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classical vegetarian recipes

Sweet Potato Wedges with Tahini-Honey Sauce and Everything Bagel Spice

October 24 2018 My New Roots 

Sweet Potato Wedges with Tahini-Honey Sauce and Everything Bagel Spice   Ive now been blogging for eleven years (11years!!!). And in those eleven years, you know what Ive learned about you? You love sweet potatoes. You love tahini. And you love sauce. And if I post anything with those things - or even better - a combination of those things, I know its going to go over well. I often get preoccupied with making my recipe posts totally out there with crazy ingredients, involved techniques, and lose sight of the fact that a lot of you like really simple things too. Just like me. And just like me you like sweet potatoes and tahini and sauce. The sweet potato wedges with tahini-honey sauce and everything bagel spice that I posted on Instagram drew many requests for the recipe. I thought it would be way too easy, but your encouragement reminded me that its okay if its easy! We all have a place for uncomplicated in our lives.     I was first introduced to everything bagel spice while teaching cooking classes down in the states this past summer. One of the women in the group proclaimed that it took avocado toast to the next level, and after trying it once, I was totally hooked. She gave me two jars of the flavour confetti before I flew home, and I have just recently shaken out the last grain of salt. Without a clue on where to buy such a random thing in Canada, I set out to make my own - only I decided to be highly practical and mix up a laughably large batch because it is literally good on everything. For those of you who arent familiar with everything bagel spice mix, its the simplest combination of flaky salt, onion flakes, garlic flakes, sesame seeds, and poppy seeds, which classically tops an everything bagel. It doesnt sound like that much, but trust me, if it can make a white, doughy   this blend far more than the sum of its parts. A generous sprinkle on any dish makes it all that much more dimensional, seasoned, and delicious. My favourite applications for it include sliced garden tomatoes, cucumber, steamed green beans, roasted beets, goat cheese, cauliflower, popcorn, green salads, steamed brown rice or quinoa, eggs, hummus, and sweet potatoes...you see where Im going with this. Maybe its faster to write a list of the foods that it wouldnt be good on? Chocolate cake. There, that was easy.     But Im actually here to talk about sweet potatoes. These gorgeous golden roots are now in season, and the last local tubers being pulled from the earth as I write this. Since I live so close to a number of organic farms here in Ontario, I thought it would be fun to go see them being harvested. I called around my area to see if anyone still had them in the ground, and I got lucky when one place, Fiddlehead Farm, called me back with good news and an invitation out to their field. Fiddlehead Farm is run by a tribe of boss women who support over 150 local families through their CSA program, and hold stands at four different markets. These ladies are busy, and growing a diverse range of vegetables, greens, and herbs that seemed to stretch on for miles. I could tell from walking around the property how passionate they were about their work, and how deeply they care for their little corner of the earth. What an inspiration! Heather, the farms co-owner, hopped off her tractor to introduce herself and show me the goods. She pulled back a tangle of stems and gave a good yank to unearth a juicy bunch of sweet potatoes, all clumped together like a vegetable cuddle puddle. Jackpot! She said it had been a really good year for this particular crop, and right under my feet were literally hundreds of roots waiting patiently to be harvested before the impending frost. Seeing how things grow and meeting the people that work so hard to bring these food gifts to us gives me a deeper appreciation for every bite I take.     Sweet potatoes are nutritional powerhouses, as one of natures best sources of beta-carotene. Beta-carotene is a carotenoid form of vitamin A - an essential anti-inflammatory and antioxidant nutrient. The intensity of a sweet potatos orange flesh is a direct reflection of its beta-carotene content, so find the most vibrant ones you can, and dig in. Remember that you need a little fat to help your body absorb beta-carotene, so a drizzle of olive oil, or dousing your taters in a sauce like the one in this recipe is an important step in receiving those life-giving nutrients. Not a bad deal if you ask me. Sweet potatoes can be enjoyed roasted, steamed, sautéed, or even eaten raw, but however you choose to eat them, keep those skins on! The skin of a sweet potato is loaded with extra fiber to regulate blood sugar and support digestion, potassium to maintain normal blood pressure, and iron to deliver much-needed oxygen to your cells. Scrub sweet potatoes firmly with a soft vegetable brush - you want to remove the dirt but not take the skin away. When purchasing sweet potatoes, look for smooth, even skin without bruises or soft spots. Avoid buying sweet potatoes that are in the fridge, since cold temperatures negatively affect their flavour. Once you get them home, store them in a dry, and well-ventilated place away from a hot spot (like near the stove or on top of the fridge). Instead of keeping them in plastic, which can cause them to mold, store them in an open paper bag to extend their life.   Some notes on the recipe. Other methods Ive seen online for everything bagel spice do not suggest toasting the seeds beforehand, and I think this is a major miss. It makes a huge difference giving the sesame and poppy seeds a quick tour in a hot pan to coax out more of their flavour. If youre in a rush or simply cant be bothered, thats fine, just know that youll be missing out on some bonus taste points. And if you dont want to make three cups of the mix to start, simply half, or even quarter the recipe. I am pretty confident that youll love it though, especially once you try it on avocado toast. The Tahini Honey Sauce makes about one cup (250ml), which is plenty to cover the sweet potato wedges, but make a double batch if you want a great staple dressing for the week ahead. Its delicious on simple green salad, folded into cooked grains, drizzled over roast vegetables, or on avocado toast. The honey taste is present, but not overpowering, so feel free to add more if you want to ramp up the sweetness. For a vegan version, use maple syrup or date syrup in its place.       Print recipe     Sweet Potato Wedges with Tahini- Honey Sauce and Everything Bagel Spice Serves 4 Ingredients: 3 medium organic sweet potatoes (about 1 1/­­2 lbs. /­­ 650g) coconut oil (expeller-pressed and flavour-neutral) sea salt flat-leaf parsley and /­­ or cilantro for garnish chili flakes toasted pumpkin seeds Tahini-Honey Sauce (recipe follows) Everything Bagel Spice Mix (recipe follows) Tahini-Honey Sauce Makes 1 cup /­­ 250ml Ingredients: 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml tahini 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml water 2 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 Tbsp. extra virgin cold-pressed olive oil 1 Tbsp. raw liquid honey (substitute with maple syrup for a vegan version) 1 small clove garlic, minced 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt Big Batch Everything Bagel Spice Mix Makes 3 cups /­­ 430g Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup /­­ 80g garlic flakes 3/­­4 cup /­­ 85g onion flakes 3/­­4 cup /­­100g sesame seeds (any colour you like) 1/­­2 cup/­­ 85g poppy seeds 1/­­2 cup /­­ 80g flaky sea salt (I used Maldon) Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. 2. Scrub the sweet potatoes well under running water. Slice them lengthwise into wedges of your desired thickness. Place them on a baking sheet with space between them (if theyre too close together theyll steam each other and get soggy), and roast for about 20-25 minutes, depending on their size. Remove from the oven when fork-tender. 3. While the sweet potatoes are roasting, make the Tahini-Honey Sauce by placing all the ingredients in a blender and blend until completely smooth. Taste and adjust seasoning if necessary. To thin, add a little water and blend or stir until the desired consistency is reached. Store leftovers in the fridge for five days. 4. Make the Everything Bagel Spice Mix In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast the sesame seeds until fragrant. Remove from heat and let cool. Place poppy seeds in the same skillet, and toast over medium heat until fragrant. Remove from heat and let cool. In a large jar combine the cooled sesame and poppy seeds, garlic flakes, onion flakes, and salt. Shake or stir to combine, and secure with an airtight lid. Store in a cool, dry place away from direct light. Keeps for 3-4 month. 5. To serve, drizzle the Tahini-Honey Sauce over the sweet potato wedges (you can keep them on the baking sheet or plate them as desired), then sprinkle generously with the Everything Bagel Spice Mix, and top with fresh herbs, toasted pumpkin seeds, and chili flakes (but get creative, these are just suggestions!). Enjoy. I want to sign off with a sincere thanks for the past eleven years of support from all of you. It’s hard for me to believe that I’ve been creating in this space for so many years now (I’ve never done anything for this long!), but I wouldn’t have the motivation to keep going if it weren’t for your curiosity, enthusiasm, and appetite for the heart work I put in here. I know that I’ll stay hungry if you do Let’s keep going, together. In sincere gratitude and love, Sarah B. *   *   *   *   *   * I have great news, dear friends! Due to the overwhelmingly positive response to the Life-Changing Loaf Subscription Box, we have reopened the sales so that you can still receive (or give!) the box before the holiday season. Click here for more information, and to subscribe. Thank you very much for your ongoing support of My New Roots! The post Sweet Potato Wedges with Tahini-Honey Sauce and Everything Bagel Spice appeared first on My New Roots.

Travel Notes: Italy (Rome and the Amalfi Coast)

October 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Travel Notes: Italy (Rome and the Amalfi Coast) We went to Italy earlier this month and visited the Amalfi Coast and Rome. Having visited the Abruzzo region a few years ago, I continue to be amazed at how different Italy is from region to region. They are almost like separate, tiny countries. It was a great trip – we lucked out with the weather, all our extensive train, plane, bus and boat journeys went pretty smoothly, and we got to see so many breathtaking things. The only complaint we had is a classic one – not enough time there. Below are some photos from the trip, as well as some notes and suggestions that we hope will be useful to future travelers :) Amafli Coast Our first impression was that this is an amazingly beautiful area that’s been completely overrun by tourism. That being said, there are still ways to enjoy it less like a tourist and more like a visitor, and it’s honestly so breathtaking that it’s very worth the visit. We stayed in Vettica, a quiet village right next to Amalfi, in a tiny Airbnb with a big terrace overlooking the cliffs and the sea. For us, it was the best of both worlds. We saw close to no tourists in Vettica, and instead got to see how people lead their lives in such an amazing setting. We watched locals going to church, to the market, feeding their cats, and being completely unaffected by the copious amounts of stairs in their cliffside neighborhoods (we were out of breath every time). Yet Amalfi was close enough (still a 45 minute walk or a stressful bus ride, but totally doable) that we had access to the boats and buses that shuttle people to Capri, Positano, and other beautiful places on the coast. It was really nice to have some distance from Amalfi, because it’s incredibly crowded with tour groups on any given day, but you have to go through it to get pretty much anywhere on the coast. Capri Once we got to Capri, we were wishing that we could spend the night there. There’s so much to do and it’s so incredibly beautiful. Take the chairlift up to Monte Solaro, the highest peak, to see the insane panorama that opens up. Walk around both Capri and Anacapri. Capri is better for partying and Anacapri – for quiet walks on tiny streets. Visit the Church of San Michele in Anacapri to see the intricate, hand-painted floor. Eat torta caprese and caprese sandwiches in the spirit of true tourism :) A complete must is a visit to the Villa San Michele, a villa built by Axel Munthe, the Swedish physician and author. Munthe was a collector of classical artifacts, so the whole villa is tastefully decorated by objects from the antiquity, some of which were found right on site during the construction of the villa. There is a lush garden, a breathtaking panorama of the island and the sea, and every inch of the place is pristine and photogenic. Positano Although Positano is an incredibly beautiful town with stunning architecture, we concluded that we would have been better off having a second day in Capri instead of coming here. The reason: it is swamped with tourists and touristy shops in a way that feels quite forced and concentrated (Capri, though also very touristy, had a more spread out feel). Maybe we went to the wrong places? If you have more than four days on the Amalfi coast, which is all we had, we would still recommend coming here. It also largely depends on your goals for your travels, of course :) Ravello We went here mainly because the host of our favorite Russian travel show visited the town in one of the episodes, and it looked totally breathtaking. Ravello is a town very high in the mountains, and the bus ride up took us on some of the tightest serpentines we’ve ever seen. The views from the top are the pay off, and the air feels different – very much like the freshest mountain air. Another beautiful villa to visit is the Villa Cimbrone in Ravello, full of ancient structures, fountains, sculptures, a beautiful garden and yet another breathtaking panorama. Food We were surprised to learn that the region is actually not known for its food, and finding a good, authentic meal isn’t easy because large amounts of tourists equal large amounts of tourist trap restaurants. It is Italy however, where even bad food is decent. We did manage to find some gems, but Rome really took the prize over Amalfi in the culinary department. Here are a few favorites: Pizzeria Da Nino, Conca dei Marini A charming, small restaurant in the town neighboring Vettica, with home-cooked food and a super charming owner (Nino!) that greets you at the door and is easy to understand even when you don’t speak a word of Italian. Go for the fresh-made pasta. Al Pesce d’Oro, Vettica A restaurant at a bed and breakfast in Vettica with good pizza. We went for the zucchini and squash blossom one and were pleasantly surprised at how solid and tasty it was. Da Ferdinando, Positano An outdoor restaurant right on the beach in Positano, with a really fun atmosphere and tasty dishes. La Vecchia Cantina, Ravello When visiting Ravello, lunch presented itself as a problem, because we didn’t research anything beforehand. We wandered off the central square and into this restaurant, and ended up having a pretty solid meal with very nice service. Bar Ferraro, Anacapri Went here when visiting Capri to try the mandatory torta caprese. It was very good, and so were the little frozen ricotta shortbread cookies. Rome We are so completely in love with Rome. We only had three days there, which is nothing! It was hard to cover everything we wanted, but we tried our best. We stayed in a really cool Airbnb near Campo de Fiori, which is a centrally located square that’s busy at all times of the day. Luckily, our actual location was on a very quiet, narrow street, so it was the best of both worlds. We visited the main historic sites (the Forum, Colosseum, Pantheon etc.), as well as the Jewish Ghetto, Trastevere, Testaccio and Monti. Below are some favorites. Sites The obvious: the Forum, the Colosseum, Ponte Sant’Angelo, Piazza del Popolo, Piazza Navona, the Pantheon. Even though the Pantheon was incredibly crowded, it was still super impressive. This inscription on Raphael’s burial is still in my mind: ‘Here lies Raphael, by whom nature herself feared to be outdone while he lived, and when he died, feared that she herself would die.‘ Wow. Churches: Santa Maria del Popolo, Santa Maria Sopra Minerva, San Luigi dei Francesi, Santa Maria in Trastevere, it’s endless really :) Food La Montecarlo A really fun place that serves Roman-style thin crust pizza and more, crowded with locals at any given time. They casually line each new customer’s table with white paper in place of a tablecloth, and write out the check on the paper at the end of the meal, from memory. The service is fast and efficient. We liked the super thin-crusted pizza (endless topping options), the pesto pasta and mushroom pasta, and of course, the arancini (fried rice balls served as an app). Roscioli If you’ve ever watched any food & travel shows about Rome, chances are Roscioli was featured as a mecca for everything delicious in the center of the city. Roscioli has a whole cluster of eateries right near Campo de Fiori: a deli/­­restaurant, a cafe with a coffee counter and bite-sized pastries, a bakery, and a full-on pizza restaurant called Emma. The coffee at the cafe is excellent. At the bakery, get any of the delicious by-the-slice pizzas that they are putting out all day, as well as the bread. We liked the bread so much, we smuggled a loaf home in our luggage. If you go to Emma, definitely try the pizza, since it’s the specialty there, and apparently a whole lot of effort went into developing the pizza dough recipe. If you go to the restaurant/­­deli, Katie Parla has some great advice on navigating the menu there. Antico Forno Cordella (or Urbani) If you find yourself in the Jewish Ghetto in the morning or afternoon, stop in here for a slice of their delicious, thin and crispy pizza rossa. Pianostrada A fun dinner place with neat decor and a more modern, deconstructed take on Roman classics. Urbana 47 If you go to the Colosseum, you might as well stop here for lunch, as it’s about a 10 minute walk away. They focus on local and seasonal ingredients, and we really loved every pasta dish we ordered here. (Thank you Pauline for the recommendation!) Sant’Eustacchio il Caffe We really enjoyed sitting at an outside table here with a cappuccino and a cornetti (both very good), watching the morning world go by. Go here on your way to the Pantheon and/­­or Piazza Navona, both are super close. Don’t miss the church Sant’Eustachio that’s right there, with a beautifully sculpted deer head on the facade. Volpetti If you are in the mood to visit a serious deli, check out Volpetti in Testaccio. They carry an overwhelming amount of cheeses, meats, olives, marinated veggies, pizza by the slice, and fried snacks. They are also able to vacuum wrap anything you buy, so that you can put the stuff in your luggage with little fear of it being taken away at the airport. Sack Food Another really interesting delicatessen that carries really unusual cheeses and meats. If you are anything like us and gift food as travel gifts to your omnivore friends, this place is great. You might also like... Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Givea... Travel Notes: Chicago Market Berry Salad and a New York Weekend Saveur Magazine Best Food Blog Awards, Golubka in Special Interest .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Travel Notes: Italy (Rome and the Amalfi Coast) appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Lentil & Rice Patties with Dates, Pomegranate & Feta

November 8 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

If I don’t post this recipe now, it might very well never be posted. So here we go. In between work trips, chickenpox, writing and photographing a new book (that we will tell you more about really soon!) and living a regular two-kids family life, these little patties happened. We made them for an impromptu lunch and they turned out really tasty so we snapped a few photos and planned to test them again (like we normally do) before posting the recipe. But after more than a week of postponing, I’m realising that the recipe will prove itself more useful in your kitchens than at the desktop of our computer. When Luise made these patties, she called them “a classical vegetarian dish”. I suspect she referred to the fact that all vegetarians always seem to be on the lookout for new takes on veggie patties. Our Spinach & Quinoa Patties have been on frequent rotation in our house, but I quite like the richness that the lentils and brown rice added to these. Exactly what we need during the winter. These patties also have some important nutritional aspects, so Luise is taking over the computer now to explain them: Lentils and rice are always a good combination as they make a complete protein source, which is important for vegetarians. Most plant sources of protein are in fact, incomplete, with the exception of soybeans and quinoa. Therefore, grains such as rice, oats, wheat, rye and corn, can act as complementary proteins for legumes such as lentils. Choose whole grains and if you have time I highly recommend to soak grains and legumes (lentils, peas, beans, nuts and seeds) before cooking. It helps to break down enzyme inhibitors (among many other benefits) and optimise the nutritional value, for example will the minerals be way easier absorbed in your body. /­­Luise While the patties are quite mildly flavoured, we went a bit bolder with the presentation. We served them in lettuce leaves with dates, pistachios, herbs and pomegranate on top. Apart from looking stunning, those flavours are truly awesome together. Sweet dates, salty pistachios and creamy yogurt together with the fresh juices that splashes on your tongue as you bite into the pomegranate seeds. Divine! Lentil & Rice Patties with Dates, Pomegranate & Feta Makes 15 patties We have only made this recipe once so we haven’t had time to try a vegan version, but the mushy lentils should make it quite possible. Non-vegans could also choose to incorporate a piece of feta cheese in the patties for extra flavour. We cooked lentils and rice from scratch, but fridge leftovers are ideal in this recipe. 1 cup red split lentils (preferable pre-soaked, but not necessary) 2 cups water a pinch of sea salt 1 cup whole grain rice (preferable pre-soaked, but not necessary) 2 cups water a pinch of sea salt 1 small red onion, finely chopped 3 cloves garlic, minced 5 tbsp finely chopped mixed parsley, cilantro and mint (save some for serving) 1 carrot, grated 1 tsp sea salt and pepper 1/­­2 tsp paprika 1/­­2 tsp cumin 2 eggs 3 tsp potato starch zest from 1/­­2 lemon coconut oil, ghee, butter or olive oil for frying for serving roman lettuce pomegranate seeds chopped herbs pistachios, finely chopped dates, pitted yogurt feta cheese Place the washed and rinsed rice, water and salt in a saucepan, bring to boil, lower the heat and cook for about 30-40 minutes. Check the package for the exact cooking time. Meanwhile, place the washed and rinsed lentils, water and salt in a saucepan and bring to boil, lower the heat and let simmer for 15-20 minutes, until well cooked and a bit mushy. Pour the cooked lentils in a large mixing bowl. Prepare the other ingredients and place everything in the mixing bowl together with the cooked lentils. Stir to combine. Drain the cooked rice, if necessary and then add it to the mixing bowl with the rest of the ingredients and stir again. Heat coconut oil in a skillet and form 15 patties with a spoon. Fry for just a couple of minutes on each side, until golden and crispy on the outside. Serve the patties warm or chilled in lettuce leaves with feta cheese, pomegranate, dates, yogurt, herbs and pistachios. ********* PS! A couple of weeks ago, Food52 came by for lunch, an interview and to shoot a few photos of our kitchen. And it’s now up on their site, if you want to have a peek.

Yoghurt-bunnies with almonds

April 1 2015 Veganpassion 

Yoghurt-bunnies with almonds At Easter yeast-pastries are of course absolutely classical. Refined with yoghurt and almonds the Easter bunny tastes deliciously fresh and juicy. I just give you the total quantity right away as the bunny also is a great gift idea these days ;-) For 8 little Easter bunnies: For the yeast-dough: 9 oz. spelt flour (275 g, Type 630) 1/­­2 oz. raw-cane-sugar (15 g) 1 sachet of vanilla sugar 1/­­4 teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon almond butter (40 g) 1/­­2 sachet dry yeast   2 oz. soy-yoghurt, almond (50 g) 1 fl. oz. oil (20 ml) 3 fl. Oz. almond-drink or any other unsweetened vegan milk (100 ml) Some vegan cream to brush over the pastries Mix the flour, sugar, vanilla sugar and salt in bowl. Dissolve the yeast into about 1 fl. oz. of the almond-drink and let it rise. Add the almond-butter, yoghurt, oil and the remaining almond-drink to the flour mix. Work it for about 5 minutes with your hands until the dough becomes smooth. Grease a mixing bowl with some oil and form the dough in it to a ball. Cover it with a dish towel and let it rise for about 2 hours. Due to the almond-butter the dough wont double its volume within this period but will finish rising during baking.    Dust your working space with some oil and portion 8 pieces out of the dough. At a time separate a small piece for the cute bunny tail. Form the bigger portions to about 6 inch (15cm) long dough strands and twist them two times within themselves. Form the small separated pieces to a tail and put it in the middle. Lay the pastries on a baking tray lined with baking parchment and bake them at about 350°F (180°C) at top/­­bottom heat for about 15 minutes till they become light-golden.    Have a lot of fun trying out this recipe! Eagerly looking forward to Easter... ;-)

The With or WithoutMeat Cookbook By Jackie Newgent

September 29 2014 Meatless Monday 

The With or WithoutMeat Cookbook By Jackie NewgentIn the With or Without Meat Cookbook there are two sides to every recipe--veggies up for Meatless Monday, meat up for another day. But either way you flip it this cookbook is a healthy, whole food, flavor-forward collection compiled with the diabetic in mind. Though you need not be diabetic to enjoy what this collection has to offer. Jackie Newgent, RDN, CDN is a classically trained chef, a dietitian, a television personality, and a Meatless Monday friend and now shes delivered a book that could possibly answer that age-old question how does a vegetarian date a meat eater? Or--for you--maybe shes just answered the question how can I maintain a health-conscious, flexitarian lifestyle and keep it delicious? Each recipe offers first a vegetarian take and then a meat-fish-or-poultry add-in--so indecision need not prevent you from opening the book to the Tarragon White Bean Salad. Nor should different dietary wants demand that you make two separate dishes to please both the veg and the meat eater. The cookbook features 125 recipes, largely in the style of the Mediterranean diet. The recipes put fruits and vegetables forward, limit unhealthy fats, and prefer whole grains. Its nutrition that promotes your cardiovascular health and your overall health. The books is especially great for those with diabetes, pre-diabetes, heart-health issues, or really for anyone simply looking to improve their diet. This flexitarian approach to eating provides the best of both worlds. Each recipe includes nutrition information and follows the American Diabetic Association’s nutritional guidelines. And, The With or Without Meat Cookbook has a familiar, friendly tone that makes it feel more like a conversation than a numbered list of instruction. Check out the Red Onion Soup with Shiitake Broth recipe from the With or Without Meat Cookbook. The post The With or Without Meat Cookbook By Jackie Newgent appeared first on Meatless Monday.

International Culinary Center Goes Meatless

September 1 2014 Meatless Monday 

International Culinary Center Goes MeatlessOur friends at the International Culinary Center (ICC) are headed to Expo Milano 2015. And Chef Candy Argondizza offered us a Q&A so that we could talk about the expo, ICC, and Meatless Monday. Chef Candy Argondizza Meatless Monday: What do you see as the three key reasons for the success of ICC?  And what do you see as the biggest impact of ICC on the culinary world? Chef Candy: Our success can largely be attributed to the very passionate and experienced faculty, to the comprehensive total immersion curriculum, and to our Founder and CEO Dorothy Cann Hamiltons vision for ICC. Our biggest impact on the culinary world is training and exposing students to proper techniques and critical thinking. Just look at our roster of successful alum including Dan Barber, David Chang, Christina Tosi, Wylie Dufresne and Bobby Flay, whom have contributed greatly to the restaurant and culinary/­­pastry world. MM: Which chefs have been most influential in shaping your curriculum? How so? CC: Having been here since 1984, our school and curriculum has changed throughout the years. Chefs--from Chef Alain Sailhac, to Jacques Torres, to Nils Noren to myself (and more)--have contributed to our curriculum. Dorothy has also shaped the vision of the school and we are always tweaking the programs to stay relevant and ahead of the curve, while still staying true to classical techniques. MM: How did Meatless Monday become part of the ICC curriculum? CC: A few years ago, we developed a farm-to-table program with ICC grad and Chef Dan Barber of Blue Hill and Stone Barns Center for Agriculture, which addressed seasonality and sustainability. Meatless Mondays began from our recognition of what raising cattle does to the environment and our awareness of a vegetable-forward cuisine. We wanted our students to realize that they could feed people creatively without meat. MM: What other partnership opportunities do you see down the road with Meatless Monday? CC: Wed love to have a customized curriculum course for our students in collaboration with the Meatless Monday! We are also asking our students to become Meatless Monday recipe contributors. MM: The International Culinary Center is partnering with James Beard to staff the USA Pavilion at Expo 2015 in Milan. Can you tell us a little bit about what that means and what youll do there? CC: Yes, International Culinary Center was chosen by the U.S. State Department along with the James Beard Foundation to program and manage the USA Pavilion at Expo Milano 2015. ICC Founder and CEO, Dorothy Cann Hamilton is the President of the USA Pavilion. The key objectives include: Showcasing U.S. leadership in the global food arena as responsible and diverse Celebrating our nations rich agricultural history and regional food cultures Underscoring Americas role in advancing food security and sustainability through science, technology, innovation and free trade Fostering awareness of and enthusiasm for American cuisine, chefs, products and purveyors Highlighting American talent, products, ingenuity and entrepreneurship and the U.S. as a premier business and travel destination Connecting people and businesses in the U.S., Italy, and throughout Europe, building on strong historical ties Providing a fun, engaging, informative, and delicious experience to all! The post International Culinary Center Goes Meatless appeared first on Meatless Monday.

A Visit from Acacia Courtney, Miss Connecticut

July 21 2014 Meatless Monday 

A Visit from Acacia Courtney,  Miss ConnecticutOn June 28th, Acacia Courtney was crowned Miss Connecticut. Her personal platform is “The Monday Campaigns: A Guide to a Healthier World”--a platform were completely behind. Last week, Acacia stopped by Monday Campaigns HQ to answer questions, take some photos, and meet the staff. Left to right: Sid Lerner (Chairman of The Monday Campaigns), Acacia Courtney (Miss Connecticut 2014), and Peggy Neu (President of The Monday Campaigns)     Meatless Monday: First off, congratulations on a winning the Miss Connecticut Crown. How did it feel, what was going through your head at the time? Acacia Courtney: Thank you! It was a very surreal moment. This was my fourth year competing at the state level in the Miss America Organization, and even though I felt that I was ready to do the job of Miss Connecticut, I didn’t know what was going to happen. When I heard my name called, it was a beautiful instant full of shock, joy, and an overwhelming sense of excitement and gratitude. It felt very surreal, and yet, at the same time it also felt right. I am someone who has grown up through the Miss America Organization, and I am beyond honored to have the chance to serve my state. MM: Calling the Miss Connecticut Scholarship Program a pageant isnt really enough is it? Its more: for one, its a scholarship program and its also a forum for you to give voice to the issues (regional or global) that concern you. Can you tell us a bit about what the Miss Connecticut Scholarship Program is all about, beyond the pageantry? AC: While we only see the contestants onstage during the final night of competition, so much of what the Miss America Organization truly is actually takes place in the months leading up to the pageant. The organization has labeled the four points of the crown as service, scholarship, success, and style, and we all strive to embody these characteristics every day. Each contestant has a personal platform that she promotes and advocates for, and each contestant is very involved in her community. The program expects a high level of academic achievement, and in turn makes available more than $45 million in scholarships each year. In addition, contestants work on a talent that they perform. All of the women that compete for the job of Miss Connecticut and Miss America are well-rounded role models who make a difference in the world around them. The Miss Connecticut Scholarship Program has given me so much as a contestant, and as a young woman determined to succeed in the “real world.” The connections I have made, relationships I have formed, and opportunities I have been given have helped prepare me for college, internships, and a professional career. MM: Why did you choose to run on The Monday Campaigns: A Guide to a Healthier World? And can you tell us your top goal for Meatless Monday and your top goal for Move It Monday? AC: I chose to promote “The Monday Campaigns: A Guide to a Healthier World” as my platform because I want to be a part of changing the way we approach the concept of health. I am very aware of the obesity epidemic in the United States and have observed that there is an extreme disconnect between the farm and the plate--eating has become mindless and routine. I personally do not eat meat and am very active, but I love the Monday Campaigns because they advocate for small, easy-to-adopt changes that can make it easier for people to implement in their everyday lives. My top goal for Meatless Monday right now is to create a citywide Meatless Monday resolution in both Hartford and New Haven, two of Connecticut’s biggest cities. I have followed the development of a similar initiative in Philadelphia, PA, and I believe that eatless Monday could be incredibly successful here in CT.  I am excited to see what we can do and how I might leave this as one of my legacies as Miss Connecticut 2014. For Move It Monday, I am working on planning various fundraising events throughout the state of Connecticut that will encourage exercise and physical activity. Zumba fundraisers, walks, and runs all have provided an opportunity to raise funds and to spread the word about Move It Monday. I also understand the power of social media in creating a weekly Monday challenge for followers and potential followers. I am very passionate about sharing Meatless Monday and Move It Monday, and the tremendous benefits of both campaigns. MM: Can you share your favorite recipe for a Meatless Monday dish? AC: My mom makes an unbelievable kale and bean soup! It’s just a tablespoon of olive oil, chopped garlic, onion, kale, and tomatoes, vegetable stock, navy beans, and some seasoning. It’s easy, filling, healthy, and vegan! MM: How do you move it on Mondays? AC: Dancing is my favorite way to “move it on Mondays!” I am a classically trained ballerina (ballet en pointe will be my talent for Miss America!), but I also study jazz, musical theater, and international ballroom. I always suggest dance classes to those looking for ways to incorporate Move It Monday into their daily lifestyle because it is so fun that it often doesn’t feel like exercise. Dancing is a great way to express yourself, meet new people, and stay fit and healthy. MM: Where do you see yourself in five years? AC: My dream job is to be a sports broadcaster specializing in horse racing. In five years I see myself working for NBC Sports Network as a broadcaster and trackside analyst in the horse racing industry. In addition, I also plan to continue promoting Meatless Monday and Move It Monday as a speaker and ambassador, sharing my commitment to the creation of a healthier world. The post A Visit from Acacia Courtney, Miss Connecticut appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Red Onion Soup with Shiitake Broth

September 29 2014 Meatless Monday 

French onion soup is classically made with beef broth, but in this recipe, shiitake mushrooms give the dish umami. This recipe comes to us from Jackie Newgent, RDN, CDN. Explore her book, The With or Without Meat Cookbook, for a non-vegetarian version to cook another day of the week. Makes 5 one cup servings - 2 teaspoons canola or grapeseed oil - 3 large red onions, halved and thinly sliced - 2 teaspoons white balsamic or white wine vinegar - 1/­­2 teaspoon + 1/­­8 teaspoon sea salt, or to taste - 1 cup fresh thinly sliced shiitake mushrooms, stems removed - 1 (32-fluid ounce) carton low-sodium vegetable broth - 1/­­2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, or to taste - 1 1/­­2 teaspoons minced fresh rosemary - 1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh thyme leaves + 5 fresh thyme sprigs - 10 whole-grain pita chips - 1/­­4 cup shredded Gruy?re or other aged Swiss cheese (1 ounce) Heat the oil in a nonstick stockpot or extra-large saucepan over medium heat. Add the onions, vinegar, and 1/­­8 teaspoon of the salt and cook while stirring occasionally until softened, about 10 minutes. Increase heat to medium-high, add the mushrooms, and sauté until the onions are well caramelized, about 15 minutes. Add the broth, the remaining 1/­­2 teaspoon salt, the pepper, rosemary, and the chopped thyme and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer until the flavors are developed, about 10 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 500°. Place 5 ovenproof soup bowls or crocks onto a baking sheet. Adjust seasoning and ladle the soup into each bowl. Place two of the pita chips on top of each and sprinkle with the cheese. Bake in the oven on the top oven rack until the cheese is bubbly, about 4 minutes. Garnish each with a thyme sprig, and serve. Recipe adapted with permission from The With or Without Meat Cookbook by Jackie Newgent, RDN, CDN (American Diabetes Association, 2014) The post Red Onion Soup with Shiitake Broth appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Blackberry Hazelnut Crumble Bars

September 26 2014 My New Roots 

Blackberry Hazelnut Crumble Bars   I am writing this on the very first day of autumn. Copenhagen has welcomed this season with classically crisp air and blindingly bright sun. People are stretched out along the banks of the harbour in the afternoon light, soaking in what will be the last blows of summers fight. Ugh. Can you feel it? Last week my family and I were out at our garden. On the cycle back home we stopped by the blackberry bramble that has overtaken a major section of the vacant land nearby. It towers over me, and extends along the bike path for half a block or more, an impenetrable wall of thorns and fruit. Happily there were a few berries left, just enough to pick for a dessert and a handful to snack on with my boys. Languishing in the last morsels of hot sun we felt the seasons shifting ever-so-slightly and celebrated with the ripest and blackest of berries, like summer captured in edible jewels.   But I got the berries home and suddenly I felt a lot of pressure. Kind of like when you impulse-buy those crazy-looking mushrooms at the farmers market and worry that whatever youre going to be making isnt special enough so you let them sit in your fridge too long until they go bad. Forehead slap. That was not going to happen to my berries. No way. Here was my thought process: Sarah B, relax. You like blackberries. You like crumble. You make too many crumbles. You dont make too many bars. Crumble bars. Whats a crumble bar? Stop asking questions. Lets do this.   I proceeded in the best way I knew how, by browsing the internet for ideas. It turns out crumble bars do exist, but I couldnt find any versions that were all that virtuous. Subbing this for that while keeping things as simple as possible, I came up with an edition that is made with whole foods, totally vegan, and easily made gluten-free. The crust is light and flaky, the filling is rich and bursting with juicy flavours and the crumble topping is crunchy and satisfying. Although I use hazelnuts in mine, you could substitute those with almonds - just leave a few of them really big because biting into a large toasted nut is delicious, especially combined with the oozy and sweet fruit center. Heavenly. Next year I am definitely going to try these bars with black currants in the early summer months, and maybe raspberries later on.   Freezing and Cooking: How do they affect nutrients? Pssst. I have a secret. Sometimes in the off-season, I do something totally crazy. I buy frozen berries. What is a nutritionist such as myself doing purchasing and even recommending frozen foods to people? For one, I live in Denmark where the availability of fresh food is pretty sad in the winter, obviously. And second Im a person that does things like everyone else, such as relying on conveniences when need be. Im okay with that. But what kind of affect does freezing have on foods, say blackberries for instance? Youd be surprised, and likely thrilled to learn, that freezing does not completely spoil the vitamins and minerals in food. In fact, youre looking at a mere 10-15% nutrient loss across the board. Vitamin C is the one vitamin that is most likely to dissipate, as once the fruit or veggie has been plucked from its source, vitamin C levels start to decline almost immediately. Luckily, vitamin C is the single more common and easily obtained vitamin in nature, and you can make up for that loss somewhere else in your day.   And what about cooking? This is a little more complicated, as it varies according to the specific nutrient in question and the type of cooking method. Fat soluble vitamins (D, E, K) are not destroyed by heat alone, and vitamin A is relatively stable. The B-vitamins are also heat stable, except for panthotenic acid (B5). Folate breaks down at very high temperatures. Vitamin C is the nutrient that takes the biggest hit by far, as it is one of the most delicate vitamins in nature. It is not only destroyed by heat, but also exposure to air and light. It is also water-soluble, meaning that steaming something containing vitamin C will be surely destroy it. As a general rule, minerals are very heat stable, especially when using cooking methods that do not employ water, like roasting or baking - there is almost no loss whatsoever. If you are steaming, boiling, braising, or blanching foods, both vitamins and minerals will leach out into the water. To preserve these precious nutrients, save the broth to drink, or freeze it for later use in a soup or stew. I use it to puree my babys food. Hell never know his millet porridge was cooked with broccoli water! Since this blog is read the world over, there will of course be a few of you out there who cant get themselves to a blackberry bramble, simply because it isnt the right season. No worries. Find a grocer with organic frozen blackberries and go to town. You should not wait to make these. Seriously.       Print recipe     Blackberry Hazelnut Crumble Bars Makes 12-16 bars Crust: 2 1/­­2 cups /­­ 250g rolled oats, divided (gluten-free if desired) 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml applesauce 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml pure maple syrup 1 Tbsp. coconut oil 1 tsp. vanilla extract 1/­­2 cup /­­ 50g whole rolled oats 3/­­4 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1 tsp. baking powder Filling: 4 cups /­­ 400g blackberries (fresh or frozen) 1/­­2 Tbsp. ground cinnamon 1/­­4 tsp. ground nutmeg 1/­­4 tsp. fine grain sea salt zest of 1 organic lemon 1/­­2 Tbsp. arrowroot powder (or organic, non-GMO cornstarch) 1 Tbsp. maple syrup Crumble Topping: 1 cup /­­ 100g rolled oats 2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 2 Tbsp. coconut oil (or ghee) 2/­­3 cup /­­ 75g hazelnuts 1/­­2 tsp. ground cinnamon 1/­­4 tsp. sea salt 2 Tbsp. flour, gluten-free if desired (I used brown rice flour) Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 350°F/­­175°C. 2. In a food processor blend 2 cups /­­ 200g oats on high until you have a rough flour. Add applesauce, maple syrup, coconut oil, and vanilla. Pulse until moist. 3. In a separate bowl combine the remaining 1/­­2 cup /­­ 50g rolled oats, salt, and baking powder. Add food processor contents and fold to combine, using your hands to mix - the dough will be quite firm. 4. Place the dough into a lightly greased 8x8 brownie pan and press firmly, especially around the edges - it helps to wet your hands so that the dough doesnt stick. 5. Without cleaning the food processor, add the all the ingredients for the crumble topping, and pulse a few times to mix. You can chop the ingredients as finely as you like, but I left mine very chunky - its your call. 6. To make the filling, place all ingredients in a medium bowl and toss to combine. Put them on top of the uncooked crust and spread evenly - the berries should just cover the crust in one layer. 7. Sprinkle the crumble topping over the blackberry layer. Place in the oven for 30-35 minutes, until slightly golden on top. Let cool completely before cutting into bars. Store in the fridge for up to five days.

A Visit fromAcacia Courtney, Miss Connecticut

July 21 2014 Meatless Monday 

A Visit fromAcacia Courtney, Miss ConnecticutOn June 28th, Acacia Courtney was crowned Miss Connecticut. Her personal platform is “The Monday Campaigns: A Guide to a Healthier World,” a platform were completely behind. Last week, Acacia stopped by Monday Campaigns HQ to answer questions, take some photos, and meet the staff. Acacia Courtney, Miss Connecticut 2014, meets Sid Lerner, Chairman of The Monday Campaigns and Peggy Neu, President of The Monday Campaigns Meatless Monday: First, congratulations on a winning the Miss Connecticut Crown. How did it feel, what was going through your head at the time? Acacia Courtney: Thank you! It was a very surreal moment. This was my fourth year competing at the state level in the Miss America Organization, and even though I felt that I was ready to do the job of Miss Connecticut, I didn’t know what was going to happen. When I heard my name called, it was a beautiful instant full of shock, joy, and an overwhelming sense of excitement and gratitude. It felt very surreal, and yet, at the same time it also felt right. I am someone who has grown up through the Miss America Organization, and I am beyond honored to have the chance to serve my state. MM: Calling the Miss Connecticut Scholarship Program a pageant isnt really enough is it? Its more: for one, its a scholarship program and its also a forum for you to give voice to the issues (regional or global) that concern you. Beyond the ‘pageantry’, can you tell us a bit about what the Miss Connecticut Scholarship Program is all about? AC: While we only see the contestants onstage during the final night of competition, so much of what the Miss America Organization truly is actually takes place in the months leading up to the pageant. The organization has labeled the four points of the crown as service, scholarship, success, and style, and we all strive to embody these characteristics every day. Each contestant has a personal platform that she promotes and advocates for, and each contestant is very involved in her community. The program expects a high level of academic achievement, and in turn makes available more than $45 million in scholarships each year. In addition, contestants work on a talent that they perform. All of the women that compete for the job of Miss Connecticut and Miss America are well-rounded role models who make a difference in the world around them. The Miss Connecticut Scholarship Program has given me so much as a contestant, and as a young woman determined to succeed in the “real world.” The connections I have made, relationships I have formed, and opportunities I have been given have helped prepare me for college, internships, and a professional career. MM: Why did you choose to run on The Monday Campaigns: A Guide to a Healthier World? And can you tell us your goal for Meatless Monday and your goal for Move It Monday? AC: I chose to promote “The Monday Campaigns: A Guide to a Healthier World” as my platform because I want to be a part of changing the way we approach the concept of health. I am very aware of the obesity epidemic in the United States and have observed that there is an extreme disconnect between the farm and the plate--eating has become mindless and routine. I personally do not eat meat and am very active, but I love the Monday Campaigns because they advocate for small, easy-to-adopt changes that can make it easier for people to implement in their everyday lives. My top goal for Meatless Monday right now is to create a citywide Meatless Monday resolution in both Hartford and New Haven, two of Connecticut’s biggest cities. I have followed the development of a similar initiative in Philadelphia, PA, and I believe that eatless Monday could be incredibly successful here in CT.  I am excited to see what we can do and how I might leave this as one of my legacies as Miss Connecticut 2014. For Move It Monday, I am working on planning various fundraising events throughout the state of Connecticut that will encourage exercise and physical activity. Zumba fundraisers, walks, and runs all have provided an opportunity to raise funds and to spread the word about Move It Monday. I also understand the power of social media in creating a weekly Monday challenge for followers and potential followers. I am very passionate about sharing Meatless Monday and Move It Monday, and the tremendous benefits of both campaigns. MM: Can you share your favorite recipe for a Meatless Monday dish? AC: My mom makes an unbelievable kale and bean soup! It’s just a tablespoon of olive oil, chopped garlic, onion, kale, and tomatoes, vegetable stock, navy beans, and some seasoning. It’s easy, filling, healthy, and vegan! MM: How do you move it” on Mondays? AC: Dancing is my favorite way to move it on Mondays! I am a classically trained ballerina (ballet en pointe will be my talent for Miss America), but I also study jazz, musical theater, and international ballroom. I always suggest dance classes to those looking for ways to incorporate Move It Monday into their daily lifestyle because it is so fun that it often doesn’t feel like exercise. Dancing is a great way to express yourself, meet new people, and stay fit and healthy. MM: Where do you see yourself in five years? AC: My dream job is to be a sports broadcaster specializing in horse racing. In five years I see myself working for NBC Sports Network as a broadcaster and trackside analyst in the horse racing industry. In addition, I also plan to continue promoting Meatless Monday and Move It Monday as a speaker and ambassador, sharing my commitment to the creation of a healthier world. The post A Visit from Acacia Courtney, Miss Connecticut appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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