clove - vegetarian recipes

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London Vegan Restaurant Scene Evolution

Moroccan Split Pea Soup

Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways

Recipe | Vegetable Baked Ziti










clove vegetarian recipes

Tofu au Vin

yesterday 06:00 Meatless Monday 

This meatless take of the French classic Coq au Vin slowly simmers tofu with pearl onions, mushroom, red wine and vegetable broth. The veggie version cuts hours off the cooking time so you’ll be sitting down to dinner just a half hour after you’ve started cooking. This recipe comes to us from Donna of Apron Strings. Serves 6 - 3 tablespoons canola oil, divided - 2 cups frozen pearl onions, thawed - 3 medium carrots, peeled and diced - 3 cloves garlic, minced - 2 bay leaves - 3 cups red wine* - 3 cups low-sodium vegetable broth - 2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce - 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar - 1 14 ounce package extra firm tofu, cut into 1/­­2 inch cubes - 4 tablespoons corn starch, divided - 12 ounces mushrooms, chopped - salt and pepper, to taste - 1/­­2 cup Italian parsley, diced as a garnish *3 cups vegetable broth mixed with 3 tablespoons red wine vinegar can be substituted for the red wine. Heat 1 tablespoon of the canola oil in a large pan over medium high heat. Add the onions, carrots and garlic. Saute for 3-5 minutes, or until lightly browned. Add in bay leaves, wine, broth and soy sauce to the pan. Reduce heat so that liquid is slowly simmering. Simmer for about 20 minutes, stirring frequently, until carrots and onions are soft and liquid has reduced by half. Once sauce is reduced season with salt and pepper to taste. Add 2 tablespoons of the cornstarch into 1/­­2 cup of water and mix until combined. Stir in the cornstarch mixture to the pan to thicken the sauce. Toss tofu cubes in the remaining 2 tablespoons cornstarch and a little salt and pepper until they are all evenly coated. Heat the 2 remaining tablespoons of olive oil over medium-high heat. Sauté coated tofu cubes, turning them occasionally with a spatula, for about 3 to 5 minutes, or until they are crispy browned on all the sides. Remove and set aside in a serving bowl. Add mushrooms to pan and sauté them 5-7 minutes, or until mushrooms are browned and softened. Add red wine sauce and mushrooms to tofu in the serving bowl. Sprinkle with parsley and enjoy!     The post Tofu au Vin appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways

before yesterday Golubka Kitchen 

Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways Here’s something fun that you can make to set yourself up for endless future wins in the kitchen. This freezer bouillon is a great thing to have on hand for those times when you don’t have veggie stock or just don’t want to buy any. Add a few teaspoons to your soup or sauce, and you’ll end up with a rich flavor base with very minimal effort. Inspired by both curry paste and a brilliant ‘Souper Mix’ recipe from The River Cottage Preserves Handbook, this freezer bouillon is essentially just a combination of different, whole food aromatics that you’d typically find at the base of any soup or broth, plus salt. The beautiful thing about this recipe is that there are no strange preservatives or weird ingredients that you might find in store-bought bouillon – just good old veggies and a few other, non-sketchy flavor enhancers. Today we’ve got two variations on the theme: a ‘classic’ freezer bouillon, based on the mirepoix trio of onion, celery, and carrot, and a ‘fiery’ variation, kind of like curry paste but without all the spices, starring, ginger, shallots, garlic and more. To make both of the bouillon variations, you just pulse up veggies and salt into a fine, pesto-like paste in the food processor. Distribute the bouillon among containers, label, and keep in the freezer. Because of the fair amount of salt in the recipe, the paste doesn’t completely freeze in the freezer and is easily scoopable. The salt also helps it keep for a really long time – pretty much indefinitely in my experience. This is a concentrated product and a little is meant to go a long way, so if you taste it as is, it will taste very salty and strong. I like to use the ‘classic’ bouillon variation in all kinds of legume-based soups like lentil soup and minestrone, and in rich sauces like mushroom bolognese. The ‘fiery’ version is really lovely in all kinds of curries and healing soups, meant to help clear the sinuses. But really, there are no rules for how and where you can use this bouillon, it’s really fun to experiment with. Just the other day, I cooked up a pot of plain chickpeas (just chickpeas and salt) and wanted to make a quick, single serving of chickpea soup for lunch. I heated up some olive oil in a small pot, added about a teaspoon of the classic bouillon, and let it get fragrant for about a minute. I then added the chickpeas to the pot with about 2 cups of their cooking water, brought everything up to a simmer for a few minutes, and wilted in some spinach at the end. I ended up with the coziest bowl of soup and a very flavorful, warming broth in just a few minutes. Hope you’ll give this a try this year! Classic Freezer Bouillon   Print Serves: about 4½ cups Ingredients 1 yellow onion - peeled, roughly chopped 1 leek - white and light green part only, roughly chopped 2 medium carrots - roughly chopped 3 celery ribs - roughly chopped 1 head garlic - cloves peeled 1 bunch parsley - stems included, roughly chopped 1 tablespoon tomato paste (optional) 1 tablespoon olive oil ¼ cup sea salt Instructions Combine all the vegetables in a food processor in batches, roughly pulsing them and adding more as you go. Periodically scrape down the sides of the food processor to get everything nicely incorporated. Add the tomato paste, if using, oil, and salt, and finish processing into a pesto-like paste. Add another tablespoon of oil if your food processor is having a hard time getting going. Let the paste cool down to room temperature if it got warm while processing. Distribute the bouillon paste among sealable containers, leaving about 1 of space at the top (the paste will expand when frozen). Close and label the containers and place in the freezer. The bouillon should keep frozen indefinitely - it will not freeze solid because of the salt in the recipe. To use: use about 1 teaspoon of the bouillon per 1½ - 2 cups of water. Either add the paste directly to boiling water or sauté it up in oil for a few minutes before adding water. 3.5.3226 Fiery Freezer Bouillon   Print Serves: about 3 cups Ingredients 2 shallots - peeled, roughly chopped 6-8 total of ginger pieces - peeled if not organic, roughly chopped 1 head garlic - cloves peeled 2 medium carrots - roughly chopped 1 jalape?o or serrano pepper - seeded, roughly chopped (optional, include for more heat) 1 bunch cilantro - stems included, roughly chopped 1 tablespoon white miso (optional) 1 teaspoon turmeric powder (optional) 1 tablespoon avocado oil or olive oil ¼ cup sea salt Instructions Combine all the vegetables in a food processor in batches, roughly pulsing them and adding more as you go. Periodically scrape down the sides of the food processor to get everything nicely incorporated. Add the miso and turmeric, if using, oil, and salt, and finish processing into a pesto-like paste. Add another tablespoon of oil if your food processor is having a hard time getting going. Let the paste cool down to room temperature if it got warm while processing. Distribute the bouillon paste among sealable containers, leaving about 1 of space at the top (the paste will expand when frozen). Close and label the containers, and place in the freezer. The bouillon should keep frozen indefinitely - it will not freeze solid because of the salt in the recipe. To use: use about 1 teaspoon of the bouillon per 1½ - 2 cups of water. Either add the paste directly to boiling water or sauté it up in oil for a few minutes before adding water. 3.5.3226 The post Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Moroccan Split Pea Soup

January 20 2020 Meatless Monday 

This Moroccan versions of split pea soup, called Bissara, is hearty, filling delicious, and a breeze to make. The steaming split pea puree, earthy garlic and spices, and rich olive oil are the perfect combination for an enriching and warming winter meal. This recipe comes to us from Safa of Moroccan Zest . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 - 1.5 cups dried split peas soaked for 2 hours (or more) and drained - 4 cups water - 2 medium-sized garlic cloves, peeled -  1/­­2 tsp salt adjust according to your taste -  1/­­2 tsp pepper powder - 2 tsp cumin powder - 2 tsp paprika powder - 1 pinch hot pepper powder optional - 3 tbsp olive oil extra virgin   Cook the split peas and garlic in water until tender (it should take approximately 8 minutes in a pressure cooker, 45 minutes in a saucepan and 8 hours in a slow cooker) Let the mixture (the split peas, garlic, and water) cool down, then pour in a blender. Add the spices. Blend until smooth. If the mixture is too thick, add more water and blend again. Pour the mixture back in the pan. Add the olive oil and heat for a few minutes. If the mixture is too liquid, cook until water evaporates and the soup has the right consistency for you. Serve hot with fresh bread and olives. Decorate with cumin and olive oil. The post Moroccan Split Pea Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff

January 18 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff I really love January. To me, this month has a bright and sparkling clean feel to it. And even though the start of a new year is purely symbolic, it can be such great time to set some concrete intentions and start making lasting changes or small steps in a new direction. This year, much like the past few years, I’m inspired to simplify, minimize, and really think about the things that I bring into my life, and my impact as a consumer. In the past few years, we’ve tackled food waste and figured out a way to compost food scraps that’s sustainable for us. We’ve also done away with a lot of store-bought household products like paper towels and most single-purpose cleaning products, but there is still a lot of work to do in that area. Of course I find that cooking at home is always a top priority when it comes to simplifying in a sane way. Being prepared, having tried and true recipes and techniques under my sleeve, and having some trusted meal components stocked in the fridge or pantry always leads to less stress, less waste, and more enjoyment throughout the week. This Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff doesn’t have any particular ties to these January musings, beside the fact that it’s a cozy, wintery recipe that I’ll gladly plan to cook on any given week this winter. It’s a nostalgic flavor for us, since our family in Russia cooked it quite a bit, but we think that this plant-based version is even better than the original :) Below I’m sharing some of my plans, projects I’d like to tackle, and resources that I’ve found to be super inspiring when it comes to simplifying, minimizing my impact and beyond. Would love to hear yours! Goals: projects I’d like to tackle and a few (small but impactful) new habits I’d like to form this year – Stop buying single-purpose household cleaning products and make my own, super simple ones (key words: super simple). I already do this by making a 1 part vinegar, 1 part water all-purpose cleaner that I use on pretty much all surfaces. I sometimes infuse the vinegar with citrus peels for a week or add a few drops of essential oils for a more refreshing scent. That cleaner works really well for most things. But I’d like to make a few more site-specific mixes as well, since I sometimes panic and end up buying some shower cleaner I don’t actually need. Simply Living Well is an amazing resource for easy, home-care recipes. I’m going to make this shower spray, this floor cleaner, and this glass/­­window cleaner. All those recipes have really basic, interchangeable ingredients, which keeps them from being overwhelming. Please let me know if you have a favorite homemade laundry detergent recipe – still trying to figure that one out. – Repair things I have before buying new. I’ve always liked doing stuff with my hands, so for me this is an inherently relaxing activity that I’d like to make more time for. Right now, our linen duvet cover has decided to rip in many places at once, and instead of buying a new one, the plan is to mend it properly with tonal patches, which can look really cool. Julie O’Rourke has a super comprehensive darning and mending tutorial here in her IG stories (just flip through the doll-making part). Her whole account is super dreamy as well. – Make a pot of beans every single week. I’ve noticed that every time I make a big batch of beans, I end up thanking myself over and over again for all the easy meals I’ve made possible with that one step. I like to cook the beans with aromatics so that I also end up with a delicious broth that I can either eat with the beans or use later for soups, etc. Different kinds of beans yield such different flavor/­­cooking potential, so it’s easy to switch them up every week without getting bored. For example, I cook chickpeas with aromatics, then have them for dinner in their broth with greens and maybe other veggies wilted in. I freeze some of the broth to use later as veggie stock. I then eat the chickpeas as is in veggie bowls/­­salads, make hummus with them, marinate them, make crispy chickpeas, or make falafel/­­veggie burgers. You can of course do all of this with canned beans, but home-cooked ones are much tastier, more cost effective, less wasteful if you buy them in bulk, and the broth that you get from cooking them is super valuable! If I find that I can’t use up all of the beans, I just freeze them in their broth and again set my future self up for success. We have a lot of meal plans centered around whole pots of beans here. Inspiring Resources: – 75 Ways to Create a Low-Waste Home from Simply Living Well and Zero Waste, Plastic Free Alternatives Master List from Paris to Go are chock-full of ideas to slowly chip away at. – Jessie’s Produce Prep Ebook is such a wonderful guide to reducing food waste and enjoying the abundance of the plant food world. – Mama Eats Plants is the queen of low-waste living, vegan cooking, and a generally mindful lifestyle. – Live Planted is a great, short-format podcast about a practical approach to a low-waste lifestyle and much more. – This One Part Podcast interview with Kathryn Kellogg of Going Zero Waste is so full of positivity and details some actionable steps most of us can implement to decrease waste. Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 8 oz package tempeh - crumbled 2 teaspoons tamari 1 teaspoon maple syrup ½ cup cashews - soaked to soften if no high-speed blender 1 tablespoon white or chickpea miso 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar 1 cup purified water sea salt black pepper avocado oil or other cooking oil of choice 1 yellow onion - diced 4 garlic cloves - minced 2 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary 1 tablespoon tomato paste pinch of red pepper flakes (optional) 6 oz portobello mushroom caps (about 3 medium) - sliced into long strips ½ cup red wine 10-12 oz any pasta of choice fresh parsley - for serving (optional) Instructions Put the crumbled tempeh in a bowl. Pour the tamari and maple syrup over it, mix and let sit while making the cashew sauce. In an upright blender, combine the cashews, miso, mustard, apple cider vinegar, water, and salt and pepper to taste. Blend until very smooth. Taste for salt and pepper, adjust if needed. Set aside. Heat some oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the tempeh and stir once to coat with the oil, then let sit uninterrupted for 2-3 minutes, until the undersides are browned. Mix and let sit again for another 3-5 minutes, until browned. Push the tempeh to one side of the pan, if your pan is large enough, or transfer back to a bowl and set aside until later. Add more oil to the pan. Add the onions and a pinch of salt, and sauté for 7-8 minutes, until the onions are translucent. Add the garlic, rosemary, tomato paste, and red pepper flakes, if using. Stir until the garlic is fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the mushrooms, along with another pinch of salt. Sauté until the mushrooms are browned and all the liquid that they release has evaporated, about 8-10 min. Mix the tempeh back in. Add the wine, bring it up to a simmer, and let reduce for about 3 minutes. Add the cashew sauce, stirring it and letting it warm through for a few minutes. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Meanwhile, cook the pasta al dente in well-salted water, according to the directions on the package. Reserve about 1 cup of starchy pasta water for thinning out the sauce. Drain the cooked pasta and add it to the pan with the stroganoff. Start mixing the pasta with the sauce, adding splashes of the starchy pasta water to thin out the sauce and to get it to stick to the pasta, as needed. Enjoy right away, garnished with parsley, if using. 3.5.3226 The post Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Tofu Almond Stir-Fry

January 6 2020 Meatless Monday 

Hoisin is a Cantonese dipping sauce made from sweet potatoes, vinegar, garlic and chili peppers; you can find it in the Asian ingredients section of most supermarkets. Here, it adds immense flavor to tofu, which gets a pre-soak in vegetable broth for even more flavor. This recipe was created by Trudy Slabosz, who writes the blog veggie.num.num. Serves 4 For the tofu: - 1 package (10.5 ounces) firm tofu, cubed - 1 1/­­2 cups vegetable broth - 1 egg white - 1 tablespoon cornstarch - 1 tablespoon hoisin sauce - 1 teaspoon salt For the sauce: - 1 tablespoon cornstarch - 1 tablespoon low-sodium soy sauce - 1 tablespoon hoisin sauce To complete the Tofu Almond Stir-Fry: - 2 tablespoons canola oil, divided - 5 shallots, sliced - 5 ounces button mushrooms, sliced - 1 can (15 ounces) baby corn, drained - 1 red bell pepper, sliced - 1 green bell pepper, sliced - 1 garlic clove, minced - 2 1/­­2 ounces blanched almonds, toasted To prepare the tofu: In a medium bowl, soak the tofu cubes in vegetable broth for 30 minutes. Strain the tofu and reserve the broth. Drain tofu on a bed of paper towels. In a medium bowl, whisk together the egg white, corn starch, hoisin sauce and salt. Add the drained tofu and gently toss to coat well. To prepare the sauce: In a medium saucepot over high heat, bring the reserved broth, cornstarch, hoisin and soy sauce to a boil. Cook, stirring, 4 minutes, or until the sauce darkens and thickens slightly. To complete the Stir-Fry: Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the tofu ; cook 10, turning occasionally, until crisp and golden on all sides. Transfer to a fresh bed of paper towels to drain. Add the remaining tablespoon oil to the same skillet. Add the shallots, mushrooms, baby corn, bell peppers and garlic. Cook, stirring occasionally, 4 minutes, or until the mushrooms are tender, but the bell peppers are still crisp. Add the tofu; cook 1 minute more, tossing gently, until the tofu is heated through. Pour the sauce over the stir-fry and toss to combine. Sprinkle with the almonds The post Tofu Almond Stir-Fry appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Happy New Year Hoppin John

January 1 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Happy New Year Hoppin John If it’s January 1st, it must be time for Hoppin’ John.  I love the tradition of making black-eyed peas with rice and collards so much!  I first discovered it when we moved to Charleston SC from Pennsylvania in 1983.  It’s been a New Year’s Day tradition ever since.  Most people serve the collards on the side, but I love to combine them. I sometimes add diced tomatoes just because. My favorite way to serve them is topped with vegan sour cream, Tabasco, sliced jalapenos, with cornbread on the side. I like to cook the collards and black-eyed peas a day in advance and then add them to the rice on New Year’s Day. Here is my basic recipe (and more photos of Hoppin’ John variations from previous years).  Happy New Year to all my friends. I wish you all the best in 2020! Hoppin John with Collards 1 tablespoon olive oil or 3 tablespoons water 1 sweet yellow onion, chopped 2 garlic cloves, minced 1 cup long-grain brown rice 2 cups  vegetable broth or water Salt 3 cups cooked or 2 (16-ounce) cans black-eyed peas, drained and rinsed 3 cups chopped cooked fresh or frozen collard greens, well drained 1 (14-ounce) can fire-roasted diced tomatoes, drained (optional) 1 teaspoon Liquid Smoke 1 teaspoon Tabasco sauce, plus more to serve 1/­­4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper Vegan sour cream, to serve Sliced pickled jalapenos (optional)   Heat the oil or water in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic, cover, and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the rice and broth or water and bring to a boil. Add salt to taste (the amount of salt needed depends on the saltiness of your broth or if you use water). Reduce the heat to medium-low and cook, covered, until the rice is tender, about 30 minutes.  About 10 minutes before the rice is tender, stir in the cooked black-eyed peas, the cooked chopped collards, tomatoes (if using), Liquid Smoke, Tabasco, and black pepper. Add more salt, if needed. To serve, spoon into bowls and accompany with vegan sour cream, jalapenos (if using) and Tabasco at the table. Here are pics of two other favorites from my Hoppin’ John gallery: Made in a slow cooker with a cornbread topping…. and Hoppin’ John Collard Rolls…. (serve with Tabasco-Sour Cream)… The post Happy New Year Hoppin’ John appeared first on Robin Robertson.

One Pot Vegan Creamed Beans and Greens with Chili Oil

December 18 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

One Pot Vegan Creamed Beans and Greens with Chili Oil Every day, around 4pm, my husband and I start texting about dinner. If there aren’t any leftovers or a previously thought-through dinner plan, my most common proposition is ‘greens and beans?’ Those two are such staples and always leave us feeling really nourished. I have a million variations on the subject that I can throw together super quickly. Sometimes, for a quick and lazy lunch, I’ll just crisp up cooked chickpeas and kale in a pan with lots of salt and pepper and be totally satisfied. I always push off from there for our dinners, then add more vegetables, a sauce, a grain, crunchy toppings, etc. etc. I vary the kinds of greens and beans I use depending on season and mood, and what’s on hand. These one pot creamed beans and greens are my cozy, wintery version of our staple meal, and they definitely hit the spot every single time. The beans of choice here are white beans, since they are extra creamy in texture and go so well with lemon and pepper – both key ingredients. The green of choice is chard. I kind of think chard doesn’t get enough love? I love it because it wilts quickly, usually costs less than kale, and the stems are totally edible. The secret with the stems is cooking them first until they soften. Usually they’ll end up melting into a dish and become almost indistinguishable, but will still contribute some substance and extra plant power. If you use rainbow chard, the stems will give some of their color to whatever you’re cooking, so that’s fun as well. Chili oil is the component that takes this meal to that extra special place. I don’t recommend skipping it. We just quickly crisp up some red pepper flakes in olive oil and let it infuse while making the meal. A generous drizzle of that will really make everything sing. Hope you’re enjoying this sometimes crazy pre-holiday time! Let’s all remember to be nice to ourselves and stay warm and nourished. Sending you lots of love. One Pot Creamed Beans and Greens with Chili Oil   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the chili oil ¼ cup olive oil 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes pinch of sea salt for the creamed beans and greens avocado oil or olive oil 1 yellow onion - diced 1 medium-large bunch of chard - stems thinly sliced, leaves chopped sea salt freshly ground black pepper 5 cloves of garlic - minced a few 1 strips of lemon zest (from 1 lemon) 2 15 oz cans or 3½ cups cooked white beans 2 cups vegetable broth 2 bay leaves (optional) 1¼ cup oat milk or cashew milk juice from 1 lemon Instructions to make the chili oil Combine the oil and red pepper flakes in a saucepan over medium heat, cook, swirling, for 3-4 minutes until the pepper flakes are crispy. Add a pinch of salt. Set aside to infuse while making the beans and greens. to make the creamed beans and greens Heat oil over medium heat in a soup pot. Add the onion and chard stems, along with a pinch of salt and plenty of black pepper, and sauté for 10 minutes, or until the chard stems are very soft. Add the garlic and lemon zest, and stir until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the beans, vegetable broth, bay leaves, if using, and another pinch of salt. Bring to a boil, establish a simmer and let simmer and reduce, uncovered, for 10 minutes. Remove the bay leaves and lemon zest strips (this should be easy, since they should float up to the top). Add the chard leaves and cover the pot for a few minutes for the leaves to wilt. Remove the lid and stir in the wilted leaves. Add the milk and bring everything back up to a boil, then turn off the heat. Stir in the lemon juice. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Serve warm, drizzled with the chili oil (recipe above). Notes We prefer to use original Oatly oat milk or homemade cashew milk (1 cup cashews, 3 cups water) in this recipe, it does best with something really creamy and rich. 3.5.3226   Our New Ebook: Golubka Kitchen Sweets! Filled with our favorite, vegan and gluten-free dessert recipes in the world. The post One Pot Vegan Creamed Beans and Greens with Chili Oil appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Heart-y Artichokes, Green Beans, and Leeks

December 9 2019 Meatless Monday 

Artichoke hearts, leeks, and green beans are roasted in the oven to a crispy perfection and are then topped with a sprinkling of pistachios and pomegranate seeds. With such a combination of flavors and textures, no two bites will ever be the same. This recipe comes to us from Joy Bauer’s book Yummy Yoga: Playful Poses and Tasty Treats . Photo credit: Lucy Schaeffer. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 6 - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 2 tablespoons lemon juice - 3 garlic cloves, finely chopped (or 1/­­4 teaspoon garlic powder) -  1/­­2 teaspoon kosher salt -  1/­­4 teaspoon black pepper - 4 to 5 cups fresh green beans - One 14-ounce can quartered artichoke hearts, drained, rinsed, and patted dry - 2 or 3 leeks, sliced and cleaned (use only the white and pale green parts) - Nonstick oil spray -  1/­­2 cup pomegranate seeds -  1/­­2 cup roasted pistachio nuts, shelled   Preheat the oven to 425°F. Combine the olive oil, lemon juice, garlic, salt, and pepper in a mixing bowl. Add the green beans, artichokes, and leeks. Stir to coat evenly. Mist a baking sheet with oil spray and spread the mixture on the sheet in a single layer. Roast for about 20 to 25 minutes or until the vegetables are slightly browned and crispy. (I think theyre extra delicious when the edges get super crisp!) Remove from oven and garnish with the pomegranate seeds and pistachios. The post Heart-y Artichokes, Green Beans, and Leeks appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Sesame Tofu

December 7 2019 VegKitchen 

Sesame Tofu Quick, easy, and tasty--this is the perfect recipe for when you are in a hurry, but still want to eat something healthy.   Save Print Sesame Tofu Serves: 4   Ingredients 250 g firm tofu 1 clove garlic, finely chopped 2 tbsp soy sauce 1 tsp sesame oil 2 pinches cayenne pepper 1 tbsp sunflower oil 2 tbsp sesame seeds Instructions Drain the firm tofu and sponge it with a paper towel. The post Sesame Tofu appeared first on VegKitchen.

Biryani Rice

November 27 2019 VegKitchen 

Biryani Rice Dont let the number of ingredients stop you--this Biryani Rice is easy to make, and its amazing scents deserve the effort. Save Print Biryani Rice Serves: 8   Ingredients ¼ cup canola oil ½ cup cashews 2 large onions, sliced thinly 2 cloves garlic, minced 2 tbsp biryani curry paste or other Indian curry paste 1 tbsp ginger, minced 1 tsp salt 1 tsp ground cumin ½ tsp ground cinnamon 3¼ cups vegetable broth ¼ cup plain yogurt 3 seeds cardamom, crushed 2 stars anise 1 stick cinnamon 1¾ cup brown basmati rice 2 small hot peppers, chopped Instructions Heat the oil in a large frying pan. The post Biryani Rice appeared first on VegKitchen.

Whipped Mashed Potatoes With White Bean Gravy

November 22 2019 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Whipped Mashed Potatoes With White Bean Gravy photo by Joshua Foo, styling by me Feeds about 10 Let’s face it. The most important thing at the holiday table is going to be mashed potatoes. Hot on its heels is going to be gravy. So why mess around with anything less than the creamiest, fluffiest, lushest most dreamy taters? The secret here is twofold: Fold 1) Ingredients. Lots of cashew cream and buttery coconut oil. And fold 2) Method: whipping it all to high heaven with a hand mixer. You incorporate air, plus remove all the clumps without overmixing. No one will be able to resist these! The gravy I’ve used here is akin to a white pepper gravy. Thick and creamy with a lil’ kick. It starts with a roux (that’s toasted flour and oil to you, bub) for a deep sultry flavor and velvety thickness. It’s a really nice customizable recipe in that if you want to make it a mushroom gravy you can certainly add sautéed mushrooms before or after blending. If you want to make it a sausage gravy chop up some sausages and add them at the end. And so on! These recipes are from Superfun Times. Ingredients For the potatoes: 5 pounds russet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1 1/­­2 inch chunks 3/­­4 cup cashews, soaked in water for at least 2 hours (if you have a high speed blender soaking is not necessary) 3/­­4 cups vegetable broth, at room temp 1/­­3 cup refined coconut oil, at room temp 1/­­3 cup olive oil 1 1/­­4 teaspoons salt Fresh black pepper Thinly sliced chives for garnish, if desired For the gravy: 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 medium yellow, roughly chopped 4 garlic cloves, chopped 2 teaspoons dried thyme 2 teaspoons dry rubbed sage Several dashes fresh black pepper 3 cups vegetable broth, plus additional for thinning 2/­­3 cup all purpose flour 3 cups cooked navy beans (2 15-oz can, rinsed and drained) 1/­­3 cup tamari or soy sauce Salt to taste For the gravy: Directions Place potatoes in a pot and submerge in cold water by about an inch. Sprinkle about a teaspoon of salt into the water. Cover and bring to a boil. In the meantime, drain cashews and place in a blender with vegetable broth and blend until completely smooth, scraping the sides with a spatula occasionally to make sure you get everything. If you have a high speed blender this will take about a minute. In a regular blender it will take around 5 so give your blender a break every now and again. Back to the potatoes, once boiling, lower heat to a simmer, uncover and cook for about 12 minutes, until fork tender. Drain potatoes, then place back in the pot. Do a preliminary mash with a potato masher, just to get them broken up. Add half of cashew mixture, coconut and olive oil, salt and pepper and mash with a potato masher until relatively smooth and no big chunks are left. Now comes the creamiest part. Add the remaining cashew mixture, mix it it, then use a hand blender on high speed to whip the ever loving life out of them. They should become very smooth, fluffy and creamy. Taste for salt and pepper along the way, transfer to a serving bowl, garnish with chives and serve! Preheat a saucepan over medium-high heat. Sauté the onion and garlic in the oil for about 5 minutes. Add the thyme, sage and black pepper (I like a lot of black pepper in this) and cook for about 3 minutes more. While that is cooking, stir the flour into the broth until dissolved. If you have an immersion blender, then add the beans, broth mixture, and tamari to the saucepan. Blend immediately and lower the heat to medium. Stir the gravy often for about 10 minutes while it thickens. Use broth to thin as necessary.  If you are using a regular blender, add the beans, broth mixture, and tamari to the blender and blend until smooth. Transfer the onion and the other stuff from the pan to the blender. Puree again until no big chunks of onion are left. Add back to the pot and stir often over medium heat to thicken. Once the gravy thickens, reduce the heat to low. Now you can decide exactly how thick you want it by whisking in extra broth, anywhere from 1/­­2 cup to 3/­­4 cup. Cook for about 10 more minutes to let the flavors deepen, stirring occasionally, adding broth as necessary. Taste for salt. Keep gravy covered and warm until ready to serve.

Garlicky White Bean Avocado Toast with BBQ Drizzle

November 18 2019 Meatless Monday 

If you didnt think avocado toast could get any better, it just did! This savory breakfast recipe is easy to scale down (or up) for a quick lunch or dinner. With such a short ingredient list, youll be amazed at how delicious this is! This recipe comes to us from The  Meatless Monday Family Cookbook  by Jenn Sebestyen. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 - 1 tablespoon (15 ml) olive oil - 3 cloves garlic, minced - 1 can (15 ounces, or 425 g) cannellini beans (white kidney beans), drained and rinsed (or 1 1/­­2 cups [269 g] cooked beans) -  1/­­2 teaspoon dried oregano -  1/­­2 teaspoon salt, or to taste - Pinch of black pepper, or to taste - 2 avocados, peeled and pits removed - 4 slices hearty whole-grain bread, toasted (gluten-free, if desired) - Sweet-and-Spicy BBQ Sauce  or store-bought BBQ sauce - Hemp seeds, for garnish   Heat the olive oil over medium heat in a small skillet. Add the garlic. Sauté for 1 to 2 minutes; watch it carefully so it doesnt burn and turn down the heat a bit if necessary. Add the cannellini beans, oregano, salt, and pepper and sauté for 4 to 5 minutes until hot. To serve: Mash 1/­­2 of an avocado on each slice of toast. Spoon one-quarter of the bean mixture over the mashed avocado on each slice. Drizzle with BBQ sauce and sprinkle with hemp seeds. SERVING SUGGESTION: We like this with a side of fresh fruit to offset the richness of the avocado and beans. The post Garlicky White Bean Avocado Toast with BBQ Drizzle appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Sauteed Lentils & Dandelion Greens

November 2 2019 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Sauteed Lentils & Dandelion Greens Serves 4 If there arent delicious aromatics wafting through the air, have you even cooked? Shallot, onion, olive oil.. now thats dinner! This method is what I use time and time again with whatever I picked up at the anarchist co-op (ok fine Whole Foods) and whatever beans I have burning a hole in my cupboard. So try it with spinach, arugula or chard. Or just go ahead and try it with dandelion greens like the goddam recipe says. It takes only 15 minutes or so (if your lentils are cooked ahead of time or from a can) and it tastes like it took 20. At least. This recipe is from I Can Cook Vegan. Notes There’s a hidden gem to be learned in this simple recipe. If you cook the nutritional yeast for a minute with the shallot and stuff it gets a deep toasty flavor like a roux! It makes it taste extra special and thickens the sauce, too. So much winning. Ingredients 1/­­2 cup walnuts 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 cup thinly sliced shallot 2 cloves garlic, minced 1/­­2 teaspoon dried tarragon Fresh black pepper 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast 1/­­4 cup dry white wine 1/­­2 cup vegetable broth 1 large bunch dandelion greens 1 1/­­2 cups cooked brown or green lentils 2 cups thinly sliced radicchio Directions 1 – Preheat oven to 350 F. Spread walnuts onto a small baking tray and toast for about 10 minutes. Remove from oven, let cool, and roughly chop. In the meantime, proceed with the rest of the recipe.  2 – Preheat a large pan over medium heat. Saute shallots in olive oil with a pinch of salt until lightly browned, about 5 minutes. Add garlic, tarragon and black pepper and saute another minute. 3 – Add nutritional yeast and stir with a wooden spatula to toast for about 1 minute. Add white wine and to deglaze the pan. Let cook for about 3 minutes. 4 – Add vegetable broth and bring to a boil. Add the greens and cook down for about 5 minutes. Add the lentils and toss to heat through. Serve topped with walnuts!

Bell Pepper Bisque with Giant Croutons

October 4 2019 My New Roots 

Bell Pepper Bisque with Giant Croutons Hey friends! Im coming in hot, to drop this stellar soup recipe on you, while the weather is still fine and early fall produce is at its peak. The bell peppers in my region are bountiful and beautiful, and because I am the biggest sucker for roasted pepper anything, I came up with this dish to celebrate a seasonal favourite. But first, can we take a moment and please talk about how I just invented giant croutons? I think it might be my personal opportunity to break the internet. How is this not a thing yet?! Sure, I guess you could look at the cheese toast on French onion soup and say that is a giant crouton, but in my opinion, its merely an open-faced grilled cheese sandwich. Pfff. Not even close to this. My crouton is a cube of sourdough (important shape-distinction), kissed with garlicky oil and seared to toasty, golden perfection. The outsides are caramelized and crisp, while the center is fluffy, creamy and studded with nooks and crannies for the soup to slide in to. Guh. Too good to be true! Honestly guys, Im pretty proud of this. But I also need you to know that this soup is darn good too, even without the crouton. The recipe is loosely based on the North African Sun-dried Tomato Soup in my second cookbook, except I left out many of the warming spices, which felt prematurely winter-y. Its still t-shirt weather here, so the ginger and cinnamon had to go. Plus, I doubled the pepper count, added a teeny splash of balsamic (to round out the flavor), and made it bisque-y without the cream. Guess what I used?! Lentils!! Mic drop. But instead of bulking it up and putting the soup on legume-overload, I was conservative in my approach and just used half a cup. This made the soup rich and creamy without the cream, but in a very hush, hush way, so that you literally have no idea that theyre there. But their presence can be felt, because this soup is the real meal deal, not just a bowl of blended up veggies that will leave you hungry again in 20 minutes. With the bonus lentils, youre getting way more protein and fiber that youd normally expect from a pepper soup, and they will fill you up, and keep you energized for hours. This suddenly feels very infomercial-y. Did I mention there is a giant crouton? Moving on! Lets talk about peppers because they are in the nightshade family and that is a hot topic, if I ever heard one. Nightshade vegetables are a part of the Solanaceae family, and include tomatoes, peppers (and chilies), eggplant /­­ aubergine, and all potatoes except for sweet potatoes and yams. Originally cultivated in South America, nightshade vegetables were brought to Europe and Asia by Spanish explorers. Their name supposedly comes from the fact that they grow at night (as opposed to mushrooms, which grow in the shade). You may have heard rumors that Nightshade vegetables are toxic, that they can cause inflammation or that theyre linked to autoimmune disorders. While it is true that edible nightshades contain high levels of glycoalkaloids, specifically solanine, which at very high levels is toxic, it only seems to trigger reactions in individuals who are sensitive to it. Those with pre-existing inflammatory conditions may experience worsening of their symptoms when they consume these foods, but an elimination diet would be the only way to determine if nightshades are in fact, causing the issues. For people who do not suffer from chronic inflammatory ailments, enjoying ratatouille, a pizza, or a baked potato is likely just fine, and certainly not going to cause you to get these conditions. As far as autoimmunity is concerned, alkaloids from edible nightshades have been shown to irritate the gut, since solanine is effectively natural insecticide produced by this plant family. Gut irritation can contribute to intestinal permeability, which can set off an autoimmune reaction when proteins that should remain in the digestive tract leak into the bloodstream. The level of irritation depends on the amount consumed, and how sensitive the individual is. The highest amounts of solanine are found in green potatoes, and sprouted potatoes, but we should avoid eating those anyway.   Lets review: if you have an autoimmune disorder, leaky gut, or you exhibit symptoms of discomfort (digestive or otherwise) after consuming nightshades, try eliminating them from your diet for at least 6 weeks and see if you notice a difference. Then, re-introduce them one at a time and be aware of how you feel within a 24-hour period after eating them. If you dont have these issues, dont worry about it! There is absolutely no reason to limit your intake of these highly nutritious vegetables if they seem to do your body good. Bell peppers contain an astounding amount of vitamin C, high levels of A, and B6, with very good levels of folate, fiber, and vitamin E. They also provide flavonoids, and carotenoids. Remember to buy bell peppers that have fully ripened - anything other than the greens ones, which are typically unripe red, orange, yellow, or purple peppers. Their nutrient profile will be at its peak, and the natural sugars will be fully developed, easing their digestion. Let’s get to the recipe! If youre really pressed for time, skip roasting the peppers in the oven, and just dice them up, and add them to the pot along with the garlic in step 3. The overall flavour will be less rich, but still incredibly delicious. When Im in a crunch, Ill pull this move and have dinner on the table in 30 minutes. If you want to change things up, try orange or yellow peppers instead of the red ones. As far as sun-dried tomatoes go, I like organic, dried ones, instead of the oil-packed ones, but either would work here. With the canned tomatoes, go for whole, since they tend to be of higher quality than the diced ones. Lets talk bread. If you have access to a bakery where they make the real thing (sourdough), please use that. If you dont, find an unsliced loaf at your supermarket; bonus points if its made with wholegrain flour, organic, yeast-free, or all of the above. The bread should be cut into cubes with the serving bowl size in mind (youll want to see some of the soup around it), but if you have a huge bowl, go crazy and make that crouton as gargantuan as you want! And dont throw the offcuts away - I put them in the toaster and slathered them with hummus for my son. He was stoked about the oddly-shaped chunks.       Print recipe     Bell Pepper Bisque with Giant Croutons Makes 8 cups /­­ 2 litres /­­ Serves 4 Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee, divided 2 medium yellow onions, diced 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 3 large garlic cloves, minced 2 tsp. ground cumin 2 tsp. ground coriander 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. hot smoked paprika (depending on how spicy you like it) 4 large red bell peppers (stems, seeds, and ribs removed) 5 - 7 cups /­­ 1 1/­­4 – 1 3/­­4 liters vegetable broth 1 14.5-oz. /­­ 400ml can whole tomatoes 1/­­2 cup /­­ 45g sun-dried tomatoes, roughly chopped 1/­­2 cup /­­ 100g dried red lentils, soaked for 1 – 8 hours, if possible 2 tsp. balsamic vinegar Directions: 1. If you have time, soak the lentils in water overnight, or for up to 8 hours. Drain and rinse very well. If youre starting from dried, that is okay too, just give them a very good wash and drain before using. 2. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Prepare the peppers by cutting each of them in half, scooping out the seeds, and rubbing with a little coconut oil. Place peppers cut-side down on a parchment-lined baking sheet and place in the oven. Roast for 25-30 minutes until the skins are totally wrinkled and charred in places. 3. In a large stockpot, melt the remaining coconut oil over medium heat. Add the onions and salt and stir to coat. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions soften and begin to slightly caramelize, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic, cumin, coriander, and smoked paprika, and cook until fragrant, about 2 minutes. Add a little broth to the pot if the mixture becomes dry. 4. Add the whole tomatoes and their juices along with the sun-dried tomatoes, lentils, and the rest of the broth. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to low, and break up the whole tomatoes with your spoon. Simmer, covered for 15 minutes. Stir once or twice during cooking to prevent sticking. 5. The peppers should be done by now, so take them out of the oven, transfer all of them to a bowl with a lid or plate over the opening, making sure there are no gaps (this technique steams the peppers so that the skins will just slip right off, without using plastic wrap). Once cool enough to handle, remove the skins from the peppers, and place the peeled peppers in a blender. 6. Remove the soup from the heat and take off the lid to let cool just for a minute. Transfer to the blender, and blend on high until completely smooth. Add balsamic vinegar, and broth or water to thin, until your desired consistency is reached. Season to taste. Transfer back to the pot and keep warm. 7. Make the croutons (recipe below). 8. To serve, ladle the soup into bowls, top with fresh herbs, edible flowers, a drizzle of good olive oil, and of course place one giant crouton in the middle of each bowl. Enjoy! Giant Croutons Make as many as you want! Ingredients: 1 loaf of good bread (wholegrain sourdough is preferred) 2 Tbsp. expeller-pressed coconut oil (the unscented kind - very important!) or ghee, divided 1 clove of garlic, finely minced flaky salt, to taste Directions: 1. Cut the bread into 2 1/­­2 (6cm) slices - mine weighed 1.25 oz /­­ 35g per piece. Cut off the edges and make a cube (save the off-cuts for snacks). 2. Spread a little coconut oil on each side. 3. Heat remaining coconut oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic and sauté for a few minutes, just until the garlic is starting to turn golden. 4. Lower the heat to medium-low, and add the bread cube. Rub each side in the oil to coat with some of the garlic and sprinkle lightly with salt. Let cook on each of the six sides for a couple of minutes until golden brown. Remove from heat and enjoy immediately. I hope that wherever you are on this earth, youre enjoying the seasons shifting and embracing the changes that come with that. When I started writing this post, it was a very hot day, and now, just 48 hours later, I can feel a significant shift in temperature and weather. Here we go, fall! Im happy youre here. Big thanks to my friends at Foragers Farms for letting me crash the greenhouse at the crack of dawn to get these pics. Love to all, happy fall! Sarah B The post Bell Pepper Bisque with Giant Croutons appeared first on My New Roots.

Jamaican Jerk Tofu

January 13 2020 Meatless Monday 

Makes 6 servings This is the kind of miracle dish that can convert anyone to tofu. The Jamaican “jerk” seasoning is sure-to-please. It’s sort of like barbeque and sort of like curry, savory and sweet at the same time. Just make sure you allow plenty of time for the pressing and marinating. The drier the tofu gets before you put it in the marinade, the better. It will soak up more flavor and be nicely chewy. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! - 1 pound extra firm tofu, drained, sliced and pressed (see directions) - 1/­­2 large sweet onion, roughly chopped - 4 cloves garlic - 2 tablespoons fresh ginger, grated - Juice of 2 limes - Zest of 1 lime - 2 tablespoons soy sauce - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 3 tablespoons pure maple syrup - 1 tablespoon dried thyme - 2 teaspoons allspice - 1/­­2 teaspoon cayenne - 1 teaspoon nutmeg - 1/­­2 teaspoon cinnamon - 2 jalapeno peppers, seeded and chopped (you can cut back to one or omit entirely if you don’t like it spicy) Directions Slice the tofu into thick slabs then lay the slices on several layers of paper towels or on a clean dish towel and place a heavy plate or skillet on top. Let it sit for an hour or two. Pressing the tofu is a way to get the extra moisture out – and the drier you can get the tofu, the more of the flavorful marinade it can absorb. Puree all the rest of the ingredients in a blender or food processor to create the marinade. Place the tofu slices in a bowl, pour in the marinade, making sure to coat all the slices, and cover. Let it sit for an hour or two, flipping the slices about halfway through Heat a skillet with a small amount of olive oil over medium high heat. When the pan is hot, lay the tofu slices in a single layer and saute until crispy and browned. That will take 8-10 minutes on each side. (Photo credit: Vegan Style) The post Jamaican Jerk Tofu appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Coconut Noodle Soup

January 2 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Coconut Noodle Soup Oh man is this the perfect recipe for getting back into the swing of things after the holidays! I think that we’re all ready for some deeply nourishing, veggie-heavy meals right about now. I recently made something similar to this noodle soup for dinner and shared it on IG Stories, and got so many inquiries about the recipe. So here it is but a little more intentional and less off the cuff (directly inspired by the Thai soup Tom Kha Gai). It’s seriously my favorite thing to eat right now – the balance of coziness from the noodles and coconut milk and the healthfulness from all the ginger, garlic, mushrooms, and veggies gets me every time. Don’t let the list of ingredients deter you, this soup is very easy to make. It’s all about building flavor in the broth, which starts with the power combo of onion, chili, garlic, and ginger. The broth gets finished off with a touch of coconut milk, which really rounds out its gingery and garlicky intensity and makes it perfectly creamy. It is SO GOOD – I could seriously drink it for every meal this January. We then cook some veggies and mushrooms directly in the broth and serve everything over noodles, garnished with tons of cilantro, scallions, squeezes of lime juice, and crushed nuts. We hope that you’ll give this a try, it’s a real winner! Coconut Noodle Soup   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 tablespoon coconut oil or avocado oil 1 yellow onion - diced 1 small chili pepper - sliced and seeded if preferred sea salt 2 piece of ginger - minced or grated 6 garlic cloves - minced 4-5 kaffir lime leaves (optional but highly recommended) zest from 2 limes 4 cups (1 quart) low-sodium vegetable broth + 1 cup purified water (or 5 cups broth) 1 medium sweet potato or winter squash, or 2 medium carrots - cut in medium chunks 3.5 oz shiitake mushrooms - stemmed and sliced 1 teaspoon coconut sugar 1 13.5 oz can full-fat coconut milk juice from 1 lime, plus more lime slices for garnishing 8 oz vermicelli rice noodles or other noodles of choice green onion - sliced, for serving cilantro - for serving crushed cashews or peanuts - for serving (optional) chili flakes - for serving (optional) Instructions Heat the oil in a soup pot over medium heat. Add the onion, chili, and a pinch of salt, sauté for 8-10 minutes, until soft. Add the ginger and garlic and stir until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the kaffir lime leaves, if using, lemon zest, vegetable broth, and water. Cover and bring to a boil. Add the sweet potato/­­squash/­­carrots and shiitake mushrooms, bring back up to a simmer and simmer, covered, for 10-15 minutes, until the sweet potato/­­squash/­­carrots are cooked through. Add the sugar and coconut milk. Bring back up to a boil and turn off the heat. Stir in the lime juice. Discard the kaffir lime leaves, if using. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Cook the noodles according to the instructions on the package. Distribute the noodles among bowls. Ladle the broth over the noodles, making sure to catch some vegetables and mushrooms when ladling. Garnish generously with green onion, cilantro, lime slices, crushed nuts and chili flakes, if using. Enjoy! Notes - If you are sensitive to spice, omit the chili pepper and flakes. - Kaffir lime leaves are a life-changingly delicious ingredient, and we really recommend seeking them out. Look for them at Asian/­­Indian markets - they are often sold frozen. You can also find them dried. - This recipe is highly customizable! You can add all kinds of veggies. Here are some ideas: -baby bok choy or spinach -zucchini -spiralized daikon radish -bell pepper -basil -other mushrooms like maitake or crimini, etc. 3.5.3226 Our New Ebook: Golubka Kitchen Sweets! Filled with our favorite, vegan and gluten-free dessert recipes in the world. The post Coconut Noodle Soup appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Bell Pepper Tempeh Fajitas

December 23 2019 Meatless Monday 

Tempeh is marinated in lime juice, soy sauce, cumin, oregano and cayenne pepper. The tempeh is grilled and accompanied by bell peppers and red onions in this Tex-Mex treat, perfect for a quick weeknight meal. This recipe comes to us from Allison of Nourish Network. Serves 5 - 1/­­3 cup and 1 tablespoon olive oil, divided - 3 tablespoons fresh squeezed lime juice - 2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cumin - 1/­­2 teaspoon dried oregano - 1/­­8 teaspoon cayenne - 2 garlic cloves, grated - 2 8-ounce packages soy tempeh - 1 medium red onion, cut into 1/­­4-inch slices - 1 large red bell pepper, cut into 1/­­4-inch slices - salt and black pepper, to taste - 8 6-inch corn tortillas   Cut the tempeh into 1/­­4 inch by 2 inch strips. Place 1/­­3 cup of the olive oil with the lime juice and soy sauce in an 8 inch dish. Season with the cumin, oregno, cayenne pepper and garlic. Combine 1/­­3 cup oil, juice, soy sauce, cumin, oregano, cayenne and garlic in an 8-inch dish. Add tempeh, tossing to coat thoroughly. Cover and refrigerate for 2-12 hours, stirring occasionally. Heat a large cast-iron grill pan over medium-high heat. Brush pan with oil. Add half of tempeh to pan. Cook for 5 minutes, flip and cook 5 minutes more. Place in a warm bowl and repeat with the remaining tempeh. Place the onion and bell pepper with remaining 1 tablespoon oil. Season with salt and black pepper to taste. Add the bell pepper and onion to pan used to cook the tempeh. Cook for 3-5 minutes, stirring occasionally, or until the bell pepper and onion is tender and fragrant. Heat the tortillas directly over the flame of a gas stove or in a dry nonstick pan. Place 2 tortillas on each plate. Top evenly with tempeh and bell pepper mixture and enjoy. The post Bell Pepper Tempeh Fajitas appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegetable Curry

December 12 2019 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Vegetable Curry If this cold weather makes you want to cozy up to a curry, but you dont have a lot of time to spend in the kitchen, this curry is for you. This fabulous looking curry is from a new book called Truly Healthy Vegan Cookbook by Dianne Wenz. As a vegan lifestyle coach, Dianne is adept at showing how to prepare well-balanced meals that taste great. The opening chapter of the book is loaded with great tools and tips for eating a healthy vegan diet.  Enticing recipes such as Carrot Cake Oatmeal, Cauliflower Banh Mi, Chickpea Pot Pie, and Key Lime Bars, insure that your menus will be as flavorful and fun to eat as they are good for you. Truly Healthy Vegan Cookbook is ideal for the new vegan trying to navigate their way through unfamiliar territory.  Its also great for anyone looking to fine-tune their eating habits by eliminating processed ingredients and getting back to basics - including eating more vegetables. This cookbook features easy to find ingredients that are used to make simple and delicious recipes such as this Vegetable Curry. About this recipe, Dianne says, Vegetable curries are a favorite warming meal on cold days. I tend to make them with whatever stray bits of vegetables I have on hand to clean out the produce drawer of the fridge, but this combination of cauliflower, green beans, and carrots is my personal favorite. This is a Thai-style curry that uses red curry paste, but it can also be made with the green variety. Vegetable Curry Serves 6 /­­ Prep time: 10 minutes /­­ Cook time: 20 minutes 1 teaspoon neutral-flavored oil (such as grapeseed or avocado), vegetable stock, or water 1 medium-sized yellow onion, diced 3 garlic cloves, minced 1 tablespoon grated or minced fresh ginger 1 (14-ounce) can light coconut milk 1 cup vegetable stock 3 tablespoons red curry paste 4 cups chopped cauliflower florets 1/­­2 pound green beans, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces 2 carrots, chopped 1 (15-ounce) can chickpeas, drained and rinsed 2 cups spinach Sea salt Black pepper Heat the oil in a large stockpot over medium-high heat. Add the onion, garlic, and ginger and cook until they begin to brown, about 5 minutes. Add the light coconut milk, vegetable stock, and red curry paste to the pot and stir to combine. Add the cauliflower, green beans, carrots, and chickpeas. Bring the mixture to a boil, and then reduce the heat to medium-low. Cover the pot and simmer for 15 minutes, or until the vegetables have softened. Uncover the pot and stir in the spinach, continuing to simmer, while stirring frequently until the spinach wilts. Season with sea salt and black pepper to taste. From Truly Healthy Vegan Cookbook, by Dianne Wenz, published by Rockridge Press. Copyright (C) 2019 by Callisto Media. All rights reserved. The post Vegetable Curry appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Maple and Balsamic Roasted Brussels Sprouts

December 9 2019 Meatless Monday 

Who doesnt love roasted Brussels sprouts these days? These cruciferous veggies have gone from hated to adored over the past couple of years. And the chief reason is the discovery that these petit choux (small cabbages) roast up so nicely. This easy roasted recipe calls upon maple syrup, balsamic vinegar, cranberries, hazelnuts, red onions, and rosemary to really bring on the flavor. This recipe comes to us from Sharon Palmer, The Plant-Powered Dietitian. Serves 8 - 2 pounds Brussels sprouts  - 1 red onion, sliced  -  1/­­2 cup hazelnuts, halved  - 1 cup whole fresh or frozen cranberries (or 1/­­2 cup dried)  - 2 tablespoons olive oil  - 1 tablespoon pure maple syrup  - 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar  - 1 garlic clove, minced  - 1 teaspoon smoked paprika  - Salt and pepper (if desired, optional)  - 3 twigs fresh rosemary, chopped coarsely (or 1 teaspoon dried)   Preheat oven to 375 F.   Trim ends of Brussels sprouts and slice them in half. Arrange evenly on a baking sheet. Arrange onion slices, hazelnuts, and cranberries over Brussel sprouts and toss together gently. In a small dish, mix together, olive oil, maple syrup, vinegar, garlic, smoked paprika, and salt and pepper (if desired). Drizzle vinaigrette over vegetables, sprinkle with rosemary, and toss with tongs to distribute. Place in top rack of oven and roast until gold brown, about 35-40 minutes. The post Maple and Balsamic Roasted Brussels Sprouts appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Cheese Sauce

December 4 2019 VegKitchen 

Vegan Cheese Sauce This classic cheese sauce is extremely simple to make, and can be refrigerated for up to 1 week. Save Print Vegan Cheese Sauce Serves: 1 cup   Ingredients 1 1/­­2 cup Yukon potatoes, peeled and quartered ⅓ cup carrots, diced ¼ cup nutritional yeast 2 tbsp olive oil 2 tbsp unsweetened almond milk 1 tsp lemon juice 1 clove garlic, minced ½ tsp vinegar ½ tsp salt ¼ tsp cumin Instructions Put the potatoes and carrots in a pot and cover with water. The post Vegan Cheese Sauce appeared first on VegKitchen.

Aquafaba Pumpkin Pie

November 23 2019 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Aquafaba Pumpkin Pie photo by Kate Lewis Makes a 9-inch Pie Pumpkin Pie just got lighter, airier and way, way easier! Aquafaba (that’s cooked chickpea liquid) fluffs up as you puree literally every single ingredient together in the blender. So while it works, you can lean against the kitchen counter scrolling through Instagram and giggling at all the sillyheads that are still using eggs. Come on, it’s 2020, get with the program. But anyway, this pie is full of ginger and spice and everything nice; simply put it tastes the exact way you want pumpkin pie to taste. It also sets beautifully as you can see from those luscious fork marks. Long story short: cancel any other pies and get this on your table. Notes ~You will need 1/­­2 a cup of aquafaba. I highly recommend aquafaba from an organic can of chickpeas. That is what we tested it with and it worked beautifully! Homemade aquafaba will give you varying results in flavor and texture so experiment some time but if you’re new to this just buy the can. I am sure you will figure out some way to use those chickpeas. ~More about that can! I would suggest a 28 oz can because then you won’t need to scrape the bottom of a small can to make sure you get that full 1/­­2 cup. ~For crusts, you can use one off this site, or a storebought one, or a gluten-free crumb crust or whatever you want. No need to parbake. ~If you are using a high-speed blender (like Vitamix) then put it on a low setting. 2 sounds good. If it’s a regular old blender, do a 5 or 6. Ingredients 3 cups pumpkin purée 1/­­2 cup pure maple syrup 1/­­2 cup aquafaba (see notes) 2 tablespoons coconut oil at room temp 2 tablespoons organic cornstarch 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon ground ginger 1/­­4 teaspoon ground nutmeg Pinch of ground cloves 1/­­2 teaspoon sea salt 1 (9-inch) pie crust, unbaked and chilled Directions - Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Add the pumpkin, maple syrup, aquafaba, coconut oil, cornstarch, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, cloves and salt to a blender. Blend for about 3 minutes (less if using a high-speed blender), until light and fluffy. It should increase by 20 percent to 25 percent in volume. - Pour into prepared pie crust. Bake for about an hour, until the top is crackly, the filling is a little jiggly in the center and pulling away from the sides slightly. - Let cool for about 30 minutes at room temperature, then refrigerate for at least 3 hours. Slice and serve with whipped cream!

Cranberry Spice Oatmeal Cookies

November 22 2019 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Cranberry Spice Oatmeal Cookies Picture by VK Rees Makes 2 dozen Oatmeal cookies just remind you of home. If you come from a home that deprived you of chocolate chip cookies. Just kidding! These are gorgeous little clusters of oats studded with ruby cranberries. Crispy on the edges, chewy inside with a hint of spice.  Just the perfect thing for the holidays if you can forget about the war on Christmas and enjoy a cookie for a minute. This recipe is from Superfun Times. Notes ~ If you dont have pumpkin pie spice, 3/­­4 teaspoon ground ginger, 3/­­4 teaspoon ground cinnamon and a pinch of cloves oughta do it! Ingredients 1/­­3 cup refined coconut oil, softened at room temp 1/­­3 cup packed brown sugar 1/­­3 cup granulated sugar 3 tablespoons unsweetened almond milk or your fave non-dairy milk 1 tablespoon organic cornstarch 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract 1/­­2 cup all-purpose flour 1/­­2 teaspoon baking soda 1 1/­­2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice 1/­­2 teaspoon salt 1 1/­­2 cups rolled oats 1/­­2 cup dried sweetened cranberries 1/­­2 cup chopped walnuts Directions Preheat oven to 350 F. Lightly grease 2 large baking sheets.  In a large mixing bowl, use a handmixer or strong fork to cream together oil and sugars. Mix in the vanilla. Add the cornstarch and milk, and mix until the cornstarch is dissolved.  Sift in the flour, baking soda, spices and salt and mix to combine. Add the oats, cranberries and nuts, and use your hands to form a stiff dough. Scoop cookies out with a tablespoon or server, using about two tablespoons of dough per cookie. Place about 2 inches apart. Flatten a little with your hand. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes, until edges are lightly browned. Remove from oven and cool for about 5 minutes then transfer to cooling rack to cool completely.

Meaty Mushroom Stew over Garlic Mashed Potatoes

November 18 2019 Meatless Monday 

This recipe comes to us from The Meatless Monday Family Cookbook by Jenn Sebestyen. Jenn says: “This recipe reminds me a bit of pot roasts from my childhood. Of course, back then, it was beef, not mushrooms, but the flavor profiles are similar and both dishes are warm comfort food that make me want to curl up on the couch with a big bowl.” Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 - For the Garlic Mashed Potatoes: - 2 pounds (900 g) Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and diced -  1/­­2 teaspoon salt, or to taste - 2 tablespoons (28 g) plant-based butter or (28 ml) extra-virgin olive oil -  1/­­2 cup (120 ml) lite coconut milk, plus more as needed -  1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder, or to taste   - For the Meaty Mushroom Stew: - 2 tablespoons (28 ml) olive oil - 1 yellow onion, diced - 2 cloves garlic, minced - 2 carrots, peeled and diced - 10 ounces (280 g) sliced cremini mushrooms - 10 ounces (280 g) sliced shiitake mushrooms - 1 tablespoon (16 g) tomato paste - 2 tablespoons (28 ml) tamari, coconut aminos, or soy sauce (gluten-free, if desired) - 2 teaspoons dried thyme - 2 teaspoons dried sage - 1 1/­­2 teaspoons salt, or to taste -  1/­­4 teaspoon black pepper, or to taste - 1 1/­­2 cups (355 ml) low-sodium vegetable broth - 1 cup (130 g) frozen green peas   For the Mashed Potatoes: Add the potatoes to a large pot on the stove. Cover the potatoes with water by 2 to 3 inches (5 to 7.5 cm). Add 1/­­2 teaspoon of salt. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil and then reduce the heat to low. Simmer for 15 to 20 minutes until the potatoes are tender and easily pierced with a knife. Drain and add the potatoes back to the pot. Add the butter and coconut milk. Using a potato masher, mash the potatoes until smooth. Add additional milk 1 tablespoon (15 ml) at a time if you like your mashed potatoes a thinner consistency. Add the garlic powder and additional salt to taste. Switch to a spatula or wooden spoon to stir and incorporate the seasonings well. Set aside.   For the Meaty Mushroom Stew: Meanwhile, heat the olive oil over medium heat in a large pan. Add the onion and sauté for 5 to 6 minutes until soft and translucent. Add the garlic and carrots and sauté for 2 to 3 minutes. Add the mushrooms and sauté for 8 to 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the tomato paste, tamari, thyme, sage, salt, pepper, and vegetable broth. Increase the heat to bring to a boil and then reduce the heat to low to simmer for 10 minutes. Add the green peas, stir to incorporate, and simmer for 1 to 2 minutes to heat through.   Serve the Meaty Mushroom Stew over the Garlic Mashed Potatoes. The post Meaty Mushroom Stew over Garlic Mashed Potatoes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Soft & Chewy Spiced Apple Rings

October 11 2019 Oh My Veggies 

Is there a secret to coring apples? Please tell me that there is and I’m doing it wrong. I have an apple corer and I can never get it to go in through the stem and out through the bottom–it always goes out slightly to the side of the bottom and then I have to core my apples twice. And twice-cored apples are not as nice looking as once-cored apples. I made apple chips for Henry Happened last fall and I decided to revisit that idea, but with the addition of chai spices--cinnamon, ginger, cardamom, and just a pinch of cloves. Instead of baking the apples until they were crispy, I baked them until they were soft and chewy. Erin from Texanerin Baking posted chewy apple chips last year and I wanted to see if I could make my recipe chewy too. Because the only descriptor I like more than spiced is chewy. Chewy is never not good! Yes, I said never not! Apple rings and chips are really simple to make at home. While it’s nice to have a dehydrator for these sorts of things, you don’t need one--an oven set at a low temperature works too. When you […]

Vegan Shepherd’s Pie

September 30 2019 Meatless Monday 

Theres nothing more comforting on a cool autumn day than a heaping scoopful of shepherds pie. This recipe is a blessing for those who want to recreate the decadent taste and texture of this classic dish without using any animal products. A layer of creamy mashed potatoes sits atop a rich filling of diced cremini or baby Portobello mushrooms, lentils, and vegetables. This recipe comes from Anne Hernandez, co-founder of Urban Homestead, an online magazine that focuses on holistic remedies and healthy eating, and one of the finalists of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show Meatless Monday Rapid Fire Challenge. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 8 - Mashed Potato Topping - 5 Pounds Russet Potatoes peeled & cut into 1-inch cubes - 1/­­2 Tablespoon Salt - 2-4 Tablespoons Vegan Butter - 1 teaspoon Dry Mustard Powder - 1/­­2 teaspoon Pepper or to taste - 1 1/­­2 teaspoons Salt to taste   - Filling - 2 1/­­2 Tablespoons Extra Virgin Olive Oil - 1 Medium Onion diced - 3 Cloves Garlic minced - 1 Cup Baby Portobello/­­Crimini Mushrooms diced small - 2 Tablespoons Flour - 1 teaspoon Parsley dried - 1 teaspoon Thyme dried - 1/­­2 teaspoon Rosemary dried - 1 Bay Leaf - 1 Cup Red Wine - 2 1/­­2 Tablespoons Tomato Paste - 1 1/­­2 Cups Vegetable Broth or Stock - 1 Pound Lentils cooked - 28 Ounce Frozen Mixed Vegetables - Salt & Pepper to taste   Instructions Mashed Potato Topping Cover the peeled & cubed potatoes with cold water in a large saucepan. Sprinkle with 1/­­2 Tablespoon of salt and turn the heat to high. Once the water starts to boil, partially cover with the lid, reduce the heat to low and simmer for about 10 minutes or until the potatoes are soft. Put a colander over a heat-proof bowl and drain the potatoes, reserving the potato water. Return the potatoes to the saucepan and mash with a potato masher. Stir in the dry mustard, salt, pepper, and vegan butter. Add the potato water 1/­­2 cup at a time, mixing thoroughly with each addition, until the mashed potatoes have a slightly loose consistency (but not runny). Set aside. Filling Preheat oven to 400 F. In a large oven-proof skillet, heat olive oil until shimmering over medium heat. Add the onions and cook for 2 minutes. Add the garlic and cook for a minute longer. Add the mushrooms, season all with salt & pepper, and cook for 2 more minutes. Stir the flour, parsley, thyme, and rosemary into the mushroom mixture until evenly coated for at least a minute to cook the flour. Add the wine and cooked lentils (I used Trader Joes). Cook until most of the wine is reduced and absorbed. Whisk the tomato sauce into the vegetable broth and add with the frozen vegetables and bay leaf, stirring to combine. Simmer for 5 minutes then remove from the heat. Discard the bay leaf. If youre feeding a large crowd, leave the mixture in the skillet. If youd rather split the recipe into 2 pie plates, now is the time to do it. Follow the recipe but only bake one of the pies and freeze the other for another day. Top the filling with the mashed potatoes. You can spoon it on and spread carefully as to not mix in the filling or gravy, or use a piping bag to get fancy. Bake in the pre-heated oven for 15 minutes or until the potatoes are lightly browned. Remove the pie from the oven and let it rest for 15 minutes before serving. The post Vegan Shepherd’s Pie appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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