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Poppyseed Dukkah-Stuffed Baked Apples with Coconut Caramel

November 14 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Poppyseed Dukkah-Stuffed Baked Apples with Coconut Caramel Popping in really quickly today to share the recipe for this holiday table dessert contender – baked apples! These babies are fun to make and on the healthier side as far as desserts go, but still so satisfying and festive. They are taken up to that next level with the pockets of poppyseed dukkah cozied up inside each apple, as well as a crucial drizzle of homemade coconut caramel :D I first had the idea to make sweet dukkah (Egyptian spice and nut/­­seed mix, aka a condiment from heaven) a few years ago, when I wrapped it up in these Sweet Dukkah Cigars (which is another great dessert for coffee or tea time after a holiday meal). I do a mixture of walnuts and hazelnuts, sesame seeds, poppyseeds, aromatic spices, and dates. I especially love the combination of poppyseeds and caramel, so I upped them in this particular sweet dukkah recipe. The result: delicate, warm apples with a pleasant amount of fall-appropriate spice and crunch from the dukkah and delicate sweetness from the mandatory drizzle of coconut caramel. Some vanilla ice cream would be great on the side as well! Hope you enjoy these :) Poppyseed Dukkah-Stuffed Baked Apples with Coconut Caramel   Print Serves: 6 baked apples Ingredients for the baked apples 6 small honeycrisp apples juice from ½ lemon poppyseed dukkah (recipe below) 1½ cup apple cider rosemary, thyme or other aromatic herbs for infusing the cider (optional) olive oil - for drizzling coconut sugar - for sprinkling coconut caramel (recipe linked) for the poppyseed dukkah 1 cup raw hazelnuts or walnuts, or a mix of both ¼ cup sesame seeds 4 tablespoons poppy seeds 3 green cardamom pods - crushed in mortar and pestle, green shells removed ½ teaspoon coriander seeds 1 teaspoon cinnamon ½ teaspoon nutmeg 3 soft dates - pitted and chopped pinch of sea salt Instructions to make the baked apples Preheat oven to 350° F (180° C). Cut the top off each apple (refer to photos) and set aside. Carefully core the apples using a small knife or apple corer and drizzle the lemon juice over them. Generously stuff the apples with dukkah, piling it over the top. Close the apples with the apple tops and transfer the apples into a rimmed baking dish. Pour the apple cider over the apples and add the aromatic herbs to the bottom of the dish, where the cider accumulates, if using. Drizzle the apples with olive oil and sprinkle with coconut sugar. Bake for about 1 hour, until soft throughout, drizzling with the baking liquid every 15 minutes. Take care not to overbake the apples, as they might start coming apart at the seams. Let the apples cool just a bit and serve drizzled with the coconut caramel and sprinkled with more dukkah. A scoop of vanilla ice cream wouldnt hurt either :) to make the poppyseed dukkah Preheat oven to 350° F (180° C). Spread hazelnuts/­­walnuts on a baking sheet and toast for 5 minutes. Add sesame and poppy seeds and continue to toast for another 5 minutes. Remove from the oven. Toast the cardamom and coriander seeds in a pan over medium heat until fragrant, for about a minute or so. Finely grind in a mortar and pestle. Add the hazelnuts/­­walnuts to a bowl of a food processor and pulse a few times. Add the sesame and poppy seeds, cardamom, coriander, cinnamon, nutmeg, dates and salt to the food processor. Pulse to combine to the consistency of coarse bread crumbs. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Raw Green Mountain Parfait Lychee Sorbet and Marinated Rhubarb Compote Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut + Giveaway Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Bites .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Poppyseed Dukkah-Stuffed Baked Apples with Coconut Caramel appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Lentil Pâté

November 10 2018 VegKitchen 

Mystify your family by serving this delicious veggie pâté with lentils. A delicious source of protein for breakfast or dinner, serve them on bread or crackers with a touch of mustard--satisfaction guaranteed! Save Print Lentil Pâté Serves: 2 cups   Ingredients 1 tablespoon of olive oil 1 onion, chopped 2 clove garlic, minced 2 tablespoons of nutritional yeast 1 teaspoon of tamari 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/­­2 teaspoon ground clove 1/­­4 teaspoon ground nutmeg 1 cup dried green lentils, rinsed salt and pepper, to taste 3 cups of vegetable broth chopped fresh parsley, to taste Instructions In a saucepan over medium heat, heat oil and add onion and garlic. Sauté for about 4 minutes or until onion is tender. Add yeast, tamari, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, and lentils. Season to taste, mix well, and cook for about 5 minutes. Add the vegetable broth. Bring to a boil, reduce to low heat, and simmer uncovered for about 25 minutes or until the lentils are tender. Stir regularly while cooking. In a food processor or hand blender, reduce the mixture to a smooth, even purée. Transfer the mixture to an airtight container and allow to cool in the refrigerator for 1 hour. When ready […] The article Lentil Pâté appeared first on VegKitchen.

Cinnamon-Crunch-Stuffed Bundt Cake

November 9 2018 VegKitchen 

Cinnamon-Crunch-Stuffed Bundt Cake Who doesnt love a Bundt cake? In this banana-laced version, the unique flavor of palm sugar makes the cinnamon-spiced pecan filling absolutely crave-worthy. The cinnamon drizzle is optional but highly recommended for gilding this wonderful cake with more sweet cinnamon.  Recipe and photo from Big Vegan: More than 350 Recipes, No Meat/­­No Dairy All Delicious* by Robin Asbell. Serves: 8 1 cup granular palm sugar, palm sugar paste, or Sucanat 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon 1/­­2 cup pecans, chopped 1 1/­­2 cups whole-wheat pastry flour 1/­­2 cup unbleached all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon baking powder 1/­­4 teaspoon salt 3/­­4 cup mashed bananas 3/­­4 cup nondairy milk 1/­­2 cup canola oil 1 tablespoon egg replacer, such as Ener-G Cinnamon Drizzle (optional) 2 tablespoons agave syrup 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cinnamon Preheat the oven to 350°F. Oil a Bundt pan. In a small bowl, combine 1/­­2 cup of the sugar and the cinnamon and stir until well mixed. Stir in the pecans. In a large bowl, combine the flours, baking soda, baking powder, and salt and whisk until well mixed. In a food processor, combine the bananas and remaining 1/­­2 cup/­­100 g sugar and process until smooth. Add the nondairy milk, oil, […] The article Cinnamon-Crunch-Stuffed Bundt Cake appeared first on VegKitchen.

Apples and Cinnamon Chia Pudding

November 7 2018 VegKitchen 

Apples and Cinnamon Chia Pudding The taste of the Chia Seeds is neutral--no particular taste--which makes the recipe possibilities infinite! Chia can also be used to thicken a drink, a smoothie, or a dessert. Here, I propose a kind of chia pudding--very interesting for breakfast or a snack.  Its a raw and healthy recipe with a touch of the season from the apples and cinnamon. Save Print Apples and Cinnamon Chia Pudding Serves: 1-2   Ingredients 1 cup of coconut milk 5 tablespoons chia seeds 1 cup apples, diced Juice and grated rind of a lemon 1 tablespoon agave syrup 1 teaspoon cinnamon Instructions The day before, mix the chia seeds, coconut milk, agave syrup, and lemon juice in a container. Cover the container and store in the refrigerator. The next day, peel and cut apples into small cubes. Cook the apples with 1/­­4 cup water for 10 minutes, until you obtain a sauce. Add chia-coconut milk preparation to a small container. Place the apples sauce on top of the mixture. Sprinkle with cinnamon and grated lemon zest. 3.3.3077   The article Apples and Cinnamon Chia Pudding appeared first on VegKitchen.

Pineapple Rice Pudding

October 26 2018 VegKitchen 

Pineapple Rice Pudding Kids of all ages can enjoy this updated comfort food -- rice pudding --as a snack or dessert, or even as an offbeat lunch box offering, packed in a thermos. This version is made with brown rice, almond milk, and for extra fruity flavor, crushed pineapple. Serves: 4 to 6 3/­­4 cup short- or medium- grain brown rice  3/­­4 cup vanilla almond milk 1/­­2 cup dark or golden raisins 1/­­4 cup maple syrup 1 cup well-drained crushed pineapple 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/­­2 teaspoon cinnamon, plus more for topping Pinch of nutmeg Combine the rice with 2 1/­­2 cups water in a medium saucepan. Bring to a simmer, then cover and simmer gently until the water is absorbed, about 30 minutes. When done, stir in the almond milk, and simmer until absorbed.  Remove from the heat and allow to cool for 5 minutes, then stir in the remaining ingredients.  Divide the rice pudding among 4 serving dishes. Sprinkle each with a little extra cinnamon and serve warm or at room temperature. Nutrition information: Calories: 247;  Total fat: 3g;  Protein: 3g;  Fiber: 2.6g;  Carbs: 53g; Sodium: 29mg The post Pineapple Rice Pudding appeared first on VegKitchen.

Chilled Berry Soup

October 8 2018 VegKitchen 

Chilled Berry Soup This chilled berry soup is a fruit-filled way to celebrate mid-summer berry season, with blueberries, strawberries, and raspberries. Substitute other berries, like blackberries, if you’d like. This may be used as an appetizer, or as a refreshing finish to a summer meal. Serves: 6 1 pint blueberries 1 pint strawberries, hulled and coarsely chopped 1 cup raspberries 2 medium peaches or nectarines, chopped 4 cups raspberry or cranberry juice 1/­­3 cup dry red or white wine Juice of 1/­­2 lemon Good pinch of cinnamon 1/­­4 teaspoon each: ground allspice, nutmeg Maple syrup or agave nectar, optional, if needed Sliced strawberries for garnish Vegan Sour Cream or Cashew Cream for garnish, optional Combine all the ingredients except the last three in a large soup pot. Bring to a rapid simmer. Lower the heat, then cover and simmer gently for 10 to 15 minutes, or until the fruit is tender. Taste to see whether a bit more sweetness is needed, and add maple syrup or agave accordingly--depending on the sweetness of the fruit and the fruit juice, you may not wish to add additional sweetness, or very little. Allow the soup to cool, then chill thoroughly. Garnish each serving with a few slices […] The post Chilled Berry Soup appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegan Cinnamon Roll Cookies – Oilfree

September 24 2018 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Cinnamon Roll Cookies – OilfreeVegan Cinnamon Roll Cookies. Shhortbread like cookie dough dusted with cinnamon sugar, rolled, sliced and baked for cinnamon roll bites. Refined Oil-free Vegan Recipe.  Cinnamon Rolls, but in a cookie form with shortbread dough, rolled up with cinnamon sugar filling = Addictive!   These cinnamony bites are a perfect treat for fall or the holidays. No added oil in these cookies! The nut butter and nut flour makes them a sturdy shortbread like cookie, which is crisp and soft with a cinnamon sugar filling. Add an icing if you like. Change up the spice to pumpkin pie spice. These cookies are Easy, delicious and a favorite of everyone.  Continue reading: Vegan Cinnamon Roll Cookies – OilfreeThe post Vegan Cinnamon Roll Cookies – Oilfree appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Blueberry and Banana Muffins

September 19 2018 Oh My Veggies 

These muffins will bring happiness to the young and old. When I first tasted it, I was reminded of the muffins that my grandmother cooked for me when I was little. Personally, I like it a lot when my muffins are golden brown; it gives a really delicious taste. Prep Time: 20 minutes Cooking: 25 minutes Total: 45 minutes Servings: 15 muffins Ingredients 2 cups whole wheat flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda 1/­­2 teaspoon salt 1/­­4 teaspoon cinnamon 4 bananas peeled and pounded 3/­­4 cups brown sugar 1/­­4 cup melted coconut oil 1/­­2 cup milk 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 1 cup blueberries Preparation Mix the first 5 ingredients in a bowl and the other ingredients in another bowl. Mix the dry ingredients gently with the wet ingredients, and mix until combined. Gently add the blueberries. Fill the muffin cups up to 3/­­4 of the mold. Bake at 350° F until a toothpick comes out clean--about 25 minutes.

Vegan Cardamom Cookies – Cardamom Snickerdoodles

September 4 2018 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Cardamom Cookies – Cardamom SnickerdoodlesEasy Vegan Cardamom Cookies. These soft cookies are a cross between cardamom shortbread and Snickerdoodles. Vegan Soyfree Palm Oil free Recipe. Glutenfree option.   Jump to Recipe If you love cardamom, you will love these cookies! Soft, melt in your mouth cookies that remind you of shortbread, snickerdoodle, and Indian Desserts, all rolled into one.  I use seeds from whole green cardamom pods and ground cardamom for extra flavor punch. The nut butter and almond flour add the texture. The cookie is easily refined sugar free and is palm oil free. Change up the spices to cinnamon, chai, pumpkin pie spice for variation.  Continue reading: Vegan Cardamom Cookies – Cardamom SnickerdoodlesThe post Vegan Cardamom Cookies – Cardamom Snickerdoodles appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Green Pancakes - Three Ways

May 10 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Pancakes - Three Ways We love green pancakes (aka spinach cr?pes) in our family and are constantly exploring more ways to incorporate them into various meals. We have got lots of examples and ideas in our cookbooks but here are three new favorites: 1. Add mustard, lentils, sliced tomato and cheese to you pancakes. Fold them up, bake them quickly until the cheese melts and serve with a fresh lentil and melon salad. 2. Fill them with sweet potato, spinach, feta, yogurt and zaatar. Then roll them up and slice them into picnic rolls. 3. Make a banana split pancake bowl with some whipped cream, yogurt, raspberries, nut butter and chocolate. We are sharing all of these recipes below. You can either make the pancakes from scratch or use fridge cold leftover pancakes for these recipes. They are not vegan but if you use our vegan chickpea pancakes as base, you can easily modify the fillings to suit a vegan diet. Hummus, pesto, ajvar or coconut yogurt are excellent creamy toppings on vegan pancakes instead of yogurt and cheese. The recipe for the batter comes from our Green Kitchen at Home cookbook and we have included it in the bottom of this post. They are the most easy flippable gluten free pancakes we know. Pancakes work as a quick dinner in our family as the batter literally takes 30 seconds to mix together so we can have the first pancakes on the table within 5 minutes (admittedly I don’t always let the batter rest even if I recommend it). Gruyere, Mustard & Lentil Pancake Melt Serves 4 as a lunch This is the pancake equivalent to melted cheese sandwiches. It’s a great way to give old pancakes new life. We love it with lots of mustard (obviously use less for kids) and a crunchy salad for balance. 4 green pancakes (see recipe below) 8 slices gruyere cheese (or another cheese) 4 large teaspoons mustard 8 cherry tomatoes 200 g /­­ 1 cup cooked lentils (store bought are fine) 1 bag mixed lettuce 1 avocado 1 galia melon (or other melon) 10 cm /­­ 4 inches cucumber olive oil balsamic vinegar salt & pepper Make the batter and fry the pancakes if you haven’t done so already. Place two slices cheese in the middle of each pancake. Spread a layer of mustard on the cheese, slice the tomatoes thinly and lay them on top of the mustard along with a small handful lentils. Fold the pancakes into quarters and place in a baking dish with a drizzle of olive oil on top. Bake at 200°C/­­400°F for 10-12 minutes or until the cheese has melted. Meanwhile, chop up lettuce, avocado, melon and cucumber and place in a salad bowl. Add the remaining lentils. Drizzle with olive oil, balsamic vinegar, salt and pepper and toss. Serve the pancake warm with salad on the side. Sweet Potato & Za’atar Pancake Picnic Rolls Makes 20 rolls You can use almost any veggies in pancake rolls. Just make sure you have something creamy and sticky as base to bind them together. For a vegan version, use hummus instead of yogurt and tofu instead of feta cheese and sprinkle with nutritional yeast. Next time, we’ll add some crushed walnuts for crunch, pomegranate seeds for extra tanginess and maybe a couple of mint leaves for a fresh flavor twist. 4 green pancakes (see recipe below) 1 large sweet potato cinnamon 1 tbsp lemon juice 1 cup full-fat Turkish yogurt 200 g feta cheese 2 handfuls spinach, chopped 1 cup cooked chickpeas 2 tbsp za’atar (an awesome spice blend that you can find in Middle Eastern stores) 2 tsp chili flakes (optional) Set the oven at 200°C/­­400°F. Cut a sweet potato in half lengthwise, brush each cut side with a little oil and cinnamon. Place on a tray and bake for 40 minutes or until the flesh is soft and golden. If you haven’t prepared the batter and fried the pancakes, now is the time to do so. When the sweet potato is ready, use a fork to mash the flesh (you can mash it in its own skin to save some dishes). Squeeze over lemon juice and extra cinnamon while mashing. Spread out sweet potato mash on one half of each pancake and thick yogurt on the other half. Cut the feta cheese into 1 cm /­­ 1/­­3 inch thick sticks and place them in the centre of each pancake. Add a small handful chopped spinach, a couple of chickpeas, a generous drizzle za’atar and some chili flakes (if using). Roll up the pancakes as tightly as possible and slice into 2 inch /­­ 5 cm rolls. Sweet Pancake Banana Split Serves 4 4 green pancakes (see recipe below) 1 cup whipped cream 1 cup greek yogurt 4 bananas 1 cup raspberries 4 tbsp nut butter 4 tsp honey 30 g /­­ 1 oz dark chocolate 1 handful hemp seeds or slivered almonds Place each pancake in the bottom of a small bowl. Add dollops of whipped cream and yogurt. Cut the bananas into bite-sized pieces and spread out in the bowl. Add raspberries and drizzle with peanut butter and honey. Sprinkle with finely chopped dark chocolate, hemp seeds and top with a few mint leaves. Spinach Cr?pes (in our house they are know as Green Pancakes) Makes 10-14, depending on the size of your pan and thickness of your pancakes 5 eggs 150 g /­­ 1 cup rice flour (both light or wholegrain works, as does spelt flour) 500 ml /­­ 2 cups oat milk, or milk of choice a large handful spinach a small handful herbs (basil, mint or parsley) sea salt Crack the eggs into a blender or food processor. Add the rest of the ingredients and blend on high speed until smooth. Leave to rest for 20 minutes before starting to fry them (you can fry them right away but they will be a little harder to flip). For frying, add a little butter or coconut oil to a 20 cm /­­ 8 inch non-stick frying pan/­­skillet on medium heat. Once hot (this is important or else it will stick), whisk the batter then ladle 80 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup into the pan. Let fry for 1-2 minutes or until small bubbles form on the surface and the base is golden. Run a spatula around the edges to make sure it has detached from the pan, before carefully flipping it over and frying the other side for another minute. Transfer to a plate and repeat with the rest of the batter (you may need to reduce the heat slightly after the first cr?pes). To store the cr?pes, keep them in an air-tight wrap in the fridge and they will be good for 3-4 days.

Wagon Wheel Cake

April 12 2018 Vegan Dad 

Wagon Wheel Cake This cake is insane. Its massive, probably too sweet, has 5 separate elements, and is totally awesome!  Of course, my health conscious mother never bought us Wagon Wheels when my brothers and I were young, and oh, how we jealously pined for them when other kids brought them to school for lunch! When Vegan Mom and I were dating (and not yet vegan) in university, we used to keep ourselves motivated to study through the positive reinforcement of Viva Puffs. This cake evokes all of those memories, and is simply a lot of fun to make and eat.  INGREDIENTS - about 1 1/­­2 cups raspberry jelly Cake INGREDIENTS - 227g all purpose flour - 65g cocoa - 1 1/­­2 tsp baking soda - 3/­­4 tsp baking powder - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1 1/­­4 cup soy milk - 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar - 1/­­4 cup water - 1 cup sugar - 1/­­2 cup canola oil - 1 tbsp vanilla METHOD Preheat oven to 350 degrees 1. Grease two 10 inch round cake pans.  Cut out two circles of parchment paper to fit in the bottom of the pans.  Put the parchment papers in the bottom of the pans and grease it.  Flour both pans. 2. Sift flour, cocoa, baking powder, baking soda, and salt into a bowl.  In a separate bowl, whisk chocolate soy milk and vinegar together.  Add remaining ingredients and whisk well to blend. 3. Add dry ingredients and gently whisk until blended.  Dont overdo it. 4. Divide batter evenly between the two pans. 5. Bake for 22-24 mins, or until a toothpick comes out clean. 6. Cool on wire racks for 10 mins, then flip the pans over the remove the cake.  Remove the parchment paper.  Let them fully cool. Graham Cookie Layer INGREDIENTS - 3/­­4 cup all purpose flour - 3/­­4 cup whole wheat flour - 2 tbsp dark brown sugar - 1/­­8 tsp salt - 1/­­2 tsp cinnamon - 1/­­2 tsp baking powder - 1/­­4 cup vegetable shortening - 1/­­4 cup maple syrup - 2 tbsp soy milk METHOD 1. Mix together dry ingredients. Cut in vegetable shortening with a pastry cutter to the size of small peas.  2. Add syrup and soy milk and bring together into a ball. Add a tiny splash more soy milk if needed. 3. Divide dough into two equal pieces. Roll and trim each into a 10 circle on a piece of parchment paper, using the cake pan as a guide. Dont worry, you can trim it more after it is baked.  4. Place each piece of parchment/­­dough circle on a baking sheet. Place in the fridge to cool for 30 mins. 5. Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Bake one the middle and upper rack for 10 mins, rotating and switching the racks after 5 mins. Cookies should dry on the top and only very, very lightly brown. Do not over bake. 6. Remove from pans (parchment and all) to a cooling rack. When cooled, trim as needed with a small sharp knife using the cake pan as a guide.  Marshmallow (from Plantified) INGREDIENTS - 3/­­4 cup salt free aquafaba - 1/­­2 tsp xanthan gum - 1 tbsp vanilla extract - 1 1/­­2 cups sugar - 2 tsp agar powder - 2 tbsp glucose syrup - 1/­­3 cup water METHOD 1. In a large bowl, whisk aquafaba and xanthan gum to stiff peaks with a hand mixer. Whisk in vanilla. Set aside. 2. Bring the sugar, agar, glucose, and water to boiling in a small saucepan over medium heat. Bring to 250 F, stirring regularly/­­constantly to keep the mixture from sticking to the bottom of the pan. Be patient. The sugar will quickly jump in temperature, plateau, then rise again. Resist cranking the heat to hurry the process along. 3. Slowly stream the hot sugar mixture into the aquafaba, constantly whipping it in with the hand mixer. When the sugar mixture is fully incorporated, keep whipping the mixture until it returns to room temperature (more or less--the bottom of the bowl should not feel warm). You can do all this with a stand mixer, but I find that the sugar mixture likes to get caught up around the top of the beater, so using a hand mixer is better).  Ganache INGREDIENTS - 1/­­2 cup light coconut milk - 200g bittersweet vegan chocolate chips - 2 tbsp margarine METHOD 1. Heat coconut milk to bubbling in a small saucepan over medium heat.  2. Remove from heat and add chocolate chips and margarine.  Stir until everything is melted and smooth.  Set aside to cool completely.  TO MAKE THE CAKE! 1. Bake and cool the cake. Level the top of the cake, if necessary (i.e. make sure it is flat and not domed).  2. Bake and cool the graham cookie layer. Trim to fit on top of the cake (you can do this while the cookie is still slightly warm if you want).  3. Place one of the cake layers on a serving platter. Spread 3/­­4 cup of raspberry jelly on top. Place one of the graham cookies on top of the jam.  4. Repeat step 3 with the remaining cake, jelly, and graham cookie, and set aside. 5. Make the marshmallow. The marshmallow will set fairly quickly, so be prepared. Spread 7/­­8 of the marshmallow on top of the cake/­­jam/­­cookie layer in your serving platter. Put the second cake/­­jam/­­cookie layer on top of the marshmallow (making sure the cookie side is down and the cake layer on top). Gently press down and use an icing spatula to smooth the sides. Use the remaining 1/­­8 of the marshmallow to aid in this endeavour.  6. Let the marshmallow fully set. I like to put the cake in a cool place for this step because it makes the ganache step easier. 7. Make the ganache and let cool to room temperature. 8. Spread a thin layer of ganache over the entire cake, like you would a crumb coat of butter cream. Set aside in a cool place (the fridge) to set. 9. Use the remaining ganache to cover the cake. Set aside in a cool place to set.

Sweet Potato Sandwiches

February 9 2018 My New Roots 

Sweet Potato Sandwiches Necessity is the mother of invention, and when youre missing all of your kitchen equipment, you get creative. Weve been living out of a single suitcase for some months now, and although I have found a couple of major necessities in the mountain of unpacked moving boxes, I havent been able to locate my silicon loaf pan. As someone who makes the Life Changing Loaf of Bread on the reg, its been a challenge living without, but a stellar opportunity to come up with bread alternatives that dont involve a lot of ingredients or special equipment. As I was chopping up some sweet potato for a soup a couple of weeks ago, it dawned on me: what if I cut the sweet potato the other way and turned it into a slice of bread?! It was just crazy enough to work. And it did. Ever since then, Ive been roasting sweet potato slices once a week, keeping them in my fridge and having a sandwich-like-thing when the mood strikes. Its delicious! Not to mention wildly satisfying and so easy to make. Ive experimented with different herbs and spices on the sweet potatoes, using special salts, and even drizzling with flavoured oils once theyre out of the oven. So far, Im digging smoked salt and garlic powder, but the cinnamon, ginger, and cardamom combo was a close second at breakfast, smeared with chunky hazelnut butter.    The spread Ive come up with as a pairing to this sandwich sitch, is a horseradish and beetroot schmear. Partly because I like saying the word schmear, but mostly because its incredible in combination with the sweet potatoes. Its earthy, spicy, and complex - a great counterpoint to the sweetness of the spuds. I also like the texture difference: the sweet potatoes are so smooth and creamy, while the beet schmear is chunky and toothsome. If youve never had fresh horseradish before, be prepared to be blown away! This stuff is so, so special and delicious, I have no idea why its such an under-utilized root veggie. A part of the Brassicaceae family, horseradish shares ties with mustard, broccoli, cabbage, and wasabi. In fact, most commercially-available wasabi is made of horseradish (along with mustard, starch, and green food dye) since wasabi is challenging to grow and therefore much more expensive. But that familiar and addictive rush of sinus-clearing pleasure-pain? Thats the action of isothiocyanate, the compound found in wasabi, horseradish, and strong mustard that gives off heat when crushed, grated, or chewed. This stuff tends to mellow out once it hits the air, which is why horseradish snobs (they exist!) insist on grating it fresh. In the case of my schmear here, it will still taste delish a day or two after youve made it, but you may want to grate a little fresh over the top for a boost. Its the best way to clear out those nasal cavities this side of a neti pot! Horseradish has been used as powerful winter medicine for hundreds of years. Widely recognized for its expectorant capabilities, it is incredibly effective at removing mucus, and aiding with bronchial and lung disorders. Horseradish is a good source of vitamin C and zinc, two key players in immune system support, so consuming it in the colder months will help ward off the seasonal bugs flying around. For sore throats and coughs, combine one tablespoon of freshly grated horseradish with one teaspoon of raw honey, and one teaspoon of ground clove to some warm water. Sip the brew slowly, or use it as a gargle. This is more of a concept than a recipe, and a chance to try out sweet potatoes in a new way. Cut them as thick or as thin as you like. Mine are around 1cm, but that is just my personal preference. Remember that the slices will definitely shrink a bit during cooking, so slice them a tad thicker than you would want the finished roasted slice to be. You can even make shapes with a cookie cutter – great for kids lunches! Let your imagine run with this one, and keep me posted on which spreads and seasonings youre vibing on.     Print recipe     Sweet Potato Sandwiches Makes 6-8 sandwiches 2-3 fat, stubby sweet potatoes (organic if possible) coconut oil for rubbing (optional) salt and pepper + other spices or herbs 1 batch Horseradish Beet Schmear (recipe below) sliced fresh veggies: bell peppers, cucumber, avocado, sprouts, grated carrot etc. Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 375°F /­­ 190°C. 2. Wash and scrub sweet potatoes well, then slice lengthwise into 1 cm-thick slabs (approximately .4 inches). Place on a baking sheet and rub with coconut oil if using, and sprinkle with salt and pepper, plus any other spices or herbs youd like. 3. Place in the oven and bake until tender, about 20-25 minutes. Remove from oven and use immediately or store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for up to five days. 4. To assemble, spread one slice of sweet potato with the Horseradish Beet Schmear. Top with your favourite sliced veggies, sprouts, salt and pepper and another slice of sweet potato. You can also add mustard, vegan mayo, or any other condiment that you like. Enjoy! Horseradish Beet Schmear Makes 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 1 lb. /­­ 500g beets (about 4-5 small) coconut oil for rubbing 1 small clove garlic 3 Tbsp. freshly grated horseradish, or more to taste 3 Tbsp. tahini 3 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt, to taste 1/­­4 tsp. freshly cracked black pepper Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Rub beets with a little coconut oil, set on a baking try, and place in the oven. Roast for 20-30 minutes until you can easily pierce the beets with a sharp knife tip. 2. Remove baking tray and let cool until you can handle them. Slide off the skins, or use a vegetable peeler. Roughly chop the beets and set aside. 3. In a food processor, pulse garlic until minced. Add horseradish, tahini, lemon juice, olive oil, salt and pepper, then blend on high to combine. Add the chopped beets and pulse to chop. Blend as much or as little as you like – I like my spread a bit chunky. Taste and adjust seasoning as necessary. Some may like more horseradish - go for it! Remember that the bite will mellow out when its mixed with everything in the sandwich. 4. Use immediately, and store any leftovers in a tightly sealed container in the fridge for up to five days. Although the past few months of life limbo have been pretty frustrating, there are so many exciting things on the horizon that I cannot wait to share with you! First, my family and I are getting closer and closer to our new move-in date (you can watch house renovation updates on my Instagram Stories). Second, Im heading to Palm Springs for an EPIC bloggers retreat organized by my friend Sasha Swerdloff at the end of this month. And Im finishing up details on a sweet collaboration with one of my favourite juice bars in Toronto, that we will launch with a free public event! Stay tuned for more details on all the things. Love you guys. Now go have a sandwich, Sarah B   The post Sweet Potato Sandwiches appeared first on My New Roots.

Power Ball Energy Bites

January 9 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Power Ball Energy Bites Ideal for on-the-go breakfasts or between meal snacks, these tasty little no-bake energy bites pack a nutritious punch of protein, potassium, and other nutrients. If you dont have protein powder for this recipe, you can just leave it out. If the texture is too moist, add a bit more oats or walnuts to the mixture. Power Ball Energy Bites Ideal for on-the-go breakfasts or between meal snacks, these tasty little no-bake energy bites pack a nutritious punch of protein, potassium, and other nutrients. - 3/­­4 cup old-fashioned oats - 1/­­2 cup toasted walnuts - 2 tablespoons vegan protein powder (I use Sun Warrior vanilla) - 2 tbsp cocoa powder - 1 teaspoon cinnamon - 1 ripe banana, cut into chunks - 2 tablespoons almond butter - 1/­­4 cup maple syrup - 1/­­2 cup dried cranberries - 2 tablespoons ground flaxseeds - 1 cup shredded toasted coconut, ground - In a food processor, combine oats, walnuts, protein powder, cocoa powder, and cinnamon. Pulse until well mixed. Add the banana, almond butter, and maple syrup. Pulse until combined. Add the cranberries and flaxseeds, and pulse until combined. - Shape the mixture into 1-inch balls. If the balls are too soft, refrigerate or freeze them for an hour. Roll the balls in the ground coconut. - Transfer to a platter and refrigerate until firm, about 1 hour. Store tightly covered in the refrigerator. From The Nut Butter Cookbook by Robin Robertson. (C)2014 Robin Robertson. Used by permission from Vegan Heritage Press. Photo by Zsu Dever.      The post Power Ball Energy Bites appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Homemade Hot Chocolate

January 1 2018 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Homemade Hot Chocolate Hot Chocolate is a wintertime staple at my house. My grand-kids love it. It makes the whole kitchen smell wonderful. I enjoy making this with my grand-kids. This rich and creamy hot chocolate is easy to make, and it is delicious. - 4 cup whole milk - 3 Tbsp coco powder - 3 Tbsp semisweet chocolate (finely chopped) - 4 Tbsp sugar - 1/­­2 tsp cinnamon powder - Pinch of salt - Sweetened whipped cream (for serving) - Bring milk to a simmer in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Whisk in cocoa powder until no lumps remain, add sugar and chocolate and cook, whisking frequently, until mixture is smooth and creamy and chocolate is melted, about 5 minutes. - Divide hot chocolate among mugs. Top with whipped cream. The post Homemade Hot Chocolate appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Vegan Baked Apple Cider Donuts

November 2 2018 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Baked Apple Cider DonutsBaked Apple Cider Donuts. These Cider donuts have amazing spiced flavor with concentrated cider. Perfect for fall. Vegan Soyfree Recipe. Nutfree Refined Sugar-Free Oilfree Glutenfree option  Jump to Recipe   These Apple Cider Donuts are perfect for fall or any time of the year for that matter. The key to all the fall flavor is reducing the cider! Apple Cider gets cooked for a bit to concentrate all that amazing flavor of apples and spices. Concentrated cider, flour, more spices all baked into a flavorful spiced donut! Toss in cinnamon sugar or drizzle icing of choice. These will be a hit with everyone. 15 mins of Active time, no refined sugar! The donut batter does not use yeast, so it can also be baked into regular size muffins or mini muffins as well. Add some finely chopped apples to the batter, top with a streusel and they are ready for to go breakfast. Lets make these! Continue reading: Vegan Baked Apple Cider DonutsThe post Vegan Baked Apple Cider Donuts appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegan Gluten free Pumpkin Bars – Grainfree

October 24 2018 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Gluten free Pumpkin Bars – GrainfreeThese Vegan Gluten-free Pumpkin Bars are grain-free, fudgy and so Delicious! No Oil. Cinnamon streusel on top makes them decadent and festive. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Grain-free Recipe.   Jump to Recipe   These Pumpkin Bars are all things fall. Loaded with pumpkin, pumpkin pie spices, are fudgy, moist and great to snack on or for dessert. These are like pumpkin pie bars but with a bit of volume and texture. Smooth, hearty and So Fudgy! Pumpkin puree and maple mixed with almond flour and coconut flour and topped with an easy cinnamon streusel. No flour in these bars. They are grain and gluten free, have no added oil and can be made without refined sugar. Wondering how all that works out? make them to know!Continue reading: Vegan Gluten free Pumpkin Bars – GrainfreeThe post Vegan Gluten free Pumpkin Bars – Grainfree appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegan Pumpkin Pie Truffles

October 4 2018 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Pumpkin Pie TrufflesVegan Pumpkin Pie Truffles or No Bake Pumpkin Donut Holes. 7 Ingredient No oil, No Refined Sugar. These fudgy bites are perfect for fall. Vegan Glutenfree Soyfree Recipe  Jump to Recipe Fudgy Bites, that taste like Pumpkin Pie in a fudge form! hell yes! 7 Ingredients, No Bake, No oil, No Refined Sugar! And ready in 15 mins. It cannot get easier and tastier than this! Pumpkin puree gets heated with maple syrup to thicken slightly, then mixed with almond and coconut flours, as much pumpkin pie spice as you like, then rolled in a mix of cinnamon and coconut sugar. Bliss. Make a double batch! You can also make your own pumpkin pie spice, or use store bought or use just cinnamon, or other spice blends like chai.Continue reading: Vegan Pumpkin Pie TrufflesThe post Vegan Pumpkin Pie Truffles appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Chana with Sweet Potatoes

September 24 2018 Meatless Monday 

One of Indias most popular dishes -- Chana Masala -- features chickpeas simmered with tomatoes. This recipe features sweet potatoes and greens to make the dish even more interesting and satisfying. This recipe comes to us from Oldways. Serves 4   - 1/­­2 large onion, chopped as you like - 1 tablespoon vegetable oil of your choice - 1 teaspoon cumin - 1/­­2 teaspoon cinnamon - 1/­­2 teaspoon turmeric - 1/­­2 teaspoon coriander - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cloves - 1/­­4 teaspoon red pepper flakes - 1-2 cloves garlic, minced - 1 tablespoon freshly grated ginger - 1 (15 oz) can chickpeas, drained and rinsed - 1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes - 2 small or 1 large sweet potato, cut in chunks - 1/­­2 (15 oz) can light coconut milk or 1/­­4 can of regular coconut milk - 1 cup chopped spinach or other greens   Heat the oil in a large skillet, and cook the onion 4-5 minutes until soft and slightly golden. Add the dry spices. Amounts dont need to be exact; start with these amounts, and adjust to your taste later. Add the garlic and ginger then continue cooking gently for ten minutes to allow the flavors of all the spices to marry with the onions. Now add the tomatoes, chickpeas, sweet potatoes (cut large or small, depending on how you like them) and coconut milk. Bring to a boil, cover, and simmer on low for 45 minutes. The potatoes will soften sooner than that, but keep cooking to develop the flavors. Just before youre ready to serve, add the chopped greens and cook for a few minutes until the greens are wilted. Add salt to taste, and serve with brown rice or some other grain, or with some whole wheat naan. Active time: 1 hour The post Chana with Sweet Potatoes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Blackberry and Currant Clafoutis

September 14 2018 My New Roots 

Blackberry and Currant Clafoutis The first time I heard the word, I knew I would love it. Clafoutis. Clah. Foo. Tee. It felt so good just to say it, like a laughing cloud floating off my tongue, I was certain it would taste even better. I was right. Clafoutis is a classic French dessert; a custard tart of sorts but without a crust. It is traditionally made with flour, milk, sugar, and eggs, and a fruit, the most popular being black cherries. Arranged in a buttered dish, the fruit is bathed in rich batter and baked, then served lukewarm with a dusting of powdered sugar and sometimes cream. The concept is brilliantly simple and I knew that with a few adjustments, the clafoutis of my dreams could become a reality. For my first cookbook, I took the plunge and came up with an easy, grain-free and dairy-free foolproof recipe that I can honestly say I make more than any other dessert in my repertoire. I always have the batter ingredients on hand, and I always have seasonal fruit, so when I need something sweet on short notice, this dish often makes a delicious appearance. The only teeny issue with my original version, is that it required a food processor to blend up toasted almond flour. When I set out to make a clafoutis a couple weeks ago, we were living pretty simply at the family cottage in Denmark without any kitchen equipment to speak of, and I was left scratching my head. I knew I could simplify the calfoutis even more, so I endeavoured to make it an equipment-free recipe, and edited a couple of steps so that there wasnt even a bowl to wash. Instead of roasting the almonds in the oven, I purchased almond flour, then toasted it in a large skillet over medium heat until golden brown. Then, once the pan had been removed from the heat and cooled a bit, I mixed the remaining ingredients right there in the skillet! The last step was to simply pour the batter into the prepared baking dish with the fruit, and place it in the oven. So easy! The final results were just as good - if not better - than the more complicated version of the recipe. Since blackberries and red currants were absolutely dripping from the bushes around the island, I knew that these two berries, as untraditional as they were, would be delicious in this context. The sweet batter in contrast against the sour-tart, juicy jewels worked so perfectly. Some notes on the recipe: the reason that I measure the fruit out by volume may seem unusual, but its because the physical space that the fruit takes up in the clafoutis is more important than the weight of it. The goal is to fill the bottom almost entirely with few gaps, so that every bite contains tons of juicy fruit pieces.  You are welcome to use any fruit that is available to you, with the exception of anything with a very high water content - melon, citrus, and pineapple make the tart too soggy. I love rhubarb in the spring, cherries in the early summer, stone fruits in the late summer, and figs in the autumn. You can also add spices to the batter, such as cinnamon and cardamom, and even dried fruit like raisins, cranberries, apricots, figs or dates. I have not tried making a clafoutis without eggs. The vegan versions Ive seen online rely on either tofu or aqufaba for body and binding, and Im not overly enthusiastic about either one of those ingredients. Plus, I really love eggs. It may be groovy to try with a coconut milk + chia + arrowroot combo, but I cannot reliably say it would work since Ive never tried it before - this is just a hunch!     Print recipe     Blackberry and Currant Clafoutis Serves 6-8 Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 100g almond flour 3 large organic, free-range eggs 3/­­4 cup /­­ 100g coconut sugar 1 vanilla bean, seeds scraped or 1 tsp. vanilla extract 1 cup /­­ 250ml full-fat coconut milk 1/­­4 tsp. flaky sea salt 4 cups /­­ 1 litre fresh blackberries and currants coconut oil for greasing coconut yogurt or other cool, creamy thing to serve with (optional) Directions: - In a large skillet over medium heat, toast the almond flour, stirring often until golden. Remove pan from stove and let cool. - While the almond flour is cooling, preheat the oven to 350°F /­­ 180°C. Wash the fruit and remove any stems or debris. Rub just a little coconut oil on the bottoms of a 9 /­­ 23cm tart pan or any ovenproof dish. Scatter the fruit in the pan. - Crack eggs into a small bowl and whisk well. - To the skillet with the almond flour, add the eggs, coconut sugar, vanilla, coconut milk and salt and stir until smooth and fully combined. - Pour the batter mixture over the fruits and bake for 45 minutes on the middle rack until risen slightly and golden brown. Serve warm with a dollop of coconut yogurt and more fresh fruit, if desired. Store leftovers in the fridge for up to four days.   I’m sure you’ve noticed that look of the blog has changed a little bit. I felt that it was time for a freshen up, and I hope you take a moment to visit my homepage and have a look around. And for this first post since the redesign, I decided to make a small photo essay to convey the gorgeousness of our village on Bornholm. Bornholm is a small, Danish island in the Baltic sea off the southern tip of Sweden. My husbands family have a cottage there, in an old fish smokery right on the ocean. The light on the island is particularly special, the colour of the sea an unique shade of blue, and the air is soaked with the scent of rose hips, sun-baked rocks, salt water, and elderflower. Its one of my favourite places on earth, and I always leave feeling so inspired, and connected to nature. I hope you enjoy.     *   *   *   *   *   *   Something exciting on the way! Hi friends! I have some very exciting news to share…we are releasing the first official My New Roots Subscription Box! Each box will be filled with ingredients to make one of my vegan and gluten-free recipes, a beautifully designed recipe card, and a few products Ive personally selected that will compliment your cooking experience. And everything about this box – from the packaged products inside right down to the packing tape – was scrupulously selected and designed to have as little environmental impact as possible. Subscriptions will officially open up Friday Oct 5th. Since we only have a limited supply of boxes available, I want to give you the chance to be notified when we launch before I make the announcement across my social platforms. To stay in the loop, visit the this link and enter your email. Everyone who provides their email will also be entered for a chance to receive their first My New Roots box free of charge! 3 emails will be selected from the list at random. Weve been working on this project for a long time and Im so thrilled that its almost here! Thank you in advance for your support and ongoing love for all things MNR. xo, Sarah B   The post Blackberry and Currant Clafoutis appeared first on My New Roots.

Blueberry Applesauce Cake Bars

June 26 2018 FatFree Vegan Kitchen  

Blueberry Applesauce Cake Bars The first time I described picking blueberries, I wrote, “Theres something peaceful about picking blueberries, even when you have to stand on a ladder to do it.” I went on to post the recipe for a Chocolate-Blueberry Cake that was pretty amazing, but some of the people who commented were more curious about the ladder than the cake. I even received an email informing me that blueberries grow on bushes, not trees, so obviously my story of using a ladder must have been made up. So this time, I made sure to take photos of the picking process, not just the picked berries:(...) Read the rest of Blueberry Applesauce Cake Bars (570 words) (C) svoisin for FatFree Vegan Kitchen, 2018. | Permalink | 25 comments Post tags: Cakes, Soy-free, Under 200, Weight Watchers Points The post Blueberry Applesauce Cake Bars appeared first on FatFree Vegan Kitchen.

Adaptogenic Date Shake

May 3 2018 My New Roots 

Adaptogenic Date Shake Each year, my now friend Sasha Swerdloff of Tending the Table genius organizes a trip for women in the food world (bloggers, cookbook authors, chefs, nutritionists, photographers etc.) to get together, hang out, share delicious food, and get to know each other beyond a screen (...see? Genius!) This year I actually got to attend - ok truth: I shamelessly invited myself because I wanted to meet this talented troupe of ladies IRL. The group decided to gather in Palm Springs, much to my delight as I needed to escape two kinds of hell: overdue home renovations and Ontario in February. The days were magically sunny, delicious, and life-affirming. We cooked a lot, then let our food get cold taking too many photos of it. We swam, we hiked, we yoga-ed, we laughed, and conspired together. Besides all of the heart-warming togetherness, one of the highlights for me, was visiting a date farm just outside the city limits, to understand where our favourite whole food sweetener comes from (and to gorge ourselves, naturally). I had never seen dates on a tree before, and was moved to learn from the passionate farmer himself just how these sweet miracles grow. Dates grow on palm trees, and they fastidiously follow the calendar – you can practically set your watch to a date palms seasonal cycle. The first day of spring the tree is in full bloom and the hard work begins, as the farmer pollinates each one by hand. The ratio of male to female trees is about 1 to 30, since the male trees are only necessary to produce the pollen, and the female trees are the ones that produce the fruit. Between the first day of spring and the first day of summer, the tree sets up its entire crop for the year. All the work (trimming, feeding, etc.) must take place during this season, since its during this period is when the fruit ripens, turning from green, to yellow, to brown. The dates are ready to eat from the first day of autumn, and then the harvest begins. During this season, the fruit is either left on the tree and protected with cloth bags to prevent rain, birds and insects from spoiling the fruit, or picked when ripe. The farmer told us that the best place for the dates is to remain on the tree for freshness, but if the load is too heavy, it will not bloom as well the following year, thus effecting the trees output. After decades of date farming, he was as wide-eyed and passionate about his fruit as an eager young man, which really made us all swoon. It is truly one of my favourite things in this world, to see how and where food is grown, and to meet and connect with the people who lovingly produce it. We all left with full bellies and hearts, and of course, our bags bulging with dates.    Along the dusty, desert road home we saw so many signs for date shakes, since this is the land where this indulgent treat was invented back in the 1930s. None of us caved and bought one, but my mouth was definitely watering, and I was excited to get back and make one for myself. The original recipe is simple, and calls for dates, vanilla ice cream, milk, and sometimes a dash of cinnamon and nutmeg. I knew this was the perfect makeover opportunity, and high-vibed my date shake with coconut milk instead of dairy, hemp seeds, and adaptogens. So why the adaptogens? Well, I felt like the already-pretty-healthy date shake could use a boost, and what better way to make something more supportive than with a dose of stress-reducing, adrenal-loving, hormone-balancing, potions to get you back into balance? Yahs! I had these four choices on hand, but there are a lot of options once you start to dig around the health food store a little. Here is a little about each one and why I chose them. Ashwaganda: helps the body adapt to stress and bring us back into balance. It encourages deeper sleep, supports the immune system, and energy levels. He Shou Wu: builds the blood, harmonizes adrenal gland function, nourishes hair, skin and nervous system, increases antioxidant activity. Maca: increases stamina, elevates mood, helps to balance hormones in both men and women, supports fertility and healthy libido. Licorice: balances hormones, helps the body adapt to stress, supports the immune response, and aids learning and memory. *Some adaptogens during pregnancy, breastfeeding, and while on medication are not recommended, so check with your natural health care provider before trying any of them. The farm we visited grew seven types of dates, and we loved trying them all. The unanimous favourite was the growers very own variety that he created himself, called Black Gold. He also mentioned that this was the best type of date for a date shake, but considering the fact that you maaaaay not get a chance to visit Palm Springs anytime soon, Ill go ahead and recommend using Medjool dates for the shakes, since they are widely available, and their thin skin blends very easily into a smooth consistency. If you cannot find Medjool, try Deglet Noor instead, or soak your dates in warm water for half an hour before blending. Dates are a great source of energy, and provide a generous amount of filling dietary fibre with very little fat. Dates are mineral rich, delivering potassium, manganese, magnesium and copper, as well as an assortment of B-vitamins. Seek out dates that are plump and juicy-looking (if youre buying from a market, ask to try them first), that their skin is intact, and that they are neither glossy or dusty. I store my dates in an airtight glass jar in the fridge to extend their shelf life, and protect their flavour and nutrients. Kept this way, dates will last up to six months. Outside of the fridge at room temperature, dates will last about a month and a half, or you can freeze them for up to a year. The banana in this blend up is totally optional, and I actually really liked the version without, even though it was less thick and milkshakey. If you want to add more dates for sweetness and flavour, live it up. I found that this amount, about 3 Medjool dates, was just perfect for me, even without the banana. The spices are also optional, but help to disguise any strong flavours from the adaptogens, which admittedly can sometimes taste like the inside of a barn, or everyones favourite: feet? Mmmmm. Right. Lets cover that up. All in all, this is a delicious and filling way to start your morning, or the perfect afternoon pick-me-up. Its creamy, smooth, sweet and totally balanced. I hope you enjoy it as much as I do!        Print recipe     Adaptogenic Date Shake Serves 1 (makes 2 1/­­2 cups /­­ ml) Ingredients: 1/­­4 cup /­­ 50g pitted Medjool or Deglet Noor Dates 1/­­2 – 1 frozen banana (optional) 1 cup /­­ 250ml full-fat coconut milk 2 Tbsp. hulled hemp seeds 1/­­2 Tbsp. licorice root 1/­­2 tsp. ashwaganda 1/­­2 tsp. maca 1/­­4 tsp. ho shu wu pinch vanilla powder (or 1/­­2 tsp. pure vanilla extract) pinch ground cinnamon pinch ground nutmeg 3-4 ice cubes Directions: 1. Brew the licorice tea by combining 1 cup /­­ 250ml boiling water with 1/­­2 tablespoon of chopped licorice root. Let steep covered for 15-30 minutes. 2. Place all ingredients in the blender. Measure out 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml of licorice tea, add it to the blender, and blend on high until smooth. Taste and adjust sweetness and spice to your liking. Enjoy immediately. I just want to give a huge shout out to Sasha and all the women who attended the retreat – it was truly a beautiful experience. And if anyone out there is looking for some inspiration and general awesomeness, follow these wonderful people, below: Sasha Swerdloff – Tending the Table Renne Byrd – Will Frolic for Food Lily Diamond – Kale and Caramel Kimberly Hasselbrink – Kimberly Hasselbrink Shelley Westerhausen – Vegetarian Ventures Lindsay Kluge – Ginger Botanicals Trisha Hughes – Go Eat Your Beets Carly Diaz – Carly Diaz Eva Kosmes Flores – Adventures in Cooking Sophie MacKenzie – Wholehearted Eats Hope you’re all enjoying the first breaths of Springtime. Sending love, gratitude, and sunshine, Sarah B. Show me your shakes on Instagram: #mnrdateshake *   *   *   *   *   * Hey ya’ll! One more thing before I go: new Wild Heart High Spirit retreats are being planned! I’ll share more news about the retreats soon, but if you want to be the first to know when tickets are available, go to www.goldencircleretreats.com and join the email list. I’m so excited to welcome another group of women to this magical experience! The post Adaptogenic Date Shake appeared first on My New Roots.

Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats

March 21 2018 My New Roots 

Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats So the big move-in happened, but we are far from moved in. I am writing this from my dirty dining room table, watching and listening to a collection of relative strangers drill, saw, spackle, sand, stain, and paint around me, like a tornado of humans in tool belts. Drywall dust dances in the shafts of light pouring into our new space, as I try to ignore the deafening screech from a floor sander behind a paper-thin plastic partition a few feet away from my head. Ahhh...home renovation. I could go on about the frustrations of living in a construction site, how my filth-tolerance has reached unthinkable heights, and how if I hear someone tell me that it should all be complete in two more weeks I may collapse, but I know that whenever it is done, it will all be worth it. Really and truly. I made these Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats a few days before we relocated from our rental to our home, knowing that I would need to have a stockpile of snacks that didnt require refrigeration, or even cutting, since we would be living without electricity, and I had no idea where to locate a knife in the unpacked boxes stacked high in the basement. Since then, Ive thanked myself every time Ive sunken my teeth into each chewy-crunchy-sticky bite, the cacao releasing its relaxation-inducing alkaloids and minerals into my frazzled bloodstream, the hemp seeds delivering their much-needed anti-inflammatory omega-3s, and the nut butter grounding my nerves with all its protein and healthy fat. In these uncertain times, Ive been certain that a delicious snack was ready to satisfy me at the drop of a hammer. My original inspiration for these bars came from my fellow Canadian health-food blogger and vegan recipe guru Angela Liddon, of Oh She Glows fame. Her Almond Butter Crisp Rice Treats were a fun Sunday afternoon snack project for my four-year old son and I, and since then Ive been making many variations of them. My goal was to add more protein, healthy fats and filling fiber to the bars, so I tossed in heaps of hemp and chia seeds until I found the right balance. Losing their chewy-crisp goodness would have been a real shame, since its the texture of these treats that is so very crave-able! So I tinkered a few times, and found the exact right amount that maintained the satisfying chew. I also wanted to add chocolate. Because chocolate. After nailing the additions, I knew that top needed some flair: not just visually, but something to cut the richness a tad. I had some freeze-dried raspberries kicking around my pantry that I had bought on a whim in the US some months back, and immediately knew that they would be the perfect supplement with their vibrant pink hue and bright acidity. Bingo! Freeze-dried fruit (and vegetables) have been popping up all over the place lately, since they taste incredible, have a long shelf life, and are a nutritiously convenient way of getting another serving of produce a day, especially for kids. However, if you cant find freeze-dried raspberries, or any substitute for that matter, you can easily replace them in this recipe with more traditional dried fruit like goji berries, roughly chopped figs, apricots, or even raisins. You could also top the bars with toasted nuts or seeds, coconut or cacao nibs. Think of these as a blank canvas for your favourite add-on flavours and textures, or keep it as simple as you like. The bars are also delicious as is, and if youre into a dark and rich flavour above all else, simply leave the toppings off. But do not under any circumstance skip the flaky salt – it is key.  Hemp hemp, hooray! Since being back in the homeland and trying to buy as much locally-produced food as possible, Ive been loving on hemp seeds lately - even more than usual! Because of their mild, nutty flavor, they blend so effortlessly with just about any food, sweet or savory. And what they lack in flavor, they make up for in protein and healthy fats, specifically those essential Omegas. Weve all heard about Omega-3s and how important they are for the health of our entire body, helping to prevent cancer asthma, depression, obesity, diabetes and so on. But! There is another star on the block, Omega-6, which seems to be less talked about due to the fact that many of us get enough (or in some cases, too much) of this essential fatty acid. Omega-3 and Omega-6 fasts are essential, meaning that our bodies dont produce them and we need to obtain them from the foods we eat. Sources of Omega-3 fats include flax seeds, pumpkin seeds, walnuts, chia, dark leafy greens, some sea vegetables and cold-water fish. Omega-6 sources include soybean, canola, corn, peanut, sunflower, and sesame oils. You can see from this list that most people in the Western world at least, are getting their fair share of Omega-6 fats, and lacking in Omega-3s. In fact, in North America it is estimated that the population consumes 10 to 20 times more Omega-6 than Omega-3, due to the popularity of processed foods. Although the correct ratio of these fats is still a matter of debate, researchers in this field agree that this ratio is far too high. We should be aiming for an Omega-6 to Omega-3 ratio between 2:1 and 4:1. So why is the balance so important? Because the ratio of Omega-6s to Omega-3s helps determine the flexibility of our cell membranes, meaning that ALL communication throughout the body depends on at least in part on this balance being correct. Coronary heart disease, chronic inflammation, obesity, and healthy genetic processes have all been linked to the delicate equilibrium of essential fatty acids. How can we improve the situation then? Just making simple, small changes to our diets will greatly improve the balance of fats in our bodies. Instead of relying solely on foods high in Omega-6s like peanut butter and foods made with vegetable oils (like corn, sunflower and soybean oil) swap them with foods high in Omega-3s like walnut butter and flaxseed oil, and sprinkle chia seeds on your breakfast bowl or a salad. For omnivores replacing chicken, beef and pork with wild-caught, cold water fish will make a big difference too. But the most ideal food to choose when trying to achieve that perfect balance of these fats then, is hemp! Hemps Omega-6 to Omega-3 ratio is a healthy 3.75:1. You can find hemp in many forms these days: un-hulled and hulled seeds (also known as hemp hearts), hemp oil, hemp flour, hemp protein powder, hemp milk, and hemp seed butter. Remember that choosing hemp in its most natural form (the un-hulled or hulled hemp seeds) is your best bet to ensure a high-quality, whole food product. I like to sprinkle hemp seeds on just about everything, from my breakfast porridge to my salads and sandwiches. They add an amazing creaminess to smoothies, raw custards and cheesecakes. You can even make your own milk from hemp and you dont even need to soak the seeds first! Simply blend 1 part hulled hemp seeds to just under four parts water, with an optional sweetener like maple syrup, dates, or honey, and enjoy. Simple and delicious. You can get the full hemp milk recipe here. The last thing I want to mention is the crisp brown rice. There are a few types of it on the market, and one reason Im happy to be back in Canada, is because they have the right kind. By that I mean really crispy rice crisps. For whatever reason, the ones I found in Europe would always get soggy very quickly, whereas the ones here maintain their crunch even after combining them with wet ingredients like maple syrup and brown rice syrup. Ive also found high-vibe sprouted brown rice crisps over here from a company called One Degree (not sponsored). They work really well too, but cost a fortune. I alternate between those, and the ones Ive found at my local bulk food store that arent sprouted or even organic, but they get the job done when Im renovating a house and feeling strapped for cash. You may need to experiment with a couple kinds before finding the one. In the end, the bars should be relatively crunchy-crisp - not mushy at all (even though they will still be delicious). If you like Rice Crispy Treats, youre going to love these bars. Theyre the grown-up version of your favourite childhood treat, with a mega boost of nourishing superfoods. Its an indulgence you can feel good about feeding both you and your family...but I wont tell anyone if you hide them and eat them all yourself. Ive definitely never done that before. Nope. Never.     Print recipe     Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats Makes about 16 bars Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. virgin coconut oil, plus a little more for greasing 2/­­3 cup /­­ 160ml unsalted nut or seed butter of your choice 2/­­3 cup /­­ 160ml brown rice syrup 2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1 tsp. vanilla extract heaping 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­3 cup /­­ 40g raw cacao powder (or cocoa powder) 4 cups /­­ 200g puffed brown rice crisps 1 cup /­­ 150g hulled hemp seeds 3 Tbsp. chia seeds a few pinches flaky sea salt (Maldon works perfectly) 3-4 Tbsp. freeze-dried raspberries Directions: 1. Rub a little coconut oil in an 7″x11″ (20x30cm) baking pan. 2. Melt the coconut oil in a large saucepan over low heat. Add the nut butter, brown rice syrup, maple syrup, vanilla and fine salt, and stir to combine. Remove from heat. Stir in the cacao powder until thoroughly incorporated. 3. Add the puffed brown rice, hemp seeds, chia, and stir quickly to combine, then pour the mixture into your baking pan and press firmly (using the back of a large spoon or spatula rubbed with a little coconut oil really helps). Once smooth and even, generously sprinkle the top with the freeze-dried raspberries and flaky salt. Place in the fridge or freezer to firm up, then slice into bars or squares and enjoy. Store the bars in a tightly sealed container in the fridge or freezer. Show my your bars on Instagram: #cacaohempcrispytreats *   *   *   *   *   * Hey Toronto! I’ve just launched my first collaborative project since moving back to Canada, with my friends at ELXR Juice Lab: the Activated Power Bowl! This delicious breakfast (or snack!) is made lovingly with activated grains, superfood stir-ins, and tasty toppings. There are three mouthwatering varieties to choose from, or you can build your own bowl. I am so thrilled to offer my fellow Torontonians a vegan, gluten-free, whole food breakfast with activated grains – this is truly the first of its kind! The Activated Power Bowl is available at all four ELXR locations across the city, so if you’re in town go pick one up and enjoy. We had a very successful launch over the weekend – huge thanks to everyone who came out to taste and support! The post Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats appeared first on My New Roots.

Kichadi: The Realistic Reset

January 16 2018 My New Roots 

Kichadi: The Realistic Reset Happy 2018 dear friends! I hope that you all had a restful and relaxing holiday, and that youre ready to take on the new year. As most of you know, the past few months have been all-over-the-place (literally) for my family and I, so Ive been giving myself plenty of freedom when it comes to what Im eating and how often Im exercising. With my regular routines out the window, Ive felt an immense sense of liberation - its great to let go once in a while! - but now its gotten to the point where my body is really craving some stability and grounding, especially after the holidays. Sometimes I like to go drastic and embark on a 10-day juice fast or something like it, but my body and my mind arent feeling a hard-core anything at the moment, so Im turning to kichadi to gently ease my way back into eating with more balance. Kichadi, sometimes called and spelled khichdi, kitchari, kitcheree or khichri, is the famous one-pot wonder Indian dish that combines rice and lentils or quick-cooking pulses or legumes, such as mung beans. Its best known in Ayurvedic tradition as a cleansing and complete protein meal, very easy to digest, and a cinch to make! It is delicious, super comfort food, and even if youre not down with eating the exact same thing for every meal for several days in a row, youll be thrilled to learn its also the perfect thing to tuck into on a cold winter night. Because of its simplicity and ease, many people find that doing a kichadi “mono-diet” is very pleasant and far less of an ordeal than a juice fast for example (although I need to be clear that a juice fast is far deeper and more effective). Taking three to seven days to eat this dish exclusively gives the digestive organs a serious break since kichadi is very easy to break down and assimilate. And because digestion is at the core of human health, putting a practice in place that supports this essential process makes room for the miracle of self-healing: something the body is constantly striving for, but often distracted from by poor dietary and lifestyle choices. When we forgo processed foods, alcohol, caffeine, and common allergens for a few days, we give our bodies the space it needs to do what it naturally does anyway: clean itself up! I like to eat a kichadi diet in the colder months when the weather is unfriendly and I need some reassuring, grounding, warm food - and juicing sounds about as fun as a hole in the head. Its also a wonderful way to glide yourself into the process of cleansing if youve never tried it before. Since it doesnt involve abstaining from food, most first-timers find it totally do-able, and dare I say it, enjoyable! Ive just completed three days of eating kichadi for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and Im feeling sooo much more balanced, clear-headed, and energized - the ways I would like to feel at the beginning of a brand new year! I hope that this simple and realistic reset is up your alley, and that you give it a go. First things first, youre going to need to do a bit of planning for the kichadi diet. Set a realistic goal for yourself - ideally youll be eating this dish for at least three days, up to seven, but if one is all you can handle, that is okay too. Since youre eating throughout this practice, going about your regular life is usually fine, but if you want to go the extra mile and give yourself a real treat, do the kichadi diet over a long weekend or break from work so that you can focus on some other cleanse-enriching experiences, such as a massage, a sauna visit, daytime napping, reading an actual book, and maybe even going offline completely. Gasp! I started my kichadi diet on a Monday and carried out my normal routine with work and family life, and just made sure to give myself lots of juicy personal time in the evenings (essential oil bath, yin yoga sesh, early lights out etc.). Aside from a cleanse-classic mood swing on the last day, no one around me even noticed what I was doing. Since they were too busy eating pizza.    Before you begin youll want to start by cutting back on alcohol, caffeine, sugar, meat, dairy, processed foods, and anything else you know is throwing you off balance. If you abstain from these things for at least a couple of days before you begin, your experience will be much smoother, as you won’t be distracted by gnarly withdrawal symptoms while you’re trying to chill. You can also add any bad habits you have to your hit list, and reduce or eliminate the daily practices that arent making your life extra groovy. Whatever day you are starting the kichadi on, soak the rice and pulses /­­ legumes together the night before. This step is important for improving the digestive qualities of kichadi, but if you are really pressed for time or you forgot, get them in water as soon as you can. Remember that even soaking for an hour is better than nothing! Cook the kichadi daily if possible, since the fresher the food is, the more energy, or prana it contains. My recipe makes about six servings for my appetite (eight for people who eat less) and I can easily stretch one batch over two days if no one else in my family wants it. Regardless, youll have to make at least two batches if youre going for three days, and I would not recommend keeping kichadi around for longer than that. Freezing is an option, but freeze it in the portion size youd want to eat so that youre not heating more than you need at one sitting.        Daily routine The night before: soak the rice and pulses together in plenty of filtered water overnight. Morning: upon rising, drink a large glass of warm water with freshly squeezed lemon juice, followed by another glass of pure water. Make your first batch of kichadi, and enjoy it for breakfast. Store leftovers in the fridge. Midday: Drink a couple large glasses of water at least 30 minutes before eating. Heat your desired amount of kichadi and enjoy it for lunch. Evening: Drink a couple large glasses of water at least 30 minutes before eating. Heat your desired amount of kichadi and enjoy it for dinner. Night time: Drink a cup of herbal detox tea if desired, enjoy something that nourishes you (bath, meditation, stretching) and go to bed early. Repeat for three to seven days. Kichadi Reset tips 1. Eat when youre hungry. This may seem like an obvious one, but many people eat according to the clock, instead of listening to their bodies. Take these days to really tune in and see when your body actually desires food, and how much you need to eat to feel satisfied. When you feel real hunger, your body is giving you the signal that it is actually ready to receive. 2. Cook mindfully. Remember that cooking is something to be grateful for. If you normally approach cooking from a lets get this over with standpoint, use this opportunity to make your meal prep a ceremony, and see it as a gift to yourself. Take your time washing and cutting vegetables, delight in the sound of the spices popping, the scent that wafts up while youre peeling ginger. The attention and intention you put into your food will come back to you, and nourish you in ways that you never thought possible. 3. Keep things interesting, by adding a squeeze of lime instead of lemon to your kichadi. You can use parsley instead of cilantro, and adjust the spices to suit your personal taste. If you really need some variety, top the kichadi with some of your favourite sprouts, grated raw carrot, or fold in some spinach while its still hot. 4. Cravings are normal, especially when youre knowingly depriving yourself! If you feel a craving coming on, first identify what the craving is. Be curious...maybe it has nothing to do with the food, but more your emotional or mental state. If you really cant shake the feeling, drink water first, then try a piece of fruit, or some raw veggie sticks. 5. Drink a lot of water. The body functions optimally when properly hydrated. It is especially important when were resetting, since were letting go of things that need to be flushed out. Water is essential to this process, but it will also prevent cravings, combat fatigue and brain fog, and keep the bowels moving. Remember to drink water away from mealtimes for optimal digestion (30 minutes before eating, 2-3 hours after unless youre very thirsty). Other beverages, even if they are mostly water like coffee and tea, are not water. Only water is water. After the Kichadi diet Although it is extremely tempting to celebrate and indulge after denying oneself certain things, this is not the best time to do so. Even though this process keeps your digestive system humming along, your body is still in a sensitive place. Introduce new foods slowly, and keep combinations small and uncomplicated (i.e. dont have a meal with 20 different foods together). Limit meat, dairy, sugar, and processed foods for as long as possible. That congratulatory slice of cake should wait until youre pretty much back to normal, or maybe even find an alternative ; )     Print recipe     Simple and Cleansing Kichadi Serves 6-8 Ingredients: 1 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee 1/­­2 Tbsp. cumin seeds 1/­­2 Tbsp. mustard seeds 1/­­2 Tbsp. coriander seeds 1/­­2 tsp. ground turmeric 1 cinnamon stick 1-2 Tbsp. minced ginger (to taste) 1 large tomato, chopped (optional) 2 medium yellow onion, diced 2 medium carrots, chopped 1 small /­­ 250g sweet potato (or other seasonal root veggie), chopped 1 cup /­­ 200g brown rice 1/­­2 cup /­­ 110g mung beans or brown lentils 1 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1 cup /­­ 140g green peas, frozen or fresh 4 cups /­­ 1L water (or more, as needed) a couple handfuls finely chopped cilantro lemon to garnish Directions: 1. If possible, soak the rice and pulses together overnight, or for 8-12 hours. Drain and rinse very well. 2. Melt the oil in a large stockpot. Add the cumin and mustard seed and fry just until the mustard seeds start to pop. Add the remaining spices, stir and then add the tomato and ginger (if youre opting out of the tomato, simply use a few splashes of water). Fry for a couple minutes until fragrant. 3. Add the onion, carrots, sweet potato, brown rice, mung beans, salt, and water. Bring to a boil, reduce to simmer and cook for about 45 minutes, until the rice and beans are soft. About five minutes before serving, add the peas whether fresh or frozen, and cook until they are warm. Add more water for a stew-y consistency, or if the pot becomes dry while cooking. 4. Serve kichadi hot, garnished with cilantro and a squeeze of fresh lemon juice. Give thanks and enjoy. I hope that many of you try the kichadi diet out, and rejoice in the fact that there is no need to do something radical and overly deprivational during the winter. This is a time for closing in, for being quiet and gentle, and nourishing oneself in a tender way. And remember, you can enjoy this delicious kichadi even for a day, and any season of the year when you need to find your equilibrium once again. Its a tasty way to come back to center, every time, anytime. In health, vibrancy, and abundance for the year ahead, Sarah B. Show me your kichadi on Instagram: #mnrkichadi The post Kichadi: The Realistic Reset appeared first on My New Roots.

Rice Pudding with Berries

January 8 2018 Meatless Monday 

The Chinese often begin their day with a congee, or rice porridge. This breakfast rice, sweetened up with cinnamon and berries, is a great way to use up leftover rice. You can use any type of rice. Serves 4     - 2 cups brown rice, precooked - 1-1/­­2 teaspoons cinnamon - 1/­­2 cup almonds, slivered - 3 cups soymilk - 1/­­2 cup mixed berries Mix all ingredients and simmer until thick, stirring constantly. Serve hot or cold and garnish with berries. The post Rice Pudding with Berries appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Happy Holidays Brussels Sprout Salad

December 22 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Happy Holidays Brussels Sprout Salad Well this feels a bit weird. Writing about winter food in the middle of the night from a cute little house with a tiny swimmingpool in warm and humid Bali, Indonesia. We decided to skip Christmas this year and instead bring the kids on a sort of honeymoon holiday, so we left Stockholm last week and will stay here in Bali for a couple of more weeks. We’re mostly airbnb-ing around the island and have already experienced lots of beautiful places, monsoon down pours mixed with sunshine, excellent tempeh (and crunchy sweet tempeh), creepy insects and countless fruit platters and smoothie bowls. Traveling with three kids is definitely trickier than just one or two but we’re learning and adapting. And at the end of each day it still feels so rewarding seeing the world with them and talking about all the funny and weird travel related subjects that pop-up in their heads. Several years ago we wrote a blog post (and a chapter in our travel book) about traveling with kids and we’re thinking about writing an updated version with more guidelines and tips that we’ve picked up as our crew has grown. Let us know if you’d be interested in that. But enough about that now. The goal of the day was simply to share this little salad before Christmas is over. I realize that it’s a little late and many of you have already planned your holiday menu. But if you happen to be searching for a side dish that also could work as a main salad and is both pretty and damn tasty, you should give this one a try. We have made this recipe a couple of times in the weeks before we left. Crunchy roasted brussels sprouts have always been a popular dish in our house but what we’ve done lately is adding coconut chips to the tray and also dust everything with cinnamon and finely chopped hazelnuts which adds a super nice nuttiness to the dish. Dried apricots offer sweetness and chewiness, lentils make it more filling and blood orange more festive and fresh. We serve this salad with a simple yogurt dressing but you can skip that if you want to make it vegan. Or drizzle with tahini instead. We love this little dish and hope you will too. That’s it. The last post of the year. Have a wonderful holiday with lots of good food and we’ll be back in the beginning of January with more recipes, videos, anecdotes, maybe some Bali photos and what not. Thank you for following along! Hugs and kisses. - David, Luise and the kids. Brussels Sprouts & Blood Orange Salad with Cinnamon & Hazelnut Dust Serves 4 500 g brussels sprouts olive oil or coconut oil 1 tsp ground cinnamon sea salt & pepper 1 handful coconut flakes /­­ chips 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked black lentils 500 ml /­­ 2 cups water, to cook olive oil to drizzle salt and pepper 1/­­2 lemon, juice 2 blood oranges 1 handful dried apricot 1 handful hazelnuts 1 cup natural yoghurt 1/­­2 lemon, juice 1 large handful fresh parsley Preheat the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F. Trim bottom of brussels sprouts and cut them in halves. Place in a bowl, drizzle with a few tablespoons oil, sprinkle with cinnamon and salt and toss to cover all. Place on a baking tray and roast in the oven for 25-30 minutes until they are soft, golden and have crispy edges. A few minutes before the brussels sprouts are done, take out the tray and scatter over a handful of coconut chips, drizzle with oil and cinnamon and place the tray back in the oven and roast until golden. Meanwhile, prepare the lentils. Place rinsed lentils and water in a saucepan and bring to a boil. Lower the heat and let simmer for about 20 minutes, check the exact time, it depends on your specific type lentils. They should be soft and chewy, not mushy. Pour into a sieve to remove any excess water. Place in a bowl and drizzle with olive oil, salt, pepper and a squeeze of lemon juice. Peel and slice the blood oranges, chop the dried apricots and finely chop the toasted hazelnuts. Place the yogurt in a small bowl and stir in lemon juice, chopped parsley, salt and pepper to taste Arrange the roasted brussels sprouts and coconut chips on a serving platter together with the lentils. Add sliced blood oranges and scatter with dried apricot and hazelnut dust. Finely add dollops of yogurt sauce and chopped parsley.


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