix in the lemon zest and most of the cashew mixture, saving some for garnishing. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve the risotto right away, garnished with more of the cashew dust and herbs, if using. Notes This dish is quite lemony, so if you are sensitive to sour flavors, use 1 lemon, divided between the cabbage and the rice, instead of the 2 lemons that the recipe calls for. 3.5.3226 The post Cabbage and Lemon Risotto appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Tempeh Meatballs & Spaghetti

January 7 2021 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Tempeh Meatballs & Spaghetti Serves 2 to 4 Photo By VK Rees So many of my best memories revolve around a big juicy meatball, and lots of slurpy, garlicky marinara. My grandmas dinner table with a big platter of her meatballs right in the center of it, always featuring a few burnt ones that everyone in the family tried to grab before anyone else could. My best friends mom, a beautiful Italian woman with jet black hair and catlike blue eyes, feeding me almost every night of the week. And later, when I went vegetarian, cooking tofu balls and spaghetti with my mom and sis. Even decades later, when I lived in a loft with no heat, every Sunday night my roommates and I would watch Sopranos and eat spaghetti and meatballs, made from some storebought soy sausage stuff.  Well, this recipe is none of those exactly, but its a mishmash of all those experiences. I love the texture of tempeh in meatballs, its succulent and satisfying. A few condiments and pantry spices give me the childhood flavors that I crave. Definitely double this recipe if you feel like it, and dont forget to burn a few…those are always the best loved.  The method of simmering tempeh here is one that is so useful when you want a more neutral flavor! Learn it, live it. This recipe is from Isa Does It. Ingredients For the meatballs: 16 ounces tempeh 1 cup water 1 tablespoon tamari or soy sauce 1 tablespoon olive oil 2 cloves garlic, minced 3 tablespoons ketchup 1 tablespoon dijon mustard 1/­­2 teaspoon dried oregano 1/­­2 teaspoon dried thyme 1/­­2 teaspoon salt Several dashes fresh black pepper 1/­­2 cup very finely chopped yellow onion 1 cup panko breadcrumbs Olive oil for pan frying For the rest: 8 oz spaghetti 4 cups marinara, storebought or homemade Red pepper flakes Fresh black pepper Directions Boil a pot of salted water for spaghetti.  Meanwhile, crumble tempeh in small pieces into a 2 quart pot. Submerge in a cup of water, a tablespoon soy sauce and one tablespoon olive oil. Cover and bring to a boil. Once boiling, lower heat and simmer, with the lid slightly ajar so that steam can escape, for 15 minutes. Most of the water should be absorbed. If there is excess water, drain and place tempeh in a mixing bowl and place in the freezer to cool It should take 10 minutes or so, give it a stir after 5 minutes to make it cool evenly. In the meantime, prepare your onions. Once cool, add garlic, ketchup, mustard, oregano, thyme, salt and pepper then mix well. Mix in the onions. Now add the breadcrumbs and use your hands to mix until it holds together very well. If it seems loose, add extra breadcrumbs by the tablespoon until you can form very tight, compact balls. Scoop up about golfball sized amounts and roll between your hands to form the balls. Your water should be boiling at this point, so cook the spaghetti now. When its ready, drain and toss with marinara in the pot you boiled it in. Keep covered and hot until ready to eat. Preheat a large non-stick pan (preferably cast iron) over medium heat. Coat the pan with a thin layer of olive oil. Add meatballs one by one, rolling them in the pan to coat in oil. If your pan is not big enough to fit all of the balls comfortably, then do them in two batches. Pan fry for about 10 minutes, rolling them frequently, to cook evenly.  Serve spaghetti in big bowls, with three or four meatballs each. Top with extra red pepper flakes or fresh black pepper and slurp it up!

Cast Iron Seitan Steak & Onions

December 30 2020 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Cast Iron Seitan Steak & Onions Serves 2 to 4 If youre from Brooklyn — and youre probably not even though you say you are — then you celebrate with steak. Everyone knows this from every movie. Cavernous steakhouses that date back to the last, last century lurking all over the city, tucked under bridges or beside a forgotten waterway, with their historical plaques, creaky wood floors, and signed Frank Sinatra portraits on the wall.  Well, 2020 is over and its time to celebrate Brooklyn style. Whether its a night of somber reflection or one of dancing and drinking (in your own home with only your household members and/­­or just your cat) this recipe works. Its a visceral activity unto itself, injected with whatever meaning you need it to have.  Basically, youll work a pliable ball of gluten until its goth red and gristle-y. Then you roll and pound it. Throw it into a hissing cast iron pan to sear. Smoke. Fire. Sizzles. Who needs fireworks? I was striving for something that could come together in one pot. I like baking seitan, but it does tend to dry things out and I wanted this to be juicy (pronounced JUSAY). Enter sear/­­braise. The steaks are cooked, removed from the pan then you create a rich au jus with onions, garlic and red wine. Some miso for that savory je ne sais quoi. And the seared steaks are placed back in to cook through. The end result is some of the best seitan I have ever had! Seared and smoky, firm but tender. And totally juicy (pronounced JUSAY). Plus it comes with its own sauce, perfect for slathering. Serve with mashed potatoes or crinkle cut fries. Or anything starchy and awesome. Happy New Year.  Recipes Notes ~ I tested this recipe using tamari, but something was missing. The Braggs Liquid Aminos really upped the flavor game here, adding nuance and just kind of this steak sauce flavor that really popped. I recommend it! Not only because you get a bottle with Patricia Braggs floral hat printed on it, but its a nice ingredient to have around for when youre like This rice needs to taste more hippy. ~ Beet powder is another fabulous ingredient. It honestly doesnt have much flavor in small quantities but adds so much color! You can try to use whole beets or whatever you are going to do but I didnt try that and any adjustments to liquid and dry ingredients in this recipe will change the texture dramatically. Ive found it in stores but Amazon is evil and the most reliable place to get it.  ~ If you dont have a cast iron pan, then….wait, why dont you? Get one. You need that hot sizzle when it hits the pan and nothing else will give you that.  ~ The broth you use will affect the outcome. Make sure it isnt too salty because the sauce reduces a lot. If youre using a concentrated bullion mixed with water, that is fine, but go light with it and taste as you go to see if it needs more. ~ I used Bobs Vital Wheat Gluten. If you use a different one, results may vary. Why? Protein content, probably. Not all VWG has the same amount. They should standardize this for our vegan future. ~ I really cant see one person eating a full steak like this, so I dont know, prove me wrong. Aesthetically I wanted it to be this big, but realistically, it serves four. Ingredients For the Steaks 1 1/­­4 cups vital wheat gluten 2 tablespoon nutritional yeast 2 tablespoons beet powder 2 teaspoons lemon pepper (salt free) 1 teaspoon onion powder 1/­­2 teaspoon mild mustard powder 2/­­3 cup water at room temp 3 tablespoons Braggs liquid aminos 2 tablespoons tomato paste 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 teaspoons red wine vinegar Everything else: Olive oil for cooking 1 medium onion, sliced 4 cloves garlic, minced 1/­­2 cup dry red wine 2 tablespoons red miso 3 bay leaves Fresh black pepper 1/­­4 teaspoon dried thyme 4 cups veggie broth Fresh parsley for garnish To serve: Mashed potatoes or crinkle cut fries. Instagram seems to go gaga over crinkle cut fries. Or any potatoes, really. A baked potato would be just fine! Also a green veggie. Nothing with too much flavor because this has a lot! Directions In a large mixing bowl, combine wheat gluten flour, nutritional yeast, lemon pepper, onion powder and mustard powder. Make a well in the center. In a small bowl, mix together water, aminos, tomato paste, olive oil and vinegar until the tomato paste is incorporated.  Add wet ingredients to the well and mix until a lumpy ball forms. It will appear a bit dry. Now, use your hands (with gloves if you have them) to knead the mixture until all ingredients are incorporated and there are no dry spots. If its very cold in the kitchen, you may have a harder time kneading. Moisten your hands with warm water and keep going, it should take about 3 minutes and appear very stretchy.  Divide the ball in half with a knife. Again, if its cold, the seitan might spring back more so this process will take a big longer. On a large cutting board, flatten the dough into a kidney shape that is roughly 3/­­4 inch thick and 8 inches in length. Use a rolling pin to roll, flatten and form. Let the first one rest while you do the second one.  Let both doughs rest about 10 minutes, for the gluten to relax a bit, then repeat the rolling process. Again, its more resistant if your kitchen is very cold so you might need to let it rest one more time.  As the steaks rest the surfaces will get a little smoother, which if what you want for the sear and appearance.  Preheat the cast iron grill over medium high. It should be very hot and water should immediately evaporate. This is important because you want the steak to hiss immediately so that is sears and does not stick.  Pour in a thin layer of olive oil to coat the bottom of the pan. Add the steaks and sear until dark brown, but not burnt, about a minute and a half per side. Use a thin metal spatula to flip steaks. Once they are seared, lower the heat to medium and let them cook until somewhat firm, about 10 more minutes, flipping and pressing down on them with the spatula.  Now we are going to remove the steaks and cook the sauce in that same pan. Place steaks on a plate.  Turn heat up to medium high. Drizzle about 2 tablespoons of olive oil into the pan. Add onions and a small pinch of salt and sear the onions for about 3 minutes. Add the garlic and a little more oil if needed and cook for about 2 more minutes, stirring often.   Add the wine and stir to deglaze and reduce, about 3 minutes. Mix in the miso to dissolve. Add bay leaves, a healthy dose of fresh black pepper (1/­­2 teaspoon or so), thyme and veggie broth. Let the broth warm, reduce heat to medium. Once warm, return the steaks to the brothy pan and submerge, spooning broth and onions over. Cover the pan and let cook for about 30 minutes. The broth should be simmering this whole time, but not boiling too rapidly.  OK were almost done! Remove the cover and flip the steaks. Turn the heat up and let sauce reduce for about 15 minutes uncovered. The broth will get really boily and active. Spoon sauce over the steaks while they cook. The steaks should no longer appear submerged and the sauce should be thickened a bit and really flavorful. Taste for salt.  Let sit for 10 minutes or so before serving. Remove bay leaves and garnish with parsley.

Gingerbread People

December 20 2020 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Gingerbread People Makes around 16 cookies Photo by James Walmsley Whether youre going all out with your decorating or you’re a part of the gingerbread minimalist movement, this recipe is a surefire winner that will have you singing Christmas carols to your cat. Or at least that one Pogues song. This recipe has been on the site since the dawn of time, so let me take this moment to suggest that you color your icing with natural stuff simply because its fun and pretty. There are certainly vegan food colorings out there, too. But its nice to have these ingredients on hand for other baking projects when you want to slay Instagram. Pink: beet powder, freeze dried strawberries grated with a microplane  Hot pink/­­fucscia: dragonfruit powder Orange: freeze dried mango (its more peach, not very saturated) Green: matcha powder Purple: freeze dried blackberries or blueberries grated with a microplane Blue: spirulina, butterfly pea flower powder (turns purple with acidic ingredients) Ingredients For the cookies: 1/­­3 cup canola oil 3/­­4 cup granulated sugar 1/­­4 cup light molasses 1/­­4 cup plain unsweetened vegan milk 2 cups all purpose flour 1/­­2 teaspoon baking soda 1/­­2 teaspoon baking powder 1/­­2 teaspoon salt 1/­­2 teaspoon ground nutmeg 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/­­4 teaspoon ground cloves 1 1/­­2 teaspoons ground ginger For the icings: 2 cups confectioners sugar, sifted if clumpy 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice 1/­­4 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 tablespoons warm water Directions In a large bowl whisk together oil and sugar for about 3 minutes. Add molasses and milk. The molasses and milk wont really blend with the oil but thats ok. Sift in half the flour, all the baking powder, soda and salt and all the spices and mix until relatively smooth. Add the remaining flour. Mix until a stiff dough is formed.  Form the dough into a disd, wrap in plastic wrap and chill for an hour or up to 3 days in advance. If you chill longer than an hour you may want to let it sit for 10 minutes to warm up a bit before proceeding. Preheat oven to 350 F. Spray two parchment lined baking sheets with cooking oil.  On a lightly floured surface roll the dough out to a little less than 1/­­4 inch thick. Cut shapes with cookie cutters and use a thin spatula to gently place on cookie sheets. If you are using them to decorate a tree or something, remember to punch a hole in their heads (!) before baking. Bake for 8 minutes if they’re small and up to 12 minutes if they’re large, but be careful not to overbake. They should be lightly brown on the bottom but still soft. Remove from oven and let them cool for 2 minutes on the baking sheet then move to a cooling rack. Wait until they are completely cool before icing. Meanwhile, make the glaze: Mix everything together until there are no lumps. Let it sit for 30 minutes or so to set up a bit. If it is too stiff to pipe, add water a teaspoon at a time. Decorate with a piping bag fit with a small, round tip. Be adorable. Look at Pinterest first for ideas Let set for at least 30 minutes.

Baked Red Lentil & Vegetable Fritters with Maple Mustard Sauce

December 9 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Baked Red Lentil & Vegetable Fritters with Maple Mustard Sauce I made this recipe on a whim when cooking dinner about a month ago and shared the process on our IG stories. It seemed to resonate, and we absolutely loved how it turned out. I’m finally getting around to sharing the recipe here. These fritters are inspired by the Bengali piyaju, as well as the Korean bindae-tteok, both fritters/­­panckes that are made with legumes in the batter. Soaked and blended red lentils act as a binder in these fritters. No chia or flax, or any other binders needed! We pack the red lentil batter with a bunch of veggies: grated carrot, onion, broccoli, garlic, as well some spices. We then bake the fritters instead of frying them. If I can avoid frying, I always do, to save time and avoid smoking up the kitchen. I think that these guys come out just as golden, crispy, and lacy-edged when baked at a high temperature, as they do when fried. We are just letting the oven do the frying :)  The final product is so savory and addictive, it’s impossible not to eat them all in one sitting. To serve with, there’s a really easy and quick maple mustard dipping sauce that really takes this whole recipe over the top. We hope that you’ll give these fritters a try! Baked Red Lentil & Vegetable Fritters with Maple Mustard Sauce   Print Serves: about 12-13 3½ fritters Ingredients for the fritters 1 medium carrot, grated 1 small yellow onion, peeled and grated florets from 2 very small or 1 medium-small head broccoli, grated ½ teaspoon salt, plus more for sprinkling the vegetables 1 cup red lentils, soaked in water overnight 1 garlic clove, roughly chopped ¼ teaspoon smoked paprika pinch chili flakes avocado oil or olive oil for the sauce ⅓ cup vegan mayonnaise 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard (or 1 tbsp Dijon and 1 tbsp grainy mustard) 2 tablespoons maple syrup Instructions to make the fritters Preheat the oven to 425° F (220° C). Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper. Put the grated carrot, onion, and broccoli in a colander, set over a bowl. Sprinkle with a generous pinch of salt and mix to coat. Let the vegetables sit and release water while preparing the batter. Drain and rinse the lentils. In a food processor, combine the lentils, ½ teaspoon salt, garlic, paprika, and chili flakes. Process until smooth. Transfer the batter to a medium bowl. Using your hands, squeeze as much excess water out of the vegetables as you can. Transfer the vegetables to the bowl with the batter and mix to combine. Start forming the fritters on the prepared baking sheet by putting dollops of the batter on the sheet and flattening them out with a spoon. Flatten out from the center to achieve the uneven fritter-like edges, and leave at least an inch between the fritters. Aim for fritters about 3½ in diameter and just under ¼ in thickness. Brush generously with oil and bake for 20 minutes. Carefully flip the fritters using a flat spatula, brush with more oil, and bake for 10 more minutes, until the undersides are golden, and the edges are crispy. You will likely need to bake the fritters in a few batches. to make the sauce In a small bowl, combine the mayo, mustard, and maple syrup. Mix until smooth. Serve as a dipping sauce for the fritters. Notes If your food processor has a grating attachment, its very convenient to use to grate the vegetables for these fritters. 3.5.3226 The post Baked Red Lentil & Vegetable Fritters with Maple Mustard Sauce appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Gingerbread Cookies – Gluten-free & Grain-free

December 1 2020 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Gingerbread Cookies – Gluten-free & Grain-freeGrain-free and gluten-free vegan gingerbread cookies that are perfectly spiced, and crisp. Make them with your kiddos and have them help with icing them! Look at that gingerbread goodness. Don’t they look jolly? They are crisp and melt in your mouth at the same time, and perfectly spiced – everything you’d expect from a holiday cookie but they are gluten-free and grain-free. You can totally get the kids involved with this easy gluten-free gingerbread men recipe. The dough comes together quite easily but it’s really the decoration part where the fun’s at! For my gingerbread men frosting, I went with a simple mix of powdered sugar and coconut cream! This is the perfect and most simple frosting for these little festive fellows. You will find the smell hard to resist whilst baking! Really, impossible not to get all the cozy feels. Put on some festive tunes, don the apron and let’s get baking! These guys are: - Crispy on the edges - Soft the center if you bake for shorter time  – so addictive - Packed with those holiday spices -molasses, ginger, cinnamon, allspice, clove and nutmeg - Begging to be frosted but hey they also taste amazing as they are MORE HOLIDAY RECIPES FROM THE BLOG: - Marbled Chocolate pumpkin spice Snickerdoodles Gf - Triple Ginger Molasses cookies - Gingerbread cake Mix in a jar. GF - Pumpkin ginger snaps  - Chocolate dipped sugar Cookies. GF - Ginger tahini cookies - Gingerbread Biscotti  If you do not have gingerbread cookie cutters but still want that gingerbread magic in your mouth, you could just bake them into little rounds! Happy holidays, friends!Continue reading: Vegan Gingerbread Cookies – Gluten-free & Grain-freeThe post Vegan Gingerbread Cookies – Gluten-free & Grain-free appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Indonesian Noodles with Tempeh

August 28 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Indonesian Noodles with Tempeh The answer is: Indonesian Noodles with Tempeh. Here’s the question: What is easy to make, tastes great, features a delicious sauce made with peanut butter and coconut milk, and contains more than 30 grams of plant protein per serving? This is just one of the protein-packed recipes you’ll find in my new book, The Plant Protein Revolution Cookbook. Enjoy! Indonesian Noodles with Tempeh Tofu or seitan can be used instead of tempeh, if you prefer. You can also make this dish using cooked rice instead of noodles. - 8 ounces (225 g) rice vermicelli (or use cooked spaghetti) - 2 tablespoons (30 ml) water, or 1 tablespoon (15 ml) avocado oil - 8 ounces (225 g) braised tempeh, cut into 1/­­2-inch [1 cm] dice - 1/­­3 cup (70 ml) tamari - 1/­­2 cup (130 g) creamy natural peanut butter - 2/­­3 cup (140 ml) low-fat unsweetened coconut milk - 2 tablespoons (30 ml) fresh lemon juice - 1 to 2 teaspoons sambal oelek or other Asian chili paste (depending on how spicy you want it) - 1 teaspoon natural sugar - 11/­­4 cups (295 ml) water - 1 red bell pepper, seeded and chopped - 6 cups (420 g) chopped bok choy - 1 large carrot, shredded - 1/­­2 cup (50 g) chopped scallions, white and green parts - 3 garlic cloves - 1 tablespoon (8 g) grated fresh ginger - 1 cup (134 g) frozen peas, thawed - 1/­­4 cup (35 g) chopped unsalted dry-roasted peanuts - 2 tablespoons (8 g) minced fresh cilantro - Soak the rice vermicelli in hot water until softened, about 5 minutes. Drain well, rinse, and set aside. - Heat the water in a large skillet or wok over medium-high heat. Add the tempeh and 1 tablespoon (15 ml) of the tamari and cook until the tempeh is browned on all sides. Remove the tempeh from the skillet and set aside. - In a food processor, combine the peanut butter, coconut milk, lemon juice, sambal oelek, sugar, and the remaining 4 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon (64 ml) tamari. Add 1 cup (235 ml) of the water and process until smooth, then set aside. - Heat the remaining 1/­­4 cup (60 ml) of water in a large skillet or wok over medium-high heat. Add the bell pepper, bok choy, carrot, scallions, garlic, and ginger and cook, stirring occasionally until softened, about 10 minutes. - Reduce the heat to low and stir in the peas and the reserved tempeh. Add the reserved noodles, stir in the sauce, and simmer until the noodles are hot and well coated with the sauce. Serve garnished with peanuts and cilantro.      The post Indonesian Noodles with Tempeh appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Gazpacho with Spicy Red Lentils

July 22 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Gazpacho with Spicy Red Lentils A thing I learned this year that I can’t believe I didn’t know before is that traditional Andalusian gazpacho recipes include bread, which gets blended (originally pounded in a mortar and pestle) into the soup. Making gazpacho this way was definitely a revelation, since it comes out so silky, rich, and astoundingly flavorful considering the modest amount of ingredients involved. There’s a seemingly never-ending heat wave happening where we are, and cold soups are all I want. To make the gazpacho into a little more of a meal, I often serve it with a few spoonfuls of red lentils, which I generally prepare on the spicy and salty side. They sort of take the place of croutons in my mind, though more nourishing and flavorful. A bowl like that, garnished with basil and maybe some yogurt is so perfectly satisfying on a summer night. I hope you’ll enjoy it as well! P.S. For a variation on this theme, check out our Red Lentil Gazpacho from a few years ago. Gazpacho with Spicy Red Lentils   Print Serves: 4 as a side Ingredients for the gazpacho about 6 small-medium tomatoes (1½-2 lbs) - cored and quartered 1 red bell pepper - seeded and roughly chopped 3-4 slices day old bread - crust removed (about 4-5 oz without crust) 1 clove garlic - roughly chopped ⅓ cup olive oil 1 tablespoon + ½ teaspoon red wine vinegar small handful of basil, plus more for serving sea salt freshly ground black pepper for the spicy red lentils olive oil 1 small yellow onion - diced sea salt 1 clove garlic - minced ¼-1/­­2 teaspoon red pepper flakes (or to taste) ¼ teaspoon smoked paprika ½ cup red lentils Instructions to make the gazpacho Combine the tomatoes, bell pepper, bread, garlic, olive oil, vinegar, basil, salt and pepper to taste in an upright blender. Blend until very smooth. If all your ingredients dont fit in the blender, quickly pulse up just the vegetables, which will make room for the rest of the ingredients. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Optionally, strain the gazpacho through a fine mesh strainer for an extra silky texture. Transfer the soup to a container, cover and put in the refrigerator to cool very well for at least 2 hours or overnight. Serve cold as is or garnished with yogurt, basil, and/­­or the spicy red lentils. to make the spicy red lentils Heat a medium pot over medium heat and add enough olive oil to lightly coat the bottom. Add the onion and a pinch of salt and saute for 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the garlic, red pepper flakes, and smoked paprika and saute for another minute, until fragrant. Add the lentils, 1½ cups of water, and more salt to taste. Bring to a simmer. Simmer, covered, for 15-20 minutes, stirring periodically, until the lentils are cooked through but still al dente in parts. Let cool a bit and either serve the lentils on the gazpacho warm, at room temperature, or cold out of the refrigerator - all three ways taste great. Notes You can use the crust left over from the bread to make croutons. 3.5.3226 The post Gazpacho with Spicy Red Lentils appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Zucchini and Herb Hummus

June 17 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Zucchini and Herb Hummus There is a stand at the local St. Petersburg farmer’s market that sells the most delicious hummus. I got to talking with the owner one day, and she pointed out that the hummus is made without chickpeas, which I myself didn’t notice when trying a sample. She makes it this way is because of a legume intolerance and uses zucchini in place of chickpeas. The zucchini gives the dip that creamy texture and fairly neutral flavor that usually comes from the chickpeas. With the addition of tahini and lemon juice, the ingredient swap is almost unnoticeable. I thought it would be fun to try making a version of that hummus at home, and to share the recipe here. This dip is so fresh. It’s packed with herbs, and the zucchini makes it light and fluffy. Hope you’ll give it a try this summer. Also, if you’re looking for an easy recipe for crackers to go with this hummus, this one is great. P.S. Thank you so much for your support on our new weeknight recipe ebook! In case you missed it, you can check it out/­­purchase here. Zucchini and Herb Hummus   Print Serves: about 3 cups Ingredients 3 medium-large zucchini - halved lengthwise 2 teaspoons olive oil, plus more for drizzling the zucchini sea salt freshly ground black pepper ¼ cup tahini zest and juice from 1 large lemon 3 cloves garlic - roughly chopped a few large handfuls fresh herbs (dill, parsley, basil, etc.) Instructions Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Put the zucchini on a parchment-covered baking sheet, cut side up. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast the zucchini for 30-35 minutes, until knife-tender. Let cool for at least 15 minutes. In a food processor, combine the roasted zucchini, olive oil, tahini, lemon zest and juice, garlic, herbs, sea salt, and black pepper to taste. Process until smooth. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Transfer the hummus to a sealable container and let cool in the refrigerator for at least an hour before enjoying. 3.5.3226 New Ebook! This ebook is a collection of straightforward, plant-based recipes for busy people who love to cook. Each recipe was developed to be weeknight-friendly, with shorter cooking times and easier prep. Whole, plant foods are featured prominently throughout the ebook and make up the bulk of these vibrant, weeknight meals. Click Here to Buy   The post Zucchini and Herb Hummus appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegetable Biryani (Instant Pot)

June 5 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Vegetable Biryani (Instant Pot) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Vegetable Biryani (Instant Pot) This next recipe is due to many of you requesting I do a tasty and delicious recipe using the Instant Pot. I decided to try a recipe for "Vegetable Biryani". I have been a little hesitant to do recipes using the Instant Pot. Maybe it's because I have been cooking for so long and I'm set in my habits, or maybe it's my age! I will say I have loved using my Instant Pot more as a pressure cooker and love using it for that purpose! I make lentils and legumes using the Instant Pot and think it's great. Once I use the Instant Pot more and get used to the timings, I think it will allow me to give more precise times for my recipes. Vegetable Biryani is a complete, satisfying, one-dish meal. My mother would often say this dish is a fancy name for vegetable pulao. However, I think it is more than that. The secret behind this flavorful Vegetable Biryani is a spice mixture that creates the perfect balance of flavors. Basmati rice with a mix of fresh vegetables combined with this spice mixture turns into a dish of perfection! If you follow my steps, you'll see I try to make this recipe as simple as possible. Vegetable Biryani also makes a great lunch box meal. Make sure to check out the footnotes to see how you can make this dish vegan. Hope you enjoy! This recipe will serve 3 Course Main Course Cuisine Indian Keyword Bhojan, Bondi Raita, cooking shows, Cooking Video, Delicacy, delicious, Desi Khana, Gluten Free, Gourmet food, Homemade, Instant Pot, Jain Cooking, Khana, Lunch Box, Mint Lassi, One Pot Meal, Onion Garlic Free Cooking, Recipe videos, Rice Dish, Sattvic Food, Swaminarayan Prep Time 10 minutes Cook Time 30 minutes Total Time 40 minutes Servings 3 people Ingredients1 cup long grain rice I preferred Basmati Rice 3 Tbsp Milk 1 pinch Saffron Kesar few strands 2 Tbsp oil or ghee 1/­­4 cup cashews 15 Raisins 1 Tbsp ginger thinly sliced 2 cup mixed vegetables cubed potatoes, carrots, bell pepper, green beans cut into 1-inch pieces, cauliflower florets 1/­­4 cup Plain Yogurt whisked 1/­­4 cup Mint leaves Pudhina finely chopped 1 1/­­4 cup Water Spices3 whole Green Cardamom Elaichi 6 Cloves Laung 8 Black Peppercorns 1 inch long cinnamon stick Dalchini 2 Bay leaf Tej Patta 1 tsp Cumin seeds Jeera 1 tsp coriander powder 1 tsp fennel seed powder 1 tsp red chili powder adjust to taste 1/­­4 tsp Turmeric Haldi 1 tsp Salt adjust to taste InstructionsIn warm milk soak the saffron and keep aside. Soak the rice for about 10 minutes, then drain the water and keep aside. Use the instant pot on sauté mode add ghee after half a minute add cashews and raisins and sauté lightly roast them for about 1 minutes. Add all the whole spices and sauté for 30 seconds, they will become aromatic. Add all the dry spices, coriander powder, fennel seed powder, turmeric, red chili powder and salt stir for few seconds, add vegetables and yogurt mix it well, cleaning sides and making sure vegetable mix spread evenly in the pot. Next spread the rice evenly over the veggies. Spread the mint leaves evenly over rice. Sprinkle saffron milk on top of the rice. Add the water for cooking on top of the rice. Rice should be just immersed under water. You are layering the ingredients do not stir in between the steps. Close the lid with vent in sealing position. Change the instant pot setting to pressure cook mode. Secure the lid, close the pressure valve and cook for 9 minutes at high pressure. After the instant pot beeps, on the instant pot panel you will notice keep warm mode. Cancel the keep warm mode and wait until it releases the pressure and open the pot, that will take about 12 minutes. Open the pot and fluff the rice gently with a fork. NotesServe hot with Plain yogurt, Spinach Raita, and my favorite is Salted Mint Lassi Making Vegan: This is a easy recipe to make vegan, soak saffron in water instead of milk and yogurt you can replace with vegan yogurt or tomato puree. The post Vegetable Biryani (Instant Pot) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Lemon-Dill White Bean & Potato Soup

May 13 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Lemon-Dill White Bean & Potato Soup Coming to you with a recipe that feels simultaneously springy and warming. Spring here in the Northeast has been on the chillier side, and smoothies and big, raw salad lunches feel pretty far away. We’re still eating lots of soups/­­stews, and not hesitating to turn on the oven to roast vegetables. We’re also going through a BIG dill obsession in our household. It’s just such a unique herb, perfect at brightening up whatever dish it touches. We’ve been having tons of it in the form of lemony herb oil, served with creamy white beans, and also in potato salads. This soup is a compilation of all those flavor favorites in one bowl of coziness. All the ingredients in this soup are pretty straightforward. We start building flavor with a standard trio of onion (or leeks), celery, and carrots, followed by some spices, garlic and salt. We cook the white beans and potatoes in broth, until the potatoes are tender, and then blend half the soup for a creamy but slightly chunky texture. We finish it off with lots of fresh lemon juice and zest, and tons of dill. So simple and satisfying! Hope you and yours are well :) Lemon-Dill White Bean & Potato Soup   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients olive oil or avocado oil 1 yellow onion - diced finely, or 2 sliced leeks (white parts only) 1 medium carrot - diced finely 2 stalks celery - diced finely sea salt 4 garlic cloves - minced freshly ground black pepper ½-1 teaspoon red pepper flakes, plus more for garnishing 1½ teaspoons ground coriander 4 medium yellow potatoes or new potatoes (about 1lb) - cut into ½ chunks 2 cups cooked white beans (or 1 15 oz can) 6 cups vegetable broth 1 tablespoon white/­­mild miso a few large handfuls baby spinach (optional) zest from 2 lemons scant ¼ cup lemon juice (from about 2 medium lemons), plus more for garnishing 1 small bunch dill (about ⅓ cup packed) - stemmed and chopped, plus more for garnishing Instructions Warm a soup pot over medium heat and add a generous pour of oil once the pot is hot. Add the onion/­­leeks, carrot, celery, and a pinch of salt. Sauté over medium-low heat for about 15 minutes, or until the onion is translucent and the other vegetables are soft. Add the garlic, black pepper and red pepper flakes to taste, and coriander. Cook for about another 30 seconds, until the garlic is fragrant. Add the potatoes and another generous pinch of salt, mix to coat the potatoes. Add the beans and vegetable broth, mix, cover, and bring to a simmer. Simmer, covered, for 20 minutes, or until the potatoes are just tender. Transfer about half the soup to an upright blender, along with the miso, and blend until just smooth. You can also do this with an immersion blender, leaving some of the soup chunky. Return the blended soup to the pot. Mix and taste for salt/­­pepper, adjust if needed. Turn off the heat, wilt in the spinach, if using, and mix in the lemon zest, juice, and dill. Serve the soup warm, garnished with lemon wedges, more dill, and red pepper flakes. Notes - Dill stems are really easy to strip with a quick motion like you would do when stemming kale. This saves a lot of time! - The flavor and acidity of fresh lemon juice dissipates quite quickly, so I recommend serving any leftovers with more squeezes of lemon juice in each bowl. 3.5.3226 The post Lemon-Dill White Bean & Potato Soup appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Versatile Fennel Salad

May 6 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Versatile Fennel Salad The first warm spring days always have me craving fresh, raw, crunchy produce that I tend to overlook when it’s cold outside. Fennel is probably my number one vegetable in that category, so we’ve been having a lot of fennel salads, which got me thinking about fennel’s practicality. It tends to be sturdier and last longer than delicate salad greens, so even if you don’t have greens, you can still make a bomb salad with a bulb of fennel. This version is incredibly delicious and so much greater than the sum of its parts, plus it can be customized endlessly. The bulk of this salad is made up of melt-in-your-mouth wisps of fennel (achieved easily with a mandoline) and white beans (making for a beautiful, monochrome plate). There is a ‘cheesy,’ peppery cashew dust that gets stirred throughout and sprinkled on top of the salad, bringing some subtle umami and fattiness that usually comes in the form of grated cheese. The dressing is simple – zesty and garlicky, made with ingredients you likely have in your pantry. To customize, you can use other kinds of beans, or add in delicate greens like arugula or herbs, and/­­or citrus segments. Rustic, homemade croutons would also be really good in this salad. You can experiment endlessly. Hope you’ll give it a try! Versatile Fennel Salad   Print Serves: 2 Ingredients 1 clove garlic - grated or minced 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar pinch red pepper flakes zest of 1 lemon juice of half a lemon 1 tablespoon olive oil sea salt scant ¼ cup cashews ½ teaspoon nutritional yeast freshly ground black pepper 1 large fennel bulb (or 2 small) - stems cut off, fronds reserved ½ cup cooked white beans Instructions Combine the garlic, vinegar, red pepper flakes, lemon zest, and lemon juice in the bottom of a salad bowl, whisk to combine. Stream in the olive oil while whisking, until emulsified. Add a generous pinch of salt to taste and adjust if needed. Set aside. Grind the cashews in a mortar and pestle until mostly fine. Add the nutritional yeast, a generous amount of both black pepper and salt right to the mortar bowl, and mix to combine. Place the fennel on a mandoline stem side down, root facing up (see photo) and slice very thinly right into the bowl with the dressing. Cut the fennel in half through the root if it doesnt fit on your mandoline and proceed to slicing. Avoid the tough core by rotating the fennel when slicing, at the end. Add the white beans, reserved fennel fronds, and about half of the cashew dust to the bowl, and mix to combine. Serve right away, finished with more cashew dust. Notes To customize this recipe, you can use other kinds of beans, or add in delicate greens like arugula or herbs, and/­­or citrus segments. Rustic, homemade croutons would also be really good here. 3.5.3226 The post Versatile Fennel Salad appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Brothy Beans & Greens Lunch

April 29 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Brothy Beans & Greens Lunch I pretty much always know what I’m having for lunch, especially right now, with this chilly spring weather and infrequent grocery trips. Greens and beans! This meal never gets boring because I change up a lot of things: the kinds of greens and beans I use, how I cook them, what other components I include or leave out, etc. It’s a hearty, nutritious, warming lunch that comes together quickly and doesn’t weigh me down for the rest of the day. I also love that it’s a no-brainer on busy days. Although there’s no exact recipe for this, I thought I’d explain my method here, and maybe you’ll try and love it as much as I do. One of my New Year food resolutions was to cook a pot of beans every week and it’s been the best thing following through with it. Basically I cook the beans with plenty of water and aromatics, so that at the end I don’t just have a pot of delicious beans but also a flavorful broth. At lunch time, I reheat a portion of the brothy beans and quickly cook up some greens with garlic, olive oil, and pepper. I serve the greens on top of the brothy beans simply as is, or with any other toppings I feel like/­­have on hand, and that’s it. This lunch is also delicious served with a slice of sourdough, which I’ve been baking weekly. I use the Tartine country bread recipe, and it has been the most exciting learning experience I’ve had in a while. Brothy Beans & Greens Lunch   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 2 cups dried beans of choice sea salt olive oil aromatics of choice (see below) greens of choice - stemmed, torn or sliced if necessary garlic freshly ground black pepper/­­red pepper flakes aromatic options for the bean broth smashed garlic cloves halved onion/­­other broth vegetables or their scraps like celery, carrots, leeks, etc. hot peppers herbs (fresh or dried) lemon zest bay leaves whole peppercorns/­­other spices topping ideas freshly ground black pepper red pepper flakes fresh herbs fermented vegetables like sauerkraut/­­kimchi toasted seeds/­­nuts avocado splash of olive oil hot sauce or harissa Instructions Prepare the brothy beans. Put the beans in a large bowl and cover with plenty of water. Let soak overnight or up to 24 hours. Drain and rinse very well. Add the beans to a soup pot, along with a generous amount of salt, a splash of olive oil, and any aromatics of choice. Cover with plenty of water, so that the beans are covered by at least 2. Cover the pot and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to a gentle simmer and cook, covered, for 30 minutes to an hour, or until the beans are tender and creamy. Let cool. Discard any large pieces of aromatics (I usually leave in the garlic and peppercorns). Distribute the beans among jars together with their broth and keep refrigerated until ready to use. To make the greens and beans lunch, start heating up a portion of the beans and their broth in a small pot over medium-low heat. Heat a saute pan over medium heat for cooking the greens. Wash the greens youll be using and do not dry (if your greens are already pre-washed and dried, add a splash of water to the pan in the next step for steaming). Put the greens in the heated pan, cover, and let steam over low heat for 5-7 minutes, or until the greens are beginning to soften and are bright green in color. Remove the lid from the pan and grate a whole clove of garlic right into the pan on a microplane (or add minced). Season the greens with salt, freshly ground black pepper and/­­or red pepper flakes, and add a splash of olive oil. Stir the greens to coat, and continue cooking until they are soft enough to your liking. Transfer the beans and broth youve been heating up to a bowl, followed by the cooked greens. Add any toppings of choice and enjoy! You can also serve the beans over any grain of choice or with bread for an even more substantial meal. 3.5.3226 The post Brothy Beans & Greens Lunch appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Chai Spice Snickerdoodles

December 20 2020 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Chai Spice Snickerdoodles Makes 2 dozen cookies Photo by VK Rees These are an enticing spin on classic cinnamon snickerdoodles, livened up with heavenly Masala chai spices: ginger, cardamom and a hint of cloves. Of course cookies are always fun to eat, but the crunchy, sugary tops on these make them even more so. They dont contain any actual tea, but brew a milky cuppa and prepare to dunk.  There are from Isa Does It. Buy that book, it’s great and the author is very beautiful. Ingredients For the topping: 1/­­4 cup granulated sugar 1/­­4 teaspoon ground ginger 3/­­4 teaspoon ground cardamom 1/­­4 teaspoon ground cinnamon Scant 1/­­8 teaspoon ground cloves For the cookies: 1/­­2 cup canola oil 1 cup granulated sugar 1/­­4 cup pure maple syrup 3 tablespoons unsweetened plain vegan milk 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract 2 cups all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon baking soda 1/­­4 teaspoon salt 1/­­2 teaspoon cinnamon Directions Preheat oven to 350 F. Line 2 large baking sheets with parchment paper. Mix the topping ingredients together on a dinner plate. Set aside. In a medium mixing bowl, use a fork to vigorously mix together oil, sugar, syrup, and milk. Mix for at least a minute, until it resembles applesauce. Then mix in vanilla. Sift in remaining ingredients, stirring as you add them. Once all ingredients are added mix until youve got a pliable dough. Get in there with moist gloved hands to mix, its the easiest way to get the dough to come together. Roll dough into walnut sized balls. Pat into the sugar topping to flatten into roughly 2 inch discs. Transfer to baking sheet, sugar side up, at least 2 inches apart (they do spread a little). This should be easy as the the bottom of the cookies should just stick to your fingers so you can just flip them over onto the baking sheet. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes, they should be a bit browned on the bottoms. Remove from oven and let cool for 5 minutes, then transfer to a cooling rack to cool completely.

Porcini Ramen With Runny Cashew Egg

December 15 2020 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Porcini Ramen With Runny Cashew Egg Serves 4 to 6 I love a creamy ramen. And yeah, I get little a jealous when I see a runny egg in a bowful of noodles, getting everything all luscious. Like, what an easy way to add creaminess and flavor. But vegans do it better. This cashew sauce is eggy and creamy, so easy and impossible to mess up. It really does hit the spot. It’s poured over a ramen made incredibly beefy with porcini mushrooms and a homemade broth. This recipe is semi-epic, but you can certainly use the runny cashew egg idea on a simpler ramen of your choosing.  So heres whats going on: Youll be making a rich, spicy broth from dried porcini mushrooms, miso and peppers. When the broth is strained, you grab all those rehydrated porcinis and cut them into meaty pieces. Youll be freezing tofu, toasting garlic, sauteeing veggies and blanching scallions. Like what, are you auditioning for Top Chef or something? Yes. That is exactly what you are doing. Ok better stop reading and start cooking. Recipes Notes ~Make the broth a night or two in advance so that it has plenty of time to cool. That way when you get to the actual ramen making, its really only 3 minutes. Or like 45. But still. Just make the broth on a night where youre making a different dinner and have it cook away, hands free. The kombu gives the broth a sealike umami quality that makes it more of a traditional Japanese dashi, but the broth is yummy with or without it (But yeah, better with it). ~About that tofu: extra firm tofu is frozen then thawed, then pressed. This changes the texture and makes it even chewier, and once thawed it is so easy to press all the water out. It is a whole experience! If you dont do that part, not a big deal, but I do recommend it. Otherwise, just press the tofu and proceed with the recipe. Frozen tofu takes a day to freeze and could take two whole days to thaw. So plan for it! Just let it thaw in the fridge. If it doesnt thaw completely, you wont get the correct, chewy effect so dont try to use tofu that is at all still icy.  ~For the peppers, I used serrano because its what I had. Thai chilis would be great, too. Jalapenos in a pinch. Habanero if you want a lot of heat. But no need to cut them, just poke about 5 little slits in them with a steak knife. This releases some heat, but not too much, and it makes it so you dont have to worry about handling spicy peppers too much. You can also just use some dried peppers or even sriracha.  ~To make curly scallions, thinly slice the dark green parts of the scallion, that will go in the recipe to be sauteed. For the remaining light green and white parts, fill a bowl with ice water. Thinly slice the scallion lengthwise and submerge in ice. They will curl up and get cute! Ingredients For the Porcini Broth 3 quarts water 6 cloves garlic, smashed 1 piece kombu (optional) 1 inch ginger cut into 3 or 4 pieces (dont peel) 1 oz dried porcini 2 serrano peppers, poked (see notes) 3 tablespoons red miso For the Runny Cashew Egg 1 cup unroasted cashews, soaked overnight or boiled for 20 minutes (skip this step if you have a highspeed blender) 3/­­4 cup water 1 teaspoon kala namak 1/­­8 teaspoon turmeric For the Ramen 16 oz ramen noodles 3 to 4 tablespoons canola oil, divided 1/­­4 cup thinly sliced garlic 14 oz extra firm tofu (see recipe note) pressed and cut into small cubes Dark green scallion, thinly sliced (see recipe note) 6 baby bok choy, white parts sliced off 2 tablespoons mirin 2 tablespoons tamari For garnish: Light green and white parts of scallion, curled (see recipe note) Spicy sesame oil Thinly sliced purple cabbage Sriracha Directions Make the broth: Add all ingredients, except for miso, to a large pot and bring to a boil. Lower heat to simmer for about 30 minutes uncovered, until its reduced to about 3/­­4. Remove from heat. Stir in miso. Let broth cool until its easy to handle without burning yourself.  Once cool, strain broth in cheesecloth into a large mixing bowl, squeezing as tight as you can to get as much broth as possible. Open up the cheesecloth and pick out the mushrooms to use. Compost everything else. If you dont have cheesecloth, no prob. Use a mesh strainer and just push the broth out with your regular old hands. Make the Runny Cashew Egg: Simply blend everything until completely smooth, scraping down the sides with a rubber spatula to make sure you get everything. This takes about a minute and a half in a highspeed blender but could take 5 minutes in a normal blender. Now prepare the ramen: Prepare the noodles in a separate pot according to package directions. Be careful not to overcook.  Preheat a wok or very wide pot over low heat and use 2 tablespoons of oil to toast the garlic until nice and golden. Be very careful not to burn, it should only take 2 minutes or so. Have a plate ready, and use a thin, slotted spatula to transfer the toasted garlic to a plate, leaving as much oil in the pan as you can.  Now turn the heat up, drizzle in a tablespoon or so of oil and saute the tofu cubes until golden brown, about 5 minutes. Cut reserved porcinis into bite sized pieces. Add to wok and aute an additional 5 to 7 minutes, drizzling in extra oil if needed. Add in green scallions and the white part of the bok choy. Saute 2 minutes. Add mirin and stir for another minute.  Measure broth and make sure it comes to 8 cups. Add to the wok and heat through. If you need to add a little water thats fine. Bring to a boil. Add the green part of the bok choy to wilt. Add 2 to 3 tablespoons of tamari and taste for salt.  Build bowls: Portion noodles into big bowls. Add all the content of the ramen in broth. Spoon about 1/­­4 cup eggy sauce in one motion (in other words, dont drizzle it, just pour slowly over one section). Garnish with toasted garlic, sliced cabbage, spicy sesame oil, sriracha and the remaining scallions. 

Creamy Pumpkin Pasta with Sage Walnuts

December 2 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Creamy Pumpkin Pasta with Sage Walnuts This recipe is for those of us, who bought one too many cans of pumpkin puree as the excitement of fall was just starting. We take that canned pumpkin and turn it into an earthy, savory, and creamy pasta sauce with the addition of alliums (shallot, garlic), spices, lemon, and some plant-based cream. To make it extra special, we finish the pasta with a topping of fragrant, toasty sage walnuts. This is definitely a weeknight-friendly meal, perfect for those times when you’re craving warm, comforting carbs this coming winter. Hope you’ll give it a try! Creamy Pumpkin Pasta with Sage Walnuts   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients olive oil ½ cup chopped raw walnuts 2 tablespoons chopped fresh sage sea salt 1 large shallot - diced 4 garlic cloves - minced ¼ teaspoon smoked paprika pinch chili flakes, or to taste 15 oz (425 g) can unsweetened pumpkin puree freshly ground black pepper 1 teaspoon tamari or coconut aminos ½ cup unsweetened dairy-free creamer or cashew cream (see note) juice from 1 lemon 12 oz rigatoni or other pasta of choice Instructions Heat a large pan or pot over medium heat, add enough oil to generously coat the bottom. Add the walnuts, sage, and a generous pinch of salt. Toast, stirring frequently, for 5 minutes, until the walnuts are golden and the sage is crispy. Transfer the walnuts, sage, and their oil to a small bowl and set aside. Wipe the pot/­­pan if needed. Add more oil to coat the bottom of the same pot/­­pan. Add the shallot and a pinch of salt, saute until translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic, paprika, and chili flakes, and stir around for 30 more seconds, until fragrant. Add the pumpkin puree, plenty of black pepper, another generous pinch of salt, tamari, and creamer/­­cashew cream. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Stir to combine and let the sauce warm through. Turn off the heat and mix in the lemon juice. Meanwhile, cook the pasta in salted water, according to the instructions on the package. Reserve about ½ cup of the starchy pasta cooking water. Drain the pasta and add it to the pot/­­pan with the pumpkin sauce. Stir to coat the pasta in the sauce, adding small splashes of the reserved starchy water, if the sauce needs help sticking to the pasta or if it needs thinning. Serve the pasta right away, topped with the sage walnuts and their oil. Notes To make cashew cream at home, combine ½ cup of water and ¼ cup raw cashews in a high-speed blender. Blend until smooth. 3.5.3226 The post Creamy Pumpkin Pasta with Sage Walnuts appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Creamy Corn and Broccoli Soup

September 2 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Creamy Corn and Broccoli Soup Warm soups have regained their appeal over the last couple of weeks, with the changed, silvery light, cooler mornings and evenings, and earlier sunsets. This time of year is magical, as is any time when a seasonal shift is especially evident and new. The prospect of winter squash, warm drinks, and general coziness that fall brings still feels exciting, although it might be hard to believe once we’re in the depths of it. This soup has one foot in the summer, utilizing the sweetness of corn, and another in the fall, with its warmth and creaminess. We prepare a quick, flavorful broth using some aromatics, corn cobs, and spices, making sure to introduce plenty of savory ingredients to balance out the sweetness of the corn. We cook broccoli right in the broth and blitz everything up in a blender. The result is lovely, subtle, and packed with veggies. Hope you’ll give it a try! Creamy Corn and Broccoli Soup   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients olive oil 4 ears of corn - kernels removed, cobs reserved sea salt 1 large yellow onion - diced 4 garlic cloves - minced ½ teaspoon smoked paprika ½ teaspoon dried thyme freshly ground black pepper ½ cup white wine 3 bay leaves 8 oz broccoli florets (from about 2 medium heads) ½ cup cashews chives or other herbs - for garnishing (optional) Instructions Heat a large pot over medium heat, add enough olive oil to lightly coat the bottom. Add the corn kernels and a pinch of salt. Saute until the corn is bright yellow and slightly caramelized, about 7 minutes. Transfer to a small bowl and set aside. Add more oil to coat the bottom of the pot. Add the onion and a pinch of salt, saute for 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the garlic, paprika, thyme, and black pepper to taste, saute for 1 more minute, until fragrant. Add the wine, bring it up to a simmer and let reduce for 5 minutes. Add the reserved corn cobs to the pot, along with the bay leaves, 6 cups of water, and more salt. Increase the heat to high, cover the pot, and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and simmer, covered, for 30 minutes. Remove the corn cobs and bay leaves from the broth, discard. Add the broccoli and cashews to the pot, bring it back up to a simmer, and simmer, covered, for another 5-7 minutes, until the broccoli is tender. Add about half of the sautéed corn kernels to the pot. Transfer the contents of the pot to an upright blender and blend on high until smooth. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. You might need to do this in batches. Return the blended soup back to the pot. Mix in the rest of the corn kernels. Serve the soup warm, garnished with chives or other herbs of choice and drizzled with olive oil. 3.5.3226 The post Creamy Corn and Broccoli Soup appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Tomato and Garlic Roasted Potatoes

August 26 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Tomato and Garlic Roasted Potatoes We have a recipe for lemon miso roasted potatoes that’s a huge crowd pleaser and very much worth the little bit of extra effort it requires. Today’s recipe employs a similar technique of roasting potatoes in a number of flavorful ingredients, more summery ones this time around. We grate fresh tomatoes into a puree, which gets mixed with potatoes, garlic, rosemary, olive oil, and seasonings. We then roast the potatoes until the ‘sauce’ that’s coating them becomes sticky and concentrated. The tomato puree contributes more of a general savoriness than a direct tomato flavor, and the garlic and rosemary take the dish over the top. The result is super flavorful, and the ingredients are very simple – our favorite kind of food. Hope you’ll give these a try! Tomato and Garlic Roasted Potatoes   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 2 lbs small yellow potatoes (any waxy kind) - halved sea salt 2 large tomatoes 3 garlic cloves - crushed and peeled 2 sprigs rosemary - leaves stripped from stems olive oil freshly ground black pepper Instructions Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Put the potatoes in a medium pot, cover with cold water, salt well, and bring to a boil. Parboil for about 4 minutes, until slightly soft but not fully cooked, then drain. Cut the tomatoes in half. Use a spoon to scoop out the seeds and any of the tough core, discard. Halve the tomato halves once more. Put a box grater in a shallow bowl. Grate the tomatoes using the large hole side of the box grater, avoiding the skin, until you have a tomato puree. Put the parboiled tomatoes in a rimmed baking dish. Add the tomato puree, garlic, rosemary, plenty of olive oil, and salt and pepper to taste. Mix well to coat. Roast for 1 hour, stirring periodically, until the potatoes are golden on the outside and creamy inside. Enjoy warm. 3.5.3226 The post Tomato and Garlic Roasted Potatoes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Tie-Dye Purple Cauliflower Alfredo

July 17 2020 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Tie-Dye Purple Cauliflower Alfredo Serves 6 The world is a nightmare, dinner doesnt have to be. What if pasta could be a fantasy dreamworld where our alfredo was tie-dye purple? But this alfredo is not just pretty, its so, so tasty! Purple cauliflower is braised just until tender, keeping its color somewhat intact and bringing a deep, cruciferous flavor, plus lots of creaminess, to the sauce.  Note, I said it keeps its color somewhat intact. I had to throw in a non-conventional ingredient to make the lavender pop a bit. Dont hate…its frozen blueberries! But you really cant taste them and you know you have some laying around for the apocalypse.  So youll be left with a pretty lavender sauce to coat your noodles in. But it doesnt stop there! Take a lemon and squirt it over the plate, then watch your lavender deepem into fuschia and magenta streaks, splotches and ribbons of color. You are the greatest artist of your generation. Make sure to do this tableside and get a video of it.  OK, now get yourself on an app, order some purple cauli and whip this up! Its good wholesome entertainment for the whole fam (or your cats) and a relaxing escape that will make you think of a better possible future. Right? Recipes Notes ~ Some serving ideas: grilled or breaded tofu, tofu balls (recipes for all of those exist on this site, I’m just too world weary to link to them), toasted pine nuts, springs of fresh basil, your favorite fake chick’n. ~ Bottled lemon juice will work, but fresh will taste better! ~ If you dont have purple cauli this wont work out but it will still be a tasty cauliflower recipe.  ~ For best results, trim the white parts of the cauliflower away as much as possible so that you are left with mostly purple floret. ~ Dont use too dark a veg broth. The lighter you go, the less muted your sauce will be. ~ If you dont have a high speed blender, do not despair. Just soak the cashews for at least 2 hours (preferably overnight) and proceed with your regular old blender. You can also boil them for 20 minutes if you are super short on time and didnt plan ahead. Ingredients 2 tablespoons refined coconut oil 1 cup sliced shallot 6 cloves garlic, minced 3 cups vegetable broth 1 head purple cauliflower in small florets (about 6 cups) 3/­­4 cups whole unroasted cashews 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice (plus extra for squeezing) 1/­­4 cup nutritional yeast 10 frozen blueberries 3/­­4 teaspoons salt 1 pound fettuccine, cooked according to package directions in salted water Directions 1 – Boil salted water for pasta and get that whole thing going. By the time youre done making the sauce sauce the pasta should be drained and ready.  2 – Preheat a large pan over medium heat. Sauté shallot in coconut oil with a pinch of salt for 5 to 7 minutes. Add the garlic to the pan and spoon a little dab of oil on it. Mix in with the shallots and cook another 2 minutes.  3 – Add the broth, cover pan and bring to a boil. Place the cauliflower in the pan in as much of a single layer as possible. Cover and steam about 4 minutes. Mix cauliflower in the liquid, cover and steam another 4 minutes. It should be fork tender. Remove a few florets to place on the individual pasta plates later, if you like. 4 – In the meantime, place the cashews, lemon juice, nutritional yeast, blueberries and salt in a high speed blender (see note if you don’t have a highspeed blender). When the cauliflower is done, transfer it to the blender. Let sit for 10 minutes or so just to stop steaming. At that point, blend until smooth, scraping down the sides 5 – When pasta is ready, drain and pour the sauce over it. Reserve a little bit for dolloping over the plates of pasta. Taste pasta for salt. The saltiness with vary depending on your salted water and the saltiness of the broth. 6 – Place pasta in bowls, spoon additional sauce over noodles. Now take a seeded lemon and squirt it all over the pasta. Voila! Tie dye alfedo.

Creamy Vegan Lemon Pasta with Asparagus

June 10 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Creamy Vegan Lemon Pasta with Asparagus Coming to you with this creamy, lemony pasta that’s under 10 ingredients and presents a really delicious way to eat a lot of asparagus. I have to admit that asparagus is not my favorite vegetable, but I still eat tons of it in the spring because the mission here is to learn to love and take full advantage of all vegetables in season. I do find asparagus to be truly enjoyable in this pasta – it’s hard not to when it’s framed by carbs and a rich, creamy sauce. This dish comes together pretty quickly. We whip up a simple lemony cashew sauce in the blender and blanch the asparagus together with the pasta, then mix it all together and serve. The brightness and acidity of the lemon punctuates the richness of the sauce and gives the whole thing a sunny feel. Hope you’ll give it a try! Creamy Vegan Lemon Pasta with Asparagus   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients ½ cup raw cashews sea salt 1 clove garlic - roughly chopped zest and juice from 1 large lemon 2 teaspoons nutritional yeast freshly ground black pepper pinch red pepper flakes (optional) 12 oz spaghetti or other pasta of choice about 13 oz asparagus - tough ends snapped, cut into 2-inch pieces basil or parsley - for garnishing (optional) Instructions Soak the cashews in hot water for at least 15 minutes. Set a large pot of well-salted water to boil. In an upright blender, combine the drained cashews with ¾ cup water, garlic, lemon zest (reserve some for garnishing), lemon juice, nutritional yeast, pepper, red pepper flakes if using, and a generous pinch of salt. Blend until very smooth. Taste for salt and adjust if needed, the sauce should be fairly salty. Cook the pasta in the prepared pot until al dente, according to the time on the package. Add the asparagus to the pot at the last 3 minutes of cooking the pasta, to blanch. Reserve 1½ cups of the starchy pasta water before draining the pasta. Drain the asparagus and pasta and return both to the pot. Pour the cashew sauce over the pasta, along with a generous splash of the reserved pasta water, mix well to combine. Add more pasta water as needed, until you have a nice saucy consistency. Serve right away, garnished with the reserved lemon zest and herbs, if using. 3.5.3226 The post Creamy Vegan Lemon Pasta with Asparagus appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

High-Vibe Condiment Classics

May 23 2020 My New Roots 

High-Vibe Condiment Classics Summer is fast-approaching (at last!) and I dont know about you, but to me this means grilling, eating outside, and enjoying all of the classic, warm-weather treats. But wait! Did you know that there are all kinds of funky ingredients hiding in the most innocuous places, like your ketchup, mustard and relish?! We shouldnt have to forgo these truly classic condiments just because were walking on the whole foods path. No way! So I decided to do a high-vibe makeover all of the condiments that youd find at a barbecue, picnic, or baseball game: ketchup, mustard, honey mustard, Dijon, relish, mayo and secret sauce, without any refined ingredients, colours, or preservatives. They are entirely vegan (except for the honey mustard), and taste absolutely incredible.  Making your own condiments from scratch is empowering, and you too will see that by whisking up your very own mustard, or blending your very own ketchup that you are incredibly capable in the kitchen! Its a serious delight to realize that youre not only qualified to make things you thought you needed to buy, but that youre also doing yourself a giant favour in cutting questionable ingredients out of your life. When I was a kid, I loved hotdogs with mustard and relish (not ketchup, that was for burgers). The vinegary tang of the yellow mustard with the sweetness of pickle relish perfectly offset the salty squishiness of a microwaved wiener. This was a typical Saturday lunch, with doughnuts for dessert, all washed down with a giant glass of milk. I wanted to recreate that nostalgia, minus pretty much everything else. The flavours bring me back to simple times and simple food. But simple food is not always so simple. Have you read the ingredients on a squeeze bottle of relish lately? Its a complicated collection of chemicals that I certainly wouldnt want in my body. High-fructose corn syrup, natural flavour, and food colouring are just a few of the ingredients that plague most tasty toppings. Food additives are everywhere, especially in shelf-stable products. If youre not going to refrigerate something or preserve it properly, it has to have things in it to prevent it from spoiling. It also has to look appealing and taste good, even after months (or years!) on a grocery store shelf. That is why it is so important to read labels and be discerning about what you choose to buy. This is not to say that these additives are inherently harmful, but they are far from natural, and Im a believer in eating as close to the earth as possible! Luckily my condiments are not only based on whole foods, but they taste amazing and are actually good for you.    Here is a small list of the food additives to watch out for and avoid, if possible. Remember to check the packages of your other summer favourites, like chips, salad dressings, sparkling beverages, soda and juice, ice cream, popsicles, and frozen yogurt.  High Fructose Corn Syrup Sometimes labeled HFCS, this highly-refined artificial sweetener has become the number one source of calories in North America. It is found in almost all processed foods, since it is cheap to make, shelf-stable, super sweet, and highly addictive. Excessive consumption has been linked to obesity, and type 2 diabetes. Watch out for it in condiments, salad dressing, bread, candy, soda, yogurt, breakfast cereals, even canned vegetables and fruit.  Natural Flavours This is a sneaky term meant to throw you off. When you see these words on an ingredient list, they refer to a naturally-derived flavouring agent that has to be extracted from plant or animal sources, designed to enhance the taste of food. Conversely, artificial flavours are synthetically created, with their original sources being manmade chemicals. Natural flavours however, are still made in laboratories by food chemists who can add any numbers of chemicals, including preservatives, solvents and other substances, which are defined as incidental additives, to what they are creating. Food manufacturers are not required to disclose whether these additives come from natural or synthetic sources, and as long as the original flavouring comes from plant or animal material, they can be classified as natural. The point is, natural flavours dont appear to be any healthier than artificial flavours, and they can still contain ingredients that may cause reactions in sensitive individuals, especially children. To avoid them, cut back on packaged products and stick to the real-deal whole foods!  Food Dyes /­­ Colours To make food look bright, fresh, and especially appealing to children, food manufacturers add dyes to obvious things like candy, sports drinks and baked goods, but also not-so-obvious things like condiments (!), pickles, cereals, salad dressing, yogurt, and chocolate milk. Some of these dyes are approved for use in certain countries, while others have banned them, making it challenging for consumers to navigate. The safety of food dyes is controversial, especially in regards to children. Studies have linked them to hyperactivity in sensitive kids, and they may cause allergic reactions in some people. Because most food dyes are found in unhealthy processed foods, its easy to avoid them if youre sticking to a more natural diet.  Hydrogenated /­­ Partially Hydrogenated Oils You know when the World Health Organization plans on eliminating these fats from the global food supply, they must be pretty problematic. Created by forcing hydrogen gas into vegetable fats under extremely high pressure to turn liquid into solid, hydrogenation creates trans fats, which increases the amount of LDL cholesterol, lowers HDL cholesterol, therefore significantly increasing the risk of coronary heart disease. Whats more is that these fats are pro-inflammatory. Although their use has been banned in several countries, trans fats still lurk in many processed foods.  As long as there is less than .5% per serving, it isnt required in to be listed in the ingredients or nutritional information. The best way to avoid them is by cutting out processed foods, especially margarine, coffee creamer, chips and crackers, frozen pizza, fast foods, baked goods, and microwave popcorn.   Health Claims – these are put on the front of the box to lure you in, and can include buzz words like natural, whole grain, low-fat, no added sugar, organic, light, low calorie, gluten-free, and enriched. Terms like these should be a red flag for you, so read the entire label, including the ingredient list, the serving size, the amount and types of sweetener and fat used. Think critically and be selective – if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.  The bottom line?! Stick to whole, or minimally-processed foods and ingredients as often as possible. Its better for you, and your family to make your own from scratch whenever possible. Not to mention, its fun to brag to everyone that youre a condiment master, a yogurt wizard, or a salad dressing whisperer.  I had so much FUN with these recipes! It was a blast to brainstorm which condiments I would attempt to health-ify, experiment with, and eventually master to make them all easy-to-make and delicious. My condiments wont last years in the fridge, but all of them passed the two-week mark with flying colours (all of them natural, of course). As long as youre using clean utensils to scoop out your servings, you shouldnt have a problem keeping these toppings around for a few weeks – ya know, if you can ration them for that long!  Yellow Mustard This was in fact my first attempt at making yellow mustard and it proved to be ridiculously easy! I think Id built it up in my head to be some complicated project, but wow was I mistaken. Just a few simple ingredients, and a little stovetop whisking will get you the brightest, tangiest, most beautiful ballpark mustard of your dreams! I must warn you, from one condiment-master to another, that the bubbling mixture gets darn hot and tends to splatter when its cooking. To avoid scalding yourself, use the pot lid as s shield (insert laughing emoji here).      Print recipe     Yellow Mustard Makes 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml Ingredients:  1 cup /­­ 250ml cold water 3/­­4 cup dry mustard powder 3/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­2 tsp. ground turmeric 1/­­2 tsp. garlic powder 1/­­8 tsp. ground paprika 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml apple cider vinegar Directions: 1. In a small saucepan, whisk together water, dry mustard, salt, turmeric, garlic, and paprika until smooth. Cook the mixture over medium-low to low heat, stirring often, until it bubbles down to a thick paste, 30 to 45 minutes. 2. Whisk the apple cider vinegar into the mustard mixture and continue to cook until its thickened to the desired consistency – this can take between 5 and 15 minutes depending on how thick you like it.  3. Let the mustard cool to room temperature. Transfer the mustard to an airtight glass jar or container, and refrigerate for up to 3 months.  Honey Mustard Depending on how sweet you like your honey mustard, its just the above yellow mustard recipe with as much honey stirred in as you like! I added two tablespoons and it was perfect for me, but if you want even more, got for it. I recommend avoiding very runny honey, since this will loosen the mustard. Instead, opt for something on the thicker side to maintain the consistency. If youre vegan, brown rice or date syrup would be the best choices, since they are more viscous than maple syrup, for example. I love this on sandwiches with lots of fresh veggies and sprouts!     Print recipe     Honey Mustard Makes 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml Ingredients: 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml yellow mustard (recipe above) 2 Tbsp. raw honey Directions: 1. Combine the mustard and the honey. Taste and add more honey if desired. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 3 months.  Grainy Dijon Mustard This style of Dijon is a whole-seed one, which is my favourite because of the great texture and colour variations. Its spicy and complex, and will only get better with time. Keep in mind that this recipe is in two stages, the first one requiring you to soak your mustard seeds the night before you plan on blending.      Print recipe     Grainy Dijon Mustard Makes 1 cup /­­ 250ml  Ingredients: 1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g yellow mustard seeds 1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g black mustard seeds 1/­­2 Tbsp. ground mustard 1/­­3 cup /­­ 75ml white wine vinegar 1/­­3 cup /­­ 75ml apple cider vinegar 2 tsp. maple syrup 1/­­2 tsp. sea salt Directions: 1. Combine all ingredients and refrigerate overnight (for 12-24 hours) to allow the mustard seeds to soften and absorb the flavours. 2. Place mixture in blender and mix on high for a minute or two, until the seeds have broken and the mustard thickens. 3. Transfer contents to a clean jar and enjoy! Dijon will keep for about one month in the refrigerator. Sweet Pickle Relish This was the most anticipated condiment to try and make myself, since its one of my favourites, but also one of the worst offenders for additives. I successfully recreated that gorgeous tang, and succulent texture of commercial relish that I loved so much as a kid. The taste of this one is off the charts! My recipe uses coconut sugar instead of refined sugar and syrups, so the colour is a little darker and browner than the conventional types, but I dont think youll notice – and you certainly wont miss the food colouring!     Print recipe     Sweet Pickle Relish Makes 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 340g finely diced cucumber 1/­­2 cup /­­ 85g finely diced yellow onion 1 tsp. salt, divided  1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml apple cider vinegar  1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g coconut sugar 1/­­4 tsp. garlic powder 1 tsp. yellow mustard seeds 1 tsp. dried dill 1/­­4 tsp. turmeric 1/­­4 red bell pepper, finely diced 1 tsp. arrowroot, dissolved in 2 tsp. water Directions: 1. Toss the cucumber and onion with 3/­­4 teaspoon of salt in a sieve set over a bowl, and let drain for about 3 hours. Next, press the ingredients against side of sieve to release as much liquid as possible, then discard liquid from bowl.  2. Bring the vinegar, coconut sugar, and remaining 1/­­4 teaspoon of salt to a boil in a small saucepan, stirring until sugar has dissolved, then simmer until reduced to about a 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml (just eyeball it), about 3 to 4 minutes. Add the garlic, mustard, dill, and turmeric, stir until fragrant, about 1-2 minutes. 3. Add the drained cucumber and onion mixture, plus diced red bell pepper, and simmer, stirring for about 2 minutes. Make the arrowroot slurry, then whisk it into the relish. Simmer, stirring, 2-3 minutes until noticeably thickened. Turn off the heat and transfer relish to a glass jar or storage container and leave uncovered until it cools to room temperature, then put in the fridge. The relish will keep for up to a month in the fridge.  Tomato Ketchup This ketchup was an old blog post that I revisited and revised. I used to make this recipe in the oven, but my new method eliminates the need to crank up the heat when its probably the last thing you want to do. Instead, the whole thing is made on the stove, then blitzed up in the blender. Its deeply spiced and complex, so much more interesting than store-bought ketchup. The first time I made the new version, I used a good portion of it for a soup base, then added more to a dip – both were delicious, so if you have leftovers, put it to use in an unexpected place. Its tasty with everything!      Print recipe     Tomato Ketchup Makes 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 1 Tbsp. coconut oil (expeller-pressed, flavour neutral)  3 star whole anise (make sure they are whole to remove easily!) 3 bay leaves 1 tsp. ground coriander pinch of chili flakes  1 large onion, chopped  3/­­4 tsp. sea salt  1/­­4 tsp. freshly ground black pepper 3 cloves garlic, minced 2.2 lbs. /­­ 1 kg tomatoes  2 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar 1 Tbsp. maple syrup  Directions: 1. Melt the coconut oil in a medium stockpot, then add the star anise, bay leaves, coriander, and chili flakes. Cook until fragrant about 2 minutes, then add the onions, salt and pepper, and cook until slightly browned, about 10 mins. Next add the add garlic, cook for 1-2 minutes, then add balsamic vinegar, scraping any stuck bits off the bottom of the pot. Add tomatoes and their juices, then bring to a simmer.  2. Cook on low heat for about 60 mins or until reduced and starting to caramelize on the bottom of the pot.  3. Turn off heat and remove bay and anise, add maple syrup. Let cool slightly and transfer to a blender, blend until smooth. Taste, and adjust seasoning to suit your taste.  4. Let cool to room temperature, then transfer to an airtight glass container and store in the fridge. Keeps for about one month.   Aquafaba Mayonnaise This was the most exciting discovery to make: vegan mayo using aquafaba! Aqua faba translates to bean water and its the cooking liquid from chickpeas. Although any can of chickpeas will have this, I make my own, since there are no additives or chemicals that have leached from the can itself. If you cook your own chickpeas from dried, you have aquafaba. Although I wouldnt normally consume large amounts of aquafaba, in this case its used in such a small amount that I think its fine. Plus, did I mention it makes vegan mayo?! The results are so unbelievably shocking and delightful that Im a convert, even though I eat eggs! I highly suggest using the most neutral-tasting olive oil you can find for this recipe. Since it makes up the majority of the flavour of the mayonnaise, a strong-tasting olive oil will overpower the delicate nature of this condiment. I used the one from Pineapple Collaborative, which works perfectly. I also tried avocado oil, grapeseed, and sunflower, but didnt like the results as much as mild olive oil. Its up to you! You can really use whatever you have on hand, just keep in mind that it will really dictate the taste of the final result.      Print recipe     Aquafaba Mayonnaise Makes about 1 cup /­­ 250ml Ingredients: 3 Tbsp. aquafaba 1/­­4 tsp. Dijon mustard 1/­­4 tsp. fine salt 1 1/­­2 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tsp. apple cider vinegar 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml mild olive oil (or other light-tasting oil) Directions: 1. Place the aquafaba in the bottom of a wide-mouth jar. Add the mustard, salt, lemon juice, vinegar, and the olive oil. Allow a minute for the oil to separate into a distinct layer. 2. Insert an immersion blender all the way to the bottom of the jar. (Note: this will not work with an upright blender) Start the blending process on medium speed and do not lift the blender until the mixture has thickened and turned white at the bottom of the jar. Only then, slowly move the blender up, waiting for the oil to incorporate as you go, until you get the texture of mayonnaise. Use immediately; refrigerate leftovers in a tightly sealed jar for up to 1 month. The mayonnaise will thicken slightly once cooled in the fridge. Smoky Secret Sauce This is the creamy, tangy, and perfectly seasoned sauce that most famously adorns the Big Mac burger from McDonalds. Whats best about my version is that it has zero secrets...nothing weird to hide here! I had the most fun with this recipe, since it required a number of the condiments that Id already made as ingredients. I did deviate a tad from the original and added smoked paprika, since I love the added dimension of smoke flavour to anything thats going on grilled food, but Ive also found this to be a stellar salad dressing, especially for chop-style salads that have chunky, less delicate ingredients. I hope you find some fun things to slather it on this summer. Its lip-smakingly tasty!      Print recipe     Smoky Secret Sauce Makes 1 cup /­­ 250ml Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml aquafaba mayonnaise (recipe above) 1 tablespoon yellow mustard (recipe above) 2 tablespoons sweet pickle relish (recipe above) 1 tsp. maple syrup 1/­­2 teaspoon white wine vinegar 1/­­2 teaspoon paprika 1/­­4 tsp. smoked paprika (not traditional, but delicious!) 1/­­4 teaspoon garlic powder 1/­­4 teaspoon onion powder Directions: 1. Fold all ingredients together in a small bowl or jar. Enjoy immediately, and store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for 2-3 weeks.    As a bonus, Ive included this stellar recipe for carrot hot dogs – since youll need a high-vibe wiener to put your condiments on! Hahaaa! I realize that carrot hot dogs are pretty 2018, but Id never tried them before and it was a very amusing undertaking. I looked at a number of recipes online and my version is a mash-up of the ones that sounded the most delicious. My method is also much easier and faster than other versions Ive seen, since its just a braise on the stove and a quick grill (no marinating, steaming, roasting, etc).  The important thing to keep in mind for this recipe, is that the amount of time you braise the carrots for,Im  will be dictated by the girth of the carrots. Mine were more sausage-sized (approx 1.5 or 3.5-3.75 cm) than a typical hot dog wiener, and a 20-minute simmer was the perfect amount. If your carrots are smaller, Id go down to 15 minutes. Insert a sharp knife to check on the doneness after 10 minutes or so, and take them out when they are tender, but way before they get mushy. Remember that youre also going to be grilling them for 10 minutes so they will cook even more, and you dont want them too soft. The final result should be tender all the way through, but shouldnt fall apart in your mouth.     Print recipe     Carrot Hot Dogs Serves 8 Ingredients: 8 large hot dog-sized carrots 8 hot dog buns 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml tamari 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml apple cider vinegar  1 cup /­­ 250ml vegetable broth or 1 tsp. vegetable bullion powder + 1 cup water 2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 2 Tbsp. coconut oil (preferably expeller-pressed, flavour neutral) 1 Tbsp. liquid smoke 2 tsp. yellow mustard 1 tsp. garlic powder 1 tsp. paprika 1/­­2 tsp. onion powder 1/­­2 tsp. ground black pepperWash and peel carrots. Round the edges of the carrot to look more like wieners, if desired.  Direcitons: 1. Whisk all marinade ingredients together in a large stockpot with a lid. Add the peeled carrots and bring to a boil, reduce to a gentle simmer, and cook with the lid on for about 20 minutes (less if your carrots are on the thin side, see headnote). Remove from heat and turn on the grill.  2. Grill the carrots over medium-high, turning every couple of minutes, basting them with the remaining braising liquid if desired. Cook until slightly charred and fragrant, 10 minutes total. Grill or toast the buns. Place a carrot on each bun and enjoy with all of the condiments! I wish you all an incredible summer ahead! I recognize that this season is going to look very different from years past, but as long as were all healthy and the sun is shining, weve got it pretty good. Stay safe out there, and keep fuelling your body with the whole foods it needs to thrive and feel alive!  All love and happy condiment-making, Sarah B The post High-Vibe Condiment Classics appeared first on My New Roots.

Chana Masala Kale Bowl

May 11 2020 Meatless Monday 

The seasoned chickpea dish chana masala, while traditionally meatless, gets a new twist in this recipe. Served over a kale alongside shredded beets and sunflower seeds, it’s part salad, part curry and totally delicious. This recipe comes to us from Alexandra of The New Baguette. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4. For the chana masala: - 1 tablespoon organic canola oil - 2 medium onions, diced - 2 teaspoons grated ginger - 1 clove garlic, grated - 1 hot green chili pepper, minced - 1 tablespoon ground coriander - 2 teaspoons ground cumin - 2 teaspoons cumin seeds, toasted - 2 teaspoons paprika - 1 teaspoon ground turmeric - 1 teaspoon garam masala - 1/­­4 teaspoon cayenne pepper - 1 15-ounce can whole tomatoes with their juices, finely diced - 2/­­3 cup water - 4 cups cooked chickpeas OR 2 15-ounce cans chickpeas, drained and rinsed - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - Juice of 1 lemon (about 2 tablespoons) For the bowl: - 1 teaspoon grated ginger - 1 garlic clove, grated - 2 teaspoons lemon juice - 1 tablespoon sunflower OR extra virgin olive oil - 1/­­2 teaspoon sea salt - 3/­­4 large bunch curly kale, stemmed, and torn into bite-size pieces - 1 large beet, peeled, and shredded/­­spiralized - 1/­­4 cup hulled sunflower seeds, toasted To make the chana masala: Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add onion, garlic, ginger and pepper and sauté until browned, about 5 minutes. Turn heat down to medium-low and add the spices. Cook for 1 minute. Then add tomatoes with their juices, scraping up any bits that have stuck to the bottom of the skillet. Add water and chickpeas. Simmer uncovered for 10 minutes, then stir in salt and lemon juice. To make bowls and assemble: In a small bowl, whisk together ginger, garlic, lemon juice, oil and salt. In a large bowl, massage kale with ginger dressing for 1 minute, until kale has softened and wilted a little. To serve, divide kale among 4 bowls, top with shredded beets, chana masala and sunflower seeds. Do ahead: The chana masala, dressing and vegetables may be prepared separately and kept in the fridge for up to 4 days. The post Chana Masala Kale Bowl appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Kale Caesar With Brussel Sprout Croutons

May 5 2020 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Kale Caesar With Brussel Sprout Croutons Serves 4 Caesar is the mother of all salads, vegan or not. But especially vegan! Who can deny a briny, lemony, creamy, garlicky dressing? I think the reason that Kale Caesars in particular are so popular (besides the fact that it sounds like hail, Caesar I suppose), is that the acidic dressing really breaks down the kales mask of toughness, revealing its true, velvetty nature. It still retains its crunch and heartiness but after the massage its, well, relaxed a bit! This dressing uses nori as a seasoning, adding that ocean flavor to the mix. I love roasted Brussels instead as croutons, for their toasty crunch. If youd like to add protein, toss in some chickpeas or top with tempeh or tofu, a chickpea cutlet or even some storebought fake chickn sliced up. Avocado, of course, never hurts either.  This is originally from I Can Cook Vegan. If you buy that book I promise to do only good things with the money. Recipes Notes ~ Lacinato kale is my fave for salads because its at once crunchy and a little more delicate than other kale varieties. But use what you got! ~ And yeah you can totally just use this dressing on romaine, too. Like, duh, why not. Just skip the massaging part ~ If you dont have a highspeed blender like viamix or blendtec, you can make this using a regular blender. Soak cashews them overnight first, or, if you dont have that kind of time, boil in water for 30 min and drain. You will have to scrape down the sides with a rubber spatula and give your blender a rest from time to time, and it could take like 5 minutes to get it totally smooth. Just be patient. Ingredients For the brussels: 1 lb brussels, quartered 2 to 3 tablespoons olive oil 1/­­2 teaspoon salt For the dressing: 3 cloves garlic 1 cup whole unroasted cashews 1/­­2 sheet nori, torn to pieces 1/­­4 cup tablespoons nutritional yeast 3/­­4 cup water 1/­­4 cup fresh lemon juice 1 tsp whole grain dijon mustard 3/­­4 teaspoon salt Several dashes fresh black pepper For the salad: 1 lb lacinato kale, rough stems removed, torn into 2 inch pieces or so Optional: Roasted pepitas or sunflower kernels for garnish Sliced lemon for squeezing Directions 1 – Preheat the oven to 425 F for the brussels. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper and set aside.  2 – Toss the quartered brussel sprouts with olive oil and a dash of salt. Bake for 15 minutes, until lightly browned. No need to flip them, just let em roast. 3 – Make the dressing. Place garlic in a high-speed blender and pulse to chop up. Add remaining ingredients and blend until completely smooth, about a minute, scraping down the sides with a rubber spatula every now and again.  4 – Pour about 3/­­4 of the dressing into a large mixing bowl. Add the kale and massage it into the dressing for about a minute. Dont be afraid to really get in there like youre kneading dough.  5 – Top with roasted brussels and drizzle on more dressing. Finish with seeds, a little extra black pepper and serve with a lemon!

The Spring Supper Salad

April 23 2020 My New Roots 

The Spring Supper Salad Greetings, friends! For fun I am resurrecting one of the blog posts I wrote back in 2010 – a warm butter bean salad bowl, garlic-roasted carrots and wild rice. Why I am re-publishing a decade-old recipe? Well, for one I thought that there are a bunch of new followers around here who have never even seen this delight (hello, by the way)! Second, most of you who have been here since the beginning may have forgotten about it. Third, its the ideal pantry staple recipe. And lastly, because its very, very delicious. Creamy butter beans, golden garlic-y carrots coins, chewy wild rice, crisp and bright pickled onions, silky kale, and refreshing dill, all coming together with a lick-your-lips mustardy dressing that is divine on just about everything – this salad and beyond. I’ve also re-named it the Spring Supper Salad because it’s the perfect seasonal transition meal (yea baby, it’s definitely a meal) incorporating both winter and spring produce and flavours, as we make our way into the light of the upswing! Hooray! This recipe brings back so many memories for me. It was around this time that I had been working in restaurants in Copenhagen for about 3 years. I loved my job, and could hardly believe that someone actually paid me to spend all day in a hot, cramped kitchen, cooking a dozen new dishes every day without a menu or recipes – definitely still in the honeymoon phase. I felt confident in the food I was making, applying my deep understanding of nutrition to recipe development, and I used every day to push myself creatively, keenly aware of how fast I was learning and growing. I was certainly in the vortex, and it was a very exciting time of my life.  I started my shift around 8 am, and the majority of my dishes needed to be ready at 12 noon when we opened the doors for lunch. This is a relatively short window of time to pump out 200 servings of anything, but after some years, I developed short cuts that would deliver a lot of flavour in a hurry. One of these short cuts, was garlic oil – the first thing I would make after tying my apron strings, that would act as a marinade, a roasting medium, and a base for soups, stews, dressings and sauces for the entire day. In fact, I dont think that there were many dishes coming off of my station that didnt have garlic in them back then (such an easy way to make things taste good!). This oil sat on my bench and it got tossed into all the things, and all the people kept coming back for more.  One thing I loved using the garlic oil on, was winter veggies. I could toss them in said liquid gold, crank up the oven, and in half an hour, Id have a blistered, glistening pile of roasted rainbow roots to serve, only needing a squeeze of lemon juice and a smattering of fresh herbs to make it presentable. Who wouldnt want to dive into that?! Plus, it was cheap. Like most restaurants, we were always looking at the bottom line and how we could make even the most humble foods taste exquisite. Garlic oil was the ticket.  At the restaurant, my signature move was combining veggies, grains, and beans in exciting ways (which was very novel at the time!) so this dish emerged from a commercial ovens worth of garlic-roasted carrots needing a home. With some tender and creamy butter beans coming off the stove, and some day-old, steamed wild rice calling out to me from the fridge, this combination came together very organically, taking the varied textures, colours, and flavours into consideration.  The secret to this dish is the consistency of the garlic in the oil. Different from mincing garlic and adding it to oil, here you must must must grate it or blend it up together so it becomes almost paste-like. This way, the garlic goes everywhere the oil does, and evenly caramelizes into the most divine, delectable gold, thats mellow and sweet and roast-y. You will not hate it. Stop! Fiber time. Fiber is probably the least sexy and alluring of all the nutrients we hear about. Its all about Protein! Fat! And if you hear about carbohydrates, its probably something ignorant and unfair (I really hate jerks picking on macronutrients, back off!). Fiber seems pretty boring and something only your grandmother cares about, so why do you need to?   One reason that plant-rich diets are so health-sustaining, is not only due to their high fiber content, but their potential for fiber diversity. In the past, fiber has been broken down into two main categories: soluble and insoluble. Whats new and exciting in this field of research, is that we can see that fiber can be broken down into several more categories (viscous, non-viscous, non-starch polysaccharides, resistant starches etc.) each one bringing forth the potential for diversified food sources for our gut bacteria. In short, the greater the diversity of plants we eat, the greater the diversity of our microbiome.  Why does this matter? Because our gut is the foundation for our overall health. If weve got a wide range of troops on the front lines of our immune system, the better our chances are for not just surviving, but thriving. The fiber we eat also feeds our good bacteria, and specific types of fiber feed specific types of bacteria. Enjoy eating the widest variety of plants you can, to ensure that youre supporting the widest variety of good guys in your digestive system. They will repay you in spades Im tellin ya!  The foods with the highest amounts of fiber are beans and lentils, vegetables, fruits, grains, and nuts and seeds (remember that there is no fiber in animal-based foods). Different proportions of soluble, insoluble fiber, as well as viscous /­­ non-viscous fiber, and fermentable fiber can be found in all of these food groups, it is highly recommended that you eat from each of them. And instead of focusing on grams (the minimum daily recommended intake is a measly 25g, not that were talking about that…), we need to focus on diversity. Enjoy as many plant-based foods as you can, and experience the terrain of your body slowly begin to change. Everything comes back to the gut, and not just what you are eating, but what your gut-bacteria are eating too. With this dish, youll be feeding those good guys with fiber from six different plants! Talk about a solid mix. Beans, whole grains, 3 different veggies, plus herbs, add up to serious fiber diversity. Good, good, good fiberations! The fun thing about revisiting this recipe, was seeing if there was anything I would change this time around. I have learned so much and grown incredibly as a cook in the past ten years, so I was surprised that I didnt have many tweaks to make. The only two things I felt this salad needed was a dark leafy green and a pickle – classic Sarah B moves at this point! Since we still dont have any spring greens happening yet, I decided kale was the winner, and obviously it needed to be massaged! I turned the red onions in the original recipe into a quick pickle, as this is another indispensable kitchen technique that Ive learned since posting the first time around. This salad-meal has everything you need and crave from a single bowl: its super flavourful and filling, with all of the textures in the mix to satisfy your noshing desires. The elements can all be made separately, even on separate days, if it seems like too many things to cook at once for a single dish. If you go the rollover route, boil the beans and rice a day or so before (and make extra while youre at it, because meal prep is for winners), and pickle the onions up to a week ahead. The kale can be prepped /­­ massaged a day or so in advance, but the carrots should be roasted right before serving.  If you dont have butter beans, any white bean would work (navy, cannellini, Great Northern, or baby lima beans are some varieties) and if you want to switch up the grain, any kind of rice would work – even millet or quinoa would be delicious! Instead of carrots, use any root veg you have kicking around your crisper: beets, sweet potato, turnip, or winter squash would taste great in the garlic oil. And if dill isnt the herb of your dreams, try substituting it with flat-leaf parsley, cilantro, basil, or tarragon.      Print recipe     Butter Bean, Wild Rice, and Garlic-Roasted Carrot Salad Serves 6-8 Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup wild rice 1 cup dried butter beans 4-5 medium carrots 4 cloves garlic 2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 1 bunch fresh dill sea salt freshly ground black pepper a handful of quick-pickled red onion (recipe follows) 1 batch massaged kale (recipe follows) Dressing: 1 Tbsp. Dijon mustard 1 Tbsp. maple syrup 2 Tbsp. raw apple cider vinegar 3 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil pinch of sea salt Directions: 1. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight. Drain, rinse well and cover with fresh water. Add a teaspoon of sea salt. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, and cook until beans are soft - about 45 minutes. 2. While the beans are cooking, rinse the wild rice well, drain, and put in a pot. Cover rice with 1.5 cups fresh water, add a couple pinches of sea salt, bring to a boil, and reduce to simmer. Cook until rice is chewy-tender - about 45 minutes. You will know the rice is done when the grains open up to reveal their purple-gray inner portion. 3. Preheat the oven to 400F. While the rice is cooking, wash the carrots and slice them on the diagonal into coins, place on a baking sheet. Grate the garlic with a microplane and combine it with the oil. Pour over carrots and toss to coat. Sprinkle with salt. Place in the oven and roast, turning them a few times over the course of 15-20 minutes. The carrots should be cooked but not mushy - al dente! 4. Make the dressing by combining all ingredients together, shake well. 5. Now all the elements come together: Drain and rinse beans in cool water to stop the cooking process. Pour dressing over warm beans and toss. Let sit for 5 minutes or so. Drain the rice if any water remains, cool slightly. Mix with beans. Toss in the carrots, scraping the pan to add garlic oil to the remainder of the ingredients. Throw in the massaged kale, as many pickled onions as you fancy, and an explosion of dill. Cracked black pepper too, if it’s calling to you. 6. Serve immediately and enjoy. Quick-Pickled Red Onion Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml raw apple cider vinegar 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water 2 tsp. fine sea salt 3 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1 medium red onion, thinly sliced Directions: 1. Combine the vinegar, water, salt, and maple syrup in a large jar. Stir to dissolve the salt and syrup. Add the onions to the jar and put them in the fridge. Enjoy after at least 30 minutes, keeps for up to two weeks.  Massaged Kale Ingredients: 3 cups /­­ 90g shredded curly or dino kale Juice of 1/­­2 lemon 2 tsp. extra virgin olive oil 2 pinches of fine sea salt, plus more as needed Directions: 1. In a large bowl, combine the shredded kale, lemon juice, olive oil, and salt. Using your hands, rub and squeeze the kale together as if you are giving it a massage, until the kale leaves are dark green and tender, about 2 minutes. Enjoy immediately in the salad, or store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for up to five days.  I really hope you enjoy this delicious and satisfying meal soon. These days are asking so much of us, and I continue to come back to the kitchen for grounding, clarity, and connection. There are no answers, just presence. And in that presence I find myself over a cutting board, being grateful for just what is front of me, slicing a carrot, then another, saying thank you for simple things. Love to you all. Stay well and safe out there. xo, Sarah B The post The Spring Supper Salad appeared first on My New Roots.


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