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citrus vegetarian recipes

Vegan Ceviche

September 12 2017 VegKitchen 

Vegan Ceviche Vegan ceviche, a Latin-American specialty, is a perfect and refreshing first course or appetizer, especially when its made all-vegetable.Traditionally, its made with seafood and vegetables, but taking the fish out of the equation, its still really good, with its salty and citrusy flavors. Its a great appetizer for most any kind of Southwestern- or Mexican-style […] The post Vegan Ceviche appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegan Lemon Cookies with Chia Seeds – 1 Bowl

September 1 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Lemon Cookies with Chia Seeds – 1 BowlVegan Lemon Cookies with Chia seeds. 1 Bowl, 7 Ingredients. Zesty, Bite size Soft cookies for snacking or weekend baking. Vegan Recipe. Easily Gluten-free, Nut-free We got a few days of break from the heat, so I baked these snack cookies! They are zesty, soft, melt in the mouth, citrusy, chewy from the chia seeds, easy and fun.  This summer, I have been craving lemon in muffin form, in chia pudding form, doughnut form (so good!) and pound cake. And of course a lot of Shikanji, which is Indian Lemonade or Limeade with lemon/­­lime juice, salt, sweetener, kala namak(Indian sulphur black salt), black pepper and cumin. The spiced lemonade is amazingly refreshing and also another use of kala namak.  These cookies also have a great lemony flavor. Make a double batch of these lemon cookies to snack on through the day. Lemon juice and lemon zest (or use lime juice and zest for lime cookies), coconut oil, some non dairy yogurt/­­applesauce, chia seeds and flour. 7 Main ingredients, 1 Bowl and ready within 30 minutes. Continue reading: Vegan Lemon Cookies with Chia Seeds – 1 BowlThe post Vegan Lemon Cookies with Chia Seeds – 1 Bowl appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin

July 16 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline ChardinToday’s self-care dialogue is with Pauline Chardin, a Parisian, a pro-traveler, and the author of our favorite wanderlust blog, The Voyageur. Pauline is a freelance art director and trend consultant in fashion, who looks to travel as a steady source of inspiration. Her blog is unlike any travel blog you’ve ever seen. Each story is accompanied by photo essays that are aesthetically sensitive to their environment and attentive to details that might otherwise go unnoticed. The documented destinations are always interesting and full of beauty that feels raw and true, captured from a less expected angle. From a secluded cabin in the mountains of Central France, a Moss Temple in Japan, to a lush sculpture park in Brazil, Pauline’s got us daydreaming and plotting future adventures any chance we get. In her self-care, Pauline is refreshingly down to Earth, with a bit of that inevitable, French chic thrown into the mix. Here, she tells us about her upcoming move to the South of France as a way to be closer to nature, her bedtime and beauty routines, her ways of dealing with jet lag, why she makes a point of packing parmesan and olive oil to bring on her journeys, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Making the best of time and things is definitely a big preoccupation of mine. I like to plan and think ahead, I guess that puts me in the routine camp. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I’m in the process of becoming more of a “morning person”, we’ll be moving from Paris to the countryside next year, and I have this image of myself getting up at 6am  and having all the time of the world. I’m not there yet, but here’s a typical morning from these last weeks. I wake up at 7:30 , before my husband, open all the windows while the air is still fresh and the street not too noisy. I spend some time in the bathroom before sitting at my desk to start working on some not-too-demanding tasks. An hour or so later, I prepare breakfast for us two. We’re both mostly working from home, which gives us the leisure of enjoying rather stress-free breakfasts and the time to have a nice conversation before digging into work. Everything is rather quiet until 10am , that’s when e-mails start to arrive and phones start to ring. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I found that there are three things that help me find a deep, relaxing sleep : the first one is the Sarvangâsana posture (also supposed to keep you from growing older if you do it 30 minutes every day, but I’m far from being that disciplined), my husband giving me a head massage and watching episodes of Cosmos (I’ll never know the secrets of the universe because I always fall into the most blissful sleep after 10 minutes). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – homemade fare, like vanilla millet pudding with fresh mango and almonds. Lunch – cereals with vegetables, like polenta fries with peperonata and fresh ricotta. Generally no dessert but an espresso with a piece of chocolate. Snack – I don’t really eat much between meals, except fruits in the summer. Dinner – mostly vegetables, cold or hot depending on the season, like a beet and cucumber carpaccio with green peppers. I have fruits for dessert, cooked in the winter and fresh in the summer, often with a bit of ice cream! -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I drink Mariage Fr?res tea in the morning and rarely have more than one espresso a day, at lunch. I only break that rule in countries where the coffee is very good, in Italy of course, but also in Japan because I love their milk coffee. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I really do, but I also find that I don’t like very sweet things anymore. My rule is to almost only eat pastries I’ve prepared myself. I’ve also realized that fruits are often enough to fulfill my cravings.  -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I’m a big fan of Yotam Ottolenghi’s cooking and his sincere and generous approach to cooking, I have a few of his books, and his recipes rarely disappoint me. I have also been very inspired by my trips to Japan and Japanese wisdom in general, from their ‘it’s the journey that matters’ philosophy to their culture of bathing, or their ceramics. I find these things really help my happiness. More broadly, my way of living and eating is and was influenced by my parents, whose health would put any twenty-year old to shame! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I’ve been doing pilates and yoga for years. I try to do at least one lesson a week, but lately it’s been more small home-sessions, by myself, two or three times a week. I also love to hike and swim whenever I have the opportunity. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it?  I really enjoy it and would love to do more (hopefully having a big house instead of a small apartment will help). I’ve been working a lot lately and I’ve been finding it hard to take a break during the day to do it. It’s a pity because I know the benefits all too well! Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I feel it’s very important to be comfortable in my body, to take good care of it and to be healthy, but I don’t like to dwell too much on the idea of my own beauty. I’m much more interested in what others project. Partly because of my line of work, I’ve learned to appreciate and enjoy all the subtleties of female beauty (much more than men, I must admit). I should also mention that I work in a very feminine environment that definitely puts style and personality before plastic beauty and basic seduction. I find it very freeing! -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Like a lot of people, these last years I’ve been trying to embrace more natural products. I aspire to low maintenance but find as I get older that being a woman is definitely high maintenance. For now I put in the time because I find it relaxing and a good break from working. My favorites include Nuxe Huile prodigieuse, almond oil, Océopin pine powder scrub, and Aesop déodorant herbacé. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Not really, I think I haven’t graduated to supplements yet. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My mother often used an eyebrow pencil and it has become a make-up staple of mine. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Yoga, cooking and being close to nature are the three simple things I strive to include in my daily life to keep things relaxed. So far I’ve been really good with the cooking part, I could definitely do better with the yoga, and the nature is still a work in progress. At the moment I live in Paris, so it’s complicated, but I look forward to a future where I can just open the window and hear the cicadas. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I find it ironic, and well, sad, that stress tends to keep you from doing anything that would make you feel better. It’s paralyzing in a way. Besides the solutions cited above, I find that making something with my hand (be it a cake, a dress or a drawing) helps me get centered again. Another good measure is travel or any form of exploration, if I manage to get excited and curious again, then I’m on my way to feeling better. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I cook your magical broth! I really do, even when I’m in good shape…which probably makes me too energized for my own good. Apart from that, working mostly from home means I’m rarely sick. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? It’s complicated. I’m very passionate about my job, which is relatively stress-free but also quite time-consuming. After ten years of doing it, I’m only realizing now that I may be working too much. This being said, I totally embrace the overlap, for me everything is connected, everything could and should be a source of inspiration, I “just” need to be careful about keeping some time to explore new things… I stopped counting the people around me who are in pain because of their job, so I try to be extra vigilant about the choices I and my loved ones make on the subject. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Most of my work requires that I spend a lot of my time in front of a computer and it would not come off as shocking to say that this isn’t a good thing. I’ve found out it has a way of making me feel like I’m not accomplishing much, even though I’ve been working for hours, maybe it’s because tasks get blended with one another, I don’t know. In any case, this “distortion” has the added drawback of not making me feel really good about myself, like I’m spinning in a wheel. On the other hand, when I spend a day, of even half a day, off my computer, I feel like I’m moving mountains, even if I’m only attending to mundane things. This is a great feeling and I wish it didn’t feel like some sort of luxury! -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Picking up yoga and pilates years ago was life-changing. I wasn’t into sports before that, and the body awareness it creates is an endless source of fascination. Knowledge -- You have a talent for seeking out the less traveled paths, hidden corners and beautiful places to stay wherever you travel. What is your approach when it comes to planning a trip? Coming up with the destination is a rather subjective process, which is often more about fantasy and pieces of information than reality. It might come from photographs I’ve seen, or a movie, or a conversation I’ve had. It’s a difficult balance to pick a place that sounds promising but which still remains a bit mysterious. Today with instagram, you sometimes feel like you’ve been there already, and it’s nice when you’re on your couch but a bit disheartening when you’re planning a trip. I sometimes also like to pick a rather touristic place and go there to see if it could be done off the beaten track, or photographed differently, like when we went to Rome, or to see the Giza pyramids. Besides that, I find that doing a lot of research is key if you want the trip to be both relaxing and interesting. It takes a lot of time and might ruin the surprise a little bit, but unless you’re traveling for a month, I find it too frustrating to “fail” a destination because you were too lazy to check opening hours and interesting spots. It’s a complicated task though, because you have to find recommendations from people whose sensibility is close to yours. It’s easy enough to find adresses of shops and restaurants, but when it comes to knowing that little neighborhood with a fantastic atmosphere, or that incredible building from the 70’s, or that little-known museum, then it gets complicated. For me travelling isn’t necessary about “consuming” or doing “breathtaking” things, it’s about finding inspiration. I’m doing The Voyageur to make it easier for others! -- Do you practice any special self-care routines while traveling, especially when it comes to jet lag? Sadly I’m not immune to jet-lag, on the contrary I find it totally messes up my digestion (in addition to my sleep). Jet-lag or not, I found that the best way to feel good abroad was to cook for myself as much as I can. To me it’s a win-win, it’s cheaper, I feel better and lighter, and I get to shop groceries and cook in a totally different setting. It has become an important part of our travels, one that I enjoy very much. I pack a whole battery of pantry essentials and then I buy fresh produce when I’m the ground. Every destination has its on treasures, things you’ll probably have a hard time finding back home, and it’s not necessary what you would get in restaurants : mountains of berries in Finland, cheap zucchini flowers in Venice, sour cream in St Petersburg or sweet muffin bread from the Azores islands. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I tend to believe I allow more time for packing than most people (I’m puzzled when I hear someone telling me they just throw random stuff in a suitcase an hour before their flight). I like to really think through what clothes I’m bringing, so it will fit the atmosphere of the destination, but also obviously local constraints and the kind of adventure I’m embarking on. I don’t really believe in a standardized list, I’m actually rather depressed by this packing advice of people bringing the same standard black and white things everywhere. I’m more about having the right equipment for each situation, it might be a stylish rain cloak if you go to Yakushima island, a fan for Egypt or a scarf in Andalucia that echoes the local ceramic patterns. It’s about those items that will be useful but will also make you happy. I find that objects can take on a new life when you bring them somewhere far-flung, they become the green dress you couldn’t stop wearing in Kerala or the perfumed oil you wore in Brazil. It builds new connections, it’s somewhere between a science and an art! Whatever the trip, beside the obvious items, you’ll have a good chance of finding in my luggage : – a camera – a Mason Pearson comb and brush – a swimsuit, even when swimming doesn’t sound like an option – A homemade meal for the trip, which makes a world of difference, and was actually initiated by your article on the subject. I recently acquired a wood bento box which makes it even greater! It also means that I have a box at hand if we’re having picnics during the rest of our stay. – If I know I’m going cook, I’m bringing a few ingredients, but most certainly there will be olive oil, a box of pasta and a chunk of Parmesan, which sounds pretty weird. It’s kind of a survival kit, when I have that, I know that we’re only a couple of tomatoes away from a comforting meal. Also, I’ve been to countries where finding all three ingredients would prove quite challenging, and expensive, which makes you cherish them even more. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Pretty much what I do to keep stress at bay, but if we’re taking things to another level of indulgence, I’d say anything water-related : a Japanese onsen bath, hammam, a swim in the sea or even just a plunge in the pool. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Way of the World by Nicolas Bouvier, and, any of his books really. He’s a Swiss writer and traveler who documented his journeys with a lot of wisdom and poetry. Song/­­Album – Nina Simone and Piano, even though it might be more soul-wrenching than soul-feeding. Movie – The Vertical Ray of the Sun by Tran Anh Hung, makes me want to book a ticket to south-east Asia right away. Piece of Art – Crépuscule by Felix Vallotton, strangely the landscape in the painting appeared to me on a stormy evening on Yakushima island in Japan… -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in Paris? Mokonuts, 5 rue st bernard, 75011 Paris A Japanese and a Lebanese in a tiny kitchen. I’m in love with their olive and white chocolate cookie and their carrot soup. They’re only open for lunch and you have to book ahead. Café Ineko, 3 Rue des Gravilliers, 75003 Paris Freshly opened vegetarian restaurant. Sincere and flavourful, my favorite of late. Their breakfast sounds fabulous and I’m planning to go very soon! Rice and Fish, 16 Rue Greneta, 75002 Paris Delicious fusion-style makis in a super relaxed atmosphere. Come early to get a seat. Pizzeria Dei Cioppi, 44 Rue Trousseau, 75011 Paris It’s easier than ever to find good pizza in Paris, but we’re faithful to this tiny one. Light, sophisticated pizzas in a quiet street with good music, what else? Osteria Ferrara, 7 Rue du Dahomey, 75011 Paris A slightly high-end italian restaurant with to-die-for risotto. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Tina of tforia.com, I love her very low-profile and delicate approach. All photos are from Pauline’s travels (and kitchen), courtesy of Pauline Chardin. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright

June 14 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright We’re so excited to introduce this new interview series today! It’s something that we’ve had in the works for a while, and we’re really happy to be kicking it off with such a special guest. Self-care has been a very prevalent topic in the wellness sphere lately, and it’s something that we’re both very passionate about, as evidenced by our love for nourishing foods :) We do, however, find that many articles on the subject can be quite generalized and anxiety-inducing, often leaving us with a feeling of not doing it right, or not doing enough. We became interested in digging a little deeper, in order to see what self-care looks like applied to real life, by real people we admire. We are fascinated by the quiet elegance of everyday routine and always searching for day-to-day inspiration, which we’ll strive to discover plenty of in the series. We hope you enjoy these in-depth conversations, and feel free to reach out with suggestions for future interview guests! Today’s dialogue is with Laura Wright, blogger and author of The First Mess Cookbook. Laura is a magician when it comes to approachable, plant-based cooking, and we look to her blog and cookbook almost every day for reliable, delicious recipes, as well as beautiful photography and an overall feeling of warmth and lightness. In this interview, Laura talks about her approach to self-nourishment, exercise, beauty, stress, fun, and much more. As expected, her self-care routine is full of wisdom and inspiration. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I get in moods where both are equally important. I stick to a certain rhythm with my early mornings and evenings though because I find it makes for better sleep and more productive days. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I wake up with the sun and take our dog out. Then, I drink a huge glass of water and make coffee, tea, matcha, or some sort of elixir. It’s usually coffee though. I read for a bit while I have my first morning beverage, or I’ll do a bit of journaling. After my partner leaves for work, I head out for a walk/­­run or do some form of exercise. Then, I fix up breakfast (usually a smoothie) and plan out what I’d like to accomplish that day. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? This time of year, I do most of my gardening after dinner, and I find that really helps me wind down. Just being out there as the sun’s going down seems to send a good message to my brain that it’s time to relax. Also, limited screen exposure after dinner is key. I use the Saje Natural Wellness Sleep Well roller on the soles of my feet, too. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Either a smoothie with greens and healthy fats (avocado, almond butter, coconut etc) or steel-cut oatmeal with tons of toppings in the winter. Lunch – Usually whatever I’m working on suffices as lunch, but ideally a salad with a little bit of grains tossed in and some legumes/­­nuts/­­seeds for protein. Stuff on toast is a go-to lunch for me as well. Snack – Right now I’m really into plantain chips with guacamole. Dinner – This time of year, we grill almost all of our vegetables and serve them with a big salad or slaw, whatever protein we’ve got, and a little heap of fermented vegetables or sauerkraut. I’ve been making these amazing grilled veggie tacos with cassava flour tortillas lately too. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Yes! Coffee, matcha, black tea, green tea–I love it all in moderation. I can be sensitive to caffeine sometimes, so I try to limit myself to 2 caffeinated beverages a day, and always before 2 pm . -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I try to never skip breakfast because when I do, I need something sweet by the time 3 o’clock  hits. I find that consuming a good amount of healthy fat in the mornings helps me curb those cravings. Sometimes you just need a treat though. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? So many! I have this tray on my counter with all of these powders and tinctures that I sprinkle into my coffee/­­tea or other elixirs. For supplements, I take a probiotic, Vitamin D3, B12, and Omega 3 daily. With superfoods/­­powders etc: I like all of the mushroom powders these days (reishi, chaga, lion’s mane and cordyceps) because they help soothe my nerves as well as provide a focused mental energy of sorts. I put spirulina in every smoothie I make because it has so much going on nutritionally. I take ashwagandha and mucuna pruriens to help with stress management. I love all the Moon Juice Dusts, too (Spirit Dust is my go-to). -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I could count a hundred personal influences in the realm of self-care, but I think Jason Wachob’s Wellth is a good place to start for a lot of people thinking about the subject. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I do! I’m always changing it up because I like variety. I like to run, hike, do weight and resistance routines, swim in the summertime, and yoga here and there too. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I really like it, but I find I need some convincing to get started. Getting to it early in the morning is the safest bet for me personally, just to have it ticked off the list before the day really starts. And thinking about the delicious smoothie I’m going to drink after always helps :) -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Getting a step tracker! I know that sounds weird. I work from home and sometimes I spend way too much time puttering on the computer or standing still in my kitchen. Now I head out for at least 13,000 steps a day in addition to my workouts. I sleep deeper and have so much more energy during the day. Plus our dog loves all the extra walks :) Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Feeling clear-minded, open, and confident in any situation. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? My skin is so sensitive so I have my routine down to a science. I love to dry brush before I hop in the shower. From there, I use this special oil-based soap from France, and then while my skin is still damp, I moisturize with coconut oil. For my face, I use a similar oil-based cleanser, rosewater and witch hazel toner, the Cell Serum from Living Libations and Tata Harper’s Clarifying Moisturizer. I’ve also been using Cocokind’s Chia Facial Oil at night along with their Full Brow Balm. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Tocotrienols! They make smoothies/­­hot drinks super creamy and my skin loves all that Vitamin E. Plus all the usuals like greens, proper hydration, and omega-rich foods like flax seeds. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? The only tip I have is to pay attention to what you’re eating and drinking! Your skin/­­hair/­­overall appearance is a direct reflection of what’s happening on the inside. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? I’m a lot better at knowing my limits these days. I can sense when I’m bordering on overcommitment, and I just shut it down and start saying no to stuff. I try to nourish my body well and carve out frequent pockets of time for quiet and stillness. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Going outside, meditating, reading a good book, cooking a beautiful meal with no intention of posting it to Instagram :) -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I’ll eat lots of citrus and ginger and make a pot of vegetable broth with thyme, garlic, and shiitake mushrooms. I do immune tonics with mushroom powders too, drink lots of fluids, and take extra care to get a good night’s sleep and think positive. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? Like I mentioned before, I’m a lot better at sensing when a project may not serve me/­­my career than I used to be. I think the work/­­life balance comes a lot more naturally now. When I was making my cookbook, it felt like I lived in that world, and I was eating a lot of takeout and just not looking after myself because I put that work first. When I start turning to certain shortcuts or I’m habitually depending on caffeine or working on the computer past my bedtime, I know it’s time to reset my outward glance. A reset usually means a day off with some gardening, intentionally simple meal prep, and creative pursuits that aren’t food related. Knowledge -- Your way of coming up with healthful, plant-based recipes that are unique and modern, but also doable and approachable is unprecedented in the food blog world. What is your process when it comes to developing recipes? That is very generous of you to say! I have a professional cooking background, but I also appreciate the comfort of ease and efficiency. Ultimately I want my recipes to bring some kind of enjoyment or sense of ease/­­relief in someone’s life. Those two goals are front of mind when I get to work on a certain recipe concept. The recipe will usually start out slightly chef-y (lots of ingredients, multiple cooking methods, longer prep time), and then slowly I edit it down to streamline and make it do-able for most lightly experienced cooks. I also read every food magazine/­­food media website I can to stay up to date on new cooking methods and ingredients. Fun & Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I work on my house! I like tinkering with the layout and picking up new pieces, plants, rugs etc. My favourite/­­ultimate “treat yourself” strategy though is booking a weekend (or longer) away somewhere with my partner. -- A book/­­song/­­movie to feed the soul: Book – Invincible Living by Guru Jagat Song/­­Album – The Master of None Season 2 soundtrack on Spotify. Italian disco, classic New Edition etc.! Movie – Win It All on Netflix (such a feel good movie, seriously) -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? –  A rosewater sprayer in TSA-approved size for a fresh/­­hydrating face mist –  Snacks (raw nuts, bars etc) –  Amazing Grass packets for when I need greens fast. –  Moisturizer –  Large scarf that doubles as a blanket –  A smoky quartz that I don’t leave home without. –  A hemp cloth and tiny container of oil-based soap because I always want to wash my face immediately after a flight, even a short one. –  Minimal clothing–usually neutral coloured basics that work well for a variety of situations. I tend to always buy clothing at my destination so I go light on it when I’m packing. –  Saje Peppermint Halo: I get back pain here and there and use this as a pain killer of sorts, both at home and away. It’s like rolling ice right onto the problem area! –  Bamboo utensils and metal straw for minimizing waste on the go. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Renee Bird! Based on this amazing post, I think she may be just the person for this series ;) All photos courtesy of Laura Wright The post Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Strawberry Cardamom Milk

June 4 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Strawberry Cardamom Milk I didn’t grow up drinking strawberry milk and thus have no nostalgic connection to it, nor did I have any particular interest in making it, until I ended up with way too many strawberries this past spring. I might sound like a broken record to some of you, but for a bit of context, it’s worth mentioning (once again) that this year’s strawberry season yielded the craziest, dreamiest berries I’ve ever eaten in Florida or anywhere else in the world. I couldn’t stay away from the strawberry farm until my freezer could no longer fit the copious amounts of strawberries I was freezing. We consumed bowls and bowls of fresh strawberries with breakfast, lunch and dinner, but I also cooked with them a bunch (see some of the results here and here). I kind of ran out of recipe ideas towards the end there, so I decided to give this whole strawberry milk deal a try. Boy was I wrong to wait this long, this stuff is heaven. Refreshing, delicious and totally worth the little bit of effort. The method here is a bit more intentional than just blending some strawberries with milk, and yields a truly special little drink. I think spices are extremely important in cooking but especially in plant-based cooking, where building flavor is a bit more of a challenge. A dash of spice can really elevate a dish to the next level, and that’s where the cardamom comes in. The magical, slightly spicy and citrusy flavor of cardamom goes so well with the syrupy macerated strawberries and makes this milk that much more interesting. If you don’t have any cardamom though, this drink will still be delicious without it. There is a step-by-step video above, which shows you how to make almond milk as well as how to flavor it with strawberries. Consider giving this recipe a whirl some day soon when you get your hands on some jammy berries. Enjoy your Sunday :) Strawberry Cardamom Milk   Print Serves: about 3½ cups Ingredients for the almond milk 1 cup raw almonds - soaked in purified water overnight 3 cups purified water for the strawberry cardamom milk about 3 cups sliced strawberries ⅓ cup raw sugar 3 cups unsweetened almond milk 5 cardamom pods - green shells removed, seeds ground in a mortar and pestle Instructions to make the almond milk Drain and rinse the almonds. Place them in a blender along with the water and blend on high speed until completely broken down. Working in batches, strain the milk into a bowl through a nut milk bag. Discard the strained pulp or save for future use in granola, baking, etc. Transfer the milk to a clean bottle or jar and keep refrigerated for up to 3 days. to make the strawberry milk Place the strawberries in a medium bowl and pour the sugar over them. Toss and let macerate until the strawberries yield their syrupy juice, for at least 1 hour or overnight (the longer the better). Puree the strawberries together with their syrup in an upright blender until smooth. Strain the puree through a fine mesh strainer for the silkiest strawberry milk, this step is optional. Combine the almond milk, strawberry puree and freshly ground cardamom in an upright blender and blend until well combined and frothy. Pour the milk into a bottle or jar and chill very well the refrigerator. Enjoy cold. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Sweet Potato Buckwheat Snack Bars with Cardamom Tahini Hot Chocolate Simple Spicy Strawberry Gazpacho Spiced Hot Chocolate and a Cookbook of Our Own .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Strawberry Cardamom Milk appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Breakfast Buckwheat Florentines

April 28 2017 My New Roots 

Breakfast Buckwheat Florentines Done is better than perfect. I cant tell you how many times I repeat this to myself on a daily basis, as a sort of mantra to soothe and convince the perfectionist inside me to just follow through. To just put it out there. I almost pushed publish on this blog post yesterday afternoon, but something was holding me back. Two things, in fact. First, the photos werent what I wanted them to be: they were on the boring side without a lot of colour, and not really inspiring. Second, the recipe itself just wasnt there. I was trying to make a vegan yogurt coating with coconut butter and although it was tasty, the texture was all wrong: chunky and gritty. Was it good enough? Probably. Would anyone have noticed what I saw as shortcomings? Probably not. But could I deal with it? Apparently, no. As I was putting the finishing touches on the post, it hit me like a bolt of lightening: I needed to use cashew butter to achieve the silky consistency I was after. Noooo! It was the solution I had been calling in, but to arrive at the witching hour just seemed cruel. How could I start all over at this point? Was I crazy to even try, considering I didnt know for sure that it would work out? With only minutes to make a decision, I hopped on my bike and cycled to the health food store. Again. Cursing myself, my brain, my ridiculous inability to know when to let go, and my insistence that what I put out in the world is my absolute best, really started to annoy me. I bought all the ingredients for the third time, raced home, and got to work. The cookies were the best theyd ever been. Perfect, in fact. But was it worth it? For anyone out there nodding their heads in recognition that they too, have these borderline masochistic tendencies to achieve an arbitrary portrait of perfection, may I ask what it is that drives us to create and then hold it all back if its not exactly what we imagined in our heads? Because nothing is perfect! When do we draw the line and just push publish? Is done really better than perfect? Because done for me it seems like settling for mediocrity a lot of the time. Even if its just a friggin cookie. Im not looking for answers here, just venting I suppose. But if you want to share your similar struggles, feel free in the comments. Its not often I open up or vent in this space, so maybe we can all throw a perfectionist party, and make sure to have these very perfect cookies on the table. Speaking of! Florentines are traditionally almond-centric biscuits, sometimes with the addition of dried fruit like cherries and orange zest, with a rich chocolate coating on the bottom. Because I really love dessert for breakfast, I was motivated to make a morning-appropriate version that wouldnt make me feel like a glutton. I chose to add some buckwheat to the mix since I love to start my day with whole grains, and swapped out the chocolate for a vanilla-cashew butter coating that I basically want to pour over my entire life. Like I mentioned, my original thought was to go with something yogurt-like, but once I made this saucy concoction, there was no need to pretend it was something else. Pure, divine, silky-smooth pleasure glaze! Ahem. I love these cookies because they are so simple to make with just a few ingredients, and incredibly fast. On my third testing, they were done - mixed, baked and glazed – in 20 minutes. If youre in a rush to get your treat fix, leave the cashew coating out of the equation, and youll still have a gorgeously tasty and satisfying little snack. As far as additions and flavours go, these wicked little morsels are kind of a blank slate. I made a couple batches with orange zest and one without. Personally, I really loved the citrusy warmth that the orange lends, and its nod to morning fodder, but you can also omit it for a more neutral taste. Instead, spice them up with cinnamon, cardamom, lemon zest, rose, lavender, coconut etc. I think adding cacao nibs would also be really delicious, as would dried blueberries, dried figs, or apricots. Whatever you choose to do, get ready to be very excited to get up in the morning. Couple these cookies with a turmeric latte, a piece of fruit and youll be good to go. Until 4 oclock when you want another one.     Print recipe     Breakfast Buckwheat Florentines Makes 12 Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup /­­ 90g raw buckwheat groats 1/­­2 cup /­­ 70g slivered almonds (or sunflower seeds) 1/­­3 cup /­­ 45g almond meal 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. coconut oil 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup a couple pinches sea salt zest of 1 organic orange, optional Vanilla Cashew Coating: 1/­­3 cup /­­ 85ml cashew butter 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml coconut oil 1 Tbsp. pure maple syrup seeds from 1 vanilla bean pinch sea salt Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 350°F /­­ 175°C. Line a rimmed cookie sheet with baking paper. 2. In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast buckwheat until golden, about 3 minutes. Transfer buckwheat to a mixing bowl to cool. In the same skillet toast the slivered almonds until golden, about 2 minutes. Transfer them to the bowl of buckwheat to cool, add the almond meal and stir to combine. 3. In the same skillet (no need to wash) over low heat, melt the coconut oil and add the orange zest, if using. Turn off the heat and whisk in the maple syrup and salt. Pour the liquid over the buckwheat and almond mixture and fold to combine. Do not wash the skillet. 4. Using a tablespoon measure, scoop out the florentine cookie mixture and set each one on the lined baking sheet with plenty of space in between (I baked these in 2 batches of six). Using the back of the spoon, flatten the cookies out a little. Place in the oven and bake for 7-10 minutes until the edges are golden and bubbly. Remove from oven and let cool for about 5 minutes. Transfer to a cooling rack and repeat with remaining mixture. 5. While the florentines are baking, make the cashew coating. Melt the coconut oil in the same skillet over low heat, then add the cashew butter and stir well to combine. Once melted, add the vanilla bean and maple syrup. Stir well and turn off the heat. 6. Once the florentines have cooled, make sure that the cashew coating is still liquid. Spoon a couple teaspoons on the bottom of each cookie and spread it as evenly as possible. Place on a lined baking sheet, coating side up in the fridge or freezer to set. Once firm, repeat with remaining coating, except this time place the coating side down on the lined baking sheet. Place in the fridge or freezer to set, then enjoy! Store leftovers in the fridge or freezer in a tightly sealed container for up to two weeks. Once I started editing the new photos for this post, I realized that the last batch of Florentines werent as golden, or as flat as the previous batches. I decided to let that one go. And Im very proud of that. *   *   *   *   *   * Hey Copenhagen! Just a reminder about my first two cookbook events in CPH this Spring. The first will be an intimate talk and demonstration at SLOW Copenhagen, and the second will be a magical, celebratory dinner in collaboration with the local, organic grocer and kitchen, Kost. Click on the images for more info and tickets! Cant wait to see you there.  The post Breakfast Buckwheat Florentines appeared first on My New Roots.

Nasi Goreng

March 23 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

Nasi Goreng I couldn’t even tell you how many times I had Nasi Goreng while I was in Malaysia. It was definitely often. Like, really often. Not only is this traditional vegetable fried rice dish usually totally delicious, it’s also usually easy to find and (with little to no effort) a great vegan option. Pretty much everywhere I went in the five weeks in Malaysia, this dish was on the menu or easy to order at almost any restaurant. Especially out of the big cities and in the countryside - and particularly on the islands and beaches - this is a vegan/­­vegetarian stand-by that is never hard to find. (By the way, based on my travels, this is true for most of Southeast Asia, including Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Myanmar… but the dish is found under other names and with local flavors.) This becomes an almost daily meal, if vegan options are limited. On Pulau Pangkor, there were two food places (more shacks than restaurants) that served fantastic Nasi Goreng and vegetable fried rice. And in Borneo, staying in the Permai rainforest, the local restaurant and the nearby food court had vegetable fried rice, or Nasi Goreng. There were also many breakfast or lunch buffets at hotels and restaurants that had rice dishes like this. Contrarily, when in Penang and Kuala Lumpur I was usually so blown away by other vegan choices that I didn’t eat Nasi Goreng as often. Nasi Goreng’s flavors and textures forge powerful memories for anyone who’s been to Malaysia or Indonesia - or even just a Malaysian or Indonesian restaurant - whether vegan, vegetarian, or neither. Just as with so many classic recipes - from region to region and family to family this dish is made a million different ways. This is mine… inspired by so many excellent meals on my adventures. When I created this recipe for the Malaysia cookbook, I made sure to hit all the best, unique flavors in a good Nasi Goreng: Fresh galangal root (or ginger), lime juice, spicy chili, and a thin, tangy sauce provided by the mix of Shoyu soy sauce, vinegar, and citrus zest. I also round out the savory flavors with some sweetness. Traditionally in Malaysia, this dish would be served with just a bit of chopped vegetables (and way more rice). For my recipe, I’ve got a lot of the good stuff, included the crumbled tofu - which, by the way, replaces scrambled egg - sometimes found in traditional Nasi Goreng. By the way, I have many similar recipes inspired by other travels and other countries and cuisines - including: Cambodian Fried Rice, Mexican Magic Rice, and Vegetable Fried Rice from my World, Mexico, and Sri Lanka vegan cookbooks. After you’ve tried my Nasi Goreng, check out the other recipes and decide which country’s classic fried rice is your favorite. Nasi Goreng traditional vegetable fried rice recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA available in English & German serves 2 to 3 /­­ time 40 min + - 3.5 oz (100 g) firm tofu - 1 cup (190 g) broken jasmine rice or short grain brown rice - 1/­­2 tsp sea salt - 1 2/­­3 cup (400 ml) water - 1 cup (100 g) chinese cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli or bok choy finely chopped - 1 medium (90 g) carrot finely chopped or sliced - 2-3 Tbs oil - 1 tsp sesame oil optional - 3 (50 g) spring onions chopped, separated into white ends and greens - 1 or 2 cloves garlic finely chopped - 1 large red chili finely chopped optional - 1/­­2 in. (1 cm) fresh galangal or ginger finely chopped - 1 tsp coriander ground - 1/­­2 tsp black pepper ground - 2 Tbs soy sauce (Shoyu) - 1 Tbs lime juice or lemon juice or 2 tsp rice vinegar - 1 tsp lime zest or lemon zest optional - 1 tsp sugar or agave syrup - 1/­­2 tsp sea salt - lime slices for garnish - Cut tofu in slabs, wrap in clean kitchen towel. Weight with heavy cutting boards to press out excess moisture. Let sit 20 min. Unwrap tofu and crumble into a bowl. - Wash and drain rice thoroughly. - Bring water to boil in a small pot. Add rice and salt. Stir. Return to boil. Reduce heat to low and cover. Simmer 12 to 20 min as needed. After water is absorbed, remove from heat. Fluff rice with a fork. Cover and let sit and cool, ideally an hour or more. - Heat oil in a large wok or frying pan on medium high. Add chopped spring onion ends, garlic, chili (if using), galangal (or ginger), ground coriander, and black pepper. Fry, stirring constantly, until lightly browned, 2-3 min. - Add chopped carrots. Fry, stirring constantly, 2-3 min. Add crumbled tofu. Mix well. Fry, stirring regularly, until tofu begins to turn golden brown, 3-5 min. Add chopped cabbage (or other vegetables). Fry, stirring constantly, until vegetables start to soften, 4-5 min. - Whisk soy sauce, lime (or lemon) juice, zest, sugar (or agave syrup), and sea salt in a small bowl. - Add cooked rice to frying vegetables. Mix well. Add soy sauce mix and spring onions greens. Combine well. Fry, stirring constantly until liquid has been absorbed and rice and vegetables are moderately browned, 5-7 min. Remove from heat. Cover until ready to serve. - Serve with lime slices. vegan recipe for Nasi Goreng from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA The post Nasi Goreng appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Blender Chia Orange Cranberry Muffins

March 14 2017 Vegan Richa 

Blender Chia Orange Cranberry MuffinsEasy Chia Orange Cranberry Muffins. These breakfast Muffins are simple and full of flavor. Blend up the wet and dry in a blender, pour and bake. Vegan Nut-free Soy-free Recipe. Makes 11 to 12 muffins. These Zesty Orange Muffins are perfect to add the sunshine to your day. They are super easy. Put all the wet in a blender, blend. Add chia seeds and let ithem sit for a few minutes. Then blend in the dry, pour into muffin pan, bake and done. Beautiful, fluffy, zesty, seedy muffins.  Just like my Lemon Coconut Chia Muffins, these are citrusy fluffy muffins have chia seeds for a bit of texture. Orange juice helps the muffins brown and caramelize on top. Add any berries of choice. I had a big bag of frozen cranberries from fall which needed using and orange and cranberries are a perfect combination. Continue reading: Blender Chia Orange Cranberry MuffinsThe post Blender Chia Orange Cranberry Muffins appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Double Chocolate Chunk Sunbutter Cookies

February 23 2017 My New Roots 

Double Chocolate Chunk Sunbutter Cookies Dear friends! Im on tour! And what a total blast and a half its been so far - my mind is blown by the outpouring of enthusiasm and pure LOVE here in New York City. Thanks to all of you for coming out to the events with your biggest smiles and warmest hearts. Taking my book on the road sure is a change of pace from my quiet, private, and relatively introverted life in Copenhagen. But, seeing as I like humans so much, I welcome the explosive energy, side-splitting laughter, and long hugs that this tour has brought so far. I feel like you, dear readers, are the most beautiful sort there are, and I am so lucky to have friends wherever I go. Thank you. Cannot wait to see what the next few weeks hold! Just a reminder that I am heading to Toronto, Vancouver, Seattle, Portland, San Fran and LA – check out my Events page for updated info! In case, you haven’t heard, this latest cookbook of mine, Naturally Nourished, is all about how to take grocery store staples and turn them into powerfully delicious and nutritious meals for you and your family. The recipes are on the simpler side than my first cookbook, and use only familiar ingredients. It was really fun to create this work, since you know how much I dig on the weird stuff: chaga, mucuna pruriens, schisandra berry, ho shu wu, pearl (yup, pearl). But lets get real, how many of you are going to go out and find ground up pearl to put in your morning elixir? Right. So, this book was a response to the way health food can be sometimes: inaccessible, alienating, and even elitist. I dont like to see the system moving in that direction because I believe that health is everyones right, and since we all have access to the good stuff at the local supermarket, lets not lose sight of the powerful foods that are right under our noses. Dark leafy greens, brassicas, root veggies, squash, stone fruit, citrus, herbs, garlic, ginger - you get where Im going with this. Naturally Nourished is a celebration of simple, honest, real food, and it will show you how to prepare it in a way that is easy, and crazy-tasty too. So these cookies. I am pretty over the moon for them. And they are definitely the most decadent recipe in the cookbook - loaded with serious chunks of dark chocolate, a moist, cake-y crumb and unparalleled richness. The sunflower seed crust around the outside adds fabulous texture and tooth, and the perfect crunchy contrast to the creamy chocolate. I know that the vegans out there may be a little disappointed with this recipe, but please know how darn hard I tried to make them just as good without the eggs! This cookbook was a challenge to see if I could use only very basic grocery store ingredients for every single recipe in the cookbook, so I couldnt cheat and employ a fancy vegan egg-replacer here, but I am pretty sure it would work. The eggs are important in the recipe not only to bind the ingredients together, but to dry out the dough in the oven, and create the fluffy consistency. Therefore, do not try this with a flax or chia egg - sad, sad results will ensue. Trust. Just a note for when you do make these: the cookie dough is very wet. Youll be raising an eyebrow for sure, wondering if youve done everything correctly, but stay the course and drop those cookie dough balls into the sunflower seeds - they not only act as a tasty, crunchy coating, they also help you with handling, and prevent the cookies from turning into total puddles in the oven. If youre pressed for time, skip making your own sunflower seed butter and just use store-bought. To ensure the cookies turn out just the way they are supposed to, use an unsalted, unflavoured sunbutter or another type of seed or nut butter altogether! Ive tried them with almond butter and they were bangin. You can also coat the cookies in another seed or chopped up nuts. Hazelnuts would be delightful. Or cacao nibs!     Print recipe     Double Chocolate Chunk Sunbutter Cookies Makes 20 cookies Ingredients: 2 large eggs 2 tsp. pure vanilla extract 1 cup /­­ 250ml Sunflower Seed Butter (recipe follows), or use storebought 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml pure maple syrup 1 teaspoon baking soda?1/­­4 teaspoon fine sea salt?1/­­2 cup /­­ 45g cocoa powder 3 1/­­2 oz. /­­ 100g dark chocolate (70% or higher), roughly chopped 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 170g raw, unsalted, shelled sunflower seeds Directions: 1. Preheat the oven to 325°F /­­ 160°C. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. 2. In a small bowl, whisk together the eggs and vanilla. Add the seed butter and mix thoroughly. Add the maple syrup, baking soda, and salt and fold together. Sift in the cocoa powder and stir to incorporate. Fold in the chopped chocolate. 3. Place the sunflower seeds in a separate bowl. Wet your hands slightly with water. Spoon the dough into about 20 portions and roll each into a rough ball (the dough will be very wet, but this is normal!). 4. Drop the dough balls into the bowl of seeds and roll to coat them in the seeds. Flatten the balls out slightly and place them on the prepared baking sheet about 2 inches /­­ 5cm apart (they spread a lot!). 5. Bake the cookies for 10 to 13 minutes. Let them cool slightly before serving. Store the cookies in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 1 week. Sunflower Seed Butter Makes about 1 1/­­2 cups Ingredients: 3 cups /­­ 400g raw, unsalted, shelled sunflower seeds Directions: 1. Preheat the oven to 350°F /­­ 180°C. 2. Place the sunflower seeds in an even layer on a rimmed baking sheet and toast until golden and fragrant, 10 to 15 minutes. Remove them from the oven and let cool. 3. Place the cooled sunflower seeds in a food processor and blend, occasionally scraping down the sides, until smooth and creamy (this process can take 10 minutes or more, so be patient). If the seeds are not releasing their oil, add a little olive oil to help the process. Once the mixture is creamy, transfer to a glass jar with a tight-fitting lid, and store in the fridge for up to 1 month.   I am beyond thrilled to be on tour with this second book. To be meeting so many of you who have been following my kitchen adventures for years and years, is beyond amazing. I feel like Ive said it a thousand times, but I really mean it: your generosity of spirit and support with all that I put out in the world truly humbles me. I feel so lucky to do what I do, and you are the ones that make it possible. With joy and deep gratitude, Sarah B. The post Double Chocolate Chunk Sunbutter Cookies appeared first on My New Roots.

Cauliflower Rice with Zingy White Beans and Kale

January 26 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Cauliflower Rice with Zingy White Beans and Kale There’s something very powerful about turning a pile of vegetables into a proper meal. The satisfaction/­­general victorious feeling that I get from finding a place for produce in our daily meals is one of the main reasons I’m attracted to cooking with plants, besides the more obvious nourishment factor. Another powerful feeling is finding a way to whip up a solid, plant-centric meal when you seemingly have no food left in the house. For me, that usually involves surveying the bottom of my crisper and pulling heavily from my pantry. That was the case with the recipe I have for you today, which took me from panicking about not having enough groceries to being well-fed and quite satisfied. I had a head of cauliflower I’d been ignoring, kale that was getting dangerously old, a bag of random Florida citrus, and mushrooms that didn’t make it into a stew (which are also optional in this recipe). The rest of the ingredients came straight from my pantry. We eat a lot of cauliflower around these parts in the fall and winter months, and at this point, everyone under my roof is pretty tired of the roasted-cauliflower-with-one-spice-or-another scenario. So cauliflower ‘rice’ is a good option when roasted cauliflower fatigue hits – it makes for a great, neutral bed for whichever ingredients you choose to serve with it and can be flavored so many different ways. It’s also a nice option for those trying to stay away from grains and looking for a sub that’s still tasty and comforting. I wanted to give a zingy, citrusy flavor kiss to the whole dish, since nature is awesome enough to supply us with the brightness that is citrus in the dark of winter. The ‘rice’ is cooked simply with onions and garlic, then finished off with some lemon juice. Served on top there’s a humble mix of sautéed kale, white beans and mushrooms if you have them. The white beans are also a base for the sauce, which involves orange juice and zest to get more of the sunny factor into the dish. This meal comes together pretty quickly, even more so if you make the cauliflower rice ahead of time. It’s a good candidate for a weekday meal, especially if you too happen to have all the ingredients on hand :) Cauliflower Rice with Zingy White Beans and Kale   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients for the white bean sauce 1 cup cooked white beans (butter, navy, etc.) ¼ cup + 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed orange juice (from about 2 small oranges) 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar 1½ tablespoons tamari 2 tablespoons olive oil sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste zest of 1 orange for the cauliflower rice with zingy white beans and kale 1 head cauliflower - roughly chopped into florets 3 tablespoons coconut oil - divided 1 shallot - diced 2 cloves garlic - minced ½ teaspoon red pepper flakes ½ cup water juice of ½ lemon sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste 8 oz crimini mushrooms - sliced (optional) 1 medium bunch kale - stemmed and chopped ½ tablespoon balsamic vinegar ½ tablespoon tamari 1 cup cooked white beans (butter, navy, etc.) white bean sauce (from above) Instructions to make the white bean sauce Combine all the ingredients, except orange zest, in a blender until smooth. Mix in the orange zest on the lowest blender speed setting or by hand with a spoon. to make the cauliflower rice with zingy white beans and kale Make the cauliflower rice. Divide your roughly chopped cauliflower florets into two even portions. Place the first portion into a food processor and pulse a few times, until you have pieces that are approximately the size of rice grains. Take care not to over-chop, you dont want your cauliflower to turn to mush. Transfer to a large bowl and repeat with the second half. Heat 2 tablespoons of coconut oil in a large sauté pan on medium heat. Add the shallot and sauté for 5 minutes, until soft and translucent. Add the garlic and red pepper flakes and sauté for another 2 minutes until fragrant. Add the chopped cauliflower, then mix in the water, lemon juice, salt and pepper. Cook for 8 minutes until the liquid absorbs and the rice becomes cooked but not mushy. Take care not to overcook. Transfer to a large bowl, keep warm and covered. Wipe the pan clean with a paper towel. Warm the remaining 1 tablespoon coconut oil over medium heat. Add the mushrooms, mix, then let them sit for about a minute to start releasing liquid. Add a pinch of salt to the mushrooms, mix and sauté for another 4 minutes, until all the liquid released by the mushrooms evaporates. If not using mushrooms, proceed with the kale. Add the kale, balsamic and tamari. Mix and sauté until the kale starts wilting. Add the white beans and let them warm through until the kale is completely wilted. Add the sauce, starting with ¼ - ½ cup and tasting as you go. Add more if needed. Let the sauce warm through and turn off the heat. Serve the kale and white beans over the cauliflower rice, garnished with more orange zest and more sauce, if desired. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Savory Vegetable Crumble with Eggplant, Zucchini, Tomatoes and Mushroo... Gluten-Free Winter Squash Gnocchi Sprouted Almond Romesco Pasta with Roasted Cauliflower and Blistered T... Asian Flavoured Veggie Burgers with Asparagus Fries .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Cauliflower Rice with Zingy White Beans and Kale appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Orange Cardamom Beet Smoothie

January 16 2017 Oh My Veggies 

Fresh beets add nutrients, flavor and a burst of color to this creamy, citrusy smoothie.

Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices

January 5 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices This post was created in partnership with Amira. This month we are focusing on recipes that will hopefully be helpful to those wanting to hit the reset button after all the holiday eating and drinking. I wanted a very manageable weekday dinner to be the first in the series, because we haven’t had one up in a while, and because I myself have been on the hunt for some new but trustworthy, quick and wholesome meal ideas. Most of my focus right now is on completing the kitchen renovation, a good part of which my husband and I have been doing ourselves. It’s been dragging on much longer than we expected – a common theme when it comes renovations, as I hear. We are finally down to the small finishing touches, but they somehow seem to be the hardest to complete. Cooking up large batches of un-elaborate, nourishing dishes like this stew to have on hand during the week has been one of my strategies for staying sane throughout this whole process. It’s amazing how helpful a home-cooked meal can be during times of stress. When looking for inspiration for balanced winter weeknight meals, I often turn to South Indian cuisine for its array of delicious vegetarian dishes and Ayurveda-approved ingredients. This particular stew is based on a recipe for sambar – a mung dal (yellow split mung beans that are protein-rich and affordable) stew that comes in hundreds of variations. The base for sambar is most commonly made up of mung dal that’s been cooked down to a porridge-like consistency and spiced, after which almost anything goes. You can include one or many stew-friendly vegetables in season, as well as other fun add ins like desiccated coconut. I love the versatility of this dish and usually just add in whatever vegetables or greens I have on hand. For this version, I kept things simple and only added chopped butternut squash and dried coconut – it can be as simple or as involved as you’d like. The ingredient list might seem long, but it’s mostly composed of spices, which play a huge role in building flavor in this otherwise modest stew. Each spice also brings its unique healing properties to the table – fennel helps aid digestion, turmeric is anti-inflammatory, fenugreek helps with blood sugar balance and much, much more. Like many Indian dishes, sambar is traditionally served over rice, and I’ve been truly enjoying serving it over Amira’s fragrant Thai Jasmine Brown Rice. Amira sent me a few of their premium long grain rice varieties to try, and I was consistently impressed with their quality and how distinctly different each kind tasted. Besides the jasmine brown rice, the variety that stood out to me is their Smoked Basmati Rice, which has a very unique smoked flavor and is really good in salads, and as a base for all kinds of veggie bowls. I’m crazy about smoked foods, so that one really hit the spot. If you see Amira rice in your grocery store, give it a try, I think you’ll really enjoy it! Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients 3 cups water ½ cup mung dal ¼ teaspoon turmeric ¼ teaspoon cumin ¼ teaspoon whole fenugreek seeds (optional) 3 sprigs fresh curry leaves (optional) 1 small yellow onion - chopped ½ medium butternut squash - peeled and cubed ¼ cup desiccated coconut sea salt 1 tablespoon red chili powder 2 tablespoons ghee or coconut oil ¼ teaspoon whole black mustard seeds 1 whole dried red chili - torn in half ⅛ teaspoon whole fennel seeds 1 tablespoon fresh lemon or lime juice 1½ cups cooked rice of your choice - for serving cilantro - for garnish (optional) coconut milk or yogurt - for garnish (optional) Instructions Bring 3 cups of water to a boil in a medium pot. Have a tea kettle or another pot with about 1 more cup of hot water ready, in case you need more water later in the process. Once 3 cups of water in the pot are boiling, add mung dal, turmeric, cumin, fenugreek and curry leaves (if using). Lower heat to establish a steady simmer and cook, covered, for 20 minutes. Mix periodically to ensure the mung dahl doesnt stick to the pan. Discard curry sprigs, if using. Add onion, squash, desiccated coconut, and salt to the pot. If it seems like there isnt enough liquid in the pot, add a little more hot water from the tea kettle until the vegetables have room to simmer in the water, keeping the dal consistency like a soupy porridge. Continue simmering, covered, for another 20 minutes or until the vegetables are cooked through. Stir in chili powder at half time. Mix periodically to prevent any sticking. Once the vegetables are around 5 minutes away from being done, warm ghee/­­oil in a medium pan over medium heat. Add mustard seeds and let toast for about 30 seconds, tossing all the while. Add the chili and fennel seeds and toast for another 30 seconds or until fennel is toasted in color and fragrant. Add the toasted spices along with the ghee/­­oil from the pan into the pot with the stew, mix it in and let simmer, covered, for another 5 minutes. Once stew is done cooking, discard the pepper and mix in the lemon/­­lime juice. Taste and adjust the salt. Serve stew over rice, garnished with cilantro and coconut milk/­­yogurt if desired. Notes 1. You can add any vegetables/­­greens you have on hand in place of the butternut squash here and simmer until done, thats what makes this stew so versatile. 2. Curry leaves are completely optional here, but if you can get your hands on some, add them - their unique flavor works very well in this stew. 3. Traditional sambar calls for hing and tamarind. If you have one or both, add ⅛ teaspoon of hing to the pan with the toasting spices, towards the end and add to the stew with the rest of the toasted spices and ghee/­­oil. Add 2 teaspoons tamarind paste in place of the lemon/­­lime juice and simmer stew for another 5 minutes to let the flavor incorporate. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Ginger Marinated Tofu with Citrus Salsa Creamy Millet Polenta with Rainbow Chard and Chickpeas Rose and Lavender Parfait and a Breakfast with Friends Strawberry and Asparagus Black Rice Sushi .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Bring Home the Winning Recipes from the Matthew Kenney Culinary Meatless Monday Challenge

November 7 2016 Meatless Monday 

Bring Home the Winning Recipes from the Matthew Kenney Culinary Meatless Monday ChallengeRecently, Meatless Monday President Peggy Neu was a guest presenter at a Matthew Kenney Culinary Food Future educational course held in Manhattan. The class concluded with 18 student chefs participating in a Meatless Monday Quick-Fire Challenge, where they had to reinterpret traditional dishes by turning them into plant-based raw recipes. All of the entries submitted were raw-tastic. We invite you to try your hand at the winning recipes here: 1st Place Winner Turnip Ravioli By Alexandra Jones from Australia Instagram: @_­akj  This innovative ravioli uses round turnip shapes to envelop a burnt butter, sage, and nut filling.   2nd Place Winner Raw Enchiladas By Heidi Briggs from Australia Instagram: @heidi.flora This enchilada recipe offers an abundance of vegetables: from the marinated vegetable filling to the Chinese cabbage wrap! The vegetables in this dish provide fiber and vitamin C, among other nutrients.   3rd Place Winner Raw Tomato Soup and Green Garden Salad with Avocado Dressing By Fiona Galloway from Australia Instagram: @fifigalloway Soup paired with salad is a lunch staple. This raw tomato soup and green garden salad recipe offers refreshing citrus and cilantro flavors that are sure to please. Wed love to hear your thoughts on these new raw food recipes as well as some of your own favorites. Let us know on Facebook. The post Bring Home the Winning Recipes from the Matthew Kenney Culinary Meatless Monday Challenge appeared first on Meatless Monday.

6 Healthy Foods and Drinks that Could Damage Your Teeth

August 3 2016 VegKitchen 

6 Healthy Foods and Drinks that Could Damage Your Teeth You nosh on fruit and veggies thinking youre making healthy choices for your body--but you may not know that some of these foods are damaging to your smile. Although fine in moderation, when consumed in excess, these culprits could gradually tarnish those pearly whites. Citrus Fruits The acidic content in oranges, lemons, limes, tangerines and grapefruits causes dental erosion over time.

Minty Aloe and Cucumber Lemonade

June 11 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Minty Aloe and Cucumber Lemonade Have you ever tried adding fresh aloe vera to your drinks? As soon as the days get unbearably hot around here, I like to keep a few aloe leaves in my fridge for a good number of reasons, especially for healing unexpected sunburns and making the most refreshing post-beach tonics. Aloe is one of those amazing, all-purpose healing plants; it’s anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, helps lower cholesterol, works wonders when applied topically to skin by moisturizing it and helping ease acne and blemishes, and the list goes on and on. If you’ve never taken apart a fresh aloe leaf before, its insides are made up of a clear, jellyfish-like material, which is where most of the healing magic is contained. The problem is that on its own, the flesh is quite bitter and soapy. I’ve noticed that citrus really helps neutralize that unpleasant taste, so I love adding aloe to lemonade. This lemonade recipe is pretty special – it’s just the most refreshing thing you can think of after a hot day outside. It’s minty, with a cooling effect from the cucumber and a nice tartness from freshly squeezed lemon juice. I also think it would make for a great summery cocktail mixer, if you feel so inclined :) One last aloe tip – when I’m cutting apart an aloe leaf in the kitchen and putting most of the flesh into the blender, I rub the green skins with any leftover flesh on my (clean) face, which makes for a refreshing face mask. There are some links below, Sunday hugs to you, friends. The Next Gluten Matthew Kenney on Pardon My French Human Design BodyGraph – sort of like an astrology birth chart, but it combines a bunch of traditional sciences like astrology, the Hindu-Brahmin Chakra system, the Zohar or Kabbalah, and the IChing to map out a ‘body graph.’ We found ours to be pretty accurate and fascinating. Patti Smith on Singing at Bob Dylan’s Nobel Prize Ceremony (make sure to watch the video) Six Seasons: A New Way with Vegetables – I’ve got my eye on this cookbook Roasted Poblano and Jackfruit Tacos – can’t wait to make these Our Youtube Channel – we are obsessed with making videos! Minty Aloe and Cucumber Lemonade   Print Serves: 5-6 cups Ingredients 1 packed cup mint sprigs, plus more for serving 3 cups purified water half of a large cucumber 1 large aloe leaf 1 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice (4-5 lemons) ¼ cup maple syrup Instructions Bruise the mint a bit by rubbing it between your hands. In a small saucepan, combine the mint sprigs and water, bring to a boil and let cool to infuse. Once cool, strain the mixture into an upright blender and discard the mint sprigs. Cut the cucumber half in half lengthwise and scoop out the seeds. Optionally, shave off a few cucumber ribbons with a vegetable peeler for serving in the glass. Roughly chop the cucumber and put it into the blender. Cut the white base off the bottom of the aloe leaf, then cut off the spiky sides. Cut off the top layer of the skin lengthwise. Scoop out all the flesh into the blender using a spoon. Add the lemon juice and maple syrup to the blender and blend everything until smooth. Let cool completely in the refrigerator. Serve over ice, with cucumber ribbons and more fresh mint leaves. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Pi?a Colada Milkshake - Ice Cream Sunday Raw Spearmint and Chocolate Cheesecake Superberry Smoothie Peach, Honey and Thyme Lemonade Popsicles - Ice Cream Sunday .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Minty Aloe and Cucumber Lemonade appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Asparagus with Orange Vinaigrette

May 1 2017 Meatless Monday 

Grilling the asparagus brings a charred earthy flavor to balance both the sweet citrus segments and the acidity of the vinaigrette. So gather round the BBQ and celebrate spring by chowing down on asparagus tossed with blood orange and shallot. This recipe comes to us from Kristina of FormerChef.com. Serves 6 For the grilled asparagus: - 1 bunch of asparagus, with 2” trimmed off the bottom - 2 teaspoons olive oil - salt and pepper, to taste For the blood orange vinaigrette: - 3 blood oranges - 1 shallot, sliced thin1 tablespoons white wine vinegar - 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil - salt and pepper, to taste To grill the asparagus: Toss the asparagus in a bowl with the 2 teaspoons olive oil. Grill over moderate heat for about 3-4 minutes on each side, or until asparagus is slightly charred and tender-crisp. Remove the asparagus from the grill and put on a plate. Season with salt and pepper to taste. To make the blood orange vinaigrette: Cut one of the blood oranges in half and squeeze the juice into a small bowl. Using a sharp paring knife, cut the skin and the white pith off the remaining two oranges. Over a bowl, cut in between the membranes of each segment to remove the segments from the orange. Reserve the excess blood orange juice as it falls into the bowl. After removing the orange segments squeeze what’s left of the orange to get all the juice out. Set aside. In another bowl, whisk together the sliced shallots, vinegar and olive oil. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Gently stir in the blood orange juice and segments. To complete the grilled asparagus: Spoon the vinaigrette over the grilled asparagus. Enjoy either warm or at room temperature. The post Asparagus with Orange Vinaigrette appeared first on Meatless Monday.

How to Zest Citrus Correctly

March 29 2017 Vegetarian Times 

Vegan Daikon Noodle Ramen

March 16 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegan Daikon Noodle Ramen Every time I get vegetable ramen while out, I end up walking away a little disappointed. The first slurp always starts out super intense and satisfying, but then I quickly realize how overly salty the broth is, probably in compensation for the lack of meat, and things go downhill from there. I do know that the whole point of ramen is that meaty/­­seafoody broth plus noodles, not a veggie-based umami noodle bomb, but a girl can dream. For now, I just make my own. Thankfully, there are plenty of umami-rich ingredients in the plant world, and many of them happen to be perfect for making an intense, savory soup. Broth is everything when it comes to ramen, and in this recipe, I employ a combination of fresh and dried mushrooms, hot pepper, ginger, garlic, and miso to create a dark, powerful, full-bodied broth. I shape daikon radish into noodle-like strands (using this handy tool) and use them in place of noodles, in an effort to lighten things up and to squeeze another beautiful but underutilized vegetable into the mix. I boil the daikon strands like I would any other noodles, so they soften up, lose some of that radish edge and become pretty similar to the real thing. This is a really good dish to make while we are on this uncertain line between winter and spring. Its still very warming and nourishing but a bit lighter than all those root vegetables and rich stews that youve probably had enough of by now. I know the ingredient list looks long, but a bunch of them, like black garlic (!) are optional, and you might already have a lot of the other ones in your pantry. I do have to talk a bit about black garlic here, because its kind of a life-changing little ingredient. Its made by consistently heating whole heads of garlic over the course of several weeks, which results in something similar to roasted garlic, but even more earthy and caramelized in taste. This was my first time trying black garlic and I of course fell in love - I think anyone would fall for roasted garlic x 10. Its been making its way into many of my everyday dishes, and black garlic simply spread on toast with some ghee is a revelation. Follow this link to get the recipe for the Vegan Daikon Noodle Ramen :) You might also like... Raw Greenylicious Herb Soup and BBQ Grissini by Earthsprout Cauliflower Rice with Zingy White Beans and Kale Ginger Marinated Tofu with Citrus Salsa Daikon Radish Pasta With Corn and Tomatoes in Creamy Coconut Sauce .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Vegan Daikon Noodle Ramen appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Upside Down Citrus Polenta Cake

March 8 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Upside Down Citrus Polenta CakeThis post was created in partnership with North Coast. March is tricky. It’ll throw out a few of those luxuriously warm days in a row, which cause collective memory loss about the fact that it’s still winter, and you’ll suddenly see a few dazed people out on the street wearing shorts. And then it gets cold again, and it might even snow soon, and the warm coat you so optimistically tucked away into your closet has to come back out. By this time, you might also be really tired of root vegetables and stews, and all things earthy and hearty. I am. Thankfully, there is citrus. Bright, sweet, lush, like little suns in fruit form. I’m continually amazed by the variety of citrus fruit available at the grocery store this time of year. Based on my last scan of the citrus section, there are at least three types of oranges, the blood variety being the star, about as many kinds of grapefruits (red, pink, white), and don’t even get me started on the numerous hybrids, smooth-skinned, wrinkled and everything in between. I wanted to make a treat that really captures that brightness and abundance, so an upside down cake was in order. It looks involved to those not in the know, but it’s actually the easiest kind of cake to make. For the cake itself, I wanted a batter that would come out of the oven moist and fluffy, and I aimed for gluten-free and vegan, since that is what most of you guys seem to enjoy. There was a large jar of polenta in my pantry – there always is, since my eight year old is a polenta fiend – and I had the idea to go the corncake route. I’m really happy I did, and the cake was gone within a day as proof of its success. It’s sweetened with dates, apple sauce and orange juice, so nothing too sugary here. The mellow sweetness and crumbly texture of the cake combines really well with the fragrant, bright notes of the blanket of citrus on top. I like keeping the skin on the citrus slices, since its oils contribute lovely, complex notes to the overall flavor, but if you or your kids are not fond of a little bitterness, you can cut the skin off the slices. One of the main challenges of vegan baking is coming up with the correct combination of ingredients for a moist batter that doesn’t fall apart, without eggs. I’ve found apple sauce to be the essential ‘secret’ ingredient that makes all of the above possible, while adding a bit of its subtle sweetness to the mix. It also seamlessly integrates into sweet baked goods, so you won’t be tasting apple sauce in the finished product. Plus, it’s a healthy, clean, plant-based ingredient, and we all love those here. I was excited to work with North Coast on this recipe, since their apple sauce is the best I’ve ever tasted and contains no preservatives and no added sugar, all the while being made with real, organic, non-GMO ingredients. Their sauce tastes incredibly fresh and crisp, and they offer well-considered flavor options, like plain, berry, apricot, pumpkin spice and more, made with all U.S. grown fruit. Besides this cake, I’ve been using North Coast apple sauce in so much of my cooking lately, from these brownies, to my morning oats, atop a cup of coconut yogurt and even in smoothies. The brand also offers apple cider vinegar, cider and juice, so there is a definite mastery of wholesome apple products, which I absolutely love. Upside Down Citrus Polenta Cake   Print Serves: one 9-inch cake Ingredients for the cake 1 cup non-GMO polenta 1 cup brown rice flour 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon baking powder sea salt zest of 2 organic oranges 10-12 soft Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in warm water for 10 minutes, soaking liquid reserved 1 cup freshly squeezed orange juice ⅓ cup apple sauce 2 tablespoons coconut oil, plus more for oiling the pan 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar 2-3 oranges - sliced ½-inch thick (You can use a variety of different kinds for a more colorful presentation. I used navel, cara cara and blood oranges.) Instructions to make the cake Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Cut out a parchment paper circle to cover the bottom of a 9-inch spring form or cake pan. Thoroughly oil the sides of the pan with coconut oil. In a large bowl, combine the polenta, brown rice flour, baking soda, baking powder, a pinch of salt, and orange zest, and mix thoroughly. Reserve 1/­­2 cup of the date soaking water and add it to an upright blender along with the dates and orange juice, blend until smooth. Add the apple sauce, coconut oil and apple cider vinegar and pulse to combine. Pour the wet mixture into the bowl with the dry ingredients and stir to just combine. Arrange the orange slices to cover the parchment paper-lined bottom of your pan and pour the batter over them. Even the batter out with a spoon. Lift and drop the pan gently a couple of times to get rid of any possible air bubbles. Bake for 40-45 minutes, or until an inserted toothpick comes out clean. Let cool for at least 20 minutes before inverting the cake onto a plate or a cake stand and peeling off the parchment paper. Slice and serve with plain yogurt or coconut yogurt. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Strawberry Milkshake Vegan Cobb Salad with Watermelon Bacon Fruit Leather Puzzle Barley Tomato Salad .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Upside Down Citrus Polenta Cake appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Nut Milk and Quinoa Cereal, 3 Ways

February 3 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Nut Milk and Quinoa Cereal, 3 Ways This post was created in partnership with Quinoa Queen. I’m pretty convinced that I’ll be on team homemade nut milk forever. I do buy bottled almond milk from time to time, and there are great brands out on the market that I feel lucky to have access to. But every time I make a batch at home and taste my first, bright-white sip, I make a mental note to never purchase the store-bought kind again. It’s that good. If you’ve never made nut milk at home, you’ll be surprised by how easy and satisfying the process is. It does take more effort than buying a bottle at the store, but the superior flavor and heavenly texture make it well worth it. Nut milk is made by blending nuts in water – the nuts break down and yield their creaminess and fattiness to the water, coloring it an opaque white. All you need for whipping up a batch of nut milk is a blender and something for straining out the nut pulp, once the nuts are blended up. I’ve heard of people using multiple layers of cheesecloth and fine-mesh strainers, but I’ve found the nut milk bag to be the most effective tool for the job. Run your blended mixture through the bag, give it a squeeze, and you have your milk. Easy! Another advantage to making nut milk at home is the amount of control you have over the process. Many nut milk brands add stabilizers, sweeteners and natural flavors to their mix, and by making your own, you are taking all that unwanted stuff out of the equation. You can soak your nuts/­­seeds, too, which I highly recommend. Soaking gets rid of enzyme inhibitors, which in turn makes the nuts easier to digest and improves their nutrient bioavailability. I’m pretty sure none of the nut milk brands out there are taking care to soak their nuts, so there’s another reason to make your own. You can have all sorts of fun with the kind of milk you make. Use any nuts you like, following the basic proportion, from the more common almonds and cashews, to hazelnuts, pecans and Brazil nuts. Seeds work really well, too! Pumpkin, sesame and sunflower seeds all yield delicious milk and make the endeavor more affordable. You can also make nut/­­seed blends and flavor your milk all kinds of ways. I give you a few luscious flavoring ideas here, including Chocolate-Orange Hazelnut Milk, Matcha-Mint Pumpkinseed Milk and Spiced Pecan Milk. We’ll have more on what to do with the leftover pulp soon, too. I didn’t try my first bite of cereal until the early 90s, when American goods were finally allowed to be imported into Russia after the fall of the iron curtain. Back then, we looked at cornflakes, Snickers, McDonalds and chewing gum with wide and hungry eyes, taking in their then exotic flavors with all kinds of enthusiasm. Nowadays, I find most cereal brands out there to be much too sweet and full of too many unwanted ingredients. Still, a single bite of something crunchy and porous floating in (nut) milk sends me back to those times, when I coveted cornflakes like I now covet coconut butter. I’ve been loving Quinoa Queen, the gluten-free, 100% quinoa cereal brand that uses a minimal amount of wholesome, natural ingredients. The creator of Quinoa Queen is a food scientist and comes from the Andean mountains of Ecuador, where she works with her native community to harvest the quinoa used in her product. QQ cereal is not too sweet, and there is even an unsweetened, single ingredient option which I love, especially when combined with one of these flavored nut milks. The rest of the flavor offerings are subtle and well-considered, there is a lightly sweetened one, as well as a citrusy one, which my eight year old has been eating for breakfast with the Chocolate Orange Hazelnut milk (so it’s kid approved, too). Quinoa works so well as a cereal ingredient, it’s neutral in flavor and contains a wealth of protein and fiber, among other vitamins and minerals that help with starting the morning off right. I’m pretty thrilled to have found a wholesome cereal I can enjoy with all my homemade nut milks, and if you are looking for something similar, consider giving Quinoa Queen a try. Note: You can use raw almonds, cashews or any other nuts or seeds of choice for any of these milk variations. Cashews are especially convenient, as they don’t need to be strained – their pulp breaks down enough in the blender. Chocolate-Orange Hazelnut Milk   Print Serves: 3-3½ cups Ingredients 1 cup raw hazelnuts - soaked overnight in purified water 3 large, soft Medjool dates, or more to taste 2 tablespoons raw cacao powder, or more to taste 1 teaspoon maca powder (optional) zest of 1-2 organic oranges Instructions Drain and rinse the hazelnuts. Combine them with 3 cups of purified water in an upright blender (high speed works best here). Strain through a nut bag, discard the pulp or save it for future use. Pour the hazelnut milk back into the blender, add dates, cacao and maca, if using, and blend until smooth. Add the orange zest and pulse several times to combine. Keep refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 3 days. 3.5.3226   Spiced Pecan Milk   Print Serves: 3-3½ cups Ingredients 1 heaping cup raw pecans or walnuts - soaked in purified water for 4 hours or overnight 5 green cardamom pods - green shells removed 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg or a few shaves/­­slices of whole nutmeg 2-3 soft Medjool dates - optional (I like it unsweetened) Instructions Drain and rinse the pecans/­­walnuts. Combine them with 3 cups of purified water in an upright blender (high speed works best here). Strain through a nut bag, discard the pulp or save it for the future use. Pour the walnut milk back into the blender, add the rest of the ingredients and blend until smooth. Keep refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 3 days. 3.5.3226   Matcha-Mint Pumpkinseed Milk   Print Serves: 3-3½ cups Ingredients 1 cup raw pumpkin seeds - soaked in purified water for 4 hours or overnight 2 teaspoons matcha powder or more to taste handful fresh mint leaves - to taste sweetener of choice - to taste (optional, I like it unsweetened) Instructions Drain and rinse the pumpkin seeds. Combine them with 3 cups of purified water in an upright blender (high speed works best here). Strain through a nut bag, discard the pulp or save it for future use. Pour the pumpkinseed milk back into the blender, add the rest of the ingredients and blend until smooth. Keep refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 3 days. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Rose and Lavender Parfait and a Breakfast with Friends Sweet Potato Nachos with Cheesy Chipotle Sauce and All the Fixings Pink Peppercorn Cookies from Small Plates and Sweet Treats Creamy Steel Cut Oats with Spring Vegetables .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Nut Milk and Quinoa Cereal, 3 Ways appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Immunity-Boosting Beet and Camu Camu Breakfast Bowl

January 22 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Immunity-Boosting Beet and Camu Camu Breakfast Bowl Hope your weekend’s been great so far! Checking in with a fun, immunity-boosting smoothie bowl recipe that we developed for Nuts.com. This smoothie contains a powerful, vitamin C-rich trio of raw beet, cranberries and camu camu powder. Camu camu is a magical amazonian berry that has the highest naturally occurring vitamin C content of all the known plants in the world. I did a little test and have been adding camu camu powder to my morning smoothies and porridges this winter instead of taking my usual C vitamins, and no major cold yet! This smoothie is perfectly good without camu camu too, in case you aren’t planning on adding another item to your pantry/­­superfood collection. If you are worried about the raw beet here, don’t be – its flavor gets neutralized and masked by the other ingredients, while you benefit from its wealth of nutrition and magnetic color. There are also bananas and dates for sweetness, seasonally-appropriate cranberries for bit of tartness, and avocado for some healthy fats. Some weekend links below. Enjoy your Sunday :) - Invincible Living: The Power of Yoga, The Energy of Breath, and Other Tools for a Radiant Life – currently reading this book, written by an inspiring Kundalini yoga teacher. Perfect for a Kundalini beginner like me and very down to earth – not too technical or woo woo, with tons of practical tips for a more healthful and mindful existence. I’ve been very curious about Kundalini for a while now, and have began incorporating simple techniques from this book into my daily routine, like 7 minutes of Breath of Fire (breathing in and out through your nose at even increments), which is supposed to help get your glandular system back in order. Really loving it so far! - The Well/­­Aware Podcast – we love our podcasts around here and super thrilled about this new discovery, favorite episodes include interviews with Kerrilynn + Cindy of CAP Beauty, Satsuki Shibuya, Caitlin Mociun - Anny Wang – obsessed with this Swedish artist/­­furniture designer who does these insane in 3D illustrations, just look at them! Want her prints all over my walls. - In My Fridge: Heidi Swanson - How To Put Plants at the Centre of Your Plate by Anna Jones – that celeriac steak! - The First Mess Cookbook – I’m not sure I’ve ever been this excited for a cookbook to come out, it’s going to be SO good! Laura has a little preview of the book here. Follow this link for the Immunity-Boosting Beet and Camu Camu Breakfast Bowl Recipe :) You might also like... Sprouted Sunflower Seed Cocoa Bars Sweet Potato Buckwheat Snack Bars with Cardamom Ginger Marinated Tofu with Citrus Salsa Mango, Jicama and Grilled Corn Tacos .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Immunity-Boosting Beet and Camu Camu Breakfast Bowl appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Carrot Cake Smoothie Bowl

January 12 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Carrot Cake Smoothie Bowl This post was created in partnership with Naked Nutrition. Two carrot-centric recipes in a row? Yes, and I can explain :) I got a whole lot of questions about making last Sunday’s remedy tonic in a blender as opposed to a juicer, so I thought this would be the perfect time to share the recipe for one of my favorite smoothies made with similar ingredients. This one comes together in a few quick minutes with the help of a high-speed blender and tastes very much like carrot cake in a bowl, with the added benefits of raw carrots, ginger, pea protein and spices. Carrot cake is among the desserts I crave most often, but I rarely make or eat it for all the obvious reasons – it’s cake, it’s involved, it’s quite a bit of sugar. Plus, once I figured out that a quick, healthful carrot cake smoothie bowl is a possibility, my cravings for the real deal have subsided. All the ingredients in this one are pantry staples for me. I keep a big bag of carrots on hand for soups and stews, ginger – for tea and as a general immunity saver and digestive, rolled oats – for a variety of breakfasts, and my spice rack is generally overflowing, since spices are key for building flavor in plant-centric cooking. So I know this bowl of goodness is always at arm’s reach, and I end up reaching for it quite often. Another good thing about this smoothie is that while it can most certainly be dessert, it can also easily pass for breakfast. I generally like to include protein powder in all of my smoothies to make a meal out of them and to balance my sugar intake with protein, since smoothies tend to be on the sweet, fruity side. There are so many great powdered protein brands and varieties out there, that I find that aisle in the grocery store to be quite an overwhelming place. I’m especially stumped by lengthy lists of ingredients – they look great on paper, but I always end up wondering if that tiny percentage of broccoli powder or sprouted-anything powder could offer much in terms of nutrition. I’ve been using Naked Nutrition’s plant-based protein powders for a few months now, and truly love everything about the brand, from their philosophy rooted in simplicity, to the high quality of their ingredients. All of their plant-based protein powders have no more than three whole-food ingredients with no added artificial sweeteners, flavors or colors. They carry a variety of plant sources for protein like pea, rice and even peanut butter (!), and have simple flavor options like unflavored/­­unsweetened, along with chocolate and vanilla. Naked Nutrition’s flavored powders are sweetened with coconut sugar, while I’ve found that many other healthy protein powder brands use stevia. As much as I aspire to love stevia, I haven’t been able to get on board with it at all – its flavor is the only thing I can taste when I add it to absolutely anything, so coconut sugar has been my #1 powdered natural sweetener choice for years. For this smoothie bowl, I like using either the vanilla pea protein or the chocolate one, but vanilla is my favorite for this recipe, since it goes very well with the carrot cake spices. I also love the naked rice when I don’t want any flavor or sweetener, and I can’t wait to try baking with the choc peanut butter. Can you tell I’m enthusiastic about this company? If you aren’t vegan, Naked Nutrition offers single ingredient grass-fed whey and casein proteins that are also undoubtedly great. Golubka Kitchen readers get 10% off all orders on Naked Nutrition + free shipping – use code SPINACH at checkout. Carrot Cake Smoothie Bowl   Print Serves: 2-3 Ingredients for the smoothie 2 medium carrots - peeled 1 frozen banana 2-3 dates 1-inch piece ginger ¼ cup rolled oats 1 scoop vanilla protein 1 teaspoon cinnamon ¼ teaspoon nutmeg seeds from 3 cardamom pods 1-1 2/­­2 cups almond milk topping options toasted walnuts toasted desiccated coconut hemp hearts dried mulberries stovetop granola from our tahini-ginger smoothie Instructions Combine all the ingredients in a high-speed blender until smooth. Distribute between bowls, garnish and serve. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Sweet Potato Buckwheat Snack Bars with Cardamom Ginger Marinated Tofu with Citrus Salsa Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules & a Giveaway Black Sesame Cappuccino .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Carrot Cake Smoothie Bowl appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Avocado shortage creates craving!

November 14 2016 Vegetarian Times 

Let's just say that some editors at VT have developed a big, big craving for avocados during the current shortage. If you feel the same, and are lucky enough to find one, try this flavor-filled Avocado, Fennel and Citrus Salad!

A Summer of Ice Cream

September 3 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

A Summer of Ice Cream Somehow, we’ve reached the weekend that is considered by many to be the last hurrah of summer. It always goes by in a blink, and every year, the blink seems like the fastest one yet. Though very sentimental, I also can’t help but feel some excitement toward the cooler temperatures, fall produce and general coziness to come. At the beginning of this summer, we gave ourselves a challenge to come up with a new ice cream to post here every Sunday. We are happy to have fulfilled the plan, and the result consists of twelve original ice cream recipes that we are very proud of (+1 recipe from an author we love). Sometimes, I really love setting difficult-but-realistic goals for myself that I know will make me grow, whether personally or professionally – this one made me grow in both ways. Some weeks, it was definitely challenging to think up yet another frozen treat, but mostly, it was very rewarding and quite fun. I generally find myself having a more lighthearted approach, when it comes to ice cream recipe development, as opposed to the more serious savory recipes. The abundance of summer produce made the process of coming up with new flavors quite fluid, and I worked with what was available. Below, a round up of our summer of ice cream. It’s neat to see it all lined up chronologically, starting with rhubarb in the early summer, followed by strawberries, peaches, very light sorbets for the hottest of days, tropical milkshakes, and my youngest daughter’s birthday cake. We are currently brainstorming ideas for a similar weekend series to run during the colder months of the year, and would love to hear from you on what kind of recipes you’d like to see (snacks? sandwiches? soups? It doesn’t have to start with an S!). Have a lovely weekend :) Rose and Rhubarb Frozen Yogurt – Frozen yogurt is one of the easiest frozen treats to make, especially if you have an ice cream maker. All it takes is some good yogurt, whatever secondary ingredients you choose for flavor, and a quick whirl in the machine. Ive always found rose flavor to be very invigorating, and combined with the subtle tartness of the rhubarb and creamy tanginess of the yogurt, this is dessert and aromatherapy all in one bowl. Emma’s Strawberry Thai Basil Sorbet – Aside from eating them just as they are, nothing showcases seasonal fresh berries more than homemade sorbet. This one is from Emmas beautiful cookbook, My Darling Lemon Thyme - Recipes from My Real Food Kitchen. One of the things I adore about Emmas cooking style is her love of fresh herbs. Just like her, I often include herbs in sweet dishes, its a little trick to turn many ordinary desserts into a completely unique and memorable treat. The inclusion of Thai basil in this recipe is genius and makes this creamy sorbet even more refreshing, aromatic and summery. Its also hard to believe that this intense crimson colour comes just from strawberries - a real show stopper. Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits – My go-to vegan lavender ice cream recipe with the addition of rich and decadent chocolate-tahini bits. It has a creamy, luxurious texture, which combines so well with the refreshing flavors of lavender and chewy, bittersweet pieces of chocolate. Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream – Chamomile, honey and lemon are flavors that seem to have been made for one another. In this ice cream, they unite into a subtle taste that I can only describe as soothing, steadying and balancing. Theres that unmistakably floral quality from the chamomile, sweetness from the honey, a sour citrus note from the lemon, all combined in a cooling and smooth ice cream. Green Smoothie Pops – A green smoothie on a stick that can be easily eaten for breakfast on a very hot day, or as an extra nutritious dessert, on any day. Papaya Lime Sundae – Papaya always pairs amazingly well with lime - both are tropical in flavor, and lime gives creamy and mild papaya just the right hint of brightness and zing. Presented here as a very refreshing version of a sundae, with delicious and healthful add-ins - desiccated coconut, cacao nibs (which we sprinkle on everything sweet in this house), and a drizzle of Lady Date pure date syrup. Pi?a Colada Milkshake – A recreation of my favorite beachside cocktail in non-alcoholic, vegan milkshake form. Peach, Honey and Thyme Lemonade Popsicles – These lemonade popsicles, with a bit of zing from ginger, have been in my beat-the-heat arsenal for many summers now - a dessert for the toastiest of days, requiring minimal effort. The lemonade can also be had in its original, un-frozen state, and is an incredibly refreshing, summery drink. Tahini Ice Cream Bars with Miso and Caramel and Chocolate – These vegan tahini ice cream bars, covered with a generous drizzle of miso caramel and chocolate, very distantly remind me of Snickers ice cream bars, which I used to love, but these particular ones are much more healthful and interesting in flavor. Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops with a Chocolate Core –  A recreation of my favorite Ben & Jerrys ice cream flavor, made vegan and nutritious with the addition of a few energizing superfoods, and complete with a decadent chocolate core. Mint and Chocolate Milkshake with Aquafaba Whipped Cream – A classic ice cream flavor in milkshake form. Its creamy, with little hard specs of cacao nibs, invigorating with the addition of fresh mint, and topped with a chickpea-based vegan whipped cream. Pistachio and Raspberry Fields Ice Cream Cake – Paloma’s birthday cake, named for her obsession with the Beatles. Pistachio and raspberry complement each other perfectly here, the pistachio flavor being nutty and earthy, while the raspberry becomes its perfect, juicy and fruity pair. The cacao buckwheat crust adds just the right hint of chocolate and crunch to the mix. Berry Creamsicles with White Chocolate Drizzle – These beauties are a breeze to make, requiring no ice cream maker, and are colored lilac with all of summers sweetest, sun-ripened berries. The white chocolate drizzle, made with cacao butter and cashews, adds a nice, extra bit of texture to the creamy berry base, but the creamsicles are great on their own as well, in case you dont want to bother with the drizzle. The post A Summer of Ice Cream appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Summer Greek Salad

June 23 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Summer Greek Salad I’m getting over a bad cold that really took me down by surprise, and finding myself craving plates of vegetables and not much else, after having no appetite for a few days. Having a big batch of this summery Greek salad in the refrigerator has been helpful for regaining some strength and vibrance. I’ve been making salads like this one quite a lot these past few hot months, they are can serve as a great fridge clean-out aid, and are just really delicious. I love to order a bowl of good Greek salad when out. Everything about the combination of fluffy lettuce (original Greek salad does not come with lettuce, I’ve learned), juicy tomatoes, crunchy cucumbers, briny olives, a bit of sharpness from onion, and creamy feta is just right. This is my upgraded and loaded summer version of Greek salad, with the addition of protein-rich chickpeas, grilled and raw zucchini, bell peppers, spears of asparagus and green beans, and various herbs. Since I’m wanting to eat plants only while getting over this cold, I opted out of feta cheese, replacing it with savory toasted pine nuts and a sprinkle of nutritional yeast – the vegan answer to cheese. If you haven’t tried nutritional yeast yet, it’s a really neat and nourishing little topping, composed entirely of flakey, deactivated yeast, and with a surprisingly cheesy, nutty flavor. Enjoy :) Summer Greek Salad   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients for the dressing 3 garlic cloves - minced 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1 teaspoon sea salt freshly ground black pepper ¼ cup olive oil for the salad ½ red onion - sliced thinly juice of ½ lemon handful asparagus - tough ends removed handful green beans - strings removed if present 1-2 small to medium zucchini - grilled 2 cups romaine lettuce - torn 1 cup cooked chickpeas 1 small to medium yellow summer squash - shaved w/­­ a vegetable peeler 1 cup cherry tomatoes 1-2 heirloom tomatoes - sliced 1 small English cucumber - sliced 1 red or yellow bell pepper - sliced 1 cup olives ½ cup pine nuts - toasted nutritional yeast - for sprinkling, to taste handful basil leaves - torn handful parsley and dill - finely chopped Instructions to make the dressing Combine all the ingredients in a small jar, whisk until smooth. to make the salad Place red onion in a small bowl, squeeze lemon juice over it, toss to coat and and let marinate while making the salad. Grill, blanch or saute asparagus and green beans until crisp-tender and bright green. Grill the zucchini. Arrange romaine lettuce, chickpeas, yellow squash ribbons, tomatoes, cucumber and bell pepper slices, olives, asparagus, green beans, and grilled zucchini on a large platter. Drain onion slices and scatter them over the salad. Drizzle the dressing over the salad and sprinkle with pine nuts and nutritional yeast. Garnish with fresh herbs. Serve immediately. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Sorghum Pilaf with Roasted Brussels Sprouts, Cranberries and Grapes Beet Mille-Feuille from the La Tartine Gourmande Cookbook Mung Bean Falafel Bowl with Pickled Rainbow Chard Ginger Marinated Tofu with Citrus Salsa .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Summer Greek Salad appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.


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