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chinese vegetarian recipes

chilli garlic noodles recipe | garlic noodles recipe | chinese noodles

November 15 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

chilli garlic noodles recipe | garlic noodles recipe | chinese noodleschilli garlic noodles recipe | garlic noodles recipe | chinese noodles with step by step photo and video recipe. the recipe is very similar to any othe indo chinese noodles recipe with an extra flavour of chilli garlic flavour. the flavour can be easily added by store bought sauces or perhaps by freshly grounded homemade chilli and garlic sauces. Once the ingredients are ready, the recipe for chilli garlic noodles can be prepared in less than 15 minutes without much fuss Continue reading chilli garlic noodles recipe | garlic noodles recipe | chinese noodles at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips

November 12 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips Lacy Phillips is an LA-based manifestation advisor and founder of the blog Free & Native, an amazing resource for all things to do with emotional and physical wellbeing. Lacy’s manifestation approach is truly unique and rooted in psychology just as much as it’s based on spirituality. With her clients, she focuses on pinpointing the true self, which ultimately leads to the discovery of one’s personal freedom. We’ve been reading Free & Native for years, and it’s opened our eyes to so many new ideas – from the concept of self-worth, to the recipe for the nettle and raspberry leaf infusion that helps our hair grow like crazy. In this interview, Lacy tells us about her favorite transformative supplement as of late, her number one cold cure, exercising smart not hard, as well as her morning and bedtime routines, her approach to beauty and stress, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I LOVE routine. But when I have a free day, I’ll only schedule one or two things tops because I love the freedom to do whatever I want or process in my head all day alone. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. My mornings are pretty much the same. Right now, when I wake up, I sip my Chinese herbs, bone broth with gelatin, and then I have breakfast (always within an hour of waking because I’ve suffered from endocrine and blood sugar issues). That usually looks like sprouted GF oatmeal with honey and almond butter – something that I could NEVER do in the past until I had some massive healing on my endocrine and blood sugar issues, for I would have had to have animal protein to keep my blood sugar stable. It was quite a fete when I didn’t need to do that anymore. I credit all of this to my healer Anthony Cahill in LA. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Yes, as you’re probably gathering my endocrine and hormones are very sensitive. So a rule that I had to implement in our house is no screens in the bedroom after 9p. And all screens are always on F.lux or “nighttime mode” to do away with blue light, which was severely messing with my melatonin production. Instead, I light beeswax candles in the room to suggest that red/­­orange sunset light that produces melatonin. Nightly I also practice Haley Wood’s nighttime intuitive cleansing and lymph massage technique. And I’ll usually take some time out to get quiet and grateful for the day. I’m religious about my sleep cycle which is 10p-6a. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Sprouted oatmeal or a scramble with ferments or leftovers Lunch – Leftovers or I’ve gotten terrible at ordering lunch and dinner lately which usually consists of Honey Hi, Cafe Gratitude, Dune, Botanica, Sage Bistro… Snack – Usually a smoothie in the summer or a tonic in the winter -- Do you partake in caffeine? Because of my adrenals, I had to kiss caffeine goodbye four years ago. Along with cacao and sugar. I know, what’s the point of living? Thank God for bananas and avocado. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I do when I’m extra estrogenic (estrogen dominant), which is typical for those with endocrine issues. I’m pretty good about getting that balanced now, but I can always tell when I’ve gone too estrogenic because I get very anxious and I crave a lot of sugar. Due to giving up sugar, for me, a treat is usually a date with almond butter or a smoothie. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful to your energy level and general wellness? Oh man, it’s long. So I drink three teas a day from raw herbs prescribed to me by my acupuncturist Dr. Dao, and a supplement that has been transformative for me lately is Gold Genesis which Shiva Rose gifted me. Those are the two universal ones that can benefit everyone. However, the others are genuinely tailored to my issues based on blood work. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I do. Three times a week I do HIIT, cardio three days a week, and I’m just now starting to do pilates and yoga again. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset to keep up with it?  I do. But I don’t kill myself with it. I can only exercise 20 mins a day, or I tax my adrenals, so I’m very gentle with all of them. I’m all for exercise smart, not hard. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Completely internal. In my work with my clients, it’s all about raising your subconscious worth to project magnetism. There is indeed nothing more radiant or prosperous. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Uncomplicated and hypernatural! Less is more. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Absolutely! My hair started growing like crack when I began swapping water for nettle herbal infusions in search of all of those bio-available minerals and vitamins. Herbal infusions, to me, are a real beauty secret that not enough people do! -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. It’s interesting. I grew up with a mom that is very tough, androgynous and Irish. She washes her face once a week with Ivory soap. Skincare wasn’t something I was taught. I had to go out and learn. I think I’ve tried it all in the wellness realm now, and I do have to say that since my skin is extra dry two factors have been transformative: cleansing with oil and using a washcloth to wipe it off, which also exfoliates. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines to avoid stress? The BIGGEST is Vedic Meditation twice a day, which I learned from Jac of The Broad Place. Second is the reprogramming techniques that I teach my clients and community. Third has been Gold Genesis as it’s loaded with adaptogens. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Saying no to outside events or invitations so that I can be alone to gather my energy and ground. A lot of inward moments. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? The truth – which works every single time – the moment I feel even the slightest, I do a coffee enema, then I hop right in bed and rest. Without fail, I always wake up the next morning healthy since I flushed the liver and drained the lymph. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? I do. I’m getting MUCH better at it. This next year, I’m cutting back immensely on one-on-one energy and making my offerings more accessible to everyone through new digital options which are much more affordable. Such as my UNBLOCKED classes and my entire Manifestation Formula and Reprogramming Video Workshop launching in mid-December. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Well, a lot of it has to do with my Manifestation work. So much of that is welcoming our darkness, looking at the patterns showing up in our lives, using it as a map to get into our subconscious limiting beliefs, and shifting those to get closer to our authentic essence which is our genuinely magnetic state. I’m the person that’s like, Oh wow, I’m so excited that these “issues” are showing up. Because I know exactly what to do with them and how they will turn into magnificent opportunities that connect me with what I’m calling in. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Working for myself. Only saying yes to what feels right. It’s what creates balance for me. And it took me a loooooonnnnggg time to get here. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I get out in the world and find it again. At galleries, in garments, weaves, cinema, literature… There’s more than I can consume in this lifetime. Always something. And I pull from it all. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Life experiences. They are what allowed me to discover my manifestation formula, which is hinged on self-worth = your manifestation. Knowledge -- What was your path to starting Free & Native and creating your manifestation formula? They were rather parallel. At the same time I said I’d never work for another person again, was the exact year that I threw away all of the superstitions that I head learned through New Age manifestation culture (and I had explored it all). I realized I was an incredible manifestor but never in the ways that those books and teachings suggested. And I also realized that I was worth more than I was being treated in previous jobs. I tossed them both away and decided to follow and note what works for me when. And here we are today. -- In your practice, you put a lot of emphasis on raising one’s self-worth and expanding beliefs. Why are those such key points in your formula? I realized that anytime I wouldn’t accept being small anymore, and then I wouldn’t settle for the small opportunities coming in after, while doing work on myself, bam my manifestations would come through. It all finally channeled through to me. The entire process. And I finally realized that The Universe’s only intention for us is to grow into our whole, authentic selves. Everything it does or gives us, good or bad, is to keep us on that trajectory. The gift that I realized I have is channeling those messages, and my claircognizance ability to spot energetic patterns. The third gift I have is taking the abstractness of energetic patterns and boiling them down into actionable steps and work. And now after helping hundreds of people and seeing result after result, I realized why I had to suffer through loads of superstitions and life-struggles. -- You seem to seamlessly marry psychology and spirituality in your work. Can you speak a bit about how you are able to achieve this balance? Absolutely. I always say manifestation is very easy; we’re complicated. We manifest from our subconscious beliefs rather than our thoughts. I always joke in my workshops by saying, “if only we were that powerful (manifesting from our thoughts). We think in such polarity all day long; our lives would look like a shit show.” Psychology is a means to our subconscious. Accessing it and shifting it. -- Are there any books that you recommend that are in line with your manifestation formula? I wish there was! This is a question I get all the time. In fact, I never intended to write a book, but I’m having to now as it just simply doesn’t exist. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Watch TV shows. We are avid show bingers. It’s one of the only ways that I can thoroughly check out as I’m so Aquarius and vata. I just transport to another world and completely disconnect with all the pressure I’m responsible for in this one. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Right now… Book – The Awakened Family Song/­­Album – Alice Coltrane, “Om Shanti” Movie – Lady Bird Art – Ryan Snow -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? A cozy wool sweater, boots, jeans, Gold Genesis, eye mask, and a book. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Shiva Rose and Meredith Baird. Photos courtesy of Free & Native and Serafina LoGiacco. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Chilli Paneer (Indo-Chinese Dish)

November 3 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Chilli Paneer Chilli Paneer is a popular Indo-Chinese dish. Chilli Paneer makes a spicy flavorful starter especially for many of my friends who enjoy the spicy food. Chilli Paneer can also be served as a side dish. This is absolutely delicious and easy to make. - 6 oz paneer (cut into bite sized pieces) - 1 cup bell pepper (sliced, capsicum, Shimla mirch, I am using yellow and green bell pepper for color) For Batter - 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour (plain flour, maida) - 2 Tbsp corn starch or arrow root powder - 1/­­2 tsp salt For Sauce - 2 Tbsp oil (canola or vegetable oil) - 1 Tbsp ginger (shredded, adrak) - 1 Tbsp green chili (chopped) - 1 tsp chili flakes - 2 Tbsp soy sauce - 1 Tbsp vinegar - 1 Tbsp tomato paste - 1-1/­­2 tsp corn starch or arrow root powder - 1/­­2 cup water -  I am using store bought paneer, texture is not very soft to give the paneer softer texture soak the paneer for at least 10 minutes in hot water with few drops of lemon juice. -  To make batter mix flour, corn starch, and salt in a bowl. Add the water slowly to make a smooth batter (batter should be consistency of pancake batter or dosa batter). -  Heat at least 1/­­2 inch of oil in a frying pan over medium high heat. Oil should be moderately hot. -  Dip the paneer into the batter, making sure it is completely covered by the batter. Then drop the paneer pieces slowly into oil in the frying pan. (do not overlap them) -  Fry the paneer in small batches. Fry them turning occasionally, until they are very light golden brown. Take them out over paper towel. -  Do same with bell pepper. -  For sauce heat the oil in sauce pan over medium heat; add ginger, and green chili stir for about one minutes. Add all the ingredients for sauce except corn starch, (soy sauce, vinegar, chili flakes, and tomato paste), Stir for 1 minutes. mix water and corn starch and add to the sauce. Cook for another two minutes, sauce should be thick consistency. Sauce gets thicker as it sits. -  Add paneer, and bell pepper into sauce and serve hot. The post Chilli Paneer (Indo-Chinese Dish) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin

October 11 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin Amy Chaplin is an author and chef, whose approach to whole foods and cooking is endlessly inspiring. Her cookbook is nothing short of a kitchen bible to us. We had the pleasure of meeting up with Amy in NYC a few years ago and had the best time chatting about our favorite subjects like sprouted flours, cookbook publishing, and acupuncture. Needless to say, we were excited to get a peak at her self-care routine. In this interview, Amy tells us about the valuable self-care tips she learned from her mother, her favorite meals made with pantry staples, the skincare brand she’s been using since she was a teenager, her approach to exercise, stress, and so much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I like both. I like to have a morning routine and create a work routine for whatever project Im working on but I also like to have time for free thinking and spontaneously connecting with friends. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I get up early, 6 am  is the usual time but sometimes eariler depending on what Im working on. I make warm lemon water, light a candle and mediate for 10 to 15 minutes. In late summer the sun is coming up just as I finish and I usually sit for a bit and often reply to messages from Austrlia (they are going to bed around that time). Then I feed our two dogs (my wife takes them out on a long morning walk) start making breakfast and make sencha tea. Sometimes I skip the sencha and have a matcha latte after breakfast but I try not to have too much caffeine, as much as I love it! If Im working on recipes from home, I quickly shower, dress and get started right away....sometimes before breakfast but it depends on what Im testing :) -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I stop working on the computer before dinner and leave it closed. I leave my phone downstairs so its far from my bedroom. I get into bed and usually read cookbooks or watch an episode of any series Im currently obsessed with :) Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast –  soaked oats + chia (recipe is in my book) or activated grain porridge with homemade nut milk, cardamom and berries. I usually eat grains once a day and its usually in the morning. Lunch – Beans of some kind --depending on recipes Im testing. Kraut or other fermented veg, greens--salad or steamed depending on weather. I usually add some toppings too: hemp seeds, toasted seeds, sunflower sprouts, scallions anything to make it tasty Snack – Seeded crackers and nut butter/­­avocado/­­bean pate or chia pudding or coconut yogurt Dinner – An egg or tempeh, avocado, steamed veg and a dressing of some kind--this is often quite small as Im not always hungry if I have a good lunch or if Im testing and sampling recipes. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Yes. I love green tea. Sencha is my favorite for its fresh, grassy umami taste. Rishi Tea First Flush Sencha is sublime. I also love their ceremonial grade matchas with foamed, homemade almond milk. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to but I havent eaten sugar on a regular basis for years. If Im craving something sweet I eat a few spoons of Anitas coconut yogurt--it has a naturally sweet flavor from coconut with no sweetener. If I have a berry compote around Ill have some of that with it but I never sweeten them as Ive gotten used to just the sweetness of the berries. Of course there are times when Im testing recipes for cakes and muffins and I do enjoy tasting them and the same goes for good raw chocolate. Im not rigid about it as its part of being a chef but I dont seek out sugar on a daily basis. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I change depending on what my acupuncturist recommends in the way of Chinese herbs. I have been taking spirulina to increase protein and greens lately. I take a vitamin D. Ive been adding maca powder to my breakfasts for years so dont really consider it a supplement. I like adding locally grown ashwagandha (from Furnace Creek Farm) and reishi or chaga mushroom powder to hot cacao drinks. I drink nettle tea everyday because I love it, especially when you can get it fresh from the farmers market. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  With my job being so physical, these days I gravitate towards Qi Gong and yoga--the gentler classes. I also tend to exercise by default. Walking everywhere, long dog walks, biking and general schlepping around the city and up and down stairs with heavy bags of veggies! -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I used to push myself with torturous classes and long runs but now I do less and enjoy it more. I know that I am more productive when I make time for movement but it has to be mindful.  I do yoga at home and love it when I have the time for long luxurious classes...especially restorative. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Beauty to me is an inner glow that comes from something beyond what and how we take care of our bodies. Mostly it comes with time and a spiritual sense of oneself, our path, the world and other beings around us. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Ive used Dr. Hauschka since I was a teenager. I have a huge respect for biodynamic growing practices and love the way they preserve their products naturally. I think its one of the most difficult things with natural skin care products--preserving. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Local organic veggies, lots of greens, seeds… -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. I notice a difference in my skin when I use a warm compress of essential oils (Dr. Hauschka calls them bath oils). You put a few drops in warm water and soak a face cloth, squeeze it out and press it into your skin. I use lemongrass in the morning and lavender at night. Then you cleanse and use the same water to wash the cleanser off. They smell so good and your skin feels really clean and enlivened afterwards. Its my mothers beauty secret, she looks amazing! :) Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Mainly daily meditation and breathing. I dont feel as clear or grounded without it. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Hot shower and miso soup :) -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Make miso soup with lots of ginger and scallions and I also take Woodstock C & F Seasonal Support. It always helps with a sore throat or when Im feeling under the weather. Gargling sea salt with warm water. Colloidal silver spray. Hot lemon drink with grated ginger and turmeric. Bath and sleep. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? They definitely overlap. I love what I do and have found comfort in the kitchen for as long as I can remember. Of course there are days when work completely takes over but even when my schedule is jam packed, I try and make time to spend with my partner, cuddle the dogs and see family--it just means well be eating recipes that are being tested and theyre grilled for feed back! Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I aften find myself saying “everything is working out for my highest good and remembering that everything is perfect as it is. I grew up with Louise Hay books. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Over time my lifestyle and diet has improved and I have a much more balanced approach. I used to be quite strict at times and I know that its not the way to great health for me anyway. I think now I have better overall health so I dont get thrown off on a regular basis. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Paul Pitchford’s “Healing with Whole Foods has been in my life for over 20 years and I still consult it. It always gets me in the mood for pure, simple temple-like food. My self care is also influenced by my mother. She has a deep connection to nature and a daily ritual of foot baths, lemon water in the morning and making a nightly hot water bottle (in the cooler months) Ive carried on these rituals...but dont seem to get the foot baths in as often as she does. Knowledge -- Your recipes are so well thought out and always turn out delicious, as well as incredibly nourishing. What is your process when it comes to recipe development? Thank you so much! My recipes all begin with what I crave, which is mostly deeply nourishing food with clean uncomplicated flavors. They have to make sense to me and not only be healthy but also be visually beautiful. Nature and beauty are what inspire me most. When I am developing recipes I want the steps to be clear and thorough. I spend a lot of time with new recipes before they are published. Theyre all tested over and over again by myself, friends, family and recipe testers. I feel a lot of responsibility to readers who spend time and money and a lot of effort making my recipes...they have to work and taste delicious! -- You are a big proponent of keeping a well-stocked pantry. What are some of your favorite meals that you like to throw together with pantry ingredients? Simple wraps with nori, fermented veggies, avocado (not really pantry but I always have a few of varying ripeness around). Barrys tempeh, which is made from white beans and adzuki beans and sold frozen, it tastes amazing just panfried in coconut oil. In Australia you can get fresh fava bean tempeh and Im missing it so much! Red lentil soup with lemon and spinach from my cookbook. That is perfect for right now when the weather is getting cooler and if you dont have much in the way of veg. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Drive to the country with my wife, play with my nephew, drink tea and sit in the morning sun. Have a pedicure. Travel and be in nature. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – “The Power of Intention” by Wayne Dyer Song/­­Album – Blue by Joni Mitchell Movie – I recently saw Lion and was so moved Piece of Art – Yoko Onos simple, whimsical pieces -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in NYC? ABC V, Via Carota, Ilbuco Alimentari, De Maria -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? – Good tea selection + strainer for infusing – Activated or toasted nuts – Spirulina – Pajamas and cosy sox (no matter the season) – Large scarf/­­shawl – Cardigans -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Luise from Green Kitchen Stories, Henrietta Inman, Elenore from Earthsprout, Emma from My Darling Lemon Thyme..... Photos by Amy Chaplin and Stephen Kent Johnson. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

corn fried rice recipe | sweet corn fried rice | chinese corn fried rice

September 25 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

corn fried rice recipe | sweet corn fried rice | chinese corn fried ricecorn fried rice recipe | sweet corn fried rice | chinese corn fried rice with step by step photo and video recipe. chineese cuisine recipes are one the popular cuisine internationally. most of the recipes are derived from rice and noodles which is served with stir fired vegetables and meat. one such popular rice recipe is fried rice recipe which can be developed with many variation. one such variation is sweet corn fried recipe which is not only easy to prepare, but tastes amazing. Continue reading corn fried rice recipe | sweet corn fried rice | chinese corn fried rice at Hebbar's Kitchen.

chilli paneer gravy recipe | easy paneer chilli with gravy recipe

August 31 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

chilli paneer gravy recipe | easy paneer chilli with gravy recipechilli paneer gravy recipe | easy paneer chilli with gravy recipe with detailed photo and video recipe. a popular indo chinese street food of india which is mainly served as a side dish to indo chinese rice recipes. chilli paneer comes with comes with 2 variants i.e gravy and dry version and gravy version can be served as starter recipe or as side dish recipe. chilli paneer gravy recipe | easy paneer chilli with gravy recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. Continue reading chilli paneer gravy recipe | easy paneer chilli with gravy recipe at Hebbar's Kitchen.

noodles cutlet recipe | maggi masala noodles cutlet | veg noodles cutlet

July 7 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

noodles cutlet recipe | maggi masala noodles cutlet | veg noodles cutletnoodles cutlet recipe | maggi masala noodles cutlet | veg noodles cutlet with step by step photo and video recipe. noddles cutlet is a popular street food recipe which is typically prepared with chinese noodles with other indo chinese ingredients. however this recipe is an improvised version prepared with favorite maggi masala noodles which is later stuffed with boiled aloo and sweet corn. it is typically enjoyed as evening tea time snack, but can also be used as patties to prepare veg burger. Continue reading noodles cutlet recipe | maggi masala noodles cutlet | veg noodles cutlet at Hebbar's Kitchen.

20 Turmeric Recipes Vegan Glutenfree options

June 1 2017 Vegan Richa 

20 Turmeric Recipes Vegan Glutenfree options20 Recipes with Turmeric. Turmeric Cauliflower Rice, Turmeric Chocolate Marble Loaf, Golden Iced Tea, Turmeric Miso Soup, Turmeric brussels spouts and more. Vegan Gluten-free Turmeric Recipes. Soy-free options.  Turmeric is one of the common spices used in Indian food. We grew up eating food which had turmeric in most meals. Most Dals, curries, veggie sides have Turmeric added to them in small amounts. Some creamy white sauces, Indo- chinese food or snacks were exceptions.  Fresh turmeric is a bit more bitter than powder and can be an acquired flavor. Dried powdered turmeric root (turmeric powder) is more easily available than fresh turmeric root. Powdered turmeric in larger amounts can also add a bitter profile to the dish. The overall flavor might be pronounced for some, ok or undetectable for many. With the interest in Turmeric recently increasing because of many beneficial properties, I now experiment with Turmeric in other applications other than Indian food as well. Try a few of these to start on your Turmeric adventure. In a Sauce, soup, dals, with cauliflower rice, as Turmeric Lentil Fritters (pic above), in sushi roll, in muffins, cakes, Iced tea and more. Continue reading: 20 Turmeric Recipes Vegan Glutenfree optionsThe post 20 Turmeric Recipes Vegan Glutenfree options appeared first on Vegan Richa.

The MommyTang Story at LA VegFest

May 11 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

MommyTang is the first and most popular vegan mukbanger. Her mukbang channel is youtube.com/­­mommytang. Join HappyCow’s Ken Spector as he interviews her about what Mukbanging is, what MommyTang recently did to a Korean/­­Chinese restaurant in Los Angeles, and some things you may not have known about her. For more information see: https:/­­/­­www.youtube.com/­­mommytang/­­ and check out LA VegFest: http:/­­/­­www.vegfestla.org Watch our video here: The post The MommyTang Story at LA VegFest appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Vegan 7-Layer Bean Dip

May 5 2017 VegKitchen 

Vegan 7-Layer Bean Dip 7-layer bean dip (aka 7-layer Mexican dip) is one of those delicious concoctions that probably has little to do with Mexican cuisine, in the same way that many Chinese food dishes are nowhere to be found in China. But its a heck of a party dip, so well take it. This all-vegan 7-layer bean dip […] The post Vegan 7-Layer Bean Dip appeared first on VegKitchen.

12 Best Brown Rice Recipes

April 27 2017 VegKitchen 

12 Best Brown Rice Recipes VegKitchen readers love brown rice for its versatility, and its superior nutrition profile as compared to white rice. And while there are more whole grains to choose from today -- quinoa, farro, spelt, and others -- brown rice seems to hold its own as a favorite staple. It’s inexpensive (especially bought in bulk) and so […] The post 12 Best Brown Rice Recipes appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegan Recipes Your Non-Vegan Partner will Love

April 7 2017 VegKitchen 

Vegan Recipes Your Non-Vegan Partner will Love Vegan diets arent without hot dogs, pizza, favored Chinese restaurant dishes and even facsimiles of bacon, of course. So its time to show your non vegan partner what vegan cooking can do. The post Vegan Recipes Your Non-Vegan Partner will Love appeared first on Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes: VegKitchen.com.

Easy Mapo Tofu

March 23 2017 VegKitchen 

Easy Mapo Tofu Mapo Tofu is one of  the easiest Chinese dishes to throw together, even when youre too tired to cook. Since its a stew instead of a stir-fry, you dont have to concentrate the entire time. Its full of flavor, with ginger, mushrooms and tofu in a spicy red sauce.The post Easy Mapo Tofu appeared first on Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes: VegKitchen.com.

Penang Laksa

March 13 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

Penang Laksa Incredibly, I’d been in Malaysia for almost two weeks before I got to try Laksa, the legendary noodle soup. Even before the trip, I’d read about the intensely loved, powerful and fiery, somewhat-sour soup in food blogs and food guides to Malaysia. I’d checked out plenty of recipes and seen lots of super tasty photos. Once I got to Malaysia, whenever I asked locals what dishes I had to try, I heard again and again: Laksa! Okay, great, but where? And the answer was: Penang! Penang was hands-down my favorite place to eat on the Malaysia trip. (Singapore was a fairly close second. Penang was just more artsy, soulful, and real). I collected maps with locations of the best street food in Georgetown (Penang) and scoured the web and my travel guides for addresses of must-try vegetarian restaurants. On my second day in town, I had lunch at the vegan restaurant Sushi Kitchen, and met the chef/­­owner, who made a list for me of Must-See places and dishes. That night I went to Luk Yea Yan, a vegetarian Chinese restaurant known for fantastic flavors and inexpensive eats. I ordered up the Laksa soup. Three minutes later my oversized bowl of hot, steaming, bright red soup arrived - with countless ingredients and toppings piled up to the rim. There were at least three kinds of noodles, tofu cubes, soya and seitan chunks, numerous vegetables, about four kinds of fresh herbs - and balanced on top: a soup spoon with a thick, red curry paste on it. I’d read about this… Traditionally Laksa is usually served with a generous spoonful of rempeh - spicy red curry paste for you to stir in to the hot red broth yourself. I knew what to do. I did it. A half dozen flavors immediately exploded in my mouth: tamarind, chili, lime, pineapple, cilantro, mint. This was followed by a second wave of flavors: an army of vegetables, tofu, and seitan slices. I slurped down the noodles and paddled pieces of everything with my chopsticks into my hungry jaws. I had to take a break a few times to catch my breath and cool the spice alarm with generous draws on my lemon iced tea. When I was done, my forehead was light with perspiration and my lips and tongue were tingling and alive. There was never a doubt whatsoever that I would include a vegan recipe for Penang Laksa in my new Malaysia cookbook. Several weeks later (after having tried vegan Laksa soup at least three other times in Malaysia) I was back in my kitchen in Germany and set to work. It took a few attempts to master the recipe, each try better than the last. And then I had it: my own epic Laksa recipe! Since then, I’ve made it probably ten more times, including for several dinner parties large and small, and plenty of times for lunch. It’s best on cold, cloudy days to fire up your mood and open you up! But I’ve also made it lots of other times, even in the summer, well… just because it’s so awesome and is always a dish guests talk about long after the meal. Penang Laksa classic Malaysian noodle soup recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA serves 2 to 3 /­­ time 45 min - 5 oz (150 g) seitan sliced - 3.5 oz (100 g) smoked tofu sliced - 1/­­3 cup (45 g) pineapple chopped - 1 Tbs vegetable oil  - 1 Tbs soy sauce or Vegan Fish Sauce - 7 oz (200 g) udon noodles (cooked) - 2 1/­­2 cups (600 ml) water  - 2/­­3 cup (150 ml) coconut milk  - 1 kefir lime leaf or 1 tsp lime zest  - fresh mint leaves chopped - fresh coriander leaves chopped - fresh thai basil leaves chopped - bean sprouts for garnish laksa spice paste: - 4 candlenuts or 2 Tbs cashews soaked 20 min in hot water, drained - 1 stalk lemongrass chopped - 1/­­2-1 large red chili chopped - 2 cloves garlic chopped - 1 shallot chopped - 3/­­4 in (2 cm) fresh galangal or ginger chopped - 1/­­2 tsp paprika ground (more as desired, for red color) - 1/­­2 tsp fennel seed ground - 1/­­2 tsp coriander ground - 2 tsp coconut sugar or agave syrup  - 3/­­4 tsp sea salt  - 1 tsp tamarind paste (seedless) - 2 Tbs lime juice or lemon juice  - 2 Tbs vegetable oil  - If using dried Udon: Cook, rinse, and drain 3.5 oz (100 g) noodles according to package instructions. - Blend spice paste ingredients in a small food processor until smooth. - Heat 1 Tbs oil a large pot or wok on medium high heat. Add sliced seitan and smoked tofu. Fry, turning regularly until edges are browned and crispy, 3-5 min. - Stir in chopped pineapple. Continue to stir-fry, 2-3 min. Add soy sauce (or Vegan Fish Sauce). Fry 2-3 min. Transfer to a plate or bowl. - Return pot or wok to medium high heat. Fry blended spice paste until it darkens and oil starts to separate, stirring constantly, 3-5 min. - Gradually stir in water, coconut milk and kefir lime leaf (or lime zest). Bring to simmer. Add cooked udon noodles. Return to simmer. Cook until noodles have slightly softened, 3-5 min. - Stir in fried seitan, tofu, and pineapple. Turn off heat. Cover until ready to serve. - Portion soup and noodles into bowls. Garnish with chopped herbs and bean sprouts. Serve. Panang Laksa vegan recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA (available as printed cookbook & ebook - in English & German) The post Penang Laksa appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

spring roll noodles recipe | how to make noodles spring roll recipe

October 10 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

spring roll noodles recipe | how to make noodles spring roll recipespring roll noodles recipe | how to make noodles spring roll recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. traditionally spring roll recipes are native to chinese cuisine and is mainly prepared with cabbage leaves. these savoury rolls are mainly served as appetizer with along with fried rice or noodles soup recipe. Continue reading spring roll noodles recipe | how to make noodles spring roll recipe at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Rice Paper Rolls

September 18 2017 Meatless Monday 

These Vietnamese treats are filled with vermicelli, Chinese cabbage and bean sprouts and seasoned with lime, mint, chili and cilantro. A shallot miso dipping sauce provides the perfect balance to these light rice paper rolls with unexpectedly intense flavors. This recipe comes to us from Trudy of veggie.num.num. Serves 6 For the dipping sauce: - 1 tablespoon water - 2 tablespoons sweet chilli sauce** - 1 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce** -  1/­­2 shallot, finely diced -  1/­­2 tablespoon fresh mint, finely chopped -  1/­­2 tablespoon cilantro, finely chopped - 1 teaspoon miso paste** To complete the rice paper rolls: - 4 ounces vermicelli, cooked according to instructions - 1 cup Chinese cabbage, shredded -  1/­­2 cup bean sprouts - 1 bell pepper, thinly sliced -  1/­­2 cup fresh mint leaves, finely chopped -  1/­­2 cup cilantro, finely chopped - 1 fresh red chili - Juice of 1 lime - 1 1/­­2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce** - 1 1/­­2 tablespoons sweet chili sauce** - 15-20 rice paper sheets** *Found in Asian markets or the ethnic food or sauce sections of most grocery stores. To make the dipping sauce: In a medium bowl whisk together the water, chili sauce and soy sauce. Whisk in the shallot, mint, cilantro and miso paste until thoroughly combined. To complete the rice paper rolls: After the vermicelli noodles are cooked, drain and rinse well. Roughly chop the cooked noodles. In a large bowl combine the chopped noodles, cabbage, sprouts, bell pepper, mint, cilantro and chili. Dress the veggie filling with the lime juice, soy sauce and sweet chili sauce. Toss until well mixed. Soak one individual rice paper sheet in a large bowl of water for 15-30 seconds, or until just soft. Pat dry on a clean towel. Place 2 tablespoons of filling inside the soaked rice paper roll. Fold in the edges and then roll them up firmly. The edges should seal neatly when pressed together with your fingers. Repeat the rice paper roll soaking and filling process individually until all the rice paper sheets are used up. Serve the rice paper rolls with dipping sauce on the side. The post Rice Paper Rolls appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegetable Hakka Noodles – 1 Pot Indo Chinese Noodles

July 12 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegetable Hakka Noodles – 1 Pot Indo Chinese NoodlesEasy 1 Pot Vegetable Hakka Noodles. Indo Chinese Hakka Noodles with peppers, onions, cabbage, carrots and a simple sauce. Vegan Nutfree Recipe. Can be gluten-free.  Indo Chinese food is a big category of its own in Indian cuisine. There are several dishes that make up the cuisine. The dishes are known for being heavily influenced by chinese dishes and then they are amped up with things like garlic, ginger, green chile, spices and more. These Hakka Noodles are a staple side that goes well with any of the Indo Chinese veggie mains like Manchurian(book 1), or a Chilli Tofu paneer.  To make this into a meal, add some baked tofu or some vegan meat subs marinated in soy sauce + minced ginger+ garlic. I like to make these with peppers, onion, cabbage and any other veggies that I have, and some greens. These noodles are super easy, 1 Pot, peppery and a great light weeknight meal. Continue reading: Vegetable Hakka Noodles – 1 Pot Indo Chinese NoodlesThe post Vegetable Hakka Noodles – 1 Pot Indo Chinese Noodles appeared first on Vegan Richa.

schezwan sauce recipe | schezwan chutney recipe | szechuan sauce

June 14 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

schezwan sauce recipe | schezwan chutney recipe | szechuan sauceschezwan sauce recipe | schezwan chutney recipe | szechuan sauce with step by step photo and video recipe. the schezwan sauce is originated from the szechuan cuisine which is originated from sichuan province in southwestern china. however it has a very strong influence to indian cuisine and especially to the modern indo chinese cuisine. more frequently schezwan chutney is used for schezwan fried rice but it can also be used as condiment and dips. Continue reading schezwan sauce recipe | schezwan chutney recipe | szechuan sauce at Hebbar's Kitchen.

veg crispy recipe | crispy veg recipe | veg crispy chinese recipe

May 18 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

veg crispy recipe | crispy veg recipe | veg crispy chinese recipeveg crispy recipe | crispy veg recipe | veg crispy chinese recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. an ideal party starter or can be used for light evening snack which would be appreciated by all age groups including kids. the taste and texture is very similar to manchurian recipe but has the extra crisp because of the corn flour batter. once the veggies are deep fried to crisp, it is then tossed with manchurian sauce to get the extra tangy and spicy taste. Continue reading veg crispy recipe | crispy veg recipe | veg crispy chinese recipe at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Vegan Dinner Hack: Cauliflower Fried Rice & Sautéed Tofu

May 9 2017 VegKitchen 

Vegan Dinner Hack: Cauliflower Fried Rice & Sautéed Tofu Chinese-Style Cauliflower Fried Rice served with Simple Sweet and Savory Sautéed Tofu makes a tasty vegan dinner menu, filled with healthy shortcuts.Those of you who follow Vegan Food Hacks know that were big fans of cauliflower rice. So many of you liked the cauliflower fried rice recipe we shared recently that we decided to build […] The post Vegan Dinner Hack: Cauliflower Fried Rice & Sautéed Tofu appeared first on VegKitchen.

Chinese-Style Cauliflower Fried Rice

April 27 2017 VegKitchen 

Chinese-Style Cauliflower Fried Rice Im all for rice, especially brown rice, but lately, Ive fallen for cauliflower rice. Or, to be more precise, cauliflower rice. If you havent discovered it yet, its nothing more than cauliflower chopped down into rice-like pieces. Much as I like brown rice, it can feel heavy; cauliflower rice becomes a lighter substitute. Chinese-style cauliflower fried […] The post Chinese-Style Cauliflower Fried Rice appeared first on VegKitchen.

veg noodles recipe | veg chinese noodles | vegetable noodles recipe

April 16 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

veg noodles recipe | veg chinese noodles | vegetable noodles recipeveg noodles recipe | veg chinese noodles | vegetable noodles recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. like any other indo chinese recipes, veg noodles is a popular food which is typically consumed for lunch or dinner or as street food snack. this fast food recipe is heavily popular in cosmopolitan cities and can been seen served by both street vendors to posh fine dine restaurants. Continue reading veg noodles recipe | veg chinese noodles | vegetable noodles recipe at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Nasi Goreng

March 23 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

Nasi Goreng I couldn’t even tell you how many times I had Nasi Goreng while I was in Malaysia. It was definitely often. Like, really often. Not only is this traditional vegetable fried rice dish usually totally delicious, it’s also usually easy to find and (with little to no effort) a great vegan option. Pretty much everywhere I went in the five weeks in Malaysia, this dish was on the menu or easy to order at almost any restaurant. Especially out of the big cities and in the countryside - and particularly on the islands and beaches - this is a vegan/­­vegetarian stand-by that is never hard to find. (By the way, based on my travels, this is true for most of Southeast Asia, including Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Myanmar… but the dish is found under other names and with local flavors.) This becomes an almost daily meal, if vegan options are limited. On Pulau Pangkor, there were two food places (more shacks than restaurants) that served fantastic Nasi Goreng and vegetable fried rice. And in Borneo, staying in the Permai rainforest, the local restaurant and the nearby food court had vegetable fried rice, or Nasi Goreng. There were also many breakfast or lunch buffets at hotels and restaurants that had rice dishes like this. Contrarily, when in Penang and Kuala Lumpur I was usually so blown away by other vegan choices that I didn’t eat Nasi Goreng as often. Nasi Goreng’s flavors and textures forge powerful memories for anyone who’s been to Malaysia or Indonesia - or even just a Malaysian or Indonesian restaurant - whether vegan, vegetarian, or neither. Just as with so many classic recipes - from region to region and family to family this dish is made a million different ways. This is mine… inspired by so many excellent meals on my adventures. When I created this recipe for the Malaysia cookbook, I made sure to hit all the best, unique flavors in a good Nasi Goreng: Fresh galangal root (or ginger), lime juice, spicy chili, and a thin, tangy sauce provided by the mix of Shoyu soy sauce, vinegar, and citrus zest. I also round out the savory flavors with some sweetness. Traditionally in Malaysia, this dish would be served with just a bit of chopped vegetables (and way more rice). For my recipe, I’ve got a lot of the good stuff, included the crumbled tofu - which, by the way, replaces scrambled egg - sometimes found in traditional Nasi Goreng. By the way, I have many similar recipes inspired by other travels and other countries and cuisines - including: Cambodian Fried Rice, Mexican Magic Rice, and Vegetable Fried Rice from my World, Mexico, and Sri Lanka vegan cookbooks. After you’ve tried my Nasi Goreng, check out the other recipes and decide which country’s classic fried rice is your favorite. Nasi Goreng traditional vegetable fried rice recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA available in English & German serves 2 to 3 /­­ time 40 min + - 3.5 oz (100 g) firm tofu - 1 cup (190 g) broken jasmine rice or short grain brown rice - 1/­­2 tsp sea salt - 1 2/­­3 cup (400 ml) water - 1 cup (100 g) chinese cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli or bok choy finely chopped - 1 medium (90 g) carrot finely chopped or sliced - 2-3 Tbs oil - 1 tsp sesame oil optional - 3 (50 g) spring onions chopped, separated into white ends and greens - 1 or 2 cloves garlic finely chopped - 1 large red chili finely chopped optional - 1/­­2 in. (1 cm) fresh galangal or ginger finely chopped - 1 tsp coriander ground - 1/­­2 tsp black pepper ground - 2 Tbs soy sauce (Shoyu) - 1 Tbs lime juice or lemon juice or 2 tsp rice vinegar - 1 tsp lime zest or lemon zest optional - 1 tsp sugar or agave syrup - 1/­­2 tsp sea salt - lime slices for garnish - Cut tofu in slabs, wrap in clean kitchen towel. Weight with heavy cutting boards to press out excess moisture. Let sit 20 min. Unwrap tofu and crumble into a bowl. - Wash and drain rice thoroughly. - Bring water to boil in a small pot. Add rice and salt. Stir. Return to boil. Reduce heat to low and cover. Simmer 12 to 20 min as needed. After water is absorbed, remove from heat. Fluff rice with a fork. Cover and let sit and cool, ideally an hour or more. - Heat oil in a large wok or frying pan on medium high. Add chopped spring onion ends, garlic, chili (if using), galangal (or ginger), ground coriander, and black pepper. Fry, stirring constantly, until lightly browned, 2-3 min. - Add chopped carrots. Fry, stirring constantly, 2-3 min. Add crumbled tofu. Mix well. Fry, stirring regularly, until tofu begins to turn golden brown, 3-5 min. Add chopped cabbage (or other vegetables). Fry, stirring constantly, until vegetables start to soften, 4-5 min. - Whisk soy sauce, lime (or lemon) juice, zest, sugar (or agave syrup), and sea salt in a small bowl. - Add cooked rice to frying vegetables. Mix well. Add soy sauce mix and spring onions greens. Combine well. Fry, stirring constantly until liquid has been absorbed and rice and vegetables are moderately browned, 5-7 min. Remove from heat. Cover until ready to serve. - Serve with lime slices. vegan recipe for Nasi Goreng from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA The post Nasi Goreng appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Nutty Forbidden Rice, Roasted Beet & Kale Salad

March 20 2017 Meatless Monday 

Forbidden Rice, an ancient grain that was once exclusively eaten by Chinese Emperors, has long been praised for its health and longevity benefits. This recipe features this nutty-flavored rice that is also packed with antioxidants known as anthocyanins. This recipe comes to us from Eve of The Garden of Eating. Serves 4 For the salad: - 1 lb beets -  2/­­3 cup uncooked black rice - 1 1/­­3 cup water -  1/­­2 cup pecans, roughly chopped - 1 bunch kale, washed and dried, ribs removed, chopped or shredded For the dressing: - 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar - 2 teaspoons olive oil - 1 tablespoon whole grain mustard - 1 clove garlic, pressed or minced - 1 teaspoon dried thyme - 2 teaspoons sea salt - Several grinds of black pepper and more to taste   Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Rinse the beets (no need to peel them) and position them on a sheet or two of tinfoil (you want a tight package so they end up kind of steaming in there), drizzle with olive oil and wrap them up well. Roast them for at least an hour and 15 minutes – depending on how large they are, it may take closer to two hours for them to cook all the way through – you can test by removing them and poking with a fork – they’re done when the fork sinks easily all the way into the middle of the largest beet. Remove and let cool until you can handle them without burning yourself. Remove the skins – they should slip off with ease and cut off the top and tail. Cut them into bite-sized chunks and set aside. Add the rice and water to a medium-sized pot with a tight-fitting lid, bring to a boil then reduce the heat to low, cover and simmer for 40 or so minutes. Fluff the rice. While the rice is cooking, make the dressing, mixing all the ingredients together well with a fork or a whisk. If you have a jar with a tight-fitting lid, you can also just cover it and shake well. Place the chopped kale, diced beets and rice in a pretty bowl that’s large enough to mix them all together in comfortably, drizzle the dressing over all and stir well to coat everything. Cover and put in the fridge to “stew” for a while – at least an hour and more is better. Toast the pecans for a few minutes until they’re nicely browned and crunchy. I toast mine on a sheet of recycled tinfoil in the toaster oven at 300 for about 5-6 minutes, shaking once to toast them evenly. When you’re ready to serve, top the salad with the pecans and toss well.   The post Nutty Forbidden Rice, Roasted Beet & Kale Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Special of the Day: Chef Anita Jaisinghani

February 20 2017 Meatless Monday 

Special of the Day: Chef Anita JaisinghaniHouston to NYC - Pondicheri restaurants celebrate the fresh vibrancy of Indian cuisine Anita Jaisinghani works long days. Her restaurants serve Indian-themed casual fare for breakfast and lunch, then transform to more upscale dining at night. She opened her first restaurant in Houston in 2001 - which just celebrated five years of Meatless Monday. Last summer, she added a second Pondicheri in Manhattan. Over her career, Anita earned two nominations for the coveted James Beard Awards and has been featured in the Wall Street Journal, USA Today and TIME Magazine. We sat down with her for some table talk. You’ve said your menu is guided by the principles of Ayurveda. Could you explain?  Ayurveda is a philosophy that’s all about balance, not just in food and flavors, but also in life. For instance, Ayurveda doesn’t say you can’t eat meat, but you should eat it in smaller portions. We surround meat with vegetables and other foods so the meat doesn’t become the center of the plate. With Ayurveda, the food should not only taste good, but make you feel nourished and rejuvenated after. I plan my food that way. I would say guided by Ayurveda because I don’t see the philosophy as hard rules. We’re really trying to examine our own history and heritage and select what we think makes sense for modern life. You also serve a popular Meatless Monday menu each week. What should diners expect? India is the world’s best place to be a vegetarian. It has the highest percentage of vegetarians in the world, which is why the cuisine is so extensive and imaginative. Our Meatless Monday menu is really special and it goes back to my roots. Pondicheri, to me, is such an expression of my heart. And growing up in India, it was a rule in my family that we didn’t eat meat for at least one day a week. Pondicheri also has a Bake Lab and you’re famous for your chocolate chili cookies. How did that come about?  My first restaurant job was as a pastry chef at the legendary Café Annie and I love to bake. We named our bakery the Bake Lab because we are always experimenting. The chili cookies were actually a happy accident. My first cookie ever was a Mrs. Fields chocolate chip cookie at an airport. It was warm, soft and delicious. I do not have a sweet tooth, but I loved that cookie. I began to play with cookies and, after many years of reworks, ended up with an oatmeal cookie that was not cakey and slightly gooey on the inside. One day we were out of walnuts in the Indika kitchen, so we added spiced walnuts to the recipe since that was all we had. And voila! The chocolate chili cookie was born!   Pondicheri’s Mawa Cake You also hold specially themed pop-up dinners. What’s your inspiration? Our Houston location holds six course pop-up dinners that usually feature a different region of India every three months, although we’ve done all kinds. The most recent one was Masala Sichuan, inspired by the Chinese expatriate community in Mumbai. With Indian food, theres such an immense scope that its impossible to run out of inspiration - the tasting menus give our chefs and I the opportunity to explore that scope and incorporate seasonal ingredients.   If youre in Houston or NYC, make sure to stop by Pondicheri and taste the Meatless Monday goodness. For more information, visit their website . And if you cant make it to one of their restaurants, stir up your love of Indian cuisine by making Pondicheris Peanut Noodles recipe at home. The post Special of the Day: Chef Anita Jaisinghani appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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