chive - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

10 Plant-Based Cookbooks to Inspire Your Next Meatless Monday

Gobhi ke kofte recipe | gobhi ka kofta | gobi kofta curry recipe

Restaurant Review: Roots & Rolls, Barcelona

Cabbage, Apple, and Raisin Slaw










chive vegetarian recipes

Spring Vegetable and Quinoa Pot Pie

May 15 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Spring Vegetable and Quinoa Pot Pie Spring has been super rainy for us (it’s been raining for almost a full week now!), with only a sprinkling of a few nice days, so cozy food cravings are still in full swing around here. I seriously can’t wait until freezing cold smoothies, raw salads, and huge watermelon mono-meals regain their appeal, but I definitely don’t mind living on this pot pie til then :) It’s got almost all the comforting features of a traditional pot pie, but is made with bright spring produce and a blanket of thinly sliced vegetables instead of the more traditional pastry-based crust. Leeks, asparagus, peas, and spinach all made it into this pot pie in celebration of spring. There’s also quinoa for more substance and a stew-like texture, as well as carrots and zucchini. The crust is made up of thinly sliced potatoes (use new potatoes for the ultimate seasonal points) and zucchini. You could totally sub in your favorite pot pie pastry crust here if you’re looking for something even more substantial, store-bought biscuits would work too. Don’t be afraid to improvise and include other spring goodies that you might find around this time of year. Green garlic, spring onions, and ramps could replace some of the leeks. Quickly blanched fava beans could stand in for part of the peas. Chives can be used for garnish instead of scallions, and chive blossoms will always offer the most beautiful finish. Hope you enjoy this one :) Spring Vegetable and Quinoa Pot Pie   Print technique adapted from The First Mess cookbook Serves: 6 Ingredients avocado oil or olive oil 2 leeks - white and pale parts only, thinly sliced 2 medium carrots - sliced into half-moons salt - to taste 3 medium zucchini - divided 5 garlic cloves - minced about ½ teaspoon each of dried herbs - such as thyme, rosemary, marjoram (you can use fresh herbs as well, about 1 tablespoon minced total) 1 tablespoon tomato paste ¼ cup uncooked quinoa freshly ground black pepper - to taste ½ cup dry white wine scant ¼ cup ground rolled oats or oat flour (gluten-free if needed) 2½ cups vegetable stock 1 small bunch asparagus - tough ends trimmed, cut into 1-inch pieces 4 cups baby spinach or other tender spring greens 8-10 oz fresh or frozen green peas 2 medium new potatoes or Yukon gold potatoes - thinly sliced into rounds on a mandoline fresh herbs - for garnishing Instructions Preheat the oven to 375° F (190° C). Warm a generous drizzle of oil in a soup pot or very deep pan over medium heat. Add the leeks, carrots, and a pinch of salt, and sauté for about 7 minutes, until the leeks are soft. Meanwhile, dice 2 of the zucchini into medium cubes and mandoline the remaining 1 zucchini into thin rounds, setting it aside together with the mandolined potatoes. Add the garlic, herbs, and tomato paste and stir to incorporate for about 30 seconds, until garlic is fragrant. Add the diced zucchini, quinoa, more salt, and pepper, and stir to incorporate. Pour in the wine and turn up the heat to a medium high. Let the wine cook off and absorb for 1-2 minutes. Add the ground oats/­­oat flour and the vegetable stock to the pot. Bring everything up to a simmer and cook for 3-5 minutes, stirring periodically, until the mixture is slightly thickened. Turn off the heat and let the pot sit off the heat for a few minutes, then stir in the asparagus, spinach, and peas, mixing to lightly wilt the spinach. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Spoon the stew into an oiled 9 x 9 baking dish (or a dish of a similar size), evening it out with a spoon. Arrange the mandolined potato and zucchini on top of the stew, overlapping them and alternating them in a pattern. Brush the vegetables with more oil and season with salt and pepper. Bake for 35-40 minutes, until the potato slices are fully cooked. Turn on your broiler on low and place the pot pie under the broiler for about 5 minutes, or until your crust is crispy, golden and blistered in places. Be careful not to burn the crust. Let the pot pie cool slightly and serve, garnished with fresh herbs. Notes You could divide the pot pie mixture and crust vegetables into small, single serve dishes or ramekins for individual pot pies. Just place the ramekins on a baking sheet and slide into the oven. 3.5.3226 The post Spring Vegetable and Quinoa Pot Pie appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Asparagus Corn Chowder

April 18 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Asparagus Corn Chowder We sent out this simple asparagus chowder recipe as a little bonus in our newsletter a few years ago. Since then, it’s become a total spring staple for us, and we cook it almost every time there’s good asparagus around. It also turned out to be a crowd pleaser, since we heard back from a lot of people who made and loved it (those are the best emails to get, always). This spring, while making the chowder yet again, we realized that we should probably publish it here and make it readily accessible to everyone at all times :) This delicate chowder is a great dish for showcasing asparagus – there’s few ingredients, so the tender, green qualities of asparagus can really shine. The recipe comes together so quickly, too (you can watch the whole process in our Instagram stories later today)! The key here is not to overcook the asparagus, since it’s at its best when bright green and snappy. Otherwise, it turns into something brown, mushy, and generally unappealing. It’s barely cooked in this recipe – just quickly sautéed with some lemon juice and flash blanched in broth and coconut milk. This recipe definitely allows for all kinds of improvisation with spring produce. You can use any tender spring greens that you can find this time of year, as well as herbs – chives with their pretty blossoms, basil, and mint all work great here. You can swap in peas or fava beans for some of the corn or ramps for some of the onion. Have fun with the toppings, too. An assertive flavored oil like chili oil would be great, but a drizzle of good quality olive oil is always delicious as well. Something crunchy like toasted pumpkin seeds or croutons would be heavenly on top, and lots of herbs, always. Hope you’ll give this one a try :) Asparagus Corn Chowder   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 tablespoon olive oil or other cooking oil of choice 1 teaspoon cumin - freshly ground 1 teaspoon coriander - freshly ground 1 large yellow onion - chopped sea salt - to taste kernels from 2 ears of sweet corn or about 2 cups frozen and thawed corn freshly ground black pepper 1 bunch asparagus - tough ends cut off, sliced into bite-size pieces 3 cloves garlic - minced juice of 1 lemon 1 13.5 oz can unsweetened canned coconut milk 1½ cups vegetable broth or water 4 cups spring greens, such as spinach, arugula, watercress, etc. handful of fresh basil or mint leaves (optional) chives/­­chive blossoms - for garnish (optional) chili oil, basil oil or olive oil - for garnish (optional) Instructions Heat the oil in a medium soup pot over medium heat. Add the cumin, coriander, onion and a few pinches of salt, sauté for 5 minutes. Add the corn, a pinch of salt and black pepper, and cook, stirring, for another 5 minutes. Add the asparagus and garlic and sauté until the asparagus is bright green, for about 2-3 minutes. Add the lemon juice and let it absorb for a minute. Add the coconut milk and vegetable broth/­­water and bring to a boil. Remove the pot from the heat and stir in the greens to wilt them. Transfer about half of the soup to an upright blender along with the basil/­­mint, if using, and blend until creamy. Return the blended mixture back to the soup pot and stir to combine. Taste and adjust the seasonings if needed. Serve garnished with chives and chive blossoms, a drizzle of oil or any other desired toppings. 3.5.3226 The post Asparagus Corn Chowder appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Scallion Pancakes

March 25 2019 Meatless Monday 

These 3-ingredient Vegan Scallion Pancakes are incredibly delicious and very easy to make. Theyre also known as green onion pancakes and can be made with chives or leeks too. This recipe comes to us from Bianca Zapatka . See the step-by-step photos on her blog . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Makes 4 pancakes 2  cups  all-purpose flour (250g) 3/­­4  tsp  salt 3/­­4  cup  warm water (180ml) 1 1/­­3  cup  finely sliced scallions  green part only 4  tbsp  cooking oil  plus more for brushing   1. In a large bowl, mix the flour and salt. Then pour in the water and stir with chopsticks or a fork until all the water has been absorbed. 2. Using your hands, knead all the bits of dough together. (If your dough is still very dry after a bit of kneading, add 1-2 tbsp more water*). Then transfer dough to a working surface and continue kneading until the dough is smooth and soft, about 5 minutes. 3. Shape the dough into a round ball. Cover with foil (or a damp towel) and let rest for 20-30 minutes. After resting time, divide the dough into 4 equal sized pieces and shape them into balls. (Work with one piece at a time and cover the remaining pieces so they wont get dry). 4. On a lightly floured working surface, roll out one piece into a very thin circle. 5. Brush the circle with a bit of oil, and sprinkle about 1/­­3 cup chopped scallions all over the dough. 6. Roll up the dough into a log. Take one end of the log and curl it into a snail. 7. Use your hands to flatten the dough a bit, then use your rolling pin to roll it out again to another circle, about 8-/­­9-inch (20/­­22cm) in diameter. (Dont worry if some scallions poke out through the dough). 8. Repeat with the remaining dough pieces and stack them as you go, separating with parchment paper. 9. Heat 1 tbsp oil in a pan over medium heat and pan-fry each side of one pancake for about 2-3 minutes until golden-brown and crispy. Repeat with remaining pancakes, adding about 1 tbsp oil per pancake. 10. Cut Scallion Pancakes into quarters and serve hot with dipping sauce. Notes The pancakes are best eaten when hot. Theyll be still good when cooled, but will no longer be crispy. If you still have any fried pancakes left, you can reheat them in the oven. Sprinkle some grated non-dairy cheese on top and bake for a few minutes until crispy again. If they got a bit hard overnight, you could also put them in the microwave for a few seconds. * The ideal flour water ratio may vary slightly depending on the kind of flour you use and how you measure it.   The post Scallion Pancakes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Walnut “Meat” Stuffed Pepper

March 11 2019 Meatless Monday 

Walnuts stand in for ground beef in this Tex-Mex-inspired stuffed pepper. This recipe comes to us from Chef Lisa Sereda, executive chef of Wine Time . Chef Sereda cooked it for the Meatless Monday Rapid Fire Challenge at the 2019 International Restaurant & Foodservice Show of New York. Serves 8 – 10 - 6 quarts of water - 12 medium sized Anaheim peppers - 2 cups diced yellow onion - 2 tbsp minced garlic - 3 cups roasted peppers - 6 cups roasted walnuts - 2 1/­­2 tbsp cumin - 1 tbsp cayenne pepper (plus or minus depending on spice index) - 2 tbsp paprika - 4 tbsp white sugar - 1 tbsp salt -  1/­­4 cup lemon juice - 2 tbsp olive oil - 6 cups shredded white cheddar (more or less depending on cheesy preference) - 2 cups crumbled feta - 1 cup full fat Greek yogurt (to make the pepper vegan, skip the cheese, feta and Greek yogurt) - Non-stick cooking spray - Diced fresh chives for garnish   Directions: Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Bring water to full boil in large saucepan. Cut peppers lengthwise down one side from stem to within 1/­­2 inch of tip. Boil peppers in water for about seven minutes or until pepper turns an olive green color. Remove and place in ice bath and remove seeds and veins from pepper. Drain and pat peppers dry. In separate pan sauté onion and garlic in olive oil until translucent. Pulse roasted walnuts in food processor or chop until the consistency of sautéed ground beef. Add chopped walnuts to onion and garlic and cook until mixed through. Chop roasted bell peppers in food processor until almost a liquid consistency. Add to walnut mixture. Add cayenne, paprika, cumin, sugar, salt and lemon juice. Sauté on medium for about five minutes until the mixture begins to come together and most of the moisture has evaporated. Place peppers onto prepared cooking sheet (spray bottom of pan with nonstick cooking spray before placing peppers on pan). Stuff each pepper with desired amount of walnut meat mixture. Cover each pepper with generous amount of white cheddar (omit for vegan pepper). Cook uncovered for about twenty minutes until cheese is melted and slightly browned. Garnish with crumbled feta, a drizzle or scoop of Greek yogurt and fresh chives.   The post Walnut “Meat” Stuffed Pepper appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Wonton Soup

February 4 2019 Meatless Monday 

This plant-based take on traditional wonton soup is perfect for those chilly nights when you just want to stay in and cozy up on the couch with a big bowl of comfort. You can add buckwheat noodles or you can keep it traditional with just the broth and wontons.   This recipe  comes from Ashley at Eat Figs, Not Pigs. Check out her blog  for more delicious recipes. Serves 6-8 Wontons Vegan friendly wonton or pot sticker wraps 1 cup boiling water 1 cup textured vegetable protein 2 teaspoons vegetarian chicken bouillon base or 1 vegetarian chicken bouillon cube 1/­­8 cup of vegetable or canola oil, optional 2 tbs tamari or soy sauce 2 tbs fresh chives, minced 2 tbs minced garlic 3 tsp powdered egg replacer + 4 tbs warm water, mixed together according to package directions. 1 tbs fresh ground ginger 1 tbs rice wine vinegar 1/­­4 tsp white sugar, optional 1/­­2 jalapeno, optional   Broth 1 tbs sesame oil 1 small white onion, chopped 2 tbs fresh ginger, mined 4-5 cloves fresh garlic, minced 8 teaspoons vegetarian chicken bouillon base 8 cups water Chili oil, optional Minced green onion, optional   Wontons Boil water and bouillon on high heat. Remove from heat and add dry TVP. Mix to combine and set aside to 10-15 minutes to rehydrate. After 10-15 minutes, add oil, soy sauce, chives, garlic, ginger, rice wine, sugar, jalapeno, and egg replacer, mixing to combine thoroughly. Taste mixture and season accordingly. In the middle of a wonton wrapper, add a heaping teaspoon of your vegan pork mixture. Using your finger, moisten the edges of the wonton wrapper with water. Once the edges are moist, fold in half to create a half moon shape (circle wrappers) or rectangle shape (square wrappers). With your fingers again, moisten the bottom corners of the folded wonton and fold in half where the bottom corners meet. Place wontons on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Continue this process until all the filling is gone and set aside. Broth In a pot on medium heat, add oil. Once oil is hot, add onion and ginger. Saute until onions are slightly translucent and fragrant, about 4-5 minutes. Add garlic and saute and additional 2-3 minutes. Add water and bouillon base, increase heat to high and bring to a boil. Once the broth starts boiling, reduce heat and simmer for about 15-20 minutes. While broth is simmering, fill a separate pot with water and bring to a boil. Add wontons and cook until they rise to the surface, about 2-3 minutes. Transfer wontons to a bowl with hot broth. Garnish with chili oil and green onions. Serve hot. The post Wonton Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

20 Best Vegan Recipes 2018 from VeganRicha.com

December 31 2018 Vegan Richa 

20 Best Vegan Recipes 2018 from VeganRicha.com20 Best Vegan Recipes 2018 from VeganRicha.com . Popular Recipes that made the top recipes from 2018 with a few of my favorites and also some recipes that have been consistently loved from the archives! Glutenfree Soyfree options Its a wrap! 2018 has been an year of ups and downs, in health, blogging, life and everything. My digestion issues meant I was eating less of legumes and you probably noticed that slight shift on the blog from a whole lotta chickpeas to more of mushrooms and tofu. I do make a lot of legume based meals, but with from scratch cooked beans rather than canned and also eat it only on the day they are cooked (no leftovers for me). So a lot of meals get out to the neighborhood! (if you are in seattle main area and would like some, ping me on fb. I don’t deliver, you pick)   Blogging is now pretty competitive with all the amazing new blogs with great photography and content. The competitiveness of it as a business can get to one. My plan for 2019 is to continue to do what I love, i.e. develop amazing recipes, and then delegate and find help for the rest. There will always be people who can do things better in some ways, and stressing about it gets me nowhere. So lets just create and eat amazing food!  What I also learnt is that you the readers have various interests when it comes to food. Quick recipes obviously always work. There are tons of those already out there, some on the blog and books too. And even though a good portion of my recipes use a few more ingredients and a few more steps, you choose to trust them and love the results! I am incredibly thankful that you do! Thank you for the support and love this year. Here is to many more! Wish you all a very Happy 2019! Here are the popular recipes from the year with a few of my favorites that were not as popular and also some recipes that have been consistently loved from the archives! What did you try from the blog this year that you were not sure about but turned out amazing? Let me know in the comments.Continue reading: 20 Best Vegan Recipes 2018 from VeganRicha.comThe post 20 Best Vegan Recipes 2018 from VeganRicha.com appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Pomegranate-Smashed Butternut Squash

December 24 2018 Meatless Monday 

Fresh pomegranate arils add a touch of elegance to any holiday recipe, but pomegranate juice is a culinary wonder, too. Here, it adds a touch of tartness to sweet butternut squash, making this the perfect recipe to start off your holiday meal! This recipe comes to us from Jackie Newgent, RDN, The Natural Culinary Nutritionist.   Serves 4 - 1 pound butternut squash cubes (about 3/­­4 -inch cubes) - 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil - 1/­­2 cup 100% pomegranate juice - 1/­­2 teaspoon sea salt - 1/­­2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper - 1 to 2 tablespoons minced fresh chives - 2 tablespoons pomegranate arils (seeds)   Preheat the oven to 375°F. Add the butternut squash cubes to 1 1/­­2 -quart-capacity baking dish. (Hint: Buy squash already cubed!) Drizzle with the oil. Toss to coat. Add the pomegranate juice, salt, and pepper. Cover dish well with foil. Bake until the squash is fork-tender, about 50 minutes. Carefully remove the foil. Smash the butternut squash in baking dish with a potato masher. Stir well. Adjust seasoning. Sprinkle with the chives and pomegranate arils to serve. The post Pomegranate-Smashed Butternut Squash appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Green Christmas 2018 - vegan edition

December 19 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Christmas 2018 - vegan edition The tree is already covered with colorful glass balls, small hand drawn paper Santas and tinsels, we have got light strands hanging around the windows, the presents are wrapped and Sinatra is playing from the kitchen speakers. It’s five days left to Christmas Eve and I don’t think we have ever prepared ahead for the holidays like this before. We have even cooked all the Christmas food. Twice! Well, three times actually. One was for our early celebration with David’s family. The other was to shoot these photos. And the third time because David is manic about testing recipes three times. We’ve got this. Sharing Christmas recipe roundups seems almost obligatory when you work with food. This year we asked what type of recipes you were looking for and many mentioned more vegan dishes for your holiday feasts, so that is what we have done here. I am not going to pretend that we are good at organizing big dinner parties, we are truly not. But we do have one method that we live by: Focus on having a good base of dishes and then ask guests to each bring a small side dish, drink, snack or dessert. That way you can have a generous buffet of food without the accompanying stress meltdown. Our cabbage parcels make a beautiful centerpiece with delicious mustard roasted roots and crispy smashed potatoes as warm sides. Because all of these dishes are quite rich, we also like to serve a fresh, tangy and crunchy salad on the side. Along with red cabbage Christmas krauts from our Green Kitchen at Home book. You’ll find the recipes here below. A few other favorites from the archives are our vegan Aubergine Polpette (perhaps with a gravy on the side), our Mushroom & Hazelnut Loaf, this one-tray Hasselback Potatoes with Kale and Pesto, the Pumpkin, Kale and Buckwheat Salad that we had for our wedding, this Black Quinoa & Kale Salad from dinosaur time (we’ve been making this for Christmas almost every year), and this Crispy Red Cabbage & Grape Salad (red cabbage salads are obligatory for all Danes on Christmas). We actually have one more recipe that we haven’t had time to post yet. It’s a really good gingerbread bundt cake and we’ll do our best to post the recipe before Christmas Eve (if you have our app, it is already available on there). Happy holidays! /­­Luise, David and all the kids! Stuffed Cabbage Parcels Makes 8 parcels These pretty little parcels are stuffed with rice, lentils, walnuts and raisins and cooked in a holiday spiced tomato broth. They are a little fiddly to make but super flavorful and well worth the effort. This recipe is vegan but you could also add feta cheese to the parcels if you feel like it. Filling – 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked red rice (see note) – 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked puy lentils – 500 ml /­­ 2 cups water – 1/­­2 tsp sea salt – 1 tbsp olive oil – 1 large red onion, peeled and finely chopped – 1 clove garlic, peeled and finely chopped – 1 cup walnuts, finely chopped – 4 tbsp raisins – 2 tbsp lemon juice – 4 tbsp chopped parsley Tomato Broth – 750 ml /­­ 3 cups vegetable stock – 1 x 400 g /­­ 14 oz tin crushed tomatoes – 1 tsp whole cloves – 1 tsp whole allspice – 2 star anise – 2 cinnamon sticks – 1 pinch sea salt Assembling – 1 savoy cabbage – 8 pieces of cooking string – 1 tbsp olive oil to fry in Instructions 1. Rinse rice and lentils in a sieve under running water. 2. Transfer to a saucepan and add water and salt. Bring to a boil, lower the heat and let simmer until tender, for about 35 minutes or according to the time on the package. 3. Place another sauce pan with the Tomato Broth ingredients on the stove, bring to a boil and then turn the heat down and let it slowly simmer under a lid for 20 minutes on low heat. 4. Meanwhile, add oil to a large skillet and sauté onion and garlic for 10 minutes on medium heat or until soft and translucent. 5. Transfer the onion to a bowl and wipe out the pan (you will use it to fry and cook the parcels in later on). 6. Drain any excess water from the rice and lentils. Add the onion and garlic, walnuts, raisins, lemon juice and parsley and stir to combine. 7. Carefully break off 8 leaves of the savoy cabbage. Trim off the thickest part of the stalk. 8. Blanch the savoy cabbage leaves in a sauce pan with salted boiling water for 2-3 minutes. Drain and lay out on a tea towel. 9. Spoon 3 tablespoons of filling into the center of each cabbage leaf. Fold up and tie with the string. Repeat with the remaining seven. 10. Place all parcels in a heated skillet with a little oil added. Fry on both sides until browned. 11. Pour the broth into the pan with the cabbage parcels (the pan should be half filled). Put a lid on and let simmer for about 30 minutesor until the cabbage feels soft and tender (you can cook the parcels for a shorter time if you prefer them a little crunchier). 12. Serve the parcels with a little broth poured on top. Remove the strings before eating ;) Note – We cook the rice and lentils for the filling together, just make sure that they have similar cooking times. If not, start with the one with the longest time and then add the other accordingly. Or cook in separate pans. Smashed Balsamic Potatoes Serves 4 as a side This rustic potato recipe combine three different potato methods into one - boiled, mashed and roasted. They are crispy on the outside, soft on the inside with a sweet tanginess added from balsamic vinegar. Ingredients – 1 kg /­­ 2 lb small potatoes – 2 tsp salt – 3 tbsp olive oil – 1 1/­­2 tbsp balsamic vinegar – 1 clove garlic, finely chopped – a few sprigs fresh thyme Preparation 1. Set the oven to 225°C /­­ 450°F. 2. Wash the potatoes (keep the skin on) and place in a large sauce pan. 3. Cover with water and add 1 tsp salt. Cook for about 20 minutes (longer if you use bigger potatoes) or until easily pierced with a fork. 4. Drain the water and leave to cool for a bit. 5. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and place the potatoes on it. 6. Smash the potatoes by pressing down on them using the backside of a glass. 7. Whisk together oil, balsamic vinegar and garlic. 9. Drizzle generously over the potatoes, making sure that you get it into all the nooks and crannies. You can use a brush for this as well. 10. Sprinkle with salt and thyme leaves. 11. Place in the oven and roast for 25 minutes or until the potatoes are crispy and golden brown. Tip – This is perfect as a side for 4 persons but you can easily double the recipe if you are cooking for a crowd. Just use two baking sheets and set the oven to fan mode and lower the temp slightly for more evenly distributed heat. Mustard Roasted Roots Serves 4 as a side We love a good tray of roasted roots. Here we have coated the roots in cinnamon, grainy mustard, a little vinegar and maple syrup and roasted them until they start to caramelize. We serve these with a saffron sauce which basically is this turmeric tahini sauce but with saffron instead of turmeric. But a simple yogurt based sauce could be great too. Ingredients – 1 kg /­­ 2 lb mixed roots (parsnip, carrots, swede, sweet potato) Dressing – 3 tbsp olive oil – 2 tbsp grainy mustard – 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar – 1 tsp ground cinnamon – 1 tsp maple syrup – 1 tsp sea salt To Serve – 2 tbsp hemp seeds or finely chopped almonds Preparation 1. Preheat the oven to 180°C /­­ 375°F. 2. Peel the roots and chop into batons (roughly 10 cm long and 1,5 cm thick). 3. Stir together the dressing ingredients in a large mixing bowl. 4. Add the roots and toss until all are covered. 5. Tip out on a baking sheet covered with parchment paper and spread out in an even layer. 6. Place in the oven and roast for 20 minutes. Give the sheet a toss, then crank up the heat to 225°C /­­ 450°F and bake for 20 minutes more or until golden and slightly charred. 7. Transfer the roots to a serving platter and sprinkle with hemp seeds. Tips – This is perfect as a side for 4 persons but you can easily double the recipe if you are cooking for a crowd. Just use two baking sheets and set the oven to fan mode for more evenly distributed heat. – You can use any root for this but swede, carrots, sweet potato and parsnips are our favorites.   Crispy Celery and Orange Salad Serves 4 – 1 head romain lettuce or cosmopolitan – 4 celery stalks (or fennel) – 2 oranges – 4 tbsp toasted hazelnuts Mustard vinaigrette – 2 tbsp olive oil – 1 tbsp vinegar – 1 tsp Dijon mustard – 1 tsp maple syrup 1. Rinse the lettuce in water and chop into 2 inch /­­ 5 cm large pieces, discarding the stem. 2. Thinly slice the celery stalks (or mandolin the fennel of using). 3. Peel the oranges and cut in halves and thinly slice each half. 4. Place all prepped ingredients into a large mixing bowl. 5. Whisk together the vinaigrette ingredients in a small separate bowl. 6. Gently toss the dressing with the salad ingredients. 7. Chop the toasted hazelnuts. 8. Transfer to a serving bowl and scatter with hazelnuts. Serve!

Butternut Miso Soup with Arame and Wasabi

November 14 2018 My New Roots 

Butternut Miso Soup with Arame and Wasabi   You know that game where you give someone a word and they have to make up a story with that word in it? Im like that, except with food. Give me an ingredient, and magically, as if out of nowhere, an entire recipe (or several!) will appear in my head. I could even give you the amount of salt it needs, how the vegetables should be sliced, the oven temp, and what it should be garnished with. Its a tad psycho, but my best party trick hands down. When my friend Christiann Koepke emailed me about coming to visit her in Portland, driving to the Pacific coast, and photographing some recipes together, I was all in. And then when she suggested we put seaweed into something (because ocean) it was like someone had opened the flood gates in my brain and alllll the ideas came rushing to me. Neat! And very convenient. But what do we really want to eat at the beach when its chilly and maybe windy, maybe raining, maybe freezing-raining (it is the Pacific Northwest, after all)? The answer is soup. And I knew it was going to be a creamy, dreamy, sea veggie-kissed broth with all the tasty toppings.     When seaweed is a featured ingredient in a recipe, I tend to channel Asian flavours like miso, ginger, wasabi, toasted sesame, to compliment to the unmistakably briny, salty, ocean-y flavour of seaweed. Eaten as a staple food throughout China and Japan for thousands of years, sea vegetables are rich in essential minerals, trace minerals, chlorophyll, iodine, fiber, and lots of protein. Some sea vegetables even contain vitamin B12 - a rare element for a plant! Sea vegetables are less complex than their land-dwelling relatives. Without intricate root systems or tissues, seaweeds get their nutrients from the waters they grow in. To survive, they form root-like parts to attach themselves to rocks or other stable elements. There are three categories of sea vegetables; brown, red, and green. Brown algae thrive in cool water at depths of around 50 feet. The most commonly known brown seaweed is kelp, which can grow up to 1,500 feet (500 meters) long! Red algae, like dulse, contain elements that can gel foods. Green sea vegetables bridge the gap between land and sea plants, as they can store food as starch, just like vegetation found out of the water. The most popular kind of green algae is nori, which is what your sushi comes wrapped in.      Seaweeds range in flavours from mild to wild. Some are sweet and nutty, while others are pungent, funky, and an acquired taste. If youre a seaweed newb (which most Westerners are), I suggest starting out with a less challenging one, like arame. Arame is in the brown category of sea vegetables, but when you buy it, it will appear closer to jet black. It has a stringy texture, and almost looks like wiry hair, but will soften into tender, noodle-y strands after being soaked. Before it is packaged, arame must be cooked for seven hours, and then dried in the sun. To use, simply re-hydrate by soaking it in room temperature water for 10-15 minutes until it is soft and has doubled in volume. Arame is very high in calcium, rich in iron, potassium, vitamin A and the B vitamins. And like other brown seaweeds, arame contains sodium alginate, a compound that helps to convert heavy metals in the body into harmless salt, which is easily excreted. Besides soup, I like to put arame in stews, stir fries, and salads (heres a great recipe from the archives...check out that incredible food photography!). The flavor of arame is saline and a bit funky, but mostly sweet. The texture is like an al dente pasta, and I think it adds amazing meaty-ness to a dish, with its satisfying chew.     This soup is well balanced, and hits all the notes: sweet and creamy from the butternut, savoury from miso, chewy from the arame, warming from the ginger, spicy from the wasabi, and nutty and crunchy from the toasted sesame. You could theoretically use any kind of winter squash here, like a Hokkaido pumpkin, acorn or delicate squash. Scale back on the ginger and perhaps leave out the wasabi if youre making this for kiddos. And if you dont have arame, or youre simply not into sea vegetables, leave it out, or replace with some coconut bacon. It should be noted that once youve added the miso to the soup base, its important that you dont let it boil if you reheat it. Miso is contains delicate probiotics and enzymes that will be destroyed by high heat. The soup freezes well, but leave the wasabi out until you serve it since the flavour will fade if once its frozen.             Print recipe     Butternut Squash Miso Soup with Wasabi and Arame Serves 4 (Makes 8 cups /­­ 2 liters) Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup /­­ 10g dried arame 1 large yellow onion 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 4 cloves garlic 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. /­­ 25g minced fresh ginger approx. 3 lbs. /­­ 1 1/­­2 kg butternut squash 2 Tbsp. expeller-pressed coconut oil 4 cups /­­ 1 liter water, more if needed 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml white miso, or more if desired 3 Tbsp. black sesame seeds 1 tsp. wasabi powder microgreens and wasabi arugula for garnish, if desired Directions: 1. Place the arame in a medium bowl and cover with a few inches of water. Let soak while you cook the soup. 2. Roughly chop the onion, peel and mince the garlic and ginger. Peel and cube the butternut squash. 3. Melt the coconut oil in a large stockpot over medium-high heat. Add the onions and salt, cook for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally until the onions are translucent. Add the garlic and ginger, stir, and cook for another couple of minutes. When fragrant, add the butternut squash, stir and cook for 4-5 minutes with the lid on. Add the water, replace the lid, bring to a boil, and then reduce to simmer. Cook until the squash is tender, about 15 minutes. 4. While the soup is simmering, toast the sesame seeds by placing them in a small skillet over medium heat. Stir occasionally until they begin to pop. Remove from heat and let cool completely. 5. Carefully transfer the soup to a blender (or simply use an immersion blender), and blend on high until completely smooth. Add more water to thin, if necessary. 6. Place miso and wasabi powder into two small, separate bowls. Add a bit of soup to each bowl, stir well, then add just the miso blend to the blender, and blend once again to incorporate. Taste and adjust seasoning if desired. Keep the wasabi to the side until serving. 7. Drain and lightly rinse the arame. 8. To serve, place the piping hot soup into bowls, drizzle with the wasabi and swirl, sprinkle with sesame seeds. Top with a handful of the arame, some microgreens, and enjoy.   Christiann and I had such an incredible time at the ocean, pulling this whole miracle off together. The weather - although abysmal every other day that week - was beyond beautiful from the moment we set foot on the sand, to the second we decided it was time to call it a night (and then it started pouring, ha!). We caught an epic sunset by the fire, exhausted and so grateful for the stars aligning in every way possible, to make this day possible. And it was such an honour to work alongside a photographer that has inspired me for years - if you havent checked out her genius yet, here is a link to her website and Instagram. Thank you, Christiann for making this dream a reality! I had such a blast! We have another post coming up in the New Year I cannot wait to share it with you, dear friends. Big love to all and I hope autumn is treating you well. Happy American Thanksgiving to all my loves stateside! xo, Sarah B photo credits: images 4, 6, 7, 8, 9 Christiann Koepke *   *   *   *   *   * Good news friends! Due to the overwhelming feedback, we’ve extended the period of sign-ups for the Life-Changing Loaf Subscription Box that can be shipped before the holidays. If you’re looking for a great gift for a family member or friend (or need to hand out suggestions for yourself!), this is the perfect thing – it’s the gift that keeps on giving To give the box as a gift, simply click “ship to a different address” when you check out. Thank you for all the support so far! Your loaf is on the way!     The post Butternut Miso Soup with Arame and Wasabi appeared first on My New Roots.

Summer Cobb Salad with Coconut Bacon

July 20 2018 My New Roots 

Summer Cobb Salad with Coconut Bacon Summer is HERE! Wowee zowee its been a beautiful July filled with plenty of sunshine, swimming, fresh fruit, and family time. Its also a very special feeling being in Canada for the whole spring-to-summer transition once again. Its one of my favourite things, watching this little part of the world turn green and warm, for the lakes and rivers to invite us in, for the farmers markets to burst with local goodness, and for the long days to stretch into equally enchanted nights. I dont cook a whole lot this time of year - I like to keep my food really fresh, mostly raw and pretty light.  If I am turning the stove or oven on, its often to make staples that I can keep on hand in the fridge to amp up a salad or sandwich. Lentils, beans, and quinoa are some rotating essentials that I can add a bunch of fresh veggies to, or turn into a dip. I also love to have some coconut bacon from my second cookbook, Naturally Nourished, on hand to add awesome flavour and texture to something as basic as avocado toast. The inspiration for this salad came when I had just made a fresh batch of this magical stuff, and I was trying to come up with some alternative uses for it (besides the best B.L.T. ever) when I remembered another classic bacon meal: the Cobb Salad! If you live outside of North America, chances are youre not familiar with this iconic dish, a texture-rich combination of chopped romaine, avocado, tomato, chives, hard-boiled eggs, bacon, and chicken. Its a rich and protein-heavy salad, often smothered in a creamy blue cheese dressing. Whoa! Major. Needless to say, I knew that this was perfect makeover fodder, and I had everything I needed to get started. To turn this indulgent dish into something just as delicious, but actually a salad, was relatively easy. First, I decided to turn up the green and add some spinach to the mix. This small addition delivers more iron, protein, vitamin C and folate. Instead of chicken, I pointed my garden arrow at peas, to add body and filling fiber. Cooked chickpeas, butter beans or French lentils would also work beautifully in their place. Watermelon radishes just came into season here, and it was a total no-brainer to add them to this version, since they add great crunch, delicious earthiness, and pink. Because pink! And of course I kept the avocado...duh. The Creamy Chive Dressing is such a win here. I created it in hopes of maintaining that rich and satisfying mouthfeel that blue cheese dressing lends to the classic Cobb, but without the cheese, cream, sour cream and mayo (I mean, holy cow). Instead I used hemp seeds, which are rich in Omega-3 fats, and protein to energize our summer bods. Its tangy, a little garlic-y, and super fresh. And since my recipe makes more than enough for this salad, pour the rest over thickly sliced beefsteak tomatoes, grilled eggplant and zucchini, or fold it into cooked grains and greens.      My version of Cobb Salad is more of a concept than a recipe - so feel free to play around a bit with what you have, in the amounts that you have. And if youve got some other salad-y things kicking around that would work here, toss them in! No rules, just a clean-out-the-fridge kinda deal. Its summer. Lets keep things easy and flowin! To say Im obsessed with this salad is an understatement. Its the perfect summer meal and has everything going on with its fresh, crunchy, garden-fresh veggies and greens, creamy avocado, juicy tomatoes, rich and smoky coconut bacon, smooth and tangy chive dressing, satisfying eggs, and if you dont want to dive face first into that bowl right now I dont think well ever be friends ; )     Print recipe     Summer Cobb Salad with Coconut Bacon Serves 2 as a meal, 4 as a side Ingredients: 1 head of romaine lettuce a couple large handfuls of spinach a few handfuls fresh peas, raw or lightly steamed 2 medium watermelon radish 1-2 ripe avocados, depending on how hungry you are 2-3 soft-boiled eggs, optional a couple handfuls of Coconut Bacon (recipe follows) a generous drizzle of Creamy Chive Dressing (recipe follows) chives for garnish flaky salt and pepper for garnish Directions: 1. Roughly chop the romaine and spinach, and place in a large salad bowl. 2. Thinly slice the watermelon radishes, peel and slice the avocado, cut the eggs in half, and add these ingredients to the greens. Scatter peas throughout, toss on the Coconut Bacon, drizzle with the Creamy Chive Dressing and garnish with chives, salt and pepper. Devour and rejoice. Coconut Bacon Makes 5 cups /­­ 200g Ingredients: 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml tamari 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml maple syrup 3 Tbsp. melted coconut oil 1 Tbsp. liquid smoke 1 tsp. freshly cracked black pepper 1/­­2 tsp. garlic powder 5 cups /­­ 200g coconut flakes Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 325°F /­­ 160°C. 2. Whisk all wet ingredients together in a large bowl. Add coconut flakes and toss well to coat. Let the coconut sit and marinate in the liquid for about 5 minutes. 3. Place coconut on a parchment-lined baking sheet, spreading it out evenly. Bake for 20-30 minutes, stirring every 7 minutes or so, until fragrant and crispy. The coconut will crisp up outside the oven as well, so take that into consideration. Store in an airtight container for up to three weeks. Creamy Chive dressing Makes 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 375ml Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup /­­ 100g hemp seeds zest of 1 lemon 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 clove garlic 2 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 2 tsp. pure maple syrup 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water, or more as needed 3 Tbsp. finely minced chives Directions: 1. Place all ingredients except for the chives in a blender (a high-speed blender is definitely recommended) and blend on high until completely smooth and creamy. Add the minced chives and pulse once or twice just to incorporate them. Taste and adjust seasoning if desired. If the dressing is too thick, add a little water and blend well again. 2. Pour dressing into a glass jar and store leftovers in the fridge for up to one week. Show me your salad on Instagram: #mnrcobbsalad The post Summer Cobb Salad with Coconut Bacon appeared first on My New Roots.

Smörg?st?rta - Savory Rye Sandwich Cake

June 23 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Smörg?st?rta - Savory Rye Sandwich Cake Hey friends and happy midsummer! We spent midsummer eve at a friends house, dancing like frogs around a flower covered midsummer pole. It’s one of many weird traditions that we do in Sweden on this longest day of the year. Today we are off to Noma (as in one of the coolest restaurants on earth) to test their new plant focused menu that is launching next week. We’re very excited - obviously for Noma, but also for eating a fancy dinner together with zero kids around. Before we are leaving, I wanted to post this little recipe that we uploaded to our youtube a few days ago. Just like frog dance, this savory layered sandwich cake is also a very Swedish thing. It is called smörg?st?rta and is traditionally made by layering white bread with mayonnaise, creme cheese, whipped cream, dill, chives, shrimps, salmon and a bunch of other stuff. It’s basically like a sandwich gone wild. Even if we are not completely sold on the very heavy traditional version, there is something intriguing about the concept of a sandwich cake. So we made our own version, using rye bread and three colorful and fresh (but still quite rich) spreads in between. One green spread with avocado, dill and peas. One white spread with egg, sauerkraut and creme fraiche. And one purple spread with beans, beetroot and sunflower seeds. We cover it with cream cheese with a sting of horseradish and lots of finely sliced veggies and flowers. It looks great, is fun to make and really delicious. Sandwich cake FTW! Check out this recipe video to see how we make it. This is the perfect savory dish to make for a party, brunch or gathering with friends. You can easily half the recipe or make it vegan by skipping the egg layer and replacing the cream cheese with coconut cream. If you want to try a gluten-free version of this cake you could either simply use a gluten free bread, or bake 4 trays of our vegetable flatbreads (this option is a little time consuming but would probably taste amazing). Smörg?st?rta (Savory Rye Sandwich Cake) Serves 12-16 Green Spread 300 g /­­ 2 cups cup green peas 1 small lemon, juice 1 bunch dill, chopped 2 avocados, flesh scooped out 2 tbsp olive oil 1 large pinch salt White Spread 6 hard-boiled eggs 250 g /­­ 1 cup creme fraice or sour cream 2 tbsp capers 4 tbsp sauerkraut a pinch black pepper Purple Spread 1 cup sunflower seeds, soaked for an hour in water 1 x 400 g tin white beans, drained and rinsed 2 cooked beetroots, roughly chopped 1 small lemon, juice 4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil salt and pepper Assembling 36 slices of sourdough rye bread (or bread of choice), thinly sliced 500 g cream cheese 1 tbsp grated horseradish Decoration 1 avocado, sliced or shaped into a rose 1/­­2 cucumber, sliced thinly 1 small bunch of asparagus, thinly shaved 1 lemon, halved and thinly sliced mache lettuce chives, finely chopped Start by making the spreads. Add all the ingredients for the green spread to a food processor and mix until smooth (or use a bowl and a hand blender). Taste and adjust the flavour to your liking. Transfer to a bowl and clean the food processor. For the white spread, peel and roughly chop the eggs, place in a bowl and gently stir through cr?me fraiche, capers, sauerkraut and a little black pepper. Set aside. Drain and rinse the sunflower seeds for the purple spreads and add them to the food processor (or use bowl and hand blender) along with beans, beetroot, lemon juice, olive oil and a good grind of salt and pepper. Pulse a couple of times until combined but still a little chunky. To assemble: Trim any hard ends off the bread and line up the rye slices so you have a rectangle, 3 slices wide and 3 slices long. Spread the green spread evenly on top and then place another layer of bread. Now layer they white spread evenly on top. Place another layer of bread, followed by the purple spread. Place the final 9 slices of rye on top. Add cream cheese to a mixing bowl and grate in the horseradish. Whisk to make sure it’s incorporated, taste and add more if desired. Use a palette style knife to cover the cake with a layer of cream cheese. Decorate with an avocado rose, ribbons of cucumber, shaved asparagus, machet lettuce, slices of lemons, chives and flowers. Or whatever you think looks good. Tip: You can make this cake 12-24 hours ahead and store in the fridge to let the spreads soak into the bread and soften it up a bit. Then add the cream cheese and decorations right before serving.

Spring Picnic Bread

April 16 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Spring Picnic Bread Picnic season is finally upon us and we have been kicking it off with two new favorite things. The first one is a bike and the other is a bread. We have been dreaming of a Danish cargo bike for years and years, and last month we finally splurged on this one. It’s the perfect vehicle for us because we can fit all three kids in it with seatbelts and all. It’s ideal to bring home heavy grocery bags with. And it’s environmentally friendly. All practicalities aside, it is also so much fun to ride around with and we are roaming from playground to picnic spots without a hitch. Just packing a few blankets, a big smoothie, a rhubarb compote and this beauty of a bread. We created this recipe for all type of picnic situations. We wanted something spring-y and savory that tasted awesome and could manage a bumpy bike ride. It’s basically like a savory muffin that we bake in a sheet pan. It serves many, is easy to make, super moist and flavorful and you can make lots of variations on it (although I love the look of thinly shaved asparagus on top). Needless to say, this is also ideal for a brunch or or other weekend gatherings. Just like a foccacia, the bread acts as a base and you can play around with all kind of toppings. Here are a few variations: o Swap some of the potatoes in the bread with grated carrots, parsnip or swede. o A teaspoon of mustard in the batter adds some complexity to the flavor. o Any fresh herbs can be mixed into the batter. o Olives or capers could be good on top. Spinach could also be used instead of asparagus. o You can use a dairy free yogurt instead of buttermilk and leave out the feta cheese if you prefer it dairy free. o We havent tried a vegan version but replacing the eggs with chia eggs (1 egg = 1 tablespoons chia seed + 3 tablespoons water) has worked for us on similar recipes. Asparagus & Potato Picnic Bread Serves 12 Dry Ingredients 100 g /­­ 1 cup oat flour (or the same amount rolled oats, blitzed into flour in a food processor) 100 g /­­ 3/­­4 cup rice flour (or buckwheat flour or spelt flour) 1 1/­­2 tsp baking powder 1 tsp sea salt flakes Wet Ingredients 3 free-range eggs 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup olive oil or coconut oil, at room temperature 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup cultured buttermilk (or yogurt or plant-based yogurt) 1-2 spring onions 3-4 potatoes (2 cups /­­ 250 g grated) 1 handful fresh parsley, finely chopped 100 g feta cheese Topping 3 raw asparagus 1/­­3 cup pumpkin seeds 2 tsp quality olive oil 2 tsp honey a handful chive Preheat the oven to 180°C /­­ 350°F bake mode and grease a 30 x 22 cm /­­ 12 x 9 inch tray or line it with parchment paper. Add all the dry ingredients to a large mixing bowl and stir until combined. Make a well in the centre and set aside while preparing the wet ingredients. Whisk eggs in a separate bowl, then add oil and buttermilk. Finely chop the onion. Peel the potatoes, grate them coarsely and add them to the wet mixture along with the onion and parsley. Crumble in half of the feta cheese. Give it a good stir and then pour the wet mixture into the bowl with the flours. Use a wooden spoon or spatula to combine the batter and then pour it onto the tray. Use a peeler to shave the asparagus into thin ribbons and spread them out over the batter. Crumble the remaining feta cheese on top. Combine pumpkin seeds, oil and honey and sprinkle them on top as well, along with the chive. Bake for approximately 40 minutes or until golden and a skewer inserted in the centre of the cake comes out clean. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool slightly in the tin before transferring to a wire wrack to cool completely. Store the cake at room temperature in an airtight container and it will keep for a few days. Great to bring on a picnic and serve with a tangy rhubarb compote or chutney. Enjoy!

Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov

September 24 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Today’s self-care dialogue is with Tonya Papanikolov, holistic nutritionist, plant-based chef, and creator of The Well Woman. Tonya is a true renaissance woman, well-versed in all things wellness, mindfulness, and natural healing. We are constantly inspired by her otherworldly plant cheese plates and other whole food creations, as well as her radiance and spirit. In this interview, Tonya tells us about her approach to exercise and stress, the protocol she’s been implementing for skin integrity and gut healing, her favorite facial massage tool, her path to holistic nutrition, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I honestly really need both! Routine is so important in keeping me aligned, on track and grounded however too much of it interferes with my natural creative process. I like routine for certain things like: waking up in the morning, meditation, yoga, bowel movements, meals. However, Im a very spontaneous person and I absolutely need the freedom to throw everything up in the air to do something unpredictable. Im distracted quite easily, which means I may go on a walk and begin to inspect the sap coming out of a cedar tree which derails my routine for dinner time, hypothetically speaking ;) Those are moments I happily take freedom over routine. But its all a fine balance. There cant be too much regimentation and there cant be too much freedom. The pendulum is always somewhere along the spectrum being balanced and fine-tuned. Right now in my life, based on various situations and work, I have very little routine and it is actually something Ill be working on in the fall! Calling in some solid routine. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. Mornings do differ from day to day. It just depends on what I have going on. My ideal morning would be waking around 6:30-7am and having a big glass of lemon water before a 30-minute meditation, followed by a return to bed for a cuddle and hug. Next I would have a quick cold shower and head to the kitchen to make a morning elixir. This might be a coffee with nut milk and herbs or matcha, pearl, collagen or whatever else I feel like throwing in my blender that day based on how Im feeling! But definitely a warm beverage and some reading material. I would then begin to prioritize my day and make a list of everything I want to accomplish. I really like to save some time in the mornings to respond to emails, its been a goal of mine this year to get better at responding to emails in a timely manner. But if we had to strip everything down to the bare essentials: the absolute perfect morning is any morning that I have prioritized my meditation before everything else. This is absolute self-care time and if I do nothing else but this, I am ready for my day. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Not specifically at this time. I feel very lucky to be a great sleeper. Bedtime is funny because on the one hand I know I should be going to bed earlier but on the other Im never tired in the evening and am extremely productive during these hours. It is the time of the day I love to work the most! I am the clearest, calmest, there are so few distractions for me and I never feel my energy dip at night (for better or worse). I rarely feel tired at any point in the day so I will happily stay working until 11pm. I do try to limit computer time at night and if I cant then I always have f.lux on my screen to cast off the blue light. Im really working on this! Id like to begin shutting down work by 10pm latest but when you are working for yourself, its not always possible! I feel quite blessed that I fall asleep as soon as my head hits the pillow and that I wake with ease as well. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast - a big green smoothie, a green juice, a warm elixir in the winter time, often with cacao. I will usually add a plant-based, raw, fermented protein to my smoothie or elixir. Sometimes Ill have a piece of sourdough toast from a local organic bakery with nut butter or some avocado and lemon. Lunch - a salad with raw seasonal vegetables or some cooked vegetables like broccoli, squash, sweet potato. Or steamed greens with sauerkraut, hummus and sprouts. Snack - some of my plant-based cheeses with chia/­­flax crackers Dinner - Soup, dahl, kitchari I love making elaborate meals for dinner gatherings and special evenings but when Im cooking for myself I like to aim for simple, healthy and balanced. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I do! But Im not that religious about it. I have one drink in the morning that is caffeinated which will alternate between a high-quality coffee or a matcha. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I cant say I do. I dont consume any processed sugar so this helps keep everything in check. When I do bake or use a sweetener I go for maple syrup, honey or dates. I dont feel fiendish about sweet stuff or have cravings for it. I feel lucky for this. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I am just getting through a protocol for strengthening skin integrity and gut healing. I was using a potent antioxidant Quercetin, vitamin C, collagen, an EFA supplement and a general clean diet free of the major allergens. My skin issue cleared up very quickly once I begun this protocol. I also got a good dose of salt water and vitamin D from the sun which played a huge role and were the missing pieces. But in terms of everyday stuff I take a vegan probiotic and ashwagandha. I rotate other things in and out like maca, he shou wu, schisandra. I also drink a nettle and astragalus tea. Id like to say I get everything I need from a healthful diet and clean water but Im a very sensitive being and have a long history of gut trouble like IBS (its really good now!) but this means that I do take extra care with supplementation and herbs when Im feeling sensitive or stressed. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  My day to day is extremely active and yoga is my main form of routine movement. I also dance a lot. I find it to be a wonderful way to start the day. Im usually on my bike for over an hour a day as well and this definitely gets my heart rate up. I go on the occasional run or to a spin class but as we move into Fall Im going to be looking for a new form of movement and exercise - something a bit more strenuous. This is part of the routine Ill be looking to form for fall. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I do find it pleasurable. I dont think Id ever describe the process as torturous (ha!) but I definitely think the hardest part is just getting to the class. Having the motivation to go every day or every other. Once Im there I feel good instantly. The moving and stretching make me feel stronger as the class gets more intense. And of course afterwards, the feeling is the best. Endorphins, detoxing, cooling the body down. Sign me up! Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I like to think of beauty from an energetic, magnetism point of view. When I feel my most beautiful its generally an energetic state Im in where I exude magnetism. And Im not talking about a physical beauty magnetism but more of an energetic allure for life, a curiosity. I think other people notice that. I definitely notice that in other people. I find food and nature to have so much physical beauty and that definitely effects the final dishes/­­plates I make. Im an aesthete through and through. My eyes see such beauty in ordinary everyday life moments: the colour of someones eyes, their laugh, the way they move their hands, little unnoticed smirks, hair blowing in the wind, a cluster of sunflowers growing toward the sun, the sound of leaves in the wind. This is all so beautiful to me. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Im big on my skincare regime! If I had it my way Id go for natural facials every month but it usually turns out to be once a season. I use natural products from Pure and Simple in Toronto, Naturopathica and Living Libations which is a Canadian company. Nadine makes incredible skincare products from Haliburton Ontario, you can read her interview on The Well Woman. I only use natural products on my skin which should come as no surprise! My regime is the usual: cleanser, toner, serum and cream. I also have a jade facial gua sha tool that I massage my face with after serum. Best Skin Ever is a pretty remarkable product, its an oil based serum. I try to stay on top of a weekly exfoliation and mask. If you notice your skin getting dull the best way to correct it is with some weekly exfoliation. I use a fig enzyme peel and a clay mask. I try to do this once a week. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Water! The easiest way to get beautiful, hydrated and glowing skin is from drinking 2L + water a day. Other things that help are drinking bone broth, colonics or coffee enemas always make my skin and eyes glow because they are so beneficial to our gut health. Getting good sleep is key and meditation is always elevating and leaves me with a glow. A plant-based diet with lots of veggies, greens and fermented foods is also key. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My facial gua sha massage tool! Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Meditation, yoga, breath-work, moving my body, laughing at myself, dancing. I use ashwagandha daily too. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? All of the above! I also will talk it out with friends and my sister, family, my therapist. My therapist uses an amazing method that she has been teaching me called the Sedona Method (its an amazing book that I highly suggest). Shes not your usual therapist who you just talk to. She makes me release on all feelings and this has been an incredible tool for releasing stress, fear or any negative emotion. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Oil of oregano, lots of water, a tea with ginger, turmeric and raw honey, minimal food (so that the body can send all of its energy into fighting off the bug instead of to digestion) and LOTS of sleep! -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? There is such overlap for me! Life and work are very intertwined, one in the same. And although I love it that way Im trying to implement some more boundaries and turn-off time. But the fact is that I love what I do so much so working doesnt come with a burden. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Some of the tools have become engrained at this point. I have a morning gratefulness practice of putting my hands toward the ceiling and going over everything I am grateful for in that moment. Its really just about making new habits and setting them as priorities. I try to take 20 minutes a day for stillness in the form of meditation and breath work. I journal regularly as well. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Eating a plant-based diet that consists of mostly vegetables, lots of green smoothies and healthy fats. Diet has been number one, followed by yoga and meditation. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Many books along the way. Siddhartha. The Great Work of Your Life (which not-so coincidentally appeared on my door step one day). All the books I read while studying at The Institute of Holistic Nutrition. Knowledge -- Have you always been interested in the connection between wellness and sustenance? What was your path to studying Holistic Nutrition?  My interest started quite young. I ate really healthy as a kid, my favourite food growing up were carrots (?!). The trend continued as a teenager but I definitely had a lot to learn. I knew I wanted to get into nutrition in high school and chose a university school and program accordingly. I studied nutritional science for four years at the University of Guelph and thought I would become a naturopathic doctor but decided to switch directions after school. I got into a totally different line of work in fashion, where I worked for a Canadian retailer doing fashion direction! It was a really fun job but after a substantial amount of stress and awakening, I decided to pivot back into health, wellness and food. I went back to school, to the Institute of Holistic Nutrition in Toronto. -- You make your own plant cheeses and even developed a plant cheese plate for the Toronto restaurant Nota Bene! How did you come across the plant cheese-making practice and develop your own recipes? What’s your favorite cheese that you make? I learned the process to make the plant-based cheeses while studying at Matthew Kenney Culinary in California, from there its just been experimenting and playing with new flavor and consistency combinations! Thats a tough question, I really love the truffle and charcoal flavor and the freshness of the dill and chive! -- You cook plant-based dinners for groups of people, often centering the food around beautiful themes, like your Spring Equinox dinner. Can you tell us a bit more about the dinners and your approach? Its really just about getting a group together to share in a healthy meal and to show people how versatile, delicious and vibrant a plant-based meal can be. The themes often come from inspiration around the seasons, a book, or an artist. I love the idea of working with a theme for dinners to tie everything together. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Ultimate unwinding is a weekend getaway to a cabin on a lake! Unwinding in nature is always my preference. I treat myself with a facial or going for acupuncture, reiki or to a restorative yoga class. Unwinding can be as simple as a walk. But the classic Tonya move is a back-scratch before bed. My! Favourite! -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book - You Are a Circle and You Are a Message Song/­­Album - This song that I wake up to each and every morning: Ik Ardas Wahe Guru by White Sun Movie - The Scent of Green Papaya by director Tran Anh Hung Piece of Art - Ronan Bouroullec drawings -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in Toronto? Awai, Dandylion, Actinolite, nutbar, Kupfert and Kim, Earth and City -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I love this! Here are some of mine: - Probiotics - Oil of oregano - Camera - 2L of water - A book - My recipe/­­poetry notebook - A good pen - A homemade trail mix - My favourite copper spoon - My Jesse Kamms - theyre comfortable and I love wearing them travelling -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Nikisha Brunson! Photos by Nathan Legiehn, Kelly Brown and Tonya Papanikolov. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Baked Apples with Spiced Oatmeal

August 26 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Baked Apples with Spiced Oatmeal Just checking in quickly today to share a nice little apple breakfast recipe that we have been making a lot lately. We know that August hasnt ended yet and we all want to hold on to summer for as long as we can and pretend that winter isnt coming. But we thought we’d provide you with a little something for when the first chillier days arrive (which has already happened here btw) and you hear raindrops come knocking on your window sills. For those moments, you can just bust these baked apples out of the oven, let the scent of warm cinnamon spread through your home and immediately feel a little better about the whole situation. We have been making variations of this both as breakfast and dessert - filling them with oatmeal topped with yogurt for breakfast, and a date and almond paste topped with whipped cream for dessert. The idea to pimp regular oatmeal/­­porridge by stuffing it inside baked apples is pretty great in its simplicity. But here we make it a tad more special and extra delicious by cooking the oatmeal with pure apple juice/­­cider, spices, butter or coconut oil and chopped almonds for extra rich flavor and texture. We then top the baked apples with a thick yogurt and drizzle with ginger honey for sweetness. And if you’ve got a little nut butter at home, that’s also good on top. Always use local apples if they are available and in season, they taste way better! Id love to chat more, but it was my birthday yesterday and Luise surprised me with a dinner, sleepover and breakfast at Stedsans in the Woods. It’s a restaurant in the middle of the Swedish forest with great food, beduin tents, outdoor showers and a floating sauna. So we’re pretty eager to experience it. I’ll probably share a few snaps on my Instagram stories later tonight, if you want to check it out. Oh, and if you have the feels for more apple recipes, check out these ones from our blog archive: o Apple, Almond & Buckwheat Muffins o Apple & Cinnamon Tray Cake o Chia Parfait & Apple Crunch o Hazelnut, Chocolate & Apple Buns o Apple & Oat Biscuits Baked Apples with Spiced Oatmeal and Ginger Honey We made this recipe with 10 apples because we wanted to make a large batch, but you can just as well make it for two or four people by reducing the amounts. 10 apples juice from 1/­­2 lemon Apple Oatmeal 1 cup rolled oats 1 cup unfiltered and unsweetened apple juice/­­cider (or milk of choice or water) 1 1/­­2 cup water 2 tbsp almonds, finely chopped 1/­­2 tsp ground cinnamon 1/­­2 tsp freshly ground cardamom 1/­­4 tsp ground vanilla 3 tbsp butter (or coconut oil) 10-15 almonds, chopped a large pinch salt Serve 1 cup full-fat greek yogurt (or coconut yogurt) Ginger Honey (simply stir lots of freshly grated ginger into honey over low heat) 10-15 almonds, chopped ground cinnamon Set the oven to 200°C /­­ 400 °F. Prepare the apples by cutting off the top and then, using a sharp small knife or apple corer, scoop out the seeds and core in the center of each apple. Use a small spoon to scoop out enough apple flesh to make room for the porridge. (The flesh can be chopped and mixed into the oatmeal before filling the apples). Rub the inside of the apples with a little lemon juice and place them in a baking tray with high sides. Add all the oatmeal ingredients except butter and to a medium sized sauce pan and bring to a boil while stirring. Lower the heat and cook until creamy. Stir in the butter (or coconut oil) and almonds towards the end and then fill the apples with the oatmeal, top with a pinch extra cinnamon and put the apple tops back on. Add 2 tbsp water to the bottom of the baking tray and bake for 25-30 minutes or until the apples are soft. Keep an eye on the oven as different apple varieties need different baking time. Serve the apples on a plate, topped with a dollop yogurt, chopped almonds, cinnamon and a drizzle of ginger honey.

The Chocolate Chip Cookie I Can't Stop Baking (it's been around awhile, sorta like this blog)

February 17 2019 Vegan Thyme 

The Chocolate Chip Cookie I Can't Stop Baking (it's been around awhile, sorta like this blog) This is the chocolate chip cookie for which no other chocolate chip cookie can be measured. It's Alison Roman's chocolate chip cookie recipe. Yes, this is 'that' cookie--the Instagram darling from ages ago. I'm late to the party again. But I've made over a hundred of these by now. During the holidays, I'd gone off them for a bit--baking the Greatest Hits from the archive which appear every December. Then three weeks ago, during cookie craving mania, the recipe appeared on the top of my pile of recipes and here we are, on our third batch. I halve the recipe (which is very easy to do) because I take great joy in re-making this cookie. Takes five minutes to mix, roll into a log, then chill. I prep in the morning usually because it requires a two hour chill. The halved recipe makes for a perfect 12-16 or so cookie batch. That's enough cookies to last us a week. A shortbread texture, chocolate chunks and a pinch of salt. Before slicing, Alison't recipe indicates a roll of cookie log in egg and then sugar. I brush mine with soy milk and then roll in sugar and bake. Seemed to work fine.  I've spent ten years sharing food and life stuff here. During these last few years, a little less so. I told someone recently I "had" a blog as we discussed recipes. I said it had gone dormant, almost with a sense of shame. But truthfully, I'm not ashamed at all. Life moves on, new voices arise and new stories are told.  I've simplified, pared down. This is a hard thing to do in a that-was-news-five-minutes-ago world. I think it's why I felt compelled to share this cookie even though its five minutes of fame was last year.   If you've read this far, I might as well add a few highlights/­­accomplishments/­­humble-brag moments of life--just so we're all caught up. Things haven't changed much. There's the knitting. My steady companion for over fifteen years now.  Ramblin' Woman by Caitlin Hunter. Here's mine on Ravelry here. The Weekender by Andrea Mowry pullover. Here's mine on Ravelry here.  The 1898 Hat by Kristine Byrnes. Here's mine on Ravelry here. (Btw, DH loves this hat. I was so thrilled!) Us. My steady companion for over twenty-two years. The furbabies. Always. My sister and her Dear Husband: the newlyweds as of last summer! 

Corn-Stuffed Zucchini

January 14 2019 Meatless Monday 

Zucchini stuffed with corn is a delicious and healthy combination. This recipe is low in sodium, which helps keep blood pressure control in check, providing less stress on the kidneys. It is also low in saturated and total fat, helping blood vessels supply necessary oxygen and nutrients to the heart and kidneys. This recipe comes to us from the National Kidney Foundation. Serves 4 - 3/­­4  tsp, leaves  Dried Thyme - 1/­­2  tsp, ground  Black Pepper - 1/­­2  cup pieces  Mushrooms, White, Raw - 2  ounce  Cheddar Cheese – Low Fat - 4  tbsp chopped  Chives - 1/­­4  cup, chopped  Onion - 1 1/­­2  cup  Frozen Corn - 6  medium  Squash – Zucchini Cut zucchini in halves lengthwise. Cook in boiling water for 10 minutes. Carefully remove pulp. Drain corn and zucchini pulp well and combine with onion, mushrooms, pepper, chives, and thyme. Pile mixture in zucchini shells and place in a 13 X 9 inch pan. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake, uncovered, at 350 F for 20 minutes. The post Corn-Stuffed Zucchini appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Best Vegan Recipes 2018 from VeganRicha.com

December 31 2018 Vegan Richa 

Best Vegan Recipes 2018 from VeganRicha.comBest Vegan Recipes 2018 from VeganRicha.com . Popular Recipes from the year with a few of my favorites and also some recipes that have been consistently loved from the archives! Glutenfree Soyfree options Its a wrap! 2018 has been an year of ups and downs, in health, blogging, life and everything. My digestion issues meant I was eating less of legumes and you probably noticed that slight shift on the blog from a whole lotta chickpeas to more of mushrooms and tofu. I do make a lot of legume based meals, but with from scratch cooked beans rather than canned and also eat it only on the day they are cooked (no leftovers for me). So a lot of meals get out to the neighborhood! (if you are in seattle main area and would like some, ping me on fb. I don’t deliver, you pick)   Blogging is now pretty competitive with all the amazing new blogs with great photography and content. The competitiveness of it as a business can get to one. My plan for 2019 is to continue to do what I love, i.e. develop amazing recipes, and then delegate and find help for the rest. There will always be people who can do things better in some ways, and stressing about it gets me nowhere. So lets just create and eat amazing food!  What I also learnt is that you the readers have various interests when it comes to food. Quick recipes obviously always work. There are tons of those already out there, some on the blog and books too. And even though a good portion of my recipes use a few more ingredients and a few more steps, you choose to trust them and love the results! I am incredibly thankful that you do! Thank you for the support and love this year. Here is to many more! Wish you all a very Happy 2019! Here are the popular recipes from the year with a few of my favorites that were not as popular and also some recipes that have been consistently loved from the archives! What did you try from the blog this year that you were not sure about but turned out amazing? Let me know in the comments.Continue reading: Best Vegan Recipes 2018 from VeganRicha.comThe post Best Vegan Recipes 2018 from VeganRicha.com appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Green Christmas 2018 -- Vegan Edition

December 19 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Christmas 2018 -- Vegan Edition The tree is already covered with colorful glass balls, small hand drawn paper Santas and tinsels, we have got light strands hanging around the windows, the presents are wrapped and Sinatra is playing from the kitchen speakers. It’s five days left to Christmas Eve and I don’t think we have ever prepared ahead for the holidays like this before. We have even cooked all the Christmas food. Twice! Well, three times actually. One was for our early celebration with David’s family. The other was to shoot these photos. And the third time because David is manic about testing recipes three times. We’ve got this. Sharing Christmas recipe roundups seems almost obligatory when you work with food. This year we asked what type of recipes you were looking for and many mentioned more vegan dishes for your holiday feasts, so that is what we have done here. I am not going to pretend that we are good at organizing big dinner parties, we are truly not. But we do have one method that we live by: Focus on having a good base of dishes and then ask guests to each bring a small side dish, drink, snack or dessert. That way you can have a generous buffet of food without the accompanying stress meltdown. Our cabbage parcels make a beautiful centerpiece with delicious mustard roasted roots and crispy smashed potatoes as warm sides. Because all of these dishes are quite rich, we also like to serve a fresh, tangy and crunchy salad on the side. Along with red cabbage Christmas krauts from our Green Kitchen at Home book. You’ll find the recipes here below. A few other favorites from the archives are our vegan Aubergine Polpette (perhaps with a gravy on the side), our Mushroom & Hazelnut Loaf, this one-tray Hasselback Potatoes with Kale and Pesto, the Pumpkin, Kale and Buckwheat Salad that we had for our wedding, this Black Quinoa & Kale Salad from dinosaur time (we’ve been making this for Christmas almost every year), and this Crispy Red Cabbage & Grape Salad (red cabbage salads are obligatory for all Danes on Christmas). We actually have one more recipe that we haven’t had time to post yet. It’s a really good gingerbread bundt cake and we’ll do our best to post the recipe before Christmas Eve (if you have our app, it is already available on there). Happy holidays! /­­Luise, David and all the kids! Stuffed Cabbage Parcels Makes 8 parcels These pretty little parcels are stuffed with rice, lentils, walnuts and raisins and cooked in a holiday spiced tomato broth. They are a little fiddly to make but super flavorful and well worth the effort. This recipe is vegan but you could also add feta cheese to the parcels if you feel like it. Filling – 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked red rice (see note) – 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked puy lentils – 500 ml /­­ 2 cups water – 1/­­2 tsp sea salt – 1 tbsp olive oil – 1 large red onion, peeled and finely chopped – 1 clove garlic, peeled and finely chopped – 1 cup walnuts, finely chopped – 4 tbsp raisins – 2 tbsp lemon juice – 4 tbsp chopped parsley Tomato Broth – 750 ml /­­ 3 cups vegetable stock – 1 x 400 g /­­ 14 oz tin crushed tomatoes – 1 tsp whole cloves – 1 tsp whole allspice – 2 star anise – 2 cinnamon sticks – 1 pinch sea salt Assembling – 1 savoy cabbage – 8 pieces of cooking string – 1 tbsp olive oil to fry in Instructions 1. Rinse rice and lentils in a sieve under running water. 2. Transfer to a saucepan and add water and salt. Bring to a boil, lower the heat and let simmer until tender, for about 35 minutes or according to the time on the package. 3. Place another sauce pan with the Tomato Broth ingredients on the stove, bring to a boil and then turn the heat down and let it slowly simmer under a lid for 20 minutes on low heat. 4. Meanwhile, add oil to a large skillet and sauté onion and garlic for 10 minutes on medium heat or until soft and translucent. 5. Transfer the onion to a bowl and wipe out the pan (you will use it to fry and cook the parcels in later on). 6. Drain any excess water from the rice and lentils. Add the onion and garlic, walnuts, raisins, lemon juice and parsley and stir to combine. 7. Carefully break off 8 leaves of the savoy cabbage. Trim off the thickest part of the stalk. 8. Blanch the savoy cabbage leaves in a sauce pan with salted boiling water for 2-3 minutes. Drain and lay out on a tea towel. 9. Spoon 3 tablespoons of filling into the center of each cabbage leaf. Fold up and tie with the string. Repeat with the remaining seven. 10. Place all parcels in a heated skillet with a little oil added. Fry on both sides until browned. 11. Pour the broth into the pan with the cabbage parcels (the pan should be half filled). Put a lid on and let simmer for about 30 minutesor until the cabbage feels soft and tender (you can cook the parcels for a shorter time if you prefer them a little crunchier). 12. Serve the parcels with a little broth poured on top. Remove the strings before eating ;) Note – We cook the rice and lentils for the filling together, just make sure that they have similar cooking times. If not, start with the one with the longest time and then add the other accordingly. Or cook in separate pans. Smashed Balsamic Potatoes Serves 4 as a side This rustic potato recipe combine three different potato methods into one - boiled, mashed and roasted. They are crispy on the outside, soft on the inside with a sweet tanginess added from balsamic vinegar. Ingredients – 1 kg /­­ 2 lb small potatoes – 2 tsp salt – 3 tbsp olive oil – 1 1/­­2 tbsp balsamic vinegar – 1 clove garlic, finely chopped – a few sprigs fresh thyme Preparation 1. Set the oven to 225°C /­­ 450°F. 2. Wash the potatoes (keep the skin on) and place in a large sauce pan. 3. Cover with water and add 1 tsp salt. Cook for about 20 minutes (longer if you use bigger potatoes) or until easily pierced with a fork. 4. Drain the water and leave to cool for a bit. 5. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and place the potatoes on it. 6. Smash the potatoes by pressing down on them using the backside of a glass. 7. Whisk together oil, balsamic vinegar and garlic. 9. Drizzle generously over the potatoes, making sure that you get it into all the nooks and crannies. You can use a brush for this as well. 10. Sprinkle with salt and thyme leaves. 11. Place in the oven and roast for 25 minutes or until the potatoes are crispy and golden brown. Tip – This is perfect as a side for 4 persons but you can easily double the recipe if you are cooking for a crowd. Just use two baking sheets and set the oven to fan mode and lower the temp slightly for more evenly distributed heat. Mustard Roasted Roots Serves 4 as a side We love a good tray of roasted roots. Here we have coated the roots in cinnamon, grainy mustard, a little vinegar and maple syrup and roasted them until they start to caramelize. We serve these with a saffron sauce which basically is this turmeric tahini sauce but with saffron instead of turmeric. But a simple yogurt based sauce could be great too. Ingredients – 1 kg /­­ 2 lb mixed roots (parsnip, carrots, swede, sweet potato) Dressing – 3 tbsp olive oil – 2 tbsp grainy mustard – 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar – 1 tsp ground cinnamon – 1 tsp maple syrup – 1 tsp sea salt To Serve – 2 tbsp hemp seeds or finely chopped almonds Preparation 1. Preheat the oven to 180°C /­­ 375°F. 2. Peel the roots and chop into batons (roughly 10 cm long and 1,5 cm thick). 3. Stir together the dressing ingredients in a large mixing bowl. 4. Add the roots and toss until all are covered. 5. Tip out on a baking sheet covered with parchment paper and spread out in an even layer. 6. Place in the oven and roast for 20 minutes. Give the sheet a toss, then crank up the heat to 225°C /­­ 450°F and bake for 20 minutes more or until golden and slightly charred. 7. Transfer the roots to a serving platter and sprinkle with hemp seeds. Tips – This is perfect as a side for 4 persons but you can easily double the recipe if you are cooking for a crowd. Just use two baking sheets and set the oven to fan mode for more evenly distributed heat. – You can use any root for this but swede, carrots, sweet potato and parsnips are our favorites.   Crispy Celery and Orange Salad Serves 4 – 1 head romain lettuce or cosmopolitan – 4 celery stalks (or fennel) – 2 oranges – 4 tbsp toasted hazelnuts Mustard vinaigrette – 2 tbsp olive oil – 1 tbsp vinegar – 1 tsp Dijon mustard – 1 tsp maple syrup 1. Rinse the lettuce in water and chop into 2 inch /­­ 5 cm large pieces, discarding the stem. 2. Thinly slice the celery stalks (or mandolin the fennel of using). 3. Peel the oranges and cut in halves and thinly slice each half. 4. Place all prepped ingredients into a large mixing bowl. 5. Whisk together the vinaigrette ingredients in a small separate bowl. 6. Gently toss the dressing with the salad ingredients. 7. Chop the toasted hazelnuts. 8. Transfer to a serving bowl and scatter with hazelnuts. Serve!

Green Christmas 2018

December 19 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Christmas 2018 The tree is already covered with colorful glass balls, small hand drawn paper Santas and tinsels, we have got light strands hanging around the windows, the presents are wrapped and Sinatra is playing from the kitchen speakers. It’s five days left to Christmas Eve and I don’t think we have ever prepared ahead for the holidays like this before. We have even cooked all the Christmas food. Twice! Well, three times actually. One was for our early celebration with David’s family. The other was to shoot these photos. And the third time because David is manic about testing recipes three times. We’ve got this. Sharing Christmas recipe roundups seems almost obligatory when you work with food. This year we asked what type of recipes you were looking for and many mentioned more vegan dishes for your holiday feasts, so that is what we have done here. I am not going to pretend that we are good at organizing big dinner parties, we are truly not. But we do have one method that we live by: Focus on having a good base of dishes and then ask guests to each bring a small side dish, drink, snack or dessert. That way you can have a generous buffet of food without the accompanying stress meltdown. Our cabbage parcels make a beautiful centerpiece with delicious mustard roasted roots and crispy smashed potatoes as warm sides. Because all of these dishes are quite rich, we also like to serve a fresh, tangy and crunchy salad on the side. Along with red cabbage Christmas krauts from our Green Kitchen at Home book. You’ll find the recipes here below. A few other favorites from the archives are our vegan Aubergine Polpette (perhaps with a gravy on the side), our Mushroom & Hazelnut Loaf, this one-tray Hasselback Potatoes with Kale and Pesto, the Pumpkin, Kale and Buckwheat Salad that we had for our wedding, this Black Quinoa & Kale Salad from dinosaur time (we’ve been making this for Christmas almost every year), and this Crispy Red Cabbage & Grape Salad (red cabbage salads are obligatory for all Danes on Christmas). We actually have one more recipe that we haven’t had time to post yet. It’s a really good gingerbread bundt cake and we’ll do our best to post the recipe before Christmas Eve. Otherwise we’ll just call it a post-Christmas cake ;) Happy holidays! /­­Luise, David and all the kids! Stuffed Cabbage Parcels Makes 8 parcels These pretty little parcels are stuffed with rice, lentils, walnuts and raisins and cooked in a holiday spiced tomato broth. They are a little fiddly to make but super flavorful and well worth the effort. This recipe is vegan but you could also add feta cheese to the parcels if you feel like it. Filling – 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked red rice (see note) – 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked puy lentils – 500 ml /­­ 2 cups water – 1/­­2 tsp sea salt – 1 tbsp olive oil – 1 large red onion, peeled and finely chopped – 1 clove garlic, peeled and finely chopped – 1 cup walnuts, finely chopped – 4 tbsp raisins – 2 tbsp lemon juice – 4 tbsp chopped parsley Tomato Broth – 750 ml /­­ 3 cups vegetable stock – 1 x 400 g /­­ 14 oz tin crushed tomatoes – 1 tsp whole cloves – 1 tsp whole allspice – 2 star anise – 2 cinnamon sticks – 1 pinch sea salt Assembling – 1 savoy cabbage – 8 pieces of cooking string – 1 tbsp olive oil to fry in Instructions 1. Rinse rice and lentils in a sieve under running water. 2. Transfer to a saucepan and add water and salt. Bring to a boil, lower the heat and let simmer until tender, for about 35 minutes or according to the time on the package. 3. Place another sauce pan with the Tomato Broth ingredients on the stove, bring to a boil and then turn the heat down and let it slowly simmer under a lid for 20 minutes on low heat. 4. Meanwhile, add oil to a large skillet and sauté onion and garlic for 10 minutes on medium heat or until soft and translucent. 5. Transfer the onion to a bowl and wipe out the pan (you will use it to fry and cook the parcels in later on). 6. Drain any excess water from the rice and lentils. Add the onion and garlic, walnuts, raisins, lemon juice and parsley and stir to combine. 7. Carefully break off 8 leaves of the savoy cabbage. Trim off the thickest part of the stalk. 8. Blanch the savoy cabbage leaves in a sauce pan with salted boiling water for 2-3 minutes. Drain and lay out on a tea towel. 9. Spoon 3 tablespoons of filling into the center of each cabbage leaf. Fold up and tie with the string. Repeat with the remaining seven. 10. Place all parcels in a heated skillet with a little oil added. Fry on both sides until browned. 11. Pour the broth into the pan with the cabbage parcels (the pan should be half filled). Put a lid on and let simmer for about 30 minutesor until the cabbage feels soft and tender (you can cook the parcels for a shorter time if you prefer them a little crunchier). 12. Serve the parcels with a little broth poured on top. Remove the strings before eating ;) Note – We cook the rice and lentils for the filling together, just make sure that they have similar cooking times. If not, start with the one with the longest time and then add the other accordingly. Or cook in separate pans. Smashed Balsamic Potatoes Serves 4 as a side This rustic potato recipe combine three different potato methods into one - boiled, mashed and roasted. They are crispy on the outside, soft on the inside with a sweet tanginess added from balsamic vinegar. Ingredients – 1 kg /­­ 2 lb small potatoes – 2 tsp salt – 3 tbsp olive oil – 1 1/­­2 tbsp balsamic vinegar – 1 clove garlic, finely chopped – a few sprigs fresh thyme Preparation 1. Set the oven to 225°C /­­ 450°F. 2. Wash the potatoes (keep the skin on) and place in a large sauce pan. 3. Cover with water and add 1 tsp salt. Cook for about 20 minutes (longer if you use bigger potatoes) or until easily pierced with a fork. 4. Drain the water and leave to cool for a bit. 5. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and place the potatoes on it. 6. Smash the potatoes by pressing down on them using the backside of a glass. 7. Whisk together oil, balsamic vinegar and garlic. 9. Drizzle generously over the potatoes, making sure that you get it into all the nooks and crannies. You can use a brush for this as well. 10. Sprinkle with salt and thyme leaves. 11. Place in the oven and roast for 25 minutes or until the potatoes are crispy and golden brown. Tip – This is perfect as a side for 4 persons but you can easily double the recipe if you are cooking for a crowd. Just use two baking sheets and set the oven to fan mode and lower the temp slightly for more evenly distributed heat. Mustard Roasted Roots Serves 4 as a side We love a good tray of roasted roots. Here we have coated the roots in cinnamon, grainy mustard, a little vinegar and maple syrup and roasted them until they start to caramelize. We serve these with a saffron sauce which basically is this turmeric tahini sauce but with saffron instead of tahini. But a simple yogurt based sauce could be great too. Ingredients – 1 kg /­­ 2 lb mixed roots (parsnip, carrots, swede, sweet potato) Dressing – 3 tbsp olive oil – 2 tbsp grainy mustard – 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar – 1 tsp ground cinnamon – 1 tsp maple syrup – 1 tsp sea salt To Serve – 2 tbsp hemp seeds or finely chopped almonds Preparation 1. Preheat the oven to 180°C /­­ 375°F. 2. Peel the roots and chop into batons (roughly 10 cm long and 1,5 cm thick). 3. Stir together the dressing ingredients in a large mixing bowl. 4. Add the roots and toss until all are covered. 5. Tip out on a baking sheet covered with parchment paper and spread out in an even layer. 6. Place in the oven and roast for 20 minutes. Give the sheet a toss, then crank up the heat to 225°C /­­ 450°F and bake for 20 minutes more or until golden and slightly charred. 7. Transfer the roots to a serving platter and sprinkle with hemp seeds. Tips – This is perfect as a side for 4 persons but you can easily double the recipe if you are cooking for a crowd. Just use two baking sheets and set the oven to fan mode for more evenly distributed heat. – You can use any root for this but swede, carrots, sweet potato and parsnips are our favorites.   Crispy Celery and Orange Salad Serves 4 – 1 head romain lettuce or cosmopolitan – 4 celery stalks (or fennel) – 2 oranges – 4 tbsp toasted hazelnuts Mustard vinaigrette – 2 tbsp olive oil – 1 tbsp vinegar – 1 tsp Dijon mustard – 1 tsp maple syrup 1. Rinse the lettuce in water and chop into 2 inch /­­ 5 cm large pieces, discarding the stem. 2. Thinly slice the celery stalks (or mandolin the fennel of using). 3. Peel the oranges and cut in halves and thinly slice each half. 4. Place all prepped ingredients into a large mixing bowl. 5. Whisk together the vinaigrette ingredients in a small separate bowl. 6. Gently toss the dressing with the salad ingredients. 7. Chop the toasted hazelnuts. 8. Transfer to a serving bowl and scatter with hazelnuts. Serve!

English Garden Salad

August 7 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

English Garden SaladLittle gem lettuce has spoiled me for other types of lettuce--its everything we love about butter and romaine lettuce, all in one compact little head-- and it’s perfect for this English Garden Salad. If you cant find Little Gem lettuce, substitute another type of lettuce, such as Boston or Bibb. English Garden Salad Little gem lettuce has spoiled me for other types of lettuce--its everything we love about butter and romaine lettuce, all in one compact little head. If you cant find Little Gem lettuce, substitute another type of lettuce, such as Boston or Bibb. - 4 ounces thin asparagus or young green beans trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces - 1 cup green peas, fresh or frozen - 2 to 3 heads Little Gem lettuce or other tender lettuce, coarsely chopped (about 5 cups total) - 4 cherry or grape tomatoes, halved lengthwise - 1/­­2 English cucumber, thinly sliced - 4 red radishes, trimmed and thinly sliced - 1 tablespoon chopped fresh tarragon leaves - 1 tablespoon snipped fresh chives - 1 tablespoon torn small fresh mint leaves - 3 tablespoons olive oil - 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice or white wine vinegar - 1/­­4 teaspoon salt - 1/­­8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper - Pinch sugar - Steam the asparagus and peas over boiling water, using a steamer pot with a perforated insert until crisp-tender, 2 to 3 minute. Run cold water over the vegetables to stop the cooking process, then drain and pat dry. - Transfer the cooled vegetables to a large bowl. Add the lettuce, tomatoes, cucumbers, radishes, and fresh herbs. - In a small bowl, combine the oil, lemon juice, salt, pepper, and sugar. Drizzle over the salad and toss gently to combine. Serve immediately. This recipe is from Vegan Without Borders (C) Robin Robertson, 2014, Andrews McMeel Publishing, photo by Sara Remington.   The post English Garden Salad appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Danish Summer Tacos

July 8 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Danish Summer Tacos Here is an unconventional but yet great taco recipe that we want you to try. It includes making tortillas from grated zucchini/­­courgette and filling them with a creamy and crunchy yogurt, cucumber and potato salad. Think of it as a light and summery take on tacos that probably will drive taco conservatives mad but make the rest of us happy. Because one more way to eat taco is not a bad thing. The zucchini tortillas is a recipe we have been making for the past couple of months, using egg, almond flour and parmesan to bind them together. We first saw this idea floating around on various Pinterest boards. If you have been making our vegetable flatbreads, this is a thinner version that is more elastic (mainly because of the cheese) and therefore works great as a soft tortilla shell or wrap. The creamy yogurt salad is our version of a Danish summer salad (sommersalat). It is traditionally made on smoked fresh cheese, creme fraiche, radishes, cucumber and chives and it is a classic summer dish, served on top of a sm?rrebr?d or inside a sandwich. We have upgraded the traditional version with strawberry, apple, dill, parsley and cooked potatoes and it is truly a delightful combination of flavors and textures. The sweet and fruity notes works very well with the fresh herbs and cooked sliced potatoes. It is pretty difficult to come by smoked fresh cheese if you live outside of Denmark so our version instead has full fat yogurt, lemon juice and dill. If you do find smoked fresh cheese you should definitely replace half of the yogurt with it in this recipe. We are actually writing this from Denmark as we are spending a few summer weeks with our Danish family so apart from smoked cheese, we will also be feasting on r?dgr?d med fl?de, sm?rrebr?d and p?laegschokolade. Leave us a comment if you give this a try, we’d love to hear what you think. Happy summer! Danish Summer Zucchini Tacos Makes 6 Zucchini Tortillas 2 zucchini (4 cups grated) 1 large egg 1/­­2 cup loosely packed grated parmesan cheese 25 g /­­ 1/­­4 cup almond flour sea salt & pepper Danish summer salad 4 cooked new potatoes 1/­­2 cucumber 4 radishes 6 small tomatoes 10 strawberries, pitted 1 apple, cored 4 stems dill 4 stems parsley 1 cup thick plain yogurt 2 tbsp mayonaise (optional) 1/­­2 lemon, juice sea salt & pepper For assembling 6 crispy lettuce 6 tbsp alfalfa sprouts Preheat the oven to 200°C and line a baking tray with baking paper. Grate the zucchini on the roughest side of a box grater. Place in a sieve and squeeze out any excess water from the grated zucchini. Transfer to a mixing bowl and combine with a whisked egg, grated cheese, almond flour, salt and pepper. Measure out 60 ml /­­ 1/­­4 cup of batter for each flatbread, place on the baking paper and use the palm of your hand to shape them into flat discs. Bake in the oven for about 20 minutes until golden and firm. Cut potatoes, cucumber, radishes, tomatoes, strawberries and apple into small cubes and transfer to a mixing bowl. Finely chop dill and parsley. In another bowl stir together dill, parsley, yogurt, mayonaise, lemon juice, salt and pepper and add to the cubed ingredient bowl. Gently combine so all ingredients are covered in the herby yogurt mixture. When the zucchini tacos/­­tortillas have cooled slightly, place a lettuce in each and 2 spoonfuls of summer salad and top with sprouts. Serve immediately.

Caramelized Onion White Lentil Hummus

June 14 2018 My New Roots 

Caramelized Onion White Lentil Hummus If there is one trick Ive learned in all of my years cooking, both at home and in restaurants, it is this: caramelized onions can make almost anything taste amazing. Theyre the ridiculously simple, yet magical ingredient that turns an ordinary dish into something so rich-tasting and satisfying that people go ...oh hi excuse me, this is incredible. I think the simple reason that caramelized onions taste so good, is because they are a labour of love. Not like an all-day stirring the pot kinda deal, but most definitely a food that you cant just leave on the stove and dive into an Instagram vortex. No. Caramelized onions take care and attention, at least for the better part of half an hour, and the results are so worth it I bet youll catch yourself multi-tasking at the stove tonight just to have some on hand to gussy up your omelet this weekend (boss move there, by the way). The more accurate reason that caramelized onions taste so good however, isnt technically caramelization - its called the Maillard reaction. The Maillard reaction is a browning reaction similar to caramelization, but with one distinct difference: caramelization is a chemical reaction between reducing sugars, while Maillard is a chemical reaction between reducing sugars and amino acids (proteins). And yes, there is enough protein in an onion to elicit this response - how thrilling for us! Although the Maillard reaction is very complex and complicated, what we do know is that it requires heat to transform and rearrange sugars and amino acids to create new and fantastic flavour molecules in and on your food, making it even more delicious. If youve ever eaten a golden slice of toast, enjoyed a rich cup of coffee, or nibbled on a grilled vegetable, youve experienced the pure pleasure that all of this this chemical commotion is responsible for. Science! Harnessing the power of the Maillard reaction can make you a better cook, because things that are browned properly taste more intensely, more complex, and well, better. Without even being aware of it, its the reason youll reach for the roasted veggies with the crispiest edges, or the reason that you prefer a fried egg over a boiled one (no judgement!). There are a couple ways of making this spectacular series of chemical reactions work for you, and the first is high heat. Maillard will not occur at very low temperatures, especially in situations where the food is not in direct contact with the heat, like it is on a skillet or grill for instance. When youre roasting veggies, make sure the oven is at least 400°F /­­ 200°C. When youre making pizza, you can crank it up even higher, to get those beautifully blistered crust edges that make your mouth water. The second way is to keep the food youre cooking on the dry side. For instance, have you ever noticed how if you wash mushrooms (which you should actually never do), theyll never really get brown and crusty? Too much moisture! Instead, brush those fungi gently to remove any dirt or debris, then put them in a screeching hot pan with some ghee and dont stir them. I talk more about this technique here. This is the same reason you need a large pan for these caramelized onions, since theyll need the space to allow the water to evaporate around them. If the onions are too close together, theyll only steam each other. Eew. If you’re oven roasting vegetables for dinner, cut them in the morning and leave them out all day uncovered so that the surface water will evaporate, and the veggies will brown more easily. Yes, this seems like a bit of a hassle, but the culinary nerd in me admits that its cool because it works. So, where does the hummus come into this story? Well, hummus is pretty much a food group in my world. Ive made so many variations with so many kinds of legumes, spices, alt seed butters, toppings, and stir-ins, that I could hardly believe I had never tried it with the ingredient that could single-handedly save humanity: caramelized onions. I knew that deep richness of the onions would meld perfectly with the creamy dip, and make the flavour even better. I wasnt wrong! The only thing that I wanted to improve upon, was the protein content - not because Im obsessed with protein, but simply because I thought it could be higher. To do that I simply swapped out the traditional chickpeas for white lentils, or urad dal. We not only get more protein from this change-up, but almost double the fiber, with less sodium, less fat, and less sugar. Sweet. This dip is the perfect, rich compliment to all the crisp and light, early summer veggies popping up. I went to my friends farm and picked some seriously beautiful radishes and young carrots, which paired so well with the caramelized onion flavour. I also had some Life-Changing Crackers on hand, which always make dipping more delicious. One thing I changed from the first version to the third, was the onions on top. Instead of blending all of them into the dip, I used about a third of them on top, which allows you to scoop a few tender morsels up with each bite. This delivers even more caramelized onion flavour and texture, which, let us be reminded, is the whole point of this exercise. Even though this hummus keeps well for at least five days in the fridge (you can even freeze it!), it is best eaten freshly made at room temperature, since the flavour is at its peak then. And because you’re wondering, you can find white or ivory lentils at Indian grocers, Middle Eastern markets, or some natural food stores. They are the skinned and split version of urad dal, which is black, so make sure you buy the huskless version! If you cant find them at all, simply use chickpeas - it will be just as delicious.     Print recipe     Caramelized Onion and White Lentil Hummus Makes about 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup raw white lentils (huskless split black mapte beans /­­ urad dal dhuli), soaked if possible 1 small clove garlic 3 Tbsp. tahini 3 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tsp. balsamic vinegar 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­4 tsp. ground cumin heaping 1/­­4 tsp. freshly cracked black pepper 1 batch caramelized onions (from the recipe below) cold-pressed olive oil, for garnish Directions: 1. Start by cooking the lentils. If youve soaked them beforehand (even an hour helps!) drain and rinse them very well. If youre starting from raw, place the lentils in the cooking pot, cover with plenty of water and vigorously swish them around with your hands. When the water becomes murky, drain and repeat until the water is clear, or mostly clear (this can take 3-4 rounds). Place lentils in the cooking pot and cover generously with water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to simmer and cook partially covered for about 20-30 minutes, depending on whether or not you soaked them. The lentils should be cooked until mushy. If the pot becomes dry during cooking, simply add more water. Once cooked, drain the lentils if there is any remaining water. Set aside to cool. 2. In a food processor pulse the garlic until finely minced. Add the tahini, lemon juice, balsamic, salt, cumin and pepper, then blend until combined. Add the cooked lentils and blend on high until smooth. Lastly, add about two-thirds of the caramelized onions, and pulse to incorporate them into the dip. Taste and adjust seasoning if desired. 3. To serve, spoon the hummus into a serving bowl. Make a small divot in the center of the dip and spoon in the remaining caramelized onions. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with your toppings of choice (I used toasted black sesame and chive flowers for a splash of colour, but this is totally optional). Serve with crispy fresh veggies and crackers or toasted flatbreads. Enjoy. Caramelized Onions Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. neutral-tasting coconut oil or ghee 1 lb. /­­ 500g yellow onions 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt Directions: 1. Peel the onions and slice them as evenly as possible into half-rounds. 2. Melt coconut oil or ghee over medium heat in the largest skillet you have. Add the onions, then salt, and stir well to coat. Once the onions are coated, turn the heat down to a medium-low, stirring occasionally - more often towards the end - until theyve fully caramelized, about 25-30 minutes. If the pot becomes too dry during cooking, reduce the heat a tad, or add a teeny bit of water adn stir well. In the end, youre looking for soft, silky, and golden brown goodness! Store leftovers in the fridge for up to four days, or freeze for 3 months. If it’s your first time caramelizing onions and you’re feeling intimidated, here is a stellar step-by-step tutorial from Bon Appétit. It varies ever so slightly from my method, but you’ll get the picture! Big love and happy hummus, Sarah B. Show me your hummus on Instagram: #mnrcaramelizedonionhummus  *   *   *   *   * Hello dear friends! There are only a few spots left for our January 2019 Wild Heart High Spirit retreat and we’d love to see you in Bali!  Join us along with 15 other women to unwind, reconnect, and find the inspiration to ignite you on your health journey. Our thoughtfully-designed program will awaken and nourish your entire being – body, mind, and spirit! This is a true celebration of life, and we get to do it together in paradise! Come see what all the magic is about.  Much love, Sarah B, Mikkala and the Golden Circle Retreats team The post Caramelized Onion White Lentil Hummus appeared first on My New Roots.

Warm Beet Pistachio Salad

January 1 2018 Meatless Monday 

Baby beets are roasted sweet and contrasted with bitter frisee and salty roasted pistachios. Sherry vinegar, honey and grapeseed oil are infused with fresh sage and peppercorns to dress this delicious beet salad. This recipe comes to us from Chef Jason Weiner of Almond Restaurants in New York City and Bridgehampton. Serves 4 - 1 1/­­2 cups baby beets - 3 tablespoons honey - 2 tablespoons sherry vinegar - 2 tablespoons grapeseed or canola oil - 1 teaspoon cracked peppercorns - 3 sprigs sage - 1 head frisee or curly endive, core and dark leaves discarded - 3 tablespoons roasted pistachios, shelled - 5 chives, cut into matchsticks - salt, to taste Preheat an oven to 375 degrees. Place the beets in a baking pan with about 1 cup of water. Cover tightly with foil and transfer to the oven. Roast for about 40 minutes, or until tender when pierced with a fork. The roasting time will depend on the size and age of the beets. When the beets are tender, set aside to cool. Whisk the honey, vinegar, oil, sage and peppercorns together in a mixing bowl. Transfer to a saucepot over high heat for 2-3 minutes, or until the dressing comes to a simmer. As soon as the dressing bubbles, remove it from the heat and pour through a strainer to transfer it back to the mixing bowl, omitting the sage and peppercorns. When the beets have cooled, slip off their skins and dice them roughly. Transfer to a large serving bowl. Add the curly endive and roasted pistachios to the serving bowl.  Season the beets, greens and nuts with salt to taste. Drizzle with the honey-sage vinaigrette, tossing to ensure all ingredients are evenly distributed, until the salad is dressed to preference. You may not need all the vinaigrette. Divide into 4 servings, top each with chive matchsticks and enjoy! The post Warm Beet Pistachio Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Grilled Portobello Burgers with Garlic Mayo

September 11 2017 Meatless Monday 

These portobello mushrooms are marinated in a homemade barbecue spice mix and grilled until tender. When served, they are loaded up with sweet grilled red onions and savory garlic and chive mayonnaise. This recipe comes to us from our friends at The Mushroom Council. Makes 4 burgers - Marinade - 2 teaspoons chili powder - 1 teaspoon dark or light brown sugar - 1 teaspoon fine sea salt - 1 teaspoon garlic powder - 1 teaspoon onion powder - 1 teaspoon smoked paprika -  1/­­2 teaspoon ground black pepper - 1/­­3 cup extra virgin olive oil   - Burgers - 4 portobello mushrooms, stems and gills removed - 1/­­3 cup mayonnaise - 1 teaspoon chopped chives -  1/­­4 teaspoon garlic powder -  1/­­4 teaspoon fine sea salt - 1 small red onion, sliced (keep rings intact) - 4 buns - 4 lettuce leaves - Olive oil for grilling Directions Mix all marinade ingredients in a small bowl. Place mushrooms on a baking sheet. Drizzle marinade over mushrooms and rub liberally to coat all sides. Let sit for 15 minutes. Preheat grill to high heat. To make garlic mayo, stir together mayonnaise, chives, garlic powder and salt in a small bowl. Refrigerate until ready to serve. Brush grill grate with olive oil. Place mushrooms and onion rings on grill. Cook for 5 to 7 minutes on each side, until both are darkened and tender. To serve, spread bottom of each bun with mayonnaise, top with lettuce and a few onion rings. Add mushroom and cover with top bun. The post Grilled Portobello Burgers with Garlic Mayo appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Beet Tartare with Sesame Labneh + Amsterdam

August 19 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Beet Tartare with Sesame Labneh + Amsterdam Earlier this year we were in New York to launch Green Kitchen at Home. We had a blast doing a live cooking session at Food52, teaching a cooking class and had a book signing in a tiny but packed little store in Greenwich Village. But what I really wanted to talk about today was our night off. When we tucked baby Noah (formerly known as Gabriel) to sleep in his stroller and headed to ABCV for dinner. Side note: You should know that for being a food writing couple, Luise and I very rarely go out and eat at proper restaurants. With kids, it’s just easier to do takeaway or pick places where it’s okay that they climb, run and crash. Also, fancy restaurants make me feel awkward. But we had an epic evening at ABCV. We tried the tasting menu of which I can’t even remember half of the dishes. But I know that there were simple crudités with lots of spreads, some kind of soft beet carpaccio/­­tartare with a little bit of sting to it, a whole roasted cauliflower with turmeric tahini dressing(!), avocado lettuce cups, roasted shiitake and a couple of desserts. And what made the evening even better was that Noah slept through almost the entire dinner (thank you jetlag!). We have been talking about that beet carpaccio (and the cauliflower with tahini turmeric dressing) a few times since we got back. And when Luise recently spotted a recipe for roasted beets and sesame labneh in the latest issue of Jamie Magazine, we started talking about it again. Looking through our recipe archive, it is pretty obvious that we’ve got a love for beets. They are sweet and mildly earthy, have an awesome color, can grow in our harsh Swedish climate and are cheap! What’s not to love? So a couple of days ago, we picked up a few bunches of beets, started cooking and here we are. With some kind of beetroot tartare (mixed minced beets), dollops of sesame labneh and a few suggestions on what can be used to scoop it into your mouth, apart from crackers. And as a last minute contribution, we are also offering a less fancy way of serving this, inside a rye waffle toast (yup, you might want to scroll down to it right away). This recipe is great as a starter, at a buffet table or a party. It’s pretty and impressive, creamy and delicious with plenty of flavor from fresh dill and mint and a little sting from horseradish. Since we love yogurt just as much as we love beetroots, we invited labneh (yogurt’s fancy cousin) to the party. We totally stole the idea to mix tahini into labneh from that Jamie Mag article. You should too. You need at least two hours to let the yogurt drain into labneh cheese but I’m still going to claim that this is an easy recipe - only a few ingredients and apart from draining the yogurt, it’s all pretty quick.  I imagine that a quick cheat version could be accomplished by simply using thick yogurt without draining it and buying pre-cooked beetroots. I can’t promise that it will be as good, but it’ll at least be quick and effortless. http:/­­/­­www.greenkitchenstories.com/­­wp-content/­­uploads/­­2017/­­08/­­Labneh_­drip.mp4 Okay, I can hear Isac trying to teach baby Noah how to roar like a lion with the only result that little brother cries like a baby. So I better post this now before major chaos is breaking out. No proofreading needed because yolo. Enjoy the recipe and check out info below re Amsterdam. Ciao! Beet Tartar & Sesame Labneh Serves 4 Recipe is inspired by a recipe from Jamie Magazine, Aug 2017 and a dinner we had a ABCV NYC. Sesame labneh 2 cups /­­ 500 g Greek or Turkish Yogurt 1/­­2 tsp salt 2 tbsp tahini 1 tbsp olive oil Beet Tartare  1/­­2 kg /­­ 1 lb  beetroots 2 tbsp capers juice from 1/­­2 lemon 1 tsp horseradish (or mustard) 1 handful fresh dill 1 handful fresh mint leaves salt & pepper Topping 1 handful pistachio nuts, finely chopped fresh dill, chopped fresh mint leaves, chopped 2 tbsp capers, halved lemon slices olive oil Serve with rye bread crisps, tender gem lettuce or cucumber slices Start by making the labneh. Add salt to the yogurt and stir until smooth. Wrap the yogurt in a cheese cloth or other clean thin cloth and tie it over a bowl for about 2 hours or more to allow liquid to be drained (meanwhile, cook the beetroots). You can leave it for 24-36 hours if you prefer a thicker labneh but 2 hours and a gentle squeeze (to get rid of some extra liquid) works fine. Stir in tahini, transfer to a serving bowl and top with a little bit of olive oil. Peel the beetroots, divide them in quarters and cook in salted water for approx 20 mins min or until tender. When ready, let cool and then transfer them to a food processor along with capers, lemon juice, horseradish, fresh dill, mint and seasoning. Pulse a few times until the beetroot has the consistency of course grits. Not too much though or you will end up with a sauce. You can also dice them finely. Arrange the beet tartare on a large serving plate. Fold in large dollops of sesame labneh and top with pistachio, fresh herbs, capers and lemon slices. Add a drizzle of olive oil and serve with crackers or thin rye bread crisps (thin rye bread pieces toasted in a pan or the oven for a couple of minutes), tender gem lettuce or cucumber slices to scoop with. Beet & Labneh Rye Waffle Toast We made this Waffled rye bread toast with the leftovers.  It’s a family favorite and we’ve got another recipe and the whole story behind this method in our latest book. Here are some quick instructions: Simply smudge labneh on two pieces of dark rye bread, add some spinach, fresh dill and mint and a thick layer of beet tartar. Brush a hot waffle iron with butter or coconut oil, combine the two slices and place inside the waffle iron, pressing together lightly. When you’re bread has got a nice and brown waffle pattern, the toast is ready. Cut the waffle toast in half and eat it while it’s hot. **************************** AMSTERDAM & ANTWERP - 7-9 September Green Kitchen at Home is being released in Dutch next week and to kick things off, we are coming to Amsterdam and Antwerp for a couple of press events, signings, dinners and talks. We will have a little talk, signing and dinner at the bookstore ‘t Stad Leest in Antwerp at 19.30 pm on 7 September. Tickets can be booked here. We are having a little talk + Q&A and a book signing at Limon in Amsterdam on 9 September between 10.30-11-30. There will be nibbles from the book served and we will end with a book signing. There will also be a lunch afterwards (between 12.00-14.00) and we will try to move around so we get the chance to chat with all of you. You can either buy tickets for both the talk and lunch, just the talk or just the lunch. Follow this link to read more about it in Dutch: Greenkitchenbooks.nl  


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