cholesterol - vegetarian recipes

cholesterol vegetarian recipes

Basic Herbed Cheese (Raw and Vegan)

August 2 2019 VegKitchen 

Basic Herbed Cheese (Raw and Vegan) Some vegetarians find it difficult to give up cheese even though some know its not the best food to consume. Cheese is very high in calories and fat. To that, add sodium and cholesterol. The post Basic Herbed Cheese (Raw and Vegan) appeared first on VegKitchen.

khichu recipe | papdi no lot | how to make gujarati kichu

March 5 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

khichu recipe | papdi no lot | how to make gujarati kichukhichu recipe | papdi no lot | how to make gujarati kichu with step by step photo and video recipe. generally the street food or snacks recipes are termed as greasy or not an healthy food. most of them are either deep fried with high cholesterol or perhaps having high sodium content in it. but then there is this healthy snack or dish made with rice flour known as khichu recipe or papdi no lot from gujarati cuisine. The post khichu recipe | papdi no lot | how to make gujarati kichu appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Mushroom Scallops in a Warm Pesto Pool

February 9 2019 My New Roots 

Mushroom Scallops in a Warm Pesto Pool   When we committed to going to the ocean, I immediately felt the thrilling sensation that washes over me when I stand at the intersection of land meeting water. I smelled brine and dampness. I saw certain patterns and colours; light sand against dark water, wet stones, seaweed, driftwood, and feathers. This was the second recipe I created for the dreamy on-location photoshoot with Christiann Koepke back in October (you can see the first one here). The inspiration for this dish came first in fact, fast and furiously. Just thinking about the seaside brought this recipe to me in a wave of total inspiration. I wanted the ingredients to reflect the elements in this environment, and for the final result to be a visual meeting of land and sea. Now Im not super into “fake meat”, but there is something undeniably satisfying about tricking someone into thinking a vegetable is flesh. Tee hee. Plus, Rene Redzepi does it all the time, so maybe it puts me in the cool cooking club too? Yes? Anyway, I knew something on the plate had to look like seafood, and I had my sights set on scallops. In my first cookbook, I made “scallops” out of leeks, and wanted to try something different, so going through the rolodex of tube-shaped white veggies in my mind, I fell upon king oyster mushroom stems. Naturally. Browned in ghee and well-seasoned, I knew that these morsels would look exactly like mollusks, and taste deceptively meaty. A pool of herbaceous, vibrant green pesto, would be the land, and the perfect resting place for my mushroom medallions. I combined flat-leaf parsley and spinach to create a bright yet balanced sauce that complimented - rather than overwhelmed - the rest of the dish. But with all this creaminess, I knew that I also needed to include something for textural contrast, so toasted hazelnuts became the beach stones, along with fried capers, which added a bite of seaside brine. This dish is surprisingly easy to make, and it is the prefect main to serve for family and friends that you want to spoil a little. It looks impressive, but its a cinch to get on the table without gluing you to the stove. The pesto can be made a week in advance (although the fresher, the better), so that the only thing you need to do before serving is cook the mushroom and capers, and warm the pesto a little. I love cooking the capers and mushrooms in ghee (recipe here) because its just so darn delicious, but the pesto is vegan and if you want the entire meal to be so, simply swap out the ghee for expeller-pressed coconut oil, which is refined for high heat cooking and has no tropical aroma. Beta-glucan Goodness Edible mushrooms are both medical and nutritional dynamos. Collectively, they not only provide us with plant-based protein, vitamin D, and a whole host of minerals, but most excitingly a group of polysaccharides called beta-glucans. These complex, hemicellulose sugar molecules enhance the functioning of the immune system by activating immune cell response and stimulating the production of white blood cells. These compounds also effectively mobilize immune stem cells in your bone marrow, and exhibit anti-tumor properties, so theyre often used supplementally in cancer treatment protocols. Beta-glucans help to lower cholesterol, as this type of fiber forms a viscous gel during digestion, which grabs a hold of excess dietary cholesterol, prevents absorption by moving it through your digestive tract, and eliminates it. Through your poop! This same gel also slows down your digestion, which in turn stabilizes blood sugar, and minimizes the release of insulin. King oyster mushrooms are of course a good source of beta-glucans, but you can get them in other places too: barley, oats, sorghum, mushrooms like shiitake, reishi and maitake, as well as seaweed, algae, and dates.   I wouldn’t put king oyster mushrooms in the “specialty” category of fungi, but I also know that theyre not available at every grocery store, so if you cant find them, substitute with any other kind of mushroom you like and forgo the whole scallop charade. The dish will still turn out delicious, I promise. If you want to change up the herb in the pesto, try basil instead of flat-leaf parsley. Cilantro could also be delicious, but potentially overwhelming, so use more spinach in that case. And instead of hazelnuts in the pesto and garnish, try almonds, pecans or walnuts. Yummm. I like to serve this with a big hunk of crusty bread on the side to mop up any leftover pesto in the bowl. It also helps to have some good olive oil and flaky salt around for this situation, just sayin. If youd prefer the grain route, steamed brown rice, quinoa, or millet could be a decent accompaniment too. And if you want to go completely grain-free, roasted sweet potato, winter squash, or pumpkin would be totally lovely.     Print recipe     King Oyster Mushroom Scallops in a Warm Pesto Pool Serves 4 Ingredients: 1 lb. /­­ 500g king oyster mushrooms (choose ones with fat stems) a generous amount of ghee (or expeller-pressed coconut oil) fine + flaky salt 1 jar brined capers (about 1/­­3 cup /­­ 55g) a handful of toasted hazelnuts, roughly chopped, for garnish 1 batch Parsley-Spinach Pesto (recipe follows) cold-pressed olive oil, for garnish a few leaves of parsley, for garnish Directions: 1. Remove any dirt or debris from the mushrooms with your hands, or small soft brush. (do not use water!). Slice the stems into enough rounds so that each person has 5 or 6. Keep the caps for another dish. 2. Drain the capers and pat them dry with a clean tea towel or paper towel. Heat about a tablespoon of ghee (or coconut oil) in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the capers and fry until split and crisp - about 2-3 minutes. Remove from pan and set aside. 3. Add more ghee (or coconut oil) to the same skillet over medium-high heat. When hot, add the sliced mushroom stems, a sprinkle of flaky salt, and cook on one side until golden, about 5-7 minutes. Then flip and cook on the other side until golden. Work in batches or use separate skillets - if you crowd the mushrooms they will steam each other and get soggy. That is not what were after! 4. While youre cooking the mushrooms, place the pesto in a small saucepan, add a touch of water to thin, if desired, and warm over low-medium heat. Do not boil! 5. To serve, place about 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml of the warm pesto in the bottom of a dish, spreading it out to make an indent in the center. Place 5 or 6 mushroom stems in the pesto, then top with the fried capers and toasted hazelnuts. Drizzle with olive oil and a few grinds of black pepper. Garnish with parsley and serve immediately. Parsley-Spinach Pesto Makes about 2 1/­­4 cups Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 150g hazelnuts 1 fat clove garlic 2 cups /­­ 35g flat-leaf parsley, lightly packed (tender stems only) 2 cups /­­ 65g baby spinach, lightly packed zest of 1 organic lemon 1/­­3 cup/­­ 80ml freshly squeezed lemon juice (about 2 lemons) 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml cold-pressed olive oil 1/­­2 cup /­­ 35g nutritional yeast 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water, more if needed Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place hazelnuts on baking sheet. Toast in oven for 12-15 minutes or until fragrant and lightly toasted. Remove and set aside. Once cool, remove skins by rubbing the hazelnuts together in your hands. Set aside. 2. Remove any tough stems from the parsley. Roughly chop the leaves and tender stems (this prevents the parsley from bruising in the food processor). 3. Place garlic in the food processor and pulse to mince. Add the hazelnuts, parsley, spinach, lemon zest and juice, olive oil, nutritional yeast, and salt. Pulse for 30 seconds, then add the water and pulse again until its thick, but spreadable. Remove lid and scrape. Repeat until reaches desired consistency (I like mine a little chunky, but its up to you!). Store leftovers in an airtight glass container in the fridge for up to one week. We’re home from Bali now, settling back into life in the cold Canadian winter. It feels good to be here, especially after a satisfying few weeks in the sunshine, hosting two glorious retreats. Now it’s time to ground and focus on the year ahead. I’m very excited for 2019 – so many exciting things to share with you, just on the horizon. I hope you’re all well out there, and enjoying a vibrant start to the new year. Sending love and gratitude out to you all, always. xo, Sarah B The post Mushroom “Scallops” in a Warm Pesto Pool appeared first on My New Roots.

Healthier You Series: All-Star Nutritionist Bonnie Taub-Dix Sheds Light on Good Heart Health Practices You Can Use

January 28 2019 Meatless Monday 

Healthier You Series: All-Star Nutritionist Bonnie Taub-Dix Sheds Light on Good Heart Health Practices You Can UseStart smart eating habits on Mondays for a happier and healthier you! February is just around the corner and its American Heart Month . Take a moment on Monday to focus on behaviors that may help you live a longer and healthier life. This is the third article in this months Healthier You Series. Weve discussed making good dietary choices for kidney health and type 2 diabetes . This week, we look at heart health. The American Heart Association recommends making simple changes to your diet to improve heart health, such as limiting red meat. Meatless Monday is an easy and enjoyable way to make smart food choices for your heart . Consuming less red and processed meat and more plant-based foods like whole grains, fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes can benefit cardio-health. Bonnie Taub-Dix is a nutrition consultant, author, and Meatless Monday advocate. We asked her to share some heart-friendly advice. 1. Meatless Monday encourages people to cut out meat one day a week for their health and to try a great variety of plant-based foods. Are there specific plant-based foods that are most beneficial for heart health? Plant-based protein is a hot, trendy topic but these are foods that have been around for centuries, providing fiber and an array of nutrients. Plant proteins like beans, nuts, and seeds are just a few examples of how we can cut back on meat while boosting the value of our diets. Oatmeal is a steamy bowl of goodness for breakfast swirled with almond butter and bananas or as a savory side mixed with a variety of seasonings and spices. Oats and almonds are rich in fiber to help lower cholesterol levels. Beans, the most underrated superfoods, are also rich in soluble fiber to help keep you feeling fuller longer while controlling cholesterol levels. Theyre also a great source of plant-based protein.   2. Are there particular foods to avoid? What about processed foods? Many people say they try to avoid processed food, as if its a kind of poison. Its a well-intentioned goal, but even pre-chopped fruit or vegetables are processed foods! Certain processed foods make our lives more convenient, safer-and in many ways, even more nutritious. The good news is certain processed foods are healthier than some foods found in their natural state, such as: o Plain yogurt, with added cultures, retains the protein and calcium naturally found in dairy products, and it also includes added good bacteria to help boost our gut function and immune systems. o Canned tomatoes contain more lycopene--a powerful antioxidant that reduces inflammation--than fresh tomatoes do, especially when they are eaten simultaneously with a small amount of oil to enhance absorption. Dont judge a food by the front of the package. Flip that bag or box over to read whats really inside!   3. Should people with a family history of heart disease be much more careful than those who dont have a history? What can someone with a family history do to help prevent heart disease? If you knew you could have stopped that balsamic vinegar from splattering on your favorite white sweater, would you have done something to prevent it from happening? Unless youre clairvoyant, its not very easy to prevent something you cant predict. When it comes to your body--whether its potential damage from high blood sugar, blood pressure, or cholesterol levels--this is the time to take charge of your health. You can fight against your family histories by taking a closer look at what youre putting on your plate, moving more , and finding effective ways to manage stress .   4. Whats your go-to food for heart health on Meatless Monday? Id have to say my Spicy Dark Chocolate Chili Bowl ! What I love about this recipe is that you dont really have to follow it exactly -- you can swap out for your favorite ingredients. This recipe contains beans and avocado, as well as a variety of anti-inflammatory spices. Bonnie recently published Read It Before You Eat It – Taking You from Label to Table . You can find more about Bonnie at Better Than Dieting and on Instagram. For an extra bonus, check out heart-friendly Meatless Monday recipes, from pancakes to burgers, in our free comfort food e-cookbook . Use Mondays to make positive change in your life that will do you a world of good. Meatless Monday is a global movement followed by millions who choose not to eat meat one day a week for their health and the health of the planet. Help spread the word about the many benefits of Meatless Monday, such as how reducing meat consumption may improve your heart health. Download our shareable free graphics here . Follow  us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post Healthier You Series: All-Star Nutritionist Bonnie Taub-Dix Sheds Light on Good Heart Health Practices You Can Use appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Healthier You Series: Go Meatless Monday for Kidney Health

January 14 2019 Meatless Monday 

Healthier You Series: Go Meatless Monday for Kidney HealthStart smart eating habits on Mondays for a happier and healthier you! We hear a lot about how not eating meat just one day a week is good for the planet, but what about how good it is for our health? It turns out, Meatless Monday is also an easy way to take steps towards a healthier lifestyle and better health. Cutting out meat just one day a week and choosing plant-based foods instead can help promote kidney health . In fact, eating less red and processed meat and more plant-based foods, such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, and legumes, can help lead to: o Better kidney health o Better management of kidney disease o Lower blood pressure and cholesterol o Lower risk of diabetes o Healthy weight management Your hard-working and multi-tasking kidneys work round the clock to remove wastes from your body, balance your bodys fluids and minerals, make hormones that control blood pressure and form red blood cells, and much more. You cant live without your kidneys! Were very pleased to say that Meatless Monday has partnered with the National Kidney Foundation  to encourage people to make healthier changes to their diets in support of kidney health. Gail Torres, RN, MS, RD, Senior Clinical Communications Director at the National Kidney Foundation explains, “Studies show that eating less meat may play a key role in keeping your kidneys healthy and in improving your health overall. This doesnt mean you need to cut meat out completely from your diet, but rather, to replace some meat with plant-based foods, such as soy and nuts. She continues, This change in diet helps your body make less acid, which puts less stress on your kidneys. It also lowers your intake of saturated fat, which can harm blood vessels and lead to heart and kidney disease. Less meat in the diet is also linked to preventing and controlling diabetes and high blood pressure, the two main causes of kidney disease.” 1 in 3 American adults is at risk for kidney disease. According to the National Kidney Foundation , in the United States, about 30 million adults have chronic kidney disease - and most arent aware of it. Risk factors for kidney disease include diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity, and family history. But heres the good news! You can kickstart your Mondays by swapping out meat for plant-based foods to help promote kidney health. See this weeks Meatless Monday recipe for Corn-Stuffed Zucchini, courtesy of National Kidney Foundation. Use Mondays to make positive change in your life that will do you a world of good. Meatless Monday is a global movement followed by millions who choose not to eat meat one day a week for their health and the health of the planet. To spread the word about Meatless Monday and kidney health, download our fun and shareable free graphics, here. Find us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram! The post Healthier You Series: Go Meatless Monday for Kidney Health appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Zucchini Vegetables Delight

September 22 2018 Oh My Veggies 

Today I have a delicious recipe for you.  This vegetable dish is consistent enough to be served as a meal, but you can very well serve it as a side dish. Rich in colors and flavors, this recipe will be appreciated by all! Zucchinis are 95% water, which makes them a diuretic. It helps to purify the kidneys! Rich in fiber, it is also beneficial for the digestive tract.  Zucchini is also your slimming ally--very low calorie (13.3 kcal/­­100g) and very little lipid (0.1g). In addition, it ensures the reduction of cholesterol. It prevents the accumulation of bad cholesterol and thus the appearance of cardiovascular diseases. Prep Time: 20 minutes Cook Time: 45 minutes Servings: 6 Ingredients 3 zucchini?s 2 yellow squash ?4 Roma tomatoes 1 onion 1 tbsp olive oil 1 tsp oregano 3/­­4 cup cheese (I used a Mexican mix, but you can also use cheddar) 1/­­4 cup fresh parsley salt and pepper to taste 2 cloves of garlic minced Instructions Preheat the oven to 400?F. Cut the onion and mince the garlic. Sauté the onion and garlic with olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat; cook until the onions are soft and transparent. Slice the zucchini, […]

15 Recipes That Take Oatmeal to the Next Level

November 10 2017 Oh My Veggies 

Myriad oatmeal recipes are such greats way to start the day!  Oatmeal is packed with antioxidants, fiber and is excellent for lowering cholesterol.  You don’t have to be stuck eating a boring bowl of oatmeal for breakfast every morning though.  There are so many delicious ways to prepare it, from overnight oats to baked oatmeal, […]

Minty Aloe and Cucumber Lemonade

June 11 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Minty Aloe and Cucumber Lemonade Have you ever tried adding fresh aloe vera to your drinks? As soon as the days get unbearably hot around here, I like to keep a few aloe leaves in my fridge for a good number of reasons, especially for healing unexpected sunburns and making the most refreshing post-beach tonics. Aloe is one of those amazing, all-purpose healing plants; it’s anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, helps lower cholesterol, works wonders when applied topically to skin by moisturizing it and helping ease acne and blemishes, and the list goes on and on. If you’ve never taken apart a fresh aloe leaf before, its insides are made up of a clear, jellyfish-like material, which is where most of the healing magic is contained. The problem is that on its own, the flesh is quite bitter and soapy. I’ve noticed that citrus really helps neutralize that unpleasant taste, so I love adding aloe to lemonade. This lemonade recipe is pretty special – it’s just the most refreshing thing you can think of after a hot day outside. It’s minty, with a cooling effect from the cucumber and a nice tartness from freshly squeezed lemon juice. I also think it would make for a great summery cocktail mixer, if you feel so inclined :) One last aloe tip – when I’m cutting apart an aloe leaf in the kitchen and putting most of the flesh into the blender, I rub the green skins with any leftover flesh on my (clean) face, which makes for a refreshing face mask. There are some links below, Sunday hugs to you, friends. The Next Gluten Matthew Kenney on Pardon My French Human Design BodyGraph – sort of like an astrology birth chart, but it combines a bunch of traditional sciences like astrology, the Hindu-Brahmin Chakra system, the Zohar or Kabbalah, and the IChing to map out a ‘body graph.’ We found ours to be pretty accurate and fascinating. Patti Smith on Singing at Bob Dylan’s Nobel Prize Ceremony (make sure to watch the video) Six Seasons: A New Way with Vegetables – I’ve got my eye on this cookbook Roasted Poblano and Jackfruit Tacos – can’t wait to make these Our Youtube Channel – we are obsessed with making videos! Minty Aloe and Cucumber Lemonade   Print Serves: 5-6 cups Ingredients 1 packed cup mint sprigs, plus more for serving 3 cups purified water half of a large cucumber 1 large aloe leaf 1 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice (4-5 lemons) ¼ cup maple syrup Instructions Bruise the mint a bit by rubbing it between your hands. In a small saucepan, combine the mint sprigs and water, bring to a boil and let cool to infuse. Once cool, strain the mixture into an upright blender and discard the mint sprigs. Cut the cucumber half in half lengthwise and scoop out the seeds. Optionally, shave off a few cucumber ribbons with a vegetable peeler for serving in the glass. Roughly chop the cucumber and put it into the blender. Cut the white base off the bottom of the aloe leaf, then cut off the spiky sides. Cut off the top layer of the skin lengthwise. Scoop out all the flesh into the blender using a spoon. Add the lemon juice and maple syrup to the blender and blend everything until smooth. Let cool completely in the refrigerator. Serve over ice, with cucumber ribbons and more fresh mint leaves. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Pi?a Colada Milkshake - Ice Cream Sunday Raw Spearmint and Chocolate Cheesecake Superberry Smoothie Peach, Honey and Thyme Lemonade Popsicles - Ice Cream Sunday .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Minty Aloe and Cucumber Lemonade appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

oatmeal recipe | overnight oats recipe | oats recipes for weight loss

May 14 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

oatmeal recipe | overnight oats recipe | oats recipes for weight lossoatmeal recipe | overnight oats recipe | oats recipes for weight loss with step by step photo and video recipe. an healthy and weight loss porridge which not only helps to reduce cholesterol, but also supplies all necessary multivitamins and nutrients. the good thing about oatmeal recipe is it can be prepared with various mix and match options and hence it can never be monotonous. basically all the ingredients is stacked up in a jar and refrigerated it for overnight for morning breakfast. Continue reading oatmeal recipe | overnight oats recipe | oats recipes for weight loss at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Live Longer — Fruits and Veggies Proven to Add More Life

March 27 2017 Meatless Monday 

Live Longer — Fruits and Veggies Proven to Add More LifeMarch is National Nutrition Month. So each week this month, were highlighting how certain foods can help improve specific health conditions. This is the fourth and final article in the series. Please share with friends and family who may be interested. Youve heard it many times from many different sources: doctors, talk shows, magazine articles, you name it. The way to stay healthy is to exercise regularly, watch your weight, get enough sleep and eat a sensible diet. But what if, just by choosing the right foods to eat, you could actually live longer? Thats not science fiction. Thats science fact. According to a study published in the Journal of American Medical Association, diets with a high intake of animal protein (meat) were positively associated with cardiovascular mortality. This means death caused by heart attack, heart disease or stroke. Furthermore, this danger is even greater for individuals with at least one lifestyle risk factor, such as smoking, obesity, high blood pressure or high cholesterol. And the size of this study was remarkably comprehensive, - over 130,000 people from all walks of life participated. Eating more plants - vegetables, whole grains and legumes - and fewer animal products can help you live a longer, healthier life, said Rebecca Ramsing, sr. program officer, Food Communities & Public Health Program at Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future. Taking meat off your plate a few days a week can make a long-lasting impact! On a brighter note, the study also indicates that diets with a high intake of plant-based protein - instead of meat - result in less deaths due to cardiovascular issues. This finding suggests the importance of the protein source you choose to eat regularly. In other words, people who choose more fruits, veggies, grains and nuts tend to be healthier and live longer. With this good news in mind, weve picked out one of our favorite recipes to help you savor all life has to offer. Bon appétit. Roasted Spring Veggie Couscous The post Live Longer — Fruits and Veggies Proven to Add More Life appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Show Some Love in February, ‘Go Red’ for American Heart Month

January 30 2017 Meatless Monday 

Show Some Love in February, ‘Go Red’ for American Heart Month This Friday, February 3rd, marks the American Heart Associations 14th annual National Wear Red Day. This life-saving event raises awareness of heart disease - the leading cause of death among women - by encouraging people to wear red and discuss ways to prevent this chronic disease. At Meatless Monday, we take this issue to heart. So much so, we believe that attention to heart health should be kept top of mind all year-round. And participating in Meatless Monday is an easy and effective way to do just that. According to doctors, one of the top ways to decrease your risk of heart disease is to eat a healthy, balanced diet. For many, this means reducing the amount of meat consumed each week and replacing it with vegetables, fruits, grains and nuts. In fact, eating less meat and more fruits and veggies also lowers your risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes and cancer. To get an idea of your current heart health, you can take a simple online test from the AHA called Lifes Simple 7 . In addition to diet, you can also help prevent heart disease by controlling your cholesterol, managing your blood pressure, maintaining a healthy weight, reducing your blood sugar and, of course, quit smoking. Well also give you a hand. Want to really bring home the message of heart healthy eating? Then download our free Comfort Food Heart Healthy Cookbook . Inside youll find 11 deliciously satisfying meatless recipes. Comfort food so good, youll love it with all your heart! The post Show Some Love in February, ‘Go Red’ for American Heart Month appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Declare Your Independence From Meat This Monday!

July 4 2016 Meatless Monday 

Declare Your Independence From Meat This Monday!Whats patriotic? Its not a color (red, white, and blue). Its not hot dogs and grilled burgers. Its a feeling inside--a feeling of pride, of being proud to be part of a country and a planet that can be free and sustainable. Its a feeling of commitment to make that sustainability a reality. This year July Fourth falls on Meatless Monday--the perfect opportunity to refrain from eating meat once a week in support of our own well-being and the well-being of the planet. Those of us who follow Meatless Monday do it with joy. Holidays included! But what if youre invited to a Fourth of July barbecue thats overloaded with meat? Not to worry! Here are 5 ways to stay proud and and go Meatless Monday on a prime grilling day! Meet them burger for burger. Theres absolutely no need to give into carcinogenic charred meat any time of the year. Instead, protect your health and choose from our delicious stock of TWELVE different kinds of meatless burgers--from Supreme Crispy Quinoa Burgers to Grilled Portobello Mushroom Burgers to Grilled Watermelon Pineapple Teriyaki Burgers. Send our recipes to your hosts ahead of time or bring along the ingredients and cook together. Just make sure you bring enough; one bite and guests will be wanting more. Grill the fruit and veggie aisle. Nothing says Meatless Monday better than delicious fruits and vegetables. And dont be intimidated by the word grilling. From avocados to artichokes, there are lots of unusual fruits and vegetables you can happily throw on the rack and nudge that steak aside! For even more ideas, check out our Recipe section. Commandeer the sides. Even meat-packed barbecues usually feature great summer side dishes like crisp salads, grilled corn, and juicy chunks of fresh watermelon. Bring along a can of garbanzo beans or feta cheeseand sprinkle onto your salad for an extra boost of protein. Give a toast to Meatless Monday. Pick up a glass of bubbly (kombucha works great!) and make a salute to everyones health. Follow-up with a shout-out about Meatless Monday and explain how its one of the best things youve ever done to lower your cholesterol and reduce your chances for chronic disease. Brag about your lowered emissions. When your friends rave on about their new low-emission vehicles, tell them that by not eating meat for just one day a week, you are saving the carbon equivalent of driving your car every day for a month! Not to mention, youre also helping to conserve the planets water supply. Check out this video for more eco-oriented talking points. The post Declare Your Independence From Meat This Monday! appeared first on Meatless Monday.

4 Ways to Give Your Vegan Baking a Makeover

May 10 2016 Vegetarian Times 

4 Ways to Give Your Vegan Baking a Makeover Just because youre looking to follow a healthy lifestyle, doesnt mean you have to sit out on all the fresh-baked fun! There are many tricks that natural food chefs and nutritionists alike use to help raise nutrient density, therefore lessening the guilt. While these ingenious methods may not give us the liberty to eat breakfast bread like its a leafy green salad, they do offer a wonderful compromise in creating better-for-you, great-tasting treats. These are some of my favorite tricks to use: Sneak in Fruit and Vegetable Purees | To achieve moist baked goodies, like a soft cookie or dense brownie, most chefs rely on large amounts of butter or oil (which, as you can imagine, raises the calorie and fat content of a dessert faster than you can say oh no, I really shouldnt). The good news is there are many other ways to keep moisture in desserts that are far healthier! Using fruit or vegetable purees is a go-to method of mine, as it not only keeps desserts moist, but purees also help sweeten, add flavor, and provide extra fiber at the same time. For fruits, the most versatile varieties include mashed bananas and applesauce. As for vegetables, purees of pumpkin, squash, and even carrots work excellently. How much to use ranges from recipe to recipe - as a baseline, I often use about half of the normal amount of oil a recipe calls for, and substitute the other half with a puree in a 1:1 ratio. This way, you wont sacrifice any flavor! Celebrate With Smart Sweeteners | I talk a lot about using different types of sweeteners, but it bears repeating - theres simply no need to use empty sugars like white cane sugar and corn syrup when we have a world of great sweeteners that actually offer some benefits! Use low-glycemic coconut sugar as a one-to-one replacement for all your white sugar needs, and try healthier liquid sweeteners like yacon syrup or maple syrup when you need something in liquid form. Use Superseed Eggs | While eggs do offer protein, these days, many people are increasingly avoiding them due to eggs being a high cholesterol, acid forming (and thus inflammation promoting), and/­­or allergenic food. To keep everyone in your cookie list happy, try using a binder replacement of flaxseeds or chia instead, which offer protein, healthy fats, fiber, and minerals! Once these seeds are ground into a powder, they can be mixed with water and left to sit for 10 minutes to form a jelly-like substance that acts very egg-like in recipes that dont require eggs to rise (this includes all cookies, brownies, and many cakes). To use this egg-hack, just remember this ratio: 2 tablespoons powder + 1/­­3 cup water = 2 eggs. Boost With Superfoods | Healthy eating isnt all about what you take out; its also about what you put in. If your recipe of sugar, oil, and flour seems pretty nutritionally dire, think about what you can add into the recipe that will subtly raise its healthy value. For example, adding in real cacao nibs into chocolate chip cookies not only adds a chocolaty crunch, but loads of important minerals too. Replacing a couple tablespoons of flour with unflavored or vanilla protein powder stealthily adds bonus protein and fiber. Or try adding in the enjoyable sweet chew of antioxidant-rich dried mulberries to create a treat as extra delicious as it is nutritious.

Why Garlic Should Be a Diet Staple

April 5 2016 Vegetarian Times 

Why Garlic Should Be a Diet Staple Garlic is a favorite ingredient for cooks around the world--and provides a variety of health benefits. Heres how to get the most from this ancient superfood. Garlic may stink, literally, but when it comes to health benefits, this plant is a winner. Not only is it rich in phosphorus, calcium, and copper, but when incorporated into a regular diet, it may reduce risks of cancer and heart disease. Garlic Benefits Garlics benefits include lowering total cholesterol and blood pressure, reducing oxidative stress--which has been linked to numerous health conditions--controlling infections, helping keep iron in circulation, and possibly reducing the risk of cancer, says George Mateljan, Hawaii-based author of The Worlds Healthiest Foods (GMF Publishing, 2015) and founder of Health Valley Foods. Cooked vs. Raw Garlic As for its famous odor? Not until you cut into a garlic clove will its sulfur compounds release their smell. The compounds found in raw garlic confer the greatest health benefits, but cooked garlic is a superstar, too--lending a flavor kick to soups, stews, breads, meats, vegetables, sauces, and dressings. It can also be roasted on its own so that each clove becomes soft and spreadable. Meanwhile, letting crushed garlic stand for 10 minutes before cooking with it can prevent the loss of its cancer-fighting properties, according to a study in the Journal of Nutrition. See also High and Low: Garlic Presses Know Your Garlic Supermarkets usually carry just one kind of garlic, but there are actually hundreds of different types--they can be found at farmers markets and garlic festivals (see left). They all fall into one of two general categories: Softneck Characteristics >> Most frequently found in grocery stores, this type produces stalks, but usually also has more individual cloves than the hardneck types. Flavor profile >> Generally milder than hardneck. Common types >> Silverskin and artichoke Hardneck Characteristics >> Garlics in this category feature hard, woody stalks that often send up a floral stalk, and are larger but provide fewer cloves per bulb than softneck varieties. Flavor profile >> This category includes a wider variety of flavors--including some that border on intense--than softneck garlics. Common types >> Rocambole, porcelain, purple stripe, marbled purple stripe, glazed purple stripe Garlic supplements to try Although garlic and its derivatives are included on the Food and Drug Administrations Generally Recognized As Safe list, check with your doctor before taking garlic supplements, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on blood-thinning medications. Here are a few options: Kyolic Aged Garlic Extract $21.99/­­300 Formula 100 capsules; kyolic.com Metagenics SuperGarlic 6000 $31.95/­­90 600 mg concentrate tablets; metagenics.com Natural Factors GarlicRich Super Strength Garlic Concentrate $13.97/­­90 500 mg coated softgels; natralfactors.com Natures Way Garlic Bulb $5.49/­­100 580 mg vegetarian capsules; naturesway.com The Vitamin Shoppe Aged Garlic Extract $15.99/­­200 600 mg capsules; vitaminshoppe.com

Healthier You Series: Go Meatless with Delicious Diabetes-Friendly Recipes from Chef Ronaldo Linares

January 20 2019 Meatless Monday 

Healthier You Series: Go Meatless with Delicious Diabetes-Friendly Recipes from Chef Ronaldo LinaresStart smart eating habits on Mondays for a happier and healthier you! Did you know increasing your consumption of plant-based foods and decreasing red meat could help you lower the risk of type 2 diabetes in the long term? Find out more! Photo credit: Kelly Campbell Photography This week we catch up with Chef Ronaldo Linares , a leading expert on healthy Latino cooking who is helping his community fight diabetes in a big way, with food. Known for creating modern recipes from ancient flavors, he recently published Chef Ronaldos Sabores De Cuba , where you can find close to 100 diabetes-friendly recipes using Latin flavors. The cookbook meets the dietary guidelines of the American Diabetes Association, plus its bilingual! Heres Chef Ronaldos advice for keeping it sabroso y sano (flavorful and healthy): 1) What are some of your most popular tips for making dishes diabetes-friendly? Mother Earth gives us a lot! We only have to educate ourselves about food to make delicious diabetic-friendly dishes. Here are my suggestions: o Simplicity is key. o Stick to three main ingredients. o Choose ingredients that are high in fiber, low in sugar, and contain healthy fats. o Mix up the spices to avoid using too much salt, i.e. consider adding fresh herbs to the mix! 2) Why is it important to reduce the amount of meat you eat in your diet? Thats a great question. By eating less red meat and more plant-based foods, you could lower your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Reducing your consumption of red meat can also reduce your intake of cholesterol, a change that can help heart health. This means if you are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes or heart disease, by eating more whole grains, vegetables and fruits, and less red meat, you could lower your risk of developing these diseases. 3) Whats your favorite Meatless Monday dish?  Quinoa Mango Jicama Salad! You get a great balance of protein, fat, and carbs in this tasty recipe. The crunch of the jicama, the nutty flavor from the quinoa, and the fresh herbs all add the perfect touch. This is also a great meal prep salad: Make the salad at home and bring it to work, put the dressing in a separate container, and when youre ready, mix everything up and enjoy! For me, its about keeping it simple and maximizing the flavors. 4) Whats your favorite plant-based protein and why? My top choice has to be quinoa! The possibilities are endless. From quick soups and bowls to stir-fries, its such a versatile, diabetic-friendly, and plant-based protein. One cup of cooked quinoa has 8 grams of protein and is rich in nutrients, iron, and fiber. You could make a big batch on Sunday and eat it throughout the week. 5) What is the number one piece of advice you give people who are starting a new healthy diet and lifestyle? Be patient. Eating plant-based foods comes with a whole bag of new benefits like weight loss, physical transformation, and maybe feeling better, too! Enjoy the journey, TOMA! Use Mondays to make positive change in your life that will do you a world of good. Meatless Monday is a global movement followed by millions who choose not to eat meat one day a week for their health and the health of the planet. Help spread the word about the many health benefits of Meatless Monday, such as reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes. Download our fun and shareable free graphic: Find us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram! The post Healthier You Series: Go Meatless with Delicious Diabetes-Friendly Recipes from Chef Ronaldo Linares appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Exciting New Partnership! Meatless Monday and the National Kidney Foundation

October 15 2018 Meatless Monday 

Exciting New Partnership! Meatless Monday and the National Kidney FoundationWere thrilled to announce Meatless Mondays new partnership with The National Kidney Foundation , the largest organization dedicated to the awareness, prevention, and treatment of kidney disease. The National Kidney Foundation and Meatless Monday are partnering to encourage people to make healthier changes to their diets. Studies suggest that incorporating meatless options into an overall balanced diet can help promote kidney health. Meatless Monday provides an easy way to make this first step towards a healthier lifestyle by cutting out meat just one day a week, and diversifying diets through meatless choices. Through the partnership, Meatless Monday hopes to support individuals who are at-risk or who are experiencing kidney disease in making an important dietary change. Meatless Monday also strives to help all people learn about the many benefits of reducing meat consumption. Reducing consumption of red and processed meat and eating more plant-based foods, such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, and legumes, can help lead to: o Better kidney health o Better management of kidney disease o Lower blood pressure and cholesterol o Lower risk of diabetes o Healthy weight management Kidney disease is more common than you might think! According to the National Kidney Foundation , in the United States, about 30 million adults have chronic kidney disease - and most arent aware of it.  1 in 3 American adults are at risk for chronic kidney disease. Risk factors for kidney disease include diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity, and family history. See Meatless Mondays kidney-friendly graphics and materials Theyre free for use by all – individuals, organizations, hospitals, city leaders, universities, and more,for use across social media, online, and print. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram for Meatless Monday recipes and news each week. The post Exciting New Partnership! Meatless Monday and the National Kidney Foundation appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Why Meatless Monday Should Be Part of Your Healthy Monday Reset

January 1 2018 Meatless Monday 

Why Meatless Monday Should Be Part of Your Healthy Monday ResetNew Years is commonly thought of as the time to make a fresh start. However, the beginning of the calendar year isnt the only time you can make positive changes to your lifestyle. Research shows that many people - 58 percent - also consider Monday to be a chance to start something new. Using Monday as a day to reset or recommit to a new practice gives you more than 50 chances to start fresh! This year, New Years Day falls on a Monday, so you can kick off your Monday habits on New Years Day, and continue them the rest of the year. One of the best things you can do is incorporate Meatless Monday into your week. Science is certain: the rise of meat consumption plays a significant role in global warming and climate change. It also is at the root of the increasing rates of preventable, non-communicable diseases. Despite this research, many people still have questions and concerns about switching to a plant-based diet as a way to remedy these global problems. However, it isnt necessary for people to give up meat entirely in order to make an impact on their health and the health of the planet. Reducing meat consumption even one day a week has been shown to have an impact on the rise in global temperature; it also has great effects on physical health, such as lowering blood pressure and cholesterol as well as the risk for stroke and heart disease. Meatless Monday can be that one day a week. Just one day with all plant-based meals is a great step in a positive direction for you, your family, or even your school or workplace. Its easy to go meat-free with a little information and delicious recipes. Even the most dedicated carnivores have found vegan and vegetarian recipes that are satisfying, full of protein, and simple to make while having plenty of variety. When you reset this Monday, go meatless and make a difference! We even found a few recipes to start you off. The post Why Meatless Monday Should Be Part of Your Healthy Monday Reset appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso

September 6 2017 My New Roots 

Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso I have to start by saying how incredibly moved I was by the comments on the last post, and the emails I received from you guys - a deep, heartfelt thank you. I knew that opening myself up would spark a lot of conversation, but I never imagined the impact it would have, not only in regards to the incredible outpouring of support, but for sharing your own stories and struggles. Time and time again I am reminded of the power in vulnerability and open communication. I feel truly blessed to have a community of conscious and loving readers, and that we can all share our journey with one another. That is what makes us stronger, and certainly healthier human beings in every sense of the word. Before I dig deeper into what Ive been doing to eat for balancing my hormones, Id like to just follow-up with the topic of orthorexia. Many of you expressed surprise at my struggles, thinking that because I do what I do, I must have had it all together. The truth is I thought that I did have it all together for a very long time, and creating My New Roots has been the most powerful catalyst in my healing. For the last decade, Ive felt very grounded in my choices and excited to celebrate them with you. But like I mentioned in the last post, the experience of changing my diet has brought back many of the challenges, dark thoughts and feelings that I had convinced myself were gone forever. Putting new restrictions on myself made me to put food into good and bad categories. This probably doesnt sound so terrible, but like I said before, this is a slippery slope into full-blown disordered eating for me. I see now that there is an incredibly fine line between caring about what I eat and caring too much. I believe that my relationship to food is something that I may have to keep in check for the rest of my life, or at least as long as I choose to use it as a tool to become a healthier person (so, like, forever). In the last four months of tuning into what I need right now, and eating more consciously, Ive really experienced a positive difference in how I feel, which is the biggest reward anyone could ask for! But Ive also had bad days where I wasnt prepared, and suddenly being at a wedding or a birthday party, or out for dinner with friends without much to eat in the good category, wasnt so rad. My blood sugar would crash, Id feel desperate, totally out of control and the voices would come back. What Ive learned from these experiences is that I need to be as prepared as possible in these situations, but if I can’t, I simply have to let go. I cannot control everything and I cannot always be prepared, but that in order to move forward, I have to maintain flexibility, and stop being so darn hard on myself! I firmly believe that there is more strength in being fluid and forgiving, than rigid and judgmental. I am just a person, after all. Since many of you were curious about the connection between food and hormone balance, Id like to discuss it in more detail, and share what Ive been doing to keep these miraculous chemicals in check, and keep them working for me, not against me! Upping my fat and protein intake – but especially fat Fats are an essential part of a healthy, well-balanced diet, and they are especially important for hormone balance. Fats actually create the structural components of hormones, and cholesterol specifically is responsible for our reproductive hormones; estrogen, progesterone and testosterone. The type of fat you choose however, is critical to achieving a positive effect, as the ones you consume become the building blocks for your hormones. Saturated fats like coconut oil, butter and ghee, and monounsaturated fats like olive oil, nuts, eggs, and avocados are excellent choices and should be consumed responsibly every day. Cut back on or eliminate corn, canola, sunflower, safflower and soybean oils, and replace them with the aforementioned instead. Ive also increased my protein intake, and consciously replacing more high-carbohydrate foods with more protein-rich foods such as tempeh, hemp, sprouts, activated nuts, eggs, and quality protein powder has really made a difference in stabilizing my energy levels and appetite. Getting enough protein on a vegetarian diet is totally possible, but I find that if Im not really paying attention, I can dip below the ideal 45 grams a day. Loosely (not obsessively) keeping track of my daily intake of protein has helped me feel my best. Keeping my blood sugar stable It may seem totally unrelated, but blood sugar and hormones are in fact inextricably linked. One of the main functions of the endocrine system (the system that creates and transports hormones in your body) is delivering glucose to your brain, muscles, and heart. So if anything in that process isnt working properly, than mismanaged blood sugar is the inevitable result. But whats worse is that it creates a cascade effect whereby none of the other parts of your endocrine system will work either. Sheesh! Walking the line between high and low blood sugar is something that Ive really been focusing on lately, and its working well, but it is an ongoing process that takes some getting used to. Including more fat and protein in my diet has been a game-changer for me, since those macronutrients digest slower than carbohydrates - even the complex ones from things like sweet potatoes, quinoa, and chickpeas. I try to eat a large and protein-rich breakfast within an hour of waking up (after the lemon water, of course!). Lunch is where I get the majority of my calories since that is when I need the most energy. I like eating roasted vegetables, avocado, eggs, and sprouted pseudo-grains like quinoa and buckwheat. I snack in between meals when Im hungry, but instead of reaching for a slice of rye bread or a rice cake, Ill have veggies with a high-fat dip, or a handful of my Maple Cinnamon Grain-free Granola. Dinner is mostly grain-free these days and I stick to salads, soups and stews. I go to bed no longer than four hours after dinner so that Im not hungry right before I hit the pillow. Then I like to have a break of about 14 hours between dinner and breakfast the next day, as my digestion does well on the rhythm of intermittent fasting. Eating more vegetables (and less bread a.k.a. DUH) I almost always had a couple slices of rye bread at lunch. Not that there is anything wrong with doing so, but Ill admit to feeling pretty foggy-headed afterwards. And because it filled me up so much, I had less room for veggies. Now Im prepping raw and cooked vegetables ahead of time and keeping them on hand specifically for my big lunches. Some favourites to roast in the oven are cauliflower, sweet potato, pumpkin, red onion, zucchini, tomatoes, and broccoli. Ive also started cutting up a big plate of veggie sticks in the early afternoon, before I even get hungry, so that it is there and waiting for me - no excuses. Right before diving in I douse it in freshly squeezed lemon juice, Maldon salt and Aleppo pepper. Its honestly delicious. I dont have to tell you that vegetables are full of filling fiber, replenishing phytonutrients, and yes, protein. Especially dem green ones. Eat more plants. Habits + meal prep I think this was the other big hurdle for me when it came to changing things up with my eating habits. I knew that if I was going to start eating food differently, Id have to start preparing food differently too - and a lot more often. I already spend a lot of time in the kitchen (obvi) and I love it, but I am also a person who likes to spend her non-work hours away from the cutting board. Eating this way admittedly does take more time, and makes it more challenging to eat out, or just grab something on the go. Coming to terms with this was challenging, but Ive realized that I have to dedicate more time to my diet if I want to be successful. No matter how you slice it, meal preparation is a very big part of sticking to your goals, whatever they may be. Of course there are times when its just not possible to do, and divergent days are fine, but the majority of your food youre should fall into the category that helps you feel your best, however you define that. Instead of prepping one day a week, which I know a lot of people like to do, I actually prefer to pepper it throughout the week in a way that is a little more fluid for me. If the Life-Changing Loaf of Bread is in the oven for instance, Ill chop up a bunch of veggies, and put them in too. If Im washing greens for a salad, Ill do all of them so that theyre ready to chuck into a smoothie on a whim. Lee from Americas Fat Balls have also been a super snack these days. And like I mentioned before, having fresh veggies washed and sliced up for afternoon cravings is very helpful. I can prepare two or three days worth at a time and keep them in the fridge. Mindset Instead of looking at food in terms of good and bad which I think is a dangerously judgemental way to categorize what were eating, I like to say yes to certain things, and the others fall into the not-right-now basket. For instance, I love brown rice to the ends of the earth and back, but Im not eating it right now since it doesnt make me feel all that great. And just because Im not eating brown rice these days doesnt mean I’ll never eat it again! This leaves room for flexibility and creates a far more sustainable way to look at ones diet. Isn’t it relieving to know that if you are out for dinner and there’s only rice for example, that you could potentially eat it and not beat yourself up? Ahhhh…did you feel that?! What a relief, eh? Tomorrow you’ll get back on the horse, no big deal at all. Making changes should be fun, and keep those labels for tin cans! You’re a fluid being, ever-changing, so make space for that in your meal planning too. Self-care routine, stress-reduction, exercise, and sleep I used to see self-care as something that only people with time have. Well, after totally hitting the wall a while ago, I realized that it just has to be a priority, respected as a part of a holistic approach to health, and something to actually schedule in the calendar. Staying active, sleeping, and treating myself to some yummy stress-reducing activities like spending time in nature, bodywork, and cooking (go figure) keeps me feeling happy and relaxed. Squelching stress doesnt happen by accident: it is truly a daily practice and something to be mindful of. Listen to yourself. How can this moment be juicier and more relaxing? Its fun to love yourself! Keeping stress levels low means that your body will be relaxed and not producing hormones that should only be reserved for emergency situations. Cortisol is a stress hormone released by the adrenal glands. Every time we experience a stressful situation we secrete this hormone into the blood stream so that our bodies can deal with the stressor at hand. Although cortisol is our friend in acute situations, our systems arent designed to be pumping it out round the clock as we juggle and struggle with backlogged emails, fussy kids, and traffic jams. This is why chronic stress is so detrimental to our bodies: prolonged, elevated cortisol levels wreak all kinds of wrong inside of us, raising our blood pressure, causing unwanted weight gain, exhaustion, anxiety, impaired brain function, and weakening the immune response. All the more reason to take self-care seriously, and do the things you love more often. Its actually healthy. Sleeping 7-9 hours a night is another non-negotiable. Getting enough sleep helps us to control our cortisol production, balance our blood sugar, and put us back in line with our natural circadian rhythm. Turning screens off an hour before bedtime will help signal to your body that it is in fact, night time. Create a relaxed, cozy environment and spend the last hour before bed reading, stretching, or meditating. I still struggle with this one, as I love looking at Instagram right before turning out the light, but Im becoming more mindful and doing my best. Required Reading There are a few really amazing books out there that I recommend every woman reads, whether or not you’re seeking advice on a particular health issue. Understanding our bodies and cycles is the first step in helping ourselves become healthier, stronger, more connected women. Woman Code by Alisa Vitti has been hugely educational and supportive for me. Her book is a guide to figuring out what the heck is going on inside you, and how to correct it through diet and lifestyle. I appreciate her easy-to-understand language and humour in this book, because let’s face it: nothing is very funny when you’re hormones are raging! The Complete Natural Medicine Guide to Women’s Health by Dr. Sat Dharam Kaur has been and continues to be another excellent resource for me. This book is more of an all-round toolkit for lifelong health and healing, than specifically about hormone balance. I love the holistic approach to all conditions, and inspiring programs to get us back in touch with our natural cycles in connection to the earth. The third book I recommend is Hormone Balance by Carolyn Dean. Dean is a naturopathic doctor that utilizes both traditional and alternative solutions to help readers rebalance their hormone levels. Her writing is engaging and inspiring, and this book is full of ways for women to achieve greater overall health. Oh man, I havent even talked about the tacos yet! So. I got the idea for these this past summer when I was chopping up tempeh to replace ground beef with in a tomato sauce for pasta. It turned out so meaty, satisfying, and delish that I thought I could perhaps take that same idea, spice it up a little differently, and serve them in a taco. Woot! I knew that grilled veggies and red cabbage would help cut the richness, but that I would also need a boss sauce to put them over the top. During one of my retreats I made a raw queso in our cooking class and everyone went wild for it. It seemed like a natural fit! Topped with some lime, avo, pickled red onions, and cilantro these were the best tacos Ive ever had. Ever. Ever. And Ive had a lot of tacos. I know some of you are going to ask about the corn tortillas and probably remind me that corn is a “grain”. Yes, I am aware of that, and I’ll remind you that I am not grain-free, just cutting way back. I stick mostly to pseudo-grains and make sure they are soaked prior to cooking, and enjoy a treat like this once in a while. I only purchase tortillas made with sprouted corn, or from corn that has been nixtalmized (that topic is a whole other blog post!). I buy my corn tortillas from Hija de Sanchez here in Copenhagen. Their tortillas are made fresh daily using nixtamalized corn imported from Mexico, so they taste unbelievably good. Of course taco fillings are important to a good taco, but the tortilla quality should not be overlooked! It makes the dish. Go find the good ones.     Print recipe     Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso Serves 3-4 Tempeh Taco Meat 250g /­­ 8.8oz organic, non-GMO tempeh 1 medium red onion 4 cloves garlic 1 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee 1 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. chipotle or smoked hot paprika, to taste 2 Tbsp. tamari 2-5 Tbsp. water, as needed Grilled vegetables 1 medium zucchini 1 medium red onion 1 red bell pepper 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1 tsp. ground cumin a couple pinches of cayenne, if desired 12 small corn tortillas (try to find organic, non-GMO if possible) 1 batch Raw Cashew Queso, recipe below Optional add-ins: 1 ripe avocado 1 small bunch cilantro pickled red onion or thinly sliced red onion shredded red cabbage tossed with a little salt and lime juice limes for serving hot sauce Cooking and assembly: 1. Start by making the Raw Cashew Queso (see recipe below). 2. Heat your grill or barbecue to medium-high. If not using a grill, simply cook everything in a skillet on the stove. 3. Finely chop or crumble tempeh into whatever size appeals to you (mine were rather small to mimic ground beef). Set aside. Mince red onion and garlic. Set aside. 4. Soak wooden skewers in water while you prepare the vegetables, or longer if you remember. If using metal skewers, skip this step. 5. Wash and cut the zucchini and onion into rings, the peppers into chunks. Place in a large bowl and toss with the salt and spices. 6. Skewer the vegetables so that their largest surface will lay flat on the grill (see photo). Alternate veggies until youve used them all. Place on the grill and cook until stating to char on the underside, anywhere from 5-10 minutes, depending on your cooking method. Flip and cook on the other side. 7. While the vegetables are grilling, cook the tempeh. H eat your cooking oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the onion and a few pinches of salt. Cook until starting to brown, about 7-10 minutes. Add garlic and cook for another minute until fragrant. Add crumbled tempeh, cumin, chipotle, and stir well to incorporate. Pour in the tamari, followed by a couple tablespoons of water. Stir well and add water as needed - youre after a moist mixture. Taste and adjust seasoning as desired. Cook for a total of 10 minutes. The mixture should be golden brown, hot and delicious! 8. Warm the tortilla shells on the grill or in a pan over medium-high heat. 9. Spoon the desired amount of tempeh into each tortilla shell. Followed by the roasted veggies, avocado, cabbage, cilantro and pour on the Raw Cashew Queso. Enjoy! Raw Cashew Queso Makes about 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 150g cashews, soaked for 4-8 hours or overnight 1 red bell pepper 1/­­2 tsp. salt 2 Tbsp. nutritional yeast 2-3 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice, to taste 1/­­2 clove garlic 1 small piece fresh turmeric ground cayenne, to taste 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water Directions: 1. Drain and rinse the cashews. 2. Put all ingredients, except water, in a high-speed blender or food processor and blend, adding water one tablespoon at a time until the desired consistency is reached. If you want a thick cream, use less water, for a thinner sauce, use more. (You will not achieve a perfectly smooth sauce with a food processor, but it is still delicious!). Before I go I just want to reiterate how wonderful it felt to be met with such open arms after the last post. I wish I could write back to every single one of you who shared their story with me, and everyone else here, but I simply couldnt get to them all. I am moved beyond words that so many of you felt open and supported in this space too, and I will urge you to seek out help if you need it. And if you know someone who you think may struggle with disordered eating, reach out and help them in a loving, and non-judgmental way. We are all in this together. In love and light, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   *   * http:/­­/­­www.goldencircleretreats.com/­­portugal/­­index.html Dear friends! I am thrilled to share the location for my next wellness retreat in magical Comporta, Portugal, November 5-11, 2017. Join Mikkala Marilyn Kissi and I at Sublime Comporta for seven days of luxurious living, divinely delicious meals, inspiring cooking classes and nutrition seminars, yoga, Pilates, meditation, and breath work. Come press the reset button with me! Ride horses on the beach, dance under the stars, and cozy up by the fire. This will be a week to remember. I cant wait to see you there! Click here for more info and tickets. The post Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso appeared first on My New Roots.

Step Up for Men’s Health Month this Meatless Monday

June 5 2017 Meatless Monday 

Step Up for Men’s Health Month this Meatless MondayWelcome to June: longer days, fresh garden veggies and Mens Health Month. If youre a man, this month is your yearly reminder to make sure youre healthy and fit. And if youre someone who cares about men, then this is your month to apply some friendly persuasion to make sure the guys in your life schedule a doctors appointment pronto - and maybe suggest a few changes to their eating habits. Lets dig in! Foods that Help Keep Men Healthy Show most men a juicy, fresh-grilled steak and watch their eyes light up. In fact, show some men a fast food drive-thru window and their mouths start watering. And its alright to treat yourself every now and again, but be warned. Overconsumption of meat (red and processed) as well as other unhealthy choices (fried foods, dairy and excessive alcohol drinking), can lead to serious health issues. These include heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, type 2 diabetes, obesity and cancer. Now its no secret that fresh veggies, fruits, whole grains and nuts are a healthier way to go.  And you can always start with a few simple changes. For instance, begin with the classic fare thats always tasty and satisfying, but switch out the meat ingredient - like a hearty bean burrito or a rich meatless chili. Next, fire up that grill and serve some sizzling portabella mushrooms, roasted bell peppers and hot, juicy corn on the cob. And dont forget some zesty side dishes. How about a flavorful three bean salad drizzled with a tangy-sweet vinegar olive oil dressing? Before you know it, men will be eating healthier - and not missing the meat!   Wear Blue, Support Mens Health Mark your calendar. June 16th, the Friday before Fathers Day, is Wear BLUE Day. Break out your favorite blue jeans, blue shirt or stylish blue attire to show your support. Urge the men in your life to make healthy choices in diet, weight and exercise. And be sure they get checked out by a doctor for a clean bill of health. Lets make it a guys thing. And since were using blue to support Mens Health, heres one of our favorite blueberry recipes. Blueberry Oatmeal Muffins   The post Step Up for Men’s Health Month this Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Let’s Go Nuts for Good Health

March 30 2017 VegKitchen 

Let’s Go Nuts for Good Health Heres a look at the benefits of eating nuts regularly, and the best nuts to eat. If youre going for a more balanced diet, trying to lower your cholesterol, and even want to lose weight, be sure to include nuts in your daily fare. Just a single handful can have a powerful, positive impact on your […] The post Let’s Go Nuts for Good Health appeared first on Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes: VegKitchen.com.

Sarah Bs Balinese Gado Gado

February 5 2017 My New Roots 

Sarah Bs Balinese Gado Gado First of all, hello you. Its been a while. I can hardly believe that the holidays are behind us and even the whole of January. What happened?! Well, before I launch into the recipe, I just wanted to update you all on a couple things. I need to start by saying that the Wild Heart High Spirit Bali Retreat was, without a doubt, one of the coolest projects Ive ever had the pleasure to work on. Mikkala Marilyn Kissi and I welcomed and held space for 16 women to totally transform, and come out on the other side of seven days, new humans. We all landed back into our physical bodies, rediscovering the euphoria of movement and breath, the taste of real food, the feeling of laughter in our cells, sun on our skin, smiles in our hearts. I could go on forever about how deeply moved I feel about the whole thing, but I will just say thank you to everyone who came, and that we are going to do another one very, very soon. There are a few photos from the retreat at the bottom of this post - I hope you enjoy, and join us next time. Also. Cookbook tour. Its happening. Naturally Nourished officially lands in North America February 14th and I am close behind. Ill be visiting New York, Toronto, Vancouver, Seattle, Portland, San Francisco and Los Angeles. There are more details at the bottom of this post and on my Events page, so please have a look. For all other countries, please stay tuned! Now, its recipe time. If youre a vegetarian traveling through Indonesia, gado gado will save your life. Its the dish that is on every single menu, a veggie-loaded, protein-rich salad drenched in the most flavourful, luscious peanut sauce that youve ever tasted. Combining raw and slightly steamed or blanched vegetables and bean sprouts, it is typically served with fried tofu or boiled eggs and prawn crackers, but so easily made vegan. The first time I traveled to this part of the world, I ate gado gado so often, that I almost grew tired of it. Almost. What was my initial meal to celebrate the return to the magical island of Bali this time? Naturally, gado gado, and it did not disappoint. There is something incredibly satisfying about the dish, something that grabs a hold and makes you coming back for more - I believe it is the exquisite balancing act of flavours and textures. The veggies are light and tender (never mushy!), the sprouts are crunchy and fresh, but the true magic lies da sauce. It hits all the notes with its creamy, rich, salty, sweet, acidic, toasty and spiciness. While eating it youre coming up with ways to justify pouring it on everything (Rice? Yes! Spring rolls? Obviously! Roasted veggies? Of course! Bean salad? Why not?!). Of all the dishes I taught during my retreat cooking classes in Bali, this is the one that the ladies really went wild for. Because sauce. I will mention that I am taking major liberties with the traditional recipe, keeping my version vegan and soy-free, and switching out the peanuts for more health-supportive almonds. I realize that this is akin to making pasta out of vegetables (i.e. not at all pasta), but we often and readily make allowances for the promise of something healthier, so just roll with me on this one, okay? Thanks. But Sarah, whats wrong with peanuts? You may recall me tackling this subject before, but for those of you who are hearing just learning that peanuts and the things made with it are less-than-awesome, lets recap! Although there are a lot worse things you could be eating, there are also plenty of healthier choices than peanuts, and heres why. First of all, peanuts are a bit of an odd duck plant. Not a true nut, but a bean in fact, peanuts grow underground in their thin-skinned pods, which come into direct contact with the surrounding soil. Because this soil is often moist and warm, it presents the ideal environment for fungus to proliferate. Now, its not the fungus that is the issue in this case, but the poison it releases, called alflatoxin, which is a cancer-causing agent that attacks the liver. What is the most shocking news, is that the highest levels of alflatoxin arent found in big brand peanut butters, but in the peanut butter ground fresh in health food stores. Second of all, conventionally-grown peanuts are sprayed with very high levels of pesticides and are one of the most contaminated crops in the North America. They are also often genetically modified. Thirdly, peanuts contain very high levels of Omega-6 fatty acids, an essential fat that we consume too much of in general. Ideally, Omega-6 and Omega-3 fats should be consumed in a 3:1 ratio (like the ratio found in hemp seeds!), otherwise inflammation erupts in the body. If youre a serious peanut and peanut butter lover, there are a few things you can do. For starters, find a brand of peanuts that have been grown organically in a dry environment (New Mexico for instance). Dry environments mean drier soils, which means less fungus. Make sure the nuts you are buying are very fresh and raw, since the word roasted cruelly translates to deep fried. Dry-roasted are okay since they dont use oil in the cooking process, but these nuts are typically old. But the best alternative of all? Other nuts! Like almonds. Almonds are high in vitamin E, a potent antioxidant that makes our skin look radiant, and helps protect again heart disease. Almonds have been proven to help lower cholesterol, the risk of weight gain and diabetes. They have about half the amount of Omega-6 fats that peanuts do, along with fewer calories. I snack on almonds and almond butter whenever I can, and have successfully replaced peanuts with this healthier option. I hope youre inspired to do the same! The cool thing about this dish is that you can make it any time of year with seasonal veggies and prepare them the way that suits you and the outdoor temperature, while keeping the sauce exactly the same. I like to eat veggies almost entirely raw in the summer, and include things like cucumber, green beans, radish, and lettuces. In the winter however, gado gado is truly the prefect cold-weather salad since everything can be slightly cooked and enjoyed warm. For this version, I chose two kinds of cabbage, kale, carrots, sweet potato, and freshly sprouted mung beans. An improvement Ive made since teaching this recipe at the retreat was tossing the still-warm vegetables in virgin coconut oil - best decision. This adds a whole other layer of flavour and creaminess, plus adds even more richness, which need this time of year. Did I mention theres also sauce?! There are a couple ways of making my version of gado gado sauce. The best method, for sure, is roasting your own almonds and making your own fresh nut butter. The flavour will truly blow your mind if you go in this direction. But! If you are pressed for time and /­­ or dont feel like going through the rigmarole, you can totally use store-bought almond butter. Just make sure that it is unsweetened and made from roasted almonds, not raw. We want the full depth of flavour here - raw almond butter is too mild and will be overwhelmed by the other sauce ingredients.     Print recipe     Sarah B’s Balinese Gado Gado Serves 6-8 Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. cold-pressed coconut oil 1/­­2 small head savoy cabbage, shredded 1/­­2 small head red cabbage, shredded 6-7 lacinato kale leaves, ribbed and sliced into ribbons 2 medium sweet potato 4 carrots, julienned or spiralized 2 cups packed /­­ 180g mung bean sprouts (or any sprouts!) 2 shallots, sliced into rings 1 small bunch cilantro, roughly chopped a few pinches flaky sea salt limes for serving, optional Almond Gado Gado Sauce 350g almonds = 1 cup /­­ 250ml almond butter 1 small chili, to taste (use as much or as little as you like) 1 clove garlic 2 Tbsp. tamari juice of 1/­­2 lime 2 Tbsp. coconut sugar 1/­­3 cup /­­ 85ml full-fat coconut milk 1/­­3 cup /­­ 85ml water, to thin as needed Directions: 1. Make the almond gado gado: preheat oven to 350°F /­­ 175°C. Spread almonds out evenly on a cookie sheet and roast until fragrant and golden, about 10-15 minutes. Check often - they burn quickly! Remove from oven and let cool. 2.  Place the almonds in a food processor and pulse to chop them up, then remove a good handful for garnish. Blend the remaining almonds on high, scraping down the sides every so often, until the mixture becomes smooth and liquid. Depending on your food processor, this may take up to 10 minutes - be patient, it will work! 3. Roughly chop the chili and garlic, add them to a food processor, along with the tamari, lime juice, coconut sugar and coconut milk. Blend on high and add water to achieve the correct the consistency: the sauce should be thin enough to pour, but not water-y. Taste and adjust seasoning as needed. Store in a glass jar with an airtight lid (keep leftovers in the fridge). 4. Wash and prepare the vegetables: cut the sweet potato into wedges, spiralize or julienne the carrots, shred the cabbage and kale. Set a steamer over boiling water and place the sweet potato inside first, cover, and set a timer for 6 minutes. If the sweet potatoes are tender at this point, remove them from the steamer and set aside and toss with a little of the coconut oil, then cover to keep warm (if they are still raw, continue to steam until tender). Next place the carrots and cabbage in the steamer and cook for 2-4 minutes until tender-crisp, then toss with remaining coconut oil. In a large bowl combine all the steamed veggies with sprouts, shallots and cilantro. Sprinkle with salt and toss. 5. To serve, spoon a generous portion of sauce onto each plate. Lay the salad on top (or arrange it neatly as I have), sprinkle with chopped, toasted almonds, more cilantro and shallots, as desired. Top with more sauce, if desired. Dig in.   Here are some shots I took during the retreat in Bali. It was beyond magical. If you’d like to stay updated about the next one, please sign up for our newsletter and be the first to know once we announce! And now for the book tour! I am so insanely excited to get on the road with my latest cookbook, Naturally Nourished, which you can preorder here. I’ll be in New York City and Toronto first, and tickets for the events in those cities are now available. Check the Events page, Instagram and Facebook for the remaining cities, Vancouver, Seattle, Portland, San Francisco and Los Angeles. See you soon! February 20th My New Roots x The Aerie Collective: WisdomShare “Turning Your Creativity Into a Career” Spend an evening with Sarah for an inspiring presentation about how she has grown her food blogging passion into a thriving career. Her book is available for purchase & signing. Click here for tickets and more details February 21st My New Roots + Food52 Livestream Tune in to Food52’s Facebook at 3pm EST, for a live broadcast of Sarah Britton demonstrating two of her favourite recipes from her new cookbook Naturally Nourished. Live event link: www.facebook.com/­­food52 February 21st My New Roots + Jessica Murnane + Julia Turshen A very special night of inspiring conversation + a celebration + great women in food! Join us for the launch party of two beautiful & brilliant new cookbooks: Sarah Britton’s Naturally Nourished and Jessica Murnane’s One Part Plant With the conversation led by the highly acclaimed author & chef, Julia Turshen. Come for the bites, drinks, and book signings by all three women – stay for the good times & (selfies)! Click here for tickets and more details February 22nd My New Roots + Amy Chaplin + The Finch: Plant-based Dinner Celebration We’re thrilled to invite you to a very special dinner collaboration at Michelin-starred restaurant The Finch, celebrating two fantastic women in food. Join us for this inspired & intimate gathering. Click here for tickets and more details TORONTO February 24th My New Roots x The Aerie Collective: WisdomShare “Turning Your Creativity Into a Career” Spend an evening with Sarah for an inspiring presentation about how she has grown her food blogging passion into a thriving career. Her book is available for purchase & signing. Click here for tickets and more details February 25th Naturally Nourished Book Launch at Appetito! We’re very happy to welcome you to join us for an excting interview with Sarah, Q&A, recipe tasting from the cookbook, book purchasing & signing. Click here for tickets and more details February 26th My New Roots + The First Mess: Cookbook Celebration Gathering Together with Sarah, Laura and an incredible community we would love to invite you to meet, feast & celebrate in their cookbook launch! Click here for tickets and more details The post Sarah B’s Balinese Gado Gado appeared first on My New Roots.

Hibiscus Ginger Latte

January 29 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Hibiscus Ginger Latte Hibiscus is a powerful tropical flower with a long list of health benefits (anti-inflammatory, digestive aid, metabolism-boosting, helps with cholesterol level and blood pressure maintenance). It also happens to produce the most brilliant, ruby red-colored tea with a prominent tart flavor. I’ve always found pure hibiscus tea to be a little too sour for my taste, but came up with this latte in a recent attempt to get more of its stunning color into my morning routine, and now I’m completely hooked. The creaminess of the almond milk helps offset the harshness of the hibiscus, and the ginger adds a nice note of warmth and complexity, making this latte a great winter drink. The green tea is optional here, but a great addition when you need a little help waking up in the morning or as a mid-afternoon boost. And I swear I feel like I’m getting color therapy when drinking this latte – the fluffy, pink foam is so soothing to look at, I’m in a complete state of peace by the time I’ve taken my last sip. We have some weekend links for you after the jump, have a great Sunday :) - The Cookbook Deal – I’ve been so excited for this podcast, in which Jessica Murnane documents a whole year of her life while making her first cookbook. I loved the first two episodes, and although that might have something to do with the fact that I’ve now gone through the book-making process twice, I think anyone can enjoy it because Jessica is such a great and charming storyteller. And if you are thinking of writing a cookbook, you should definitely give this one a listen. - This Hibiscus Mask from S.W. Basics - Andrea Gentl’s Photo Essay From Her Time in the Andes – breathtaking - Feedback, NY, Down the Aisle – interesting people interviewed about their grocery shopping routines. So far I’ve enjoyed interviews with Julia Turshen, Hannah and Landon Metz, Kenny Anderson. - The Matriarch Behind Beyoncé and Solange - On The Rocks – crystals explained on Garance Doré Hibiscus Ginger Latte   Print Serves: 2 Ingredients 1 tablespoon dried hibiscus flowers 1 piece ginger - shredded 1 green tea bag 1½ cups hot water 1½ cup unsweetened almond milk or other milk of choice 1 tablespoon honey/­­any other sweetener of choice, or to taste (optional) Instructions Combine hibiscus, ginger, green tea and water in a teapot or a large mug, keep covered while steeping. Remove the green tea bag after 2-4 minutes of steeping. Let the hibiscus steep for another 15-20 minutes. Warm up the milk if you prefer a hot latte. Pour the tea into a blender through a strainer. Add the milk and honey to the blender and blend until frothy and smooth. This latte also tastes great iced. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Elderflower Lemonade Black Sesame Cappuccino Spiced Hot Chocolate and a Cookbook of Our Own Quick Persimmon Eggnog .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Hibiscus Ginger Latte appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Men’s Health Month Hero: Rip Esseltyn of Engine 2 Diet

June 20 2016 Meatless Monday 

Men’s Health Month Hero: Rip Esseltyn of Engine 2 Diet Rip Esseltyn is a real man. Okay, he got the nickname Rip when he was two days old, not because of his lean ripped look.  But it fits.  An all-American swimmer in college, he became a world class triathlete, which is when he adopted a plant-strong diet. After ten years in that grueling profession he needed a break. Friends suggested he might want to be a firefighter. Its an awesome profession, said Rip. You help people, you save lives. Its like a big old slumber party. You get to go through red lights and stop signs with sirens blazing. And you do good deeds. Cook good food. No two shifts are ever the same. He applied to the Austin fire department, one of 4000 applying for twelve positions. Its more competitive than getting into Harvard, he joked. It took two years but in 1997, he made the transition from full time triathlete to full time firefighter. Triathlete, Texas firefighter, stand-up guy – he definitely qualifies as a real man.  And he grills veggies. And occasionally fruits. At the firehouse we had a nice grill in the backyard and we would grill every chance we got. Portabella mushrooms, bell peppers, corn on the cob, onions, every kind of squash you can imagine, white button mushrooms, romaine lettuce...oh and pineapples. I love grilling. Of course, when he first started at the firehouse, they were doing a lot of grilling but it wasnt veggies. Oh it was an abomination, recalled Rip. I like to say the four major food groups of the Texas male firefighter are:  Big old honking burgers with cheese and mayonnaise on white bread with a side of deep fried French fries; Beef fajitas with sour cream and cheese, full fatty beans and white rice – and if there are onions and bell peppers theyre slathered in oil and butter; Pizza with as much pepperoni, ham and hamburger meat you can throw on that guy; And the other food group is bluebell ice cream. They have bowls of bluebell for breakfast lunch and dinner. For years, he brought his own food, did his own thing. But then in April 2003, Rip was sitting out of the front porch of the fire station with a couple of his fellow firefighters and they made a bet on who had the lowest cholesterol. Its fortunate they did because one of the men, whose family had a history of heart disease, found out his cholesterol was 344 mg/­­dl. That put a scare into the whole crew and over a period of time they started to change what they ate. Rip challenged his friend with the dangerously high cholesterol to go all in with a plant-based diet for 28 days and see what happened. The cholesterol number plummeted to 197 mg/­­dl. That led Rip to develop the Engine 2 Diet which turned into a pilot study and eventually into a New York Times bestseller. In that book he shares some helpful grilling tips. Vegetables, fruits, and tofu and other meat substitutes are delicious when cooked over coals or a wood fire. Toss them lightly with a marinade first. Spray the bars of the grill with a fat-free cooking spray or employ one of those neat-o perforated skillets or cooking baskets. In his latest book, My Beef with Meat, he includes a recipe for BBQ Seitan Grilling Kabobs and a Grilled Romaine salad. He also warns that when youre grilling any kind of meat - chicken, beef, pork, or fish - what you are really doing is growing carcinogens on it. There are two that appear only in grilled meat: heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS.)” He told us that the great thing about veggies is they dont have the inherent building blocks to create any of these carcinogens. Grill veggies and you get all char and no carcinogens. For the last five years Rips been working with Whole Foods to spread the word about eating plant-based food. He has a line of Engine 2 health food products, exclusive to Whole Foods, that includes everything from cereals and almond milk to pizza crust and veggie burgers. Finally, he talked with us about how fat and cholesterol in animal products can clog arteries to the heart, head, and…other extremities important to real men.  In contrast, when youre eating whole plant-based food it keeps your blood vessels useful and elastic.  “So Id say real men eat plants,” said Rip, “and drop the blue pill in exchange for a bunch of green leafy vegetables.   The post Men’s Health Month Hero: Rip Esseltyn of Engine 2 Diet appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Meatless Meat to the Front of the Line!

April 11 2016 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Meat to the Front of the Line!If youve been wondering if your seitan burger or veggie bacon really helps the environment, heres proof. A recent study just proved that - yes! –  the production of vegetarian meat alternatives generates about 10 times less greenhouse emissions than comparable beef-based products. Researchers from Andrews University tracked CO2 emissions from the whole life cycle of plant-based meats – from seed to harvest to package and transport. Using specialized software to crunch thousands of data points, they found that the average emissions impact across all meat substitutes was 2.4 kilograms. Meat substitutes like crumbles, nuggets, deli slices and sausages had the lowest emissions while veggie burgers, which came in the highest at 4.1 kilograms, was still 5 to 124 kilograms lower than beef. Inspired by programs like Meatless Monday, more and more consumers are clamoring for meat alternatives that are not only healthy but also environmentally sustainable. Meat-free meals dont just generate less emissions; they are most often free of everything that is typically deemed unhealthy about meat: cholesterol, trans fat, and saturated fat, as well as antibiotics and hormones. From both the individual and the collective perspective, meat-free meats are a win-win choice. Luckily, there are lots of options these days for those of us still hankering for the experience of meat, but without the drawbacks. Check out our featured recipe this week, Kale Greek Salad with Chickn or these options from our partners in the meatless meat biz! Grilled Watermelon Pineapple Teriyaki Burger Pasta Alfredo with Walnut Parmesan Chickn Tortilla Soup The post Meatless Meat to the Front of the Line! appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Butternut Squash, Leek and Apple Soup

November 3 2015 My New Roots 

Butternut Squash, Leek and Apple Soup Back in the summer, I was asked to be the guest chef at a restaurant here in Copenhagen for the upcoming fall season. But not just any restaurant: a hyper-local organic restaurant sourcing 95% of their ingredients from within 200 kilometers of their front door, and one that holds classes to educate and inspire city dwellers to eat sustainably all year round. Oh, just kind of up my alley. And it is run by a woman who I clicked with instantaneously, our first conversation touching on everything from mushroom foraging to manifesting ones own reality through the power of positive thinking. I said yes because I was so moved by her ultimate mission, what the restaurant stood for, and not really taking into account that I hadnt cooked in a professional kitchen in many years. But after giving me permission to call the event The Grand Pumpkin Orgy, how could I possibly say no? Fast forward a few months to a couple weeks ago. I am standing at the cutting board preparing vegetables for soup. The soup to be served at the restaurant, which will be full of guests, all there to eat my food. I feel confident and excited, using all of my pumpkin comprehension to develop a menu of stellar proportions, and not letting the true weightiness of the event bog me down. Once cooked, everything goes into the blender. I puree it. I taste it. And its delicious. Without any major adjustments at all, it is exactly what I wanted it to be: clean and pure and tasting of the ingredients it is made with, only better. Then the doubt creeps in. Wait a second. That was easy. Is this really good enough? How can I serve such a simple dish to all these people with undoubtedly high expectations of what this dinner is supposed to be? Why did I ever think I could do this in the first place?! BAH! I brought my recipes in for the chef to review, sheepishly handing them over as if there was something wrong with them; not impressive enough, flashy or complex – just what I believed to be delicious. After a raised eyebrow, he said that he wasnt sure apple and butternut squash would go together. I gulped, but told him as confidently as I could that I believe in the intelligence of the season, and trust that whatever grows together, goes together. Right? The soup was a hit. Clean and pure and tasting of the ingredients it was made with, only better. Not only was the chef impressed (and later excused himself for judging my soup before making it himself), but the guests as well. As I went around to the tables asking everyone how it was, they all reaffirmed my belief that my instincts are not completely out of whack, and that, quite simply, good ingredients make great food. After several years eating locally-grown, seasonal produce Ive learned that you can pretty much step back and let the ingredients do the work for you, since true deliciousness needs little intervention. Cooking like a pro, to me, means respecting the ingredients and doing as little as possible to bring out their tastiness. So, this soup is that soup. The one I served at the restaurant to all of those people that scared me, but also reminded me that simple is best. It is a deep and delicious love song to autumn. The ingredients are inexpensive, widely available and the process is foolproof. Its an oven soup! Thats right: everything cooked together right on a baking sheet so there isnt even a pot to wash. Me likey. Butternut Squsah: the Nutrient Storage Facility Winter squash rocks because it is a virtual storehouse of nutrients. Unlike summer squash (re: zucchini, crooknecks, pattypans), winter squash has had a lot more time to develop and pump itself full of vitamins and minerals throughout its lengthy life on the stem. Were talking oodles more vitamin A (in the form of beta-carotene), vitamin C, manganese, potassium, and even some extra dietary fiber thrown in. This combination of nutrients spells good news for asthma sufferers, those with heart disease, elevated cholesterol, or inflammatory conditions such a rheumatoid and osteoarthritis. Nature designed summer squash to be rather delicate, with a high water content for those hot summer days when we need a cool down. Naturally, their shelf life is rather short during our abundant harvest season when produce is plentiful. On the flip side, winter squash has a tough outer skin and lower water content, which allows it to be stored for a very long time - some varieties up to six months. This means that we can keep these vitamin bombs around for a long time after the first frost to provide our bodies with the nutrition we need to see us through the long months of winter when there is nothing fresh in sight. Put that in your oven and roast it! The Garlicky Rye Bread Croutons, although an additional element to create, are the crowning glory of the dish, and really make it special. If youre not into bread, try toasting some pumpkin seeds for the top, or something else crunchy to add contrast to the silky smooth soup. It begs mentioning that the apple cider vinegar in this recipe is not optional. Why? Because it adds acidity. Acidity is the one thing missing in almost every home cooks food because, well, we are never really taught about its importance. If you read the introduction in my cookbook, I have a section called The Holy Trinity of Flavour explaining that salt, sugar and acid are the three foundation flavours of any successful dish. Adding just a touch of apple cider vinegar or lemon juice to almost anything you make (no kidding!) heightens and brightens the other flavours and creates a surprising balance of tastes. Try it and see for yourself.     Print recipe     Butternut Squash, Leek and Apple Soup with Garlicky Rye Bread Croutons Makes at least 2 quarts /­­ 2 liters, Serves 4-6 Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. melted coconut oil (or ghee) 3 leeks 1 medium onion 5 cloves garlic 1 large butternut squash (mine was about 2 lbs. /­­ 1 kg) 1 large, tart apple 4 - 6 cups /­­ 1-1 1/­­2 liters vegetable broth, as needed 1 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­2 tsp. ground cardamom 1/­­2 tsp. ground star anise apple cider vinegar to taste (start with 1/­­2 tsp. up to 1 Tbsp.) 1 batch Garlicky Rye Bread Crouton (recipe to follow) Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. 2. Prepare all vegetables: chop leeks and onions, peel garlic (but leave it whole), peel butternut and cut into cubes, chop apple. 3. Place all vegetables on a baking sheet with the coconut oil, toss to coat, and set in the oven to roast for 25-35 minutes until tender. 4. Transfer roasted vegetables to a blender and add the spices and hot vegetable stock (you may need to work in batches). Blend on high until completely smooth. Taste, then add salt and apple cider vinegar, blend and taste again. Adjust seasoning to your taste, and add stock until the desired consistency is reached: I like mine quite thin so I use the full 6 cups /­­ 1 1/­­2 liters of stock. 5. Transfer soup to a large cooking pot over medium heat to warm, if necessary. Divide soup equally among bowls and serve with the Garlicky Rye Bread Croutons and freshly cracked black pepper. Garlicky Rye Bread Croutons Serves 4 Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 200g stale dark sourdough, cut into generous cubes (any bread here would work, but make a healthy choice) 1 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee (ghee is definitely the tastiest) 2 fat cloves garlic, finely minced or grated on a microplane a couple pinches flaky sea salt Directions: 1. Melt oil in a small saucepan over low heat. When it is melted, add the garlic and stir to combine. Cook just until the garlic starts to simmer, immediately remove from heat and let cool slightly. Preheat oven to 350°F/­­175°C. 2. Cut bread into generous cubes and place in a medium sized bowl. Pour the garlic oil over the top and toss to coat, using your hands to squish the oil into the bread. Spread out bread cubes on a cookie sheet, sprinkle with salt and place in the oven. Toast for 15-20 minutes, tossing a couple times during cooking. Croutons are ready when they are crisp and golden around the edges. Once cool, store leftovers in an airtight container for up to three days. You guys. I’m making app! It’s almost ready! I can’t wait! The My New Roots iOS app will include your favourites from the blog, plus 5 exclusive app-only holiday recipes, perfect for the upcoming season. Click the link below to go to the App site where you can sign up to be notified when the app is out (soon, I promise!) and receive my brand-new recipe for Crispy Sweet Potato Shoe String Fries with Miso Tahini Gravy, like right now. Thank you for all for encouraging me to do this, and your ongoing support. I like you very much. xo, Sarah B  


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