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Crispy Vegetable Pakoras

Roasted Cauliflower Hummus

Vegan Tuscan White Bean Soup in the Instant Pot

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chickpeas vegetarian recipes

Top 20 Plant-Based Proteins

before yesterday Meatless Monday 

Top 20 Plant-Based ProteinsWill I get enough protein? is one of the most common questions asked by people looking to add more plant-based foods to their diet. The short (and long) answer is -- YES. Check out our Plant Protein Power Kit for downloadable social media graphics, plant-protein GIFs and printable posters. According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the recommended dietary allowance for individual daily protein intake is 0.8 grams per of protein per every 2 pounds of body weight. Although this is an approximate calculation -- other factors such as age, sex, body type, and lifestyle must be considered for a precise nutrient recommendation -- it provides a reliable benchmark to measure your daily protein requirements.  This amounts to around 56 grams of protein per day for the average sedentary man and 46 grams per day for the average sedentary woman. So, how do you reach that daily number eating only plant-based foods? Easy, check out our guide below and discover which seeds, nuts, legumes, vegetables, and plant-based products pack the biggest protein punch. Still have questions? Learn more about plant-based protein from the nutritional experts at Johns Hopkins University. Broccoli One of the most popular vegetables is also one of the most protein dense, with one cup of cooked broccoli containing 6 grams of protein. Roast it, sauté it, or steam it for a quick and nutritious side dish. Chia Seeds Small but mighty, 1 ounce of chia seeds packs nearly 5 grams protein. Drop a spoonful into a smoothie or combine with a liquid like juice or nut milk to make a fun-textured chia pudding. Chickpeas Cooked chickpeas are the main ingredient in hummus and boast nearly 15 grams of protein per cup. And remember, when using canned chickpeas, save the liquid -- also known as aquafaba -- for a terrific, plant-based egg white replacement. Edamame Popular in Japan and other areas of East Asia, edamame is as close you can get to a perfect food: One cup of cooked edamame contains 8 grams of fiber, 17 grams of protein, and is only 189 calories. Farro One of the lesser known ancient grains, farro needs to be on your radar. A quarter cup of uncooked farro contains 6 grams of protein. Its toothsome texture adds a pleasant chew to grain bowls and salads. Frozen Veggie Burgers There are tons of different types of pre-made frozen veggie burgers varying in ingredients, texture, and flavorful, and although their nutritional profiles differ, you can generally expect between 10 - 15 grams of protein per patty. Try a range of brands and see which one(s) fit your palate. Hemp Seed Heralded as a superfood, hemp seeds have a subtle, nutty flavor similar to pine nuts. In baking, hemp seeds can be used as a nut replacement, but it can also be added to smoothies, with 2 tablespoons containing over 6 grams of protein. Jackfruit Jackfruit is often marketed as a plant-based alternative to pulled pork, with a meaty, stringy texture fit for faux barbecue platters and sandwiches. Jackfruit is rarely sold whole, but there are a handful of brands selling products made with jackfruit in the refrigerated section of supermarkets. Jack fruit is not the most protein-dense item on this list, but it still contains 3 grams per cup. Kidney Beans These hefty beans are dense, nourishing, and nutrient-packed. One cup of cooked kidney beans contains roughly 13 grams of protein (as well as 13 grams of fiber). Lentils With tons of fiber and almost no saturated fat, look to use lentils as the foundation of multiple meals throughout the week. A cup of cooked lentils contains 18 grams of protein and more than half your recommended daily value of fiber. Mung Beans Mainly cultivated in East and Southeast Asia, the mung bean is often used as the foundation of stews, vegetable patties, or dal. One cup of cooked mung beans contains 14 grams of protein. Note: mung beans are easier to find dry rather than cooked and canned. Nut Butters Although not all nut butters are considered equal when it comes to protein content (or flavor), they generally contain around 4 grams of protein per tablespoon. Oatmeal A cup of cooked oatmeal contains 6 grams of protein; pair it with a scoop of peanut butter and a sprinkling of hemp or chia seeds for a protein-packed breakfast. Plant-Based Meat Thanks to plant-based meat, sources of vegan protein are all the rage. A typical plant-based burger patty contains 20 grams of protein. Many quick-service restaurant chains now offer versions of their classic menu items featuring some variety of plant-based meat. Quinoa The trendiest of grains (well, its technically a seed), quinoa is a splendid source of protein that can serve as the foundation of any meatless meal. A cup of cooked quinoa boasts around 8 grams of protein. Seitan The original plant-based meat replacement, seitan -- which is made from wheat gluten -- is packed with protein and can be quite tasty when properly prepared. A 3-ounce serving of seitan includes between 15 - 20 grams of protein, a number that is comparable to most animal proteins. Soy Milk The market for non-dairy nut milks has exploded in recent years, but soy milk remains the most nutritious option. One cup of soy milk has 8 grams of protein, which makes it a nice base for smoothies and shakes. Sprouted Bread Sprouted bread is a certain category of bread made from grains that have been allowed to germinate (aka sprout) before being milled into flour. Ezekiel Bread -- a common brand of sprouted bread -- contains 4 grams of protein and only 80 calories per slice. Sunflower Seeds Who wouldve thought that the innocent little sunflower seed could pack such a protein punch? A half-cup of sunflower seeds has 15 grams of proteins. Bring some in a little baggy and keep with you for a quick and nutritious snack. Tofu There are imitators and then there are originators. Tofu -- made from soy beans -- is sold in a variety of textures and forms, but no matter the type, youre guaranteed to get a solid dose of plant-based protein, with a half-cup offering around 10 grams. Our recipe for Jamaican Jerk Tofu (the most popular recipe on our website) will make you a lifelong tofu loyalist.   Below, weve curated a sample a menu to demonstrate how easy it is to hit your daily protein target eating only plant-based foods. Breakfast: Overnight Pumpkin Pie Oats (17 grams of protein) Lunch: Garlicky White Bean Avocado Toast (13 grams of protein) Dinner: Veggie Meatballs (27 grams of protein) No time to cook? No problem. Meatless Monday On-the-Go is easier than ever. Creating a plant-based Meatless Monday masterpiece? Let us know by tagging @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday on your social media posts for a chance to be featured on our channels.   The post Top 20 Plant-Based Proteins appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways

January 26 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways Here’s something fun that you can make to set yourself up for endless future wins in the kitchen. This freezer bouillon is a great thing to have on hand for those times when you don’t have veggie stock or just don’t want to buy any. Add a few teaspoons to your soup or sauce, and you’ll end up with a rich flavor base with very minimal effort. Inspired by both curry paste and a brilliant ‘Souper Mix’ recipe from The River Cottage Preserves Handbook, this freezer bouillon is essentially just a combination of different, whole food aromatics that you’d typically find at the base of any soup or broth, plus salt. The beautiful thing about this recipe is that there are no strange preservatives or weird ingredients that you might find in store-bought bouillon – just good old veggies and a few other, non-sketchy flavor enhancers. Today we’ve got two variations on the theme: a ‘classic’ freezer bouillon, based on the mirepoix trio of onion, celery, and carrot, and a ‘fiery’ variation, kind of like curry paste but without all the spices, starring, ginger, shallots, garlic and more. To make both of the bouillon variations, you just pulse up veggies and salt into a fine, pesto-like paste in the food processor. Distribute the bouillon among containers, label, and keep in the freezer. Because of the fair amount of salt in the recipe, the paste doesn’t completely freeze in the freezer and is easily scoopable. The salt also helps it keep for a really long time – pretty much indefinitely in my experience. This is a concentrated product and a little is meant to go a long way, so if you taste it as is, it will taste very salty and strong. I like to use the ‘classic’ bouillon variation in all kinds of legume-based soups like lentil soup and minestrone, and in rich sauces like mushroom bolognese. The ‘fiery’ version is really lovely in all kinds of curries and healing soups, meant to help clear the sinuses. But really, there are no rules for how and where you can use this bouillon, it’s really fun to experiment with. Just the other day, I cooked up a pot of plain chickpeas (just chickpeas and salt) and wanted to make a quick, single serving of chickpea soup for lunch. I heated up some olive oil in a small pot, added about a teaspoon of the classic bouillon, and let it get fragrant for about a minute. I then added the chickpeas to the pot with about 2 cups of their cooking water, brought everything up to a simmer for a few minutes, and wilted in some spinach at the end. I ended up with the coziest bowl of soup and a very flavorful, warming broth in just a few minutes. Hope you’ll give this a try this year! Classic Freezer Bouillon   Print Serves: about 4½ cups Ingredients 1 yellow onion - peeled, roughly chopped 1 leek - white and light green part only, roughly chopped 2 medium carrots - roughly chopped 3 celery ribs - roughly chopped 1 head garlic - cloves peeled 1 bunch parsley - stems included, roughly chopped 1 tablespoon tomato paste (optional) 1 tablespoon olive oil ¼ cup sea salt Instructions Combine all the vegetables in a food processor in batches, roughly pulsing them and adding more as you go. Periodically scrape down the sides of the food processor to get everything nicely incorporated. Add the tomato paste, if using, oil, and salt, and finish processing into a pesto-like paste. Add another tablespoon of oil if your food processor is having a hard time getting going. Let the paste cool down to room temperature if it got warm while processing. Distribute the bouillon paste among sealable containers, leaving about 1 of space at the top (the paste will expand when frozen). Close and label the containers and place in the freezer. The bouillon should keep frozen indefinitely - it will not freeze solid because of the salt in the recipe. To use: use about 1 teaspoon of the bouillon per 1½ - 2 cups of water. Either add the paste directly to boiling water or sauté it up in oil for a few minutes before adding water. 3.5.3226 Fiery Freezer Bouillon   Print Serves: about 3 cups Ingredients 2 shallots - peeled, roughly chopped 6-8 total of ginger pieces - peeled if not organic, roughly chopped 1 head garlic - cloves peeled 2 medium carrots - roughly chopped 1 jalape?o or serrano pepper - seeded, roughly chopped (optional, include for more heat) 1 bunch cilantro - stems included, roughly chopped 1 tablespoon white miso (optional) 1 teaspoon turmeric powder (optional) 1 tablespoon avocado oil or olive oil ¼ cup sea salt Instructions Combine all the vegetables in a food processor in batches, roughly pulsing them and adding more as you go. Periodically scrape down the sides of the food processor to get everything nicely incorporated. Add the miso and turmeric, if using, oil, and salt, and finish processing into a pesto-like paste. Add another tablespoon of oil if your food processor is having a hard time getting going. Let the paste cool down to room temperature if it got warm while processing. Distribute the bouillon paste among sealable containers, leaving about 1 of space at the top (the paste will expand when frozen). Close and label the containers, and place in the freezer. The bouillon should keep frozen indefinitely - it will not freeze solid because of the salt in the recipe. To use: use about 1 teaspoon of the bouillon per 1½ - 2 cups of water. Either add the paste directly to boiling water or sauté it up in oil for a few minutes before adding water. 3.5.3226 The post Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Roasted Cauliflower Hummus

January 20 2020 Oh My Veggies 

You know what I hate? Suggested serving sizes. I love hummus. I don’t make usually make hummus myself (unless it’s Edamame Hummus) because it ends up being a disaster, so I buy the little tubs of hummus at the grocery store. And I totally want to eat half the tub in one sitting. But a serving size is almost always two tablespoons. Two tablespoons. Which is nothing! Who eats two tablespoons of hummus?! I am totally a volume eater. Hummus is a healthy food, but the calories really add up when you want to eat more than two tablespoons. So I thought I’d try replacing the chickpeas with roasted cauliflower. Oh sure, my hummus wouldn’t have as much protein, but I’d be able to eat a lot more of it, which is nice too, right? As usual, I thought I was being super innovative, but then I Googled it and about a gajillion recipes for paleo hummus made with cauliflower came up. Oh snap. Anyway, if you divide this Roasted Cauliflower Hummus into four HUGE SERVINGS (see, all caps means the servings are big), you end up saving about 90 calories per serving. I kind of wanted to have a […]

How Many of These 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients Are in Your Pantry?

January 20 2020 Meatless Monday 

How Many of These 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients Are in Your Pantry?A properly-stocked pantry is essential for creating delicious plant-based dishes on the fly. But what does properly-stocked really mean? Sure, you need the basics -- olive oil, white flour, rice, pasta, etc., but there are some additional ingredients that you should consider adding to your collection. Alternative flours, exotic spices, seeds, nut butters, beans (butter beans will change your life), broths, and grains can all add extra levels of depth, dimension, and texture to any variety of plant-based dishes.   Youll likely be familiar with many of the items on this list, but there are also a few lesser known ingredients -- agar-agar, tahini, nutritional yeast, etc. -- which can be used to replace many traditional animal-based ingredients. So, grab a paper and pen, and make sure these items are on next weeks shopping list. Agar-Agar The perfect vegan gelatin replacement for your puddings, jellies, or gelées, agar-agar flakes are derived from seaweed and function similarly to animal-based gelatins. Alternative Flours Were not talking your run of the mill (went there) all-purpose, bleached white flour. Play around with some alternative flours like almond, chickpea, rice, or buckwheat. Many alternative flours are also gluten-free. Beans (canned) Explore the world of beans, and reap the benefits of a healthy, satisfying plant-based protein. Lentils, black beans, butter beans, kidney beans, chickpeas -- doesnt matter; theyre all easy to use, shelf-stable, healthy, and inexpensive. Broth A box of vegetable broth is a staple of any kitchen, but you can expand your soup selection by adding some chickn bouillon cubes to your pantry. Coconut Oil A shelf-stable saturated fat, coconut oil is a healthy alternative to other vegetable oils. In most cases it can be substituted 1:1 for other oils and butters. Its got a laundry list of benefits that range from weight loss to improved cognitive functioning. Chocolate All vegetables and no sweets make everyone hangry. A little bit of chocolate can go a long way in baking as well as a post-dinner night cap. If youre feeling adventurous try some exotic bars that contain a higher percentage of cacao. Diced Tomatoes (canned) Take a simple stew, stir-fry, or sauce to the next level with a can of diced tomatoes. Theyre every home cooks secret weapon. Tip: fire-roasted tomatoes add even more flavor to your meals. Frozen Fruits and Vegetables Toss them into a blender, soup pot or sauté pan to add some inexpensive nutrients and heft to your mid-week meals. Grains Theres an endless variety of grains available for your experimenting pleasure. Whole grains are best (think brown rice), but theres also a number of lesser-known grains that have their own unique texture and flavor profile. Try getting a bag of quinoa, amaranth, or farro and simply follow the cooking instructions on the back. Granola You can make your own or buy it for cheap at the store, but theres truly an endless combination of potential granola mixes. Bring it in a baggy as a post-lunch snack or use it to top your morning yogurt. Nut Butter High in protein and healthy fats, nut butters can add complexity to savory dishes and a nutty richness to sweets. Keep a range on hand -- almond, cashew, pistachio -- to add variety to baked goods, sandwiches, and sauces. Nutritional Yeast Just trust us with this one; we swear it tastes almost exactly like Parmesan cheese. Sprinkle on pasta, popcorn or use in macaroni and cheese if youre looking to cut out the dairy or need a boost of umami flavor. Olives Olives, especially the sliced green ones in a jar, add the perfect pop of brininess to pastas, rice bowls, and stews. Theyre a great value and can seriously elevate the flavor of ordinary dishes.  Pasta Thankfully, pasta has evolved to incorporate more alternative flours into its base. Now, you can get high-fiber, high-protein pasta made of anything from lentils to chickpeas to black beans. Pesto It is one of the most versatile condiments/­­sauces out there. A jar of pesto can last unopened in your pantry for months, and it can be your saving grace if you need to whip something up in a hurry. Add some to roasted vegetables or use it to top a tomato soup. Seaweed Snacks Low in calories and nutritionally-dense, seaweed is the ultimate snack food. Oh, and cats love it too. Spices Well, this one goes without saying, but having a pantry (or cupboard) thats properly stocked with all your necessary spices will make cooking (and eating) a whole lot more enjoyable. Some lesser known spices to add are aamchur (unripe mango), star anise, zaatar, or Aleppo pepper. Seeds Seeds are powerhouses of nutrition, texture, and flavor, and there are so many different varieties to choose from -- chia, flax, hemp, sesame, sunflower. Make chia pudding, a flax egg, or toss some hemp or sunflower seeds into your next salad or smoothie. Soy Sauce Umami in a bottle, soy sauce adds an earthy meatiness to dressings, sauces, and stir-fries. Some chefs even recommend adding a dash to tomato sauce for a boost of richness. Tahini You know it from every hummus youve ever eaten, but what might surprise you is that tahini paste is made entirely from pulverized sesame seeds. Combine a tablespoon of tahini with a dash of water, a sprinkle of cumin, and some salt for a quick and creamy dressing for salad or roasted vegetables.   If you decide to make one of these delicious recipes, let us know by tagging @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday on your social media posts for a chance to be featured on our channels.   The post How Many of These 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients Are in Your Pantry? appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Pasta with Greens, Chickpeas, and Olives

January 13 2020 VegKitchen 

Pasta with Greens, Chickpeas, and Olives This quick and nourishing year-round pasta recipe calls for chard, kale, or spinach, but you can use a combination or even substitute broccoli rabe or mustard greens. My personal favorite in this dish is chard, as it’s so good in the Italian-style trio of pasta with greens and legumes. Just add a colorful salad and you’ve got a meal. The post Pasta with Greens, Chickpeas, and Olives appeared first on VegKitchen.

Your Fool-Proof Guide to Eating More Plants in 2020…Start with Meatless Monday!

January 6 2020 Meatless Monday 

Your Fool-Proof Guide to Eating More Plants in 2020…Start with Meatless Monday!Theres no better time to commit to healthier habits than the New Year. But making a resolution is easy; keeping it, now thats the hard part. We believe going meatless on Monday should be as simple and delicious as possible. Thats why were offering up our top 20 tips for incorporating more plant-based foods into your diet. Armed with this toolbelt of tricks, techniques, pantry staples, swaps, gadgets, and apps, youll be able to approach every Meatless Monday with the confidence and culinary gusto of a seasoned gourmand. And remember, you can sign up for our Meatless Monday newsletter to receive weekly recipes, tips, articles, and food-industry updates that will help keep you focused, full, and on track.   1. Always keep an avocado on hand. Add to sandwiches instead of cheese, top your toast or bulk up a smoothie. 2. Learn to love your oven; it has a magical effect on vegetables - roast, bake or crisp! 3. Use condiments (pesto, salsa, hummus, harissa, tapenade) LIBERALLY! 4. Stock your freezer with frozen fruits, vegetables, and plant-based burgers. 5. Try different legumes (black beans, lentils, chickpeas, pigeon peas, butter beans, cannellini beans). Tip: dried legumes are very inexpensive and go a long way. 6. Go with whole grains like brown and wild rice, farro, quinoa, and bulgur. 7. Fortify your cupboard with plant-based snacks like popcorn, nuts, roasted chickpeas, dried fruit, granola, and dark chocolate. 8. Get familiar with tofu. When prepared properly (press it before cooking), its an excellent source of plant-based protein. You can also blend it into smoothies or batters. 9. Experiment with plant-based meats and burgers. Its usually pretty hard to tell the difference vs beef burgers. 10. Find a favorite nut-milk and try using it in your coffee, cereal, and recipes. There are plenty to choose from. 11. Keep coconut oil close by and use it as an alternative to butter. 12. Stock-up your spice rack. Spices from different regions of the world will add flavor and complexity to ordinary recipes and ingredients. 13. Working out? Invest in some plant-based protein powders. 14. Find fast-food and quick-service restaurants that offer up a variety of plant-based options. 15. Expand your culinary scope: Many global cuisines put greater emphasis on plant-based dishes. Look at some Indian, Thai, Mediterranean, Chinese, or Japanese cookbooks for inspiration. 16. Pump up pasta with a mix of vegetables and legumes. 17. Keep a bag of corn meal in the cupboard and use for sweet polenta, polenta fries, cornbread, and griddle cakes. 18. Invest in gadgets: Tofu press, immersion blender, juicer, spiralizer, and mandolin can add some flare to traditional vegetables. 19. Download apps for meatless eating. Happy Cow, Fork Over Knives, Vanilla Bean, and Food Monster are all great ways to find meatless options and get some recipe inspiration. 20. Catch a meatless movie like The Game Changers, What the Health, Cowspiracy, or Food Inc to learn more about the food system and plant-based eating.   Want more of tips, hacks and recipes? Follow us at @MeatlessMonday on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter! Find great plant-based recipes in our recipe gallery!   The post Your Fool-Proof Guide to Eating More Plants in 2020…Start with Meatless Monday! appeared first on Meatless Monday.

One Pot Vegan Creamed Beans and Greens with Chili Oil

December 18 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

One Pot Vegan Creamed Beans and Greens with Chili Oil Every day, around 4pm, my husband and I start texting about dinner. If there aren’t any leftovers or a previously thought-through dinner plan, my most common proposition is ‘greens and beans?’ Those two are such staples and always leave us feeling really nourished. I have a million variations on the subject that I can throw together super quickly. Sometimes, for a quick and lazy lunch, I’ll just crisp up cooked chickpeas and kale in a pan with lots of salt and pepper and be totally satisfied. I always push off from there for our dinners, then add more vegetables, a sauce, a grain, crunchy toppings, etc. etc. I vary the kinds of greens and beans I use depending on season and mood, and what’s on hand. These one pot creamed beans and greens are my cozy, wintery version of our staple meal, and they definitely hit the spot every single time. The beans of choice here are white beans, since they are extra creamy in texture and go so well with lemon and pepper – both key ingredients. The green of choice is chard. I kind of think chard doesn’t get enough love? I love it because it wilts quickly, usually costs less than kale, and the stems are totally edible. The secret with the stems is cooking them first until they soften. Usually they’ll end up melting into a dish and become almost indistinguishable, but will still contribute some substance and extra plant power. If you use rainbow chard, the stems will give some of their color to whatever you’re cooking, so that’s fun as well. Chili oil is the component that takes this meal to that extra special place. I don’t recommend skipping it. We just quickly crisp up some red pepper flakes in olive oil and let it infuse while making the meal. A generous drizzle of that will really make everything sing. Hope you’re enjoying this sometimes crazy pre-holiday time! Let’s all remember to be nice to ourselves and stay warm and nourished. Sending you lots of love. One Pot Creamed Beans and Greens with Chili Oil   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the chili oil ¼ cup olive oil 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes pinch of sea salt for the creamed beans and greens avocado oil or olive oil 1 yellow onion - diced 1 medium-large bunch of chard - stems thinly sliced, leaves chopped sea salt freshly ground black pepper 5 cloves of garlic - minced a few 1 strips of lemon zest (from 1 lemon) 2 15 oz cans or 3½ cups cooked white beans 2 cups vegetable broth 2 bay leaves (optional) 1¼ cup oat milk or cashew milk juice from 1 lemon Instructions to make the chili oil Combine the oil and red pepper flakes in a saucepan over medium heat, cook, swirling, for 3-4 minutes until the pepper flakes are crispy. Add a pinch of salt. Set aside to infuse while making the beans and greens. to make the creamed beans and greens Heat oil over medium heat in a soup pot. Add the onion and chard stems, along with a pinch of salt and plenty of black pepper, and sauté for 10 minutes, or until the chard stems are very soft. Add the garlic and lemon zest, and stir until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the beans, vegetable broth, bay leaves, if using, and another pinch of salt. Bring to a boil, establish a simmer and let simmer and reduce, uncovered, for 10 minutes. Remove the bay leaves and lemon zest strips (this should be easy, since they should float up to the top). Add the chard leaves and cover the pot for a few minutes for the leaves to wilt. Remove the lid and stir in the wilted leaves. Add the milk and bring everything back up to a boil, then turn off the heat. Stir in the lemon juice. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Serve warm, drizzled with the chili oil (recipe above). Notes We prefer to use original Oatly oat milk or homemade cashew milk (1 cup cashews, 3 cups water) in this recipe, it does best with something really creamy and rich. 3.5.3226   Our New Ebook: Golubka Kitchen Sweets! Filled with our favorite, vegan and gluten-free dessert recipes in the world. The post One Pot Vegan Creamed Beans and Greens with Chili Oil appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegetable Curry

December 12 2019 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Vegetable Curry If this cold weather makes you want to cozy up to a curry, but you dont have a lot of time to spend in the kitchen, this curry is for you. This fabulous looking curry is from a new book called Truly Healthy Vegan Cookbook by Dianne Wenz. As a vegan lifestyle coach, Dianne is adept at showing how to prepare well-balanced meals that taste great. The opening chapter of the book is loaded with great tools and tips for eating a healthy vegan diet.  Enticing recipes such as Carrot Cake Oatmeal, Cauliflower Banh Mi, Chickpea Pot Pie, and Key Lime Bars, insure that your menus will be as flavorful and fun to eat as they are good for you. Truly Healthy Vegan Cookbook is ideal for the new vegan trying to navigate their way through unfamiliar territory.  Its also great for anyone looking to fine-tune their eating habits by eliminating processed ingredients and getting back to basics - including eating more vegetables. This cookbook features easy to find ingredients that are used to make simple and delicious recipes such as this Vegetable Curry. About this recipe, Dianne says, Vegetable curries are a favorite warming meal on cold days. I tend to make them with whatever stray bits of vegetables I have on hand to clean out the produce drawer of the fridge, but this combination of cauliflower, green beans, and carrots is my personal favorite. This is a Thai-style curry that uses red curry paste, but it can also be made with the green variety. Vegetable Curry Serves 6 /­­ Prep time: 10 minutes /­­ Cook time: 20 minutes 1 teaspoon neutral-flavored oil (such as grapeseed or avocado), vegetable stock, or water 1 medium-sized yellow onion, diced 3 garlic cloves, minced 1 tablespoon grated or minced fresh ginger 1 (14-ounce) can light coconut milk 1 cup vegetable stock 3 tablespoons red curry paste 4 cups chopped cauliflower florets 1/­­2 pound green beans, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces 2 carrots, chopped 1 (15-ounce) can chickpeas, drained and rinsed 2 cups spinach Sea salt Black pepper Heat the oil in a large stockpot over medium-high heat. Add the onion, garlic, and ginger and cook until they begin to brown, about 5 minutes. Add the light coconut milk, vegetable stock, and red curry paste to the pot and stir to combine. Add the cauliflower, green beans, carrots, and chickpeas. Bring the mixture to a boil, and then reduce the heat to medium-low. Cover the pot and simmer for 15 minutes, or until the vegetables have softened. Uncover the pot and stir in the spinach, continuing to simmer, while stirring frequently until the spinach wilts. Season with sea salt and black pepper to taste. From Truly Healthy Vegan Cookbook, by Dianne Wenz, published by Rockridge Press. Copyright (C) 2019 by Callisto Media. All rights reserved. The post Vegetable Curry appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Mushroom Gravy, Savory Stuffing, Fudge Brownie Pie, and 8 Other Plant-Based Swaps for Your Thanksgiving Feast

November 25 2019 Meatless Monday 

Mushroom Gravy, Savory Stuffing, Fudge Brownie Pie, and 8 Other Plant-Based Swaps for Your Thanksgiving FeastThanksgiving is a time for family, giving, and gratitude. But its also the time for stuffing...and starches, and birds, briskets, casseroles, cranberry sauce, gravy, dressings, and desserts! But as we know from Thanksgivings past, the entire family doesnt always agree, especially when it comes to the food on the dining room table.  So, whether your guests prefer dark meat, white meat, or no meat, its important that your Thanksgiving spread accommodates everyone. Fortunately, the classic Thanksgiving fixings can be made completely plant-based without compromising tradition or taste. Weve compiled a collection of simple plant-based Thanksgiving swaps that allow everyone -- from the newly vegan to the traditional omnivore -- to enjoy the holiday feast, together. Mushroom Gravy from Trader Joes Sometimes your secret recipe is store bought. We wont tell. Trader Joes has an impressive Organic Savory Vegan Gravy made with onion, garlic, coconut milk, tamari, mushrooms, and a whole bunch of seasonings and zero work for you. Oh, its also gluten free. Roasted-Garlic Smashed Potatoes from Minimalist Baker The secret to incredibly light and fluffy dairy-free mashed potatoes isnt much of a secret. After boiling and mashing your potatoes (you can use a potato masher or hand mixer; if you use the latter, be careful not to overmix), fold in non-dairy butter and a whole head of roasted garlic to pump up the decadence.  Super Savory Vegan Stuffing from The Cheeky Chickpea A Thanksgiving spread is judged not on its turkey, but rather the quality of its stuffing. We scoured the internet to find the most satisfying stuffing recipe available. Chopped mushrooms, wild rice, bell peppers, vegetable bouillon, plant-based sausage, cubed up bread, and Thanksgiving seasonings -- fennel, garlic, parsley, fresh rosemary -- make this stuffing simply irresistible. Cinnamon Sugar Sweet Potato Casserole from Eat With Clarity Oh, sweet potato casserole; you sit innocently on the Thanksgiving table masquerading as a member of the main meal, but we all know youre our pre-dessert dessert...with your delightful topping of crushed pecans, coconut sugar, oats, and marshmallows. But the sweet and creamy nature of this indulgent side dish is a necessary counterbalance to all the punchy herbs and spices. This recipe adds another dimension to the traditional sweet potato casserole by using non-dairy milk, ground flax seeds, and melted coconut oil. Roasted Root Vegetables with a White Balsamic Glaze from Healthy World Cuisine No bacon necessary for these magical root vegetables. The recipe suggests fennel, carrots, and Cipollini onions, but you can add any of your favorite seasonal vegetables. Curried Green Bean Casserole from Omnivore’s Cookbook A spin on the classic, this curried green bean casserole adds a new dimension to the Thanksgiving table. Traditional green bean casseroles typically rely on a can of condensed cream of mushroom soup and a topping of bread crumbs and fried onion straws. This recipe is just as easy to make, but offers your taste buds so much more! No-Meat Loaf from Nora Cooks Turkey doesnt always have to be the star of the Thanksgiving spread. Meatloaf traditionally plays a supporting role, but this holiday season let it take center stage with this smoky, savory plant-based chickpea loaf. After its covered with a tangy ketchup glaze and baked in the oven, its look and texture become indistinguishable from its meaty counterpart. Cranberry Jam from Delish Theres something extraterrestrial-looking about the maroon cylinder of congealed cranberry sauce that you always find sitting menacingly next to the gravy boat. Its Thanksgiving, you deserve better. Treat your family (and yourself) with this simple-to-make four-ingredient cranberry jam. All you need is fresh cranberries, sugar, water, orange zest, and about twenty minutes. Your dinner rolls, stuffing, and other Thanksgiving starches will thank you. Chipotle Whole-Roasted Cauliflower with Caper Vinaigrette from Goya Need an alternative centerpiece for your Thanksgiving meal? Look no further than this elegant whole roasted cauliflower with a smoky chipotle finish. Top your cauliflower steaks with a tart and briny caper vinaigrette for a perfect alternative to the big bird. Chocolate Fudge Brownie Pie from Sweet Vegan Sara Some people eat to live, others eat to get to dessert. Your patience has paid off. This plant-based chocolate fudge brownie pie looks sinful, but it really isnt. The crust uses a combination of almond flour, rolled oats, date sugar, and flax eggs (coagulated flax seeds), while the filling is as healthy as hummus, using chickpeas, nondairy milk, date paste, cocoa powder, rolled oats, and vegan chocolate chips. Creamy Coconut Pumpkin Pie from Loving It Vegan What makes this pumpkin pie filling so much more luxurious than the rest? A rhinestone-studded crust? Nope, this pie gets its extra decadent flare from a can of full-fat coconut milk. Fold in some brown sugar, maple syrup, pumpkin pie spice, and a little bit of cornstarch, and youve got yourself the ultimate Thanksgiving dessert.   Invite your friends and family to try (and share) these plant-based Thanksgiving swaps. If youre looking for more meatless recipe inspiration, check out our recipe gallery. The post Mushroom Gravy, Savory Stuffing, Fudge Brownie Pie, and 8 Other Plant-Based Swaps for Your Thanksgiving Feast appeared first on Meatless Monday.

New Plant-Based Meatless Monday Cookbook Will Get the Whole Family to Eat Their Veggies

November 18 2019 Meatless Monday 

New Plant-Based Meatless Monday Cookbook Will Get the Whole Family to Eat Their VeggiesLooking for some culinary inspiration for your next round of Meatless Monday meals? Well, we have some EXCITING news: The first Meatless Monday cookbook is finally here, and with over 100 delicious, better-for-you plant-based recipes youll be able to whip up a meat-free meal for any type of eater -- from experimental flexitarians to new vegans to the staunchest of carnivores. The Meatless Monday Family Cookbook , by Jenn Sebestyen, emphasizes the limitless potential of plant-based cooking. The recipes are nutritious, easy-to-prepare, and mimic the look, taste, and texture of comfort-food favorites (youve got to check out the lentil Bolognese, butternut-squash mac and cheese, and meaty mushroom stew). The book, whose foreword is written by Sid Lerner, founder of the global Meatless Monday initiative and The Monday Campaigns, is based on the Meatless Monday philosophy of cutting out meat one day a week for your health and the health of the planet. And as its title suggest, The Meatless Monday Family Cookbook is designed for the whole family, because when kids are involved in the prepping and cooking process, they develop a greater appreciation, understanding, and respect for the food in front of them. The cookbook officially goes on sale November 19, but weve included a few recipe highlights to share with you. And with Thanksgiving right around the corner, these plant-based recipes might just be what you need to round out the holiday dinner table.     Garlicky White Bean Avocado Toast with BBQ Drizzle This recipe marries the best traits of avocado toast with the enticing aroma and flavor of cannellini beans slowly sautéed with fresh garlic and olive oil. The mixture is spooned on to the avocado-smeared toast and drizzled with a sweet and tangy homemade barbecue sauce. Pumpkin Maple-Glazed Penne with Roasted Fall Vegetables With butternut squash, carrots, parsnips, and Brussels sprouts, youre getting all the best that autumn has to offer. The subtle maple glaze adds a surprisingly subtle sweetness that pairs nicely with the fall vegetables. Meaty Mushroom Stew over Garlic Mashed Potatoes Theres nothing cozier than a hearty stew and some mashed potatoes. This recipe, which uses cremini and shitake mushrooms and a healthy dose of tamari, is an homage to umami. Ladle it over a scoop of mashed potatoes for some pure plant-based bliss. Creamy Vegetable Noodle Soup Its like a chicken potpie -- minus the chicken and the pie. No animal products are necessary for this smooth and sultry creamy vegetable noodle soup. Vegetable broth, almond milk, nutritional yeast, and a whole lot of seasonings and aromatics make this soup satisfying and delicious. Very Berry Quinoa Salad with Cinnamon Toasted Pecans This salad is light and fresh yet has plenty of protein from the quinoa and pecans. Fresh summer berries are little powerhouses of vitamins and are super kid-friendly. The toasted pecans take this dish to the next level. Rice and Bean Pan Grilled Burritos A burrito is engineered to include an entire meals worth of goodies wrapped in one, warm, fluffy package. Chocked full of smoky pinto beans, cilantro rice, lettuce, and an avocado green chile sauce, be prepared for requests for seconds. BBQ Chickpea Veggie Bowls Channeling the hot smoke of the barbecue pit, this BBQ chickpea veggie bowl is charred, sweet, and tangy with a satisfying crunch. The recipe calls for roasted broccoli, red peppers, onions, and chickpeas, but you can top your brown rice bowl with any variety of vegetables. Just dont forget to drizzle over some homemade sweet-and-spicy barbecue sauce. Sweet-and-Spicy BBQ Sauce The proper blend of sweet and heat, this BBQ sauce uses smoky chipotles, tart apple-cider vinegar, maple syrup, and a blend of spices. Squeeze a little bit any meatless Monday meal to take it to the next level. About the author: Jenn Sebestyen is the creator of VeggieInspired.com. She was inspired to write The Meatless Monday Family Cookbook to help moms and dads get both picky kids and die-hard carnivores to eat more veggies. She offers tips and tricks that have worked for getting her kids on board with a veggie-heavy Meatless Monday plan.   Interested in learning more about Meatless Monday? Click here for more recipes, cooking tips, and ways that you can spread the Meatless Monday message to your community. For a chance to be featured in our next recipe roundup, make sure to tag @MeatlessMonday or use the hashtag #meatlessmonday the next time you post a meatless or plant-based recipe. The post New Plant-Based Meatless Monday Cookbook Will Get the Whole Family to Eat Their Veggies appeared first on Meatless Monday.

20 Vegan Curry Recipes to Make Now!

October 11 2019 Vegan Richa 

20 Vegan Curry Recipes to Make Now!20 Vegan Curry Recipes to Make Now! Indian, Japanese, Jamaican, Sri Lankan Curries with lentils, chickpeas, beans, veggies, tofu and more. Gluten-free, Nut-free options, Soy-free options Its Curry week! Try some of these fabulous curries from all around the world! With various beans, tofu, protein, with and without tomato, gluten-free, nut-free options, soy-free options.

Mushroom and Onion Cauliflower Bake from Whole Food Cooking Every Day

October 4 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Mushroom and Onion Cauliflower Bake from Whole Food Cooking Every Day Happy October! Today we’ve got the coziest recipe for ushering in the first full month of fall – a cauliflower bake from Amy Chaplin’s beautiful new cookbook, Whole Food Cooking Every Day. This recipe has everything we ever want in a comforting, fall dish: mushrooms, caramelized onions, chickpeas, and hearty greens, all covered by a fluffy, almost cheesy blanket of vegan cauliflower souffle. We’ve been so excited for the release of this cookbook, being huge fans of Amy’s work. Her first book is a true bible of whole food cooking, filled with kitchen wisdom and an incredible variety of plant-forward recipes. We learned so much from that volume, like the fact that it’s best to cook beans with a sheet of kombu for better digestion and that making a curry spice blend at home is very much worth it for the unbelievable flavor. Much like Amy’s first cookbook, Whole Food Cooking Every Day is monumental and thorough, with beautiful photography woven throughout. The book is organized in a brilliant way – each chapter presents a base recipe, which is then elaborated on with different ingredient variations. The Cauliflower Bake chapter that we worked from features a recipe for a fluffy cauliflower topping, which can go over a number of different fillings. Here are some examples of other base recipe chapters: Genius Whole-Grain Porridges, Gluten-Free Breads, Simple and Healing Soups, Baked Marinated Tempeh, Seeded Crackers, Easy Cakes. Don’t all of those sound amazing? If you’re ever in the market for a trusted resource on colorful, everyday whole food cooking, look no further. We hope you’ll enjoy the cozy bake Mushroom and Onion Cauliflower Bake from Whole Food Cooking Every Day   Print recipe from Whole Food Cooking Every Day by Amy Chaplin Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the cauliflower topping 1 large head (2½ lbs) cauliflower - cut into 1½ florets ½ cup raw pine nuts, cashews, or macadamia nuts 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 3 tablespoons nutritional yeast, plus more to taste ½ teaspoon fine sea salt, plus more to taste for the mushroom and onion filling 3 tablespoons extra-virgin coconut oil 1½ lbs shiitake mushrooms - stems removed and caps thinly sliced 2 tablespoons chopped fresh thyme 3 medium onions - quartered and thinly sliced lengthwise ½ teaspoon fine sea salt, plus more to taste 6 cups (6 oz) sliced Swiss chard - tough stems removed 1½ cups cooked chickpeas (1/­­4 cup cooking liquid reserved) or 1 15 oz can (drained) 1 tablespoon tamari 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar ¼ cups filtered water if using canned chickpeas 2 teaspoons arrowroot powder 1 tablespoon filtered water freshly ground black pepper Instructions to make the cauliflower topping Set up a steamer pot with about 2 inches of filtered water in the bottom (the water shouldnt touch the bottom of the basket) and bring to a boil over high heat. Arrange the cauliflower florets in the steamer basket, cover, and steam for 10-12 minutes, until the cauliflower is cooked through but not falling apart. Remove from the heat and set aside. Put the nuts, olive oil, yeast, and salt in a high-powered blender and add the steamed cauliflower. Starting on low speed and using the tamper stick to help press the cauliflower down, blend, gradually increasing the speed to high, until completely smooth and thick; use the tamper stick to keep the mixture moving and to scrape down the sides as you go. This will take a couple of minutes. Season with more nutritional yeast and salt to taste and blend to combine. to make the mushroom and onion filling, and assemble Preheat the oven to 375°F (190° C). Warm a large skillet over medium-high heat and pour in 1 tablespoon of the oil. Add half the shiitakes and the thyme, stir to coat with oil, and cook for 10-12 minutes, stirring only every minute or two (to allow the mushrooms to brown), until the shiitakes are golden brown. Transfer to a bowl and set aside. Repeat with another tablespoon of oil and the remaining mushrooms. Wash and dry the skillet if there are blackened bits on the bottom. Add the remaining tablespoon oil to the pan, then add the onions and cook over medium heat for 8 minutes, or until beginning to brown. Cover the pan, reduce the heat to low, and cook for 10 minutes, or until the onions are soft and lightly browned. Remove the lid, add the salt, and cook uncovered for another 5 minutes, or until the onions are caramelized. Add the chard, cover, and allow to steam for 3 minutes, or until tender. Add the chickpeas, cooked mushrooms, tamari, balsamic vinegar, and chickpea cooking liquid or ¼ cup water, raise the heat, and bring to a simmer. Dissolve the arrowroot in 1 tablespoon water, stir, and drizzle into the simmering mixture, stirring constantly. When the mixture has returned to a simmer, remove from the heat and season to taste with pepper and more salt. Transfer the mixture to an 8-inch square or equivalent baking dish and smooth the surface. Spread the cauliflower topping evenly over the filling. Bake for 30 minutes, or until the filling is bubbling and the topping has begun to set. Turn on the broiler and broil the bake for 3 to 6 minutes, until the topping is golden and browning in parts. Remove from the oven and allow to sit for a few minutes before serving. Once cooled, leftovers can be stored in the fridge in an airtight container for up to 3 days. To reheat, put the bake in a baking dish, cover, and warm in a 400° F (200° C) oven until heated through. Notes Here are some modifications we made while making the recipe based on what we had on hand. It turned out delicious this way as well. - We used half shiitakes and half crimini mushrooms. Crimini take a little longer to brown but otherwise work well here. - We used sage instead of thyme and also topped the bake with some crispy fried sage. - We used coconut aminos instead of tamari - those two are pretty interchangeable. - When baking, the filling tends to bubble up and drip out of the dish, so its helpful to set the baking dish over a baking sheet, to catch the drippings and avoid a smoking oven. 3.5.3226 The post Mushroom and Onion Cauliflower Bake from Whole Food Cooking Every Day appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Plant-Based Power Chef Charity Morgan on Fueling The Tennessee Titans with Plants

September 16 2019 Meatless Monday 

Plant-Based Power Chef Charity Morgan on Fueling The Tennessee Titans with PlantsThere are plenty of reasons to eat more plant-based foods. For NFL linebacker Derrick Morgan, who most recently played on the Tennessee Titans, the reason was clear: He wanted to become an even better athlete. [Derrick] wanted to have a competitive edge for training on and off the field, Morgans wife, Chef Charity Morgan , said. After doing extensive research on using plant-based foods as fuel, Derrick decided to fully commit to plant-based eating — cold turkey — back in 2017. His wife Charity and two young kids, soon followed his lead. Now, the whole Morgan clan eats all plant-based, all the time. But this is hardly where their plant-based story ends. The Morgans new approach to eating soon made its way onto the football field. Charity, a Le Cordon Bleu-trained professional chef, gradually transitioned her cooking style to plant-based and, with that, began to serve meals to other Tennessee Titans. For me, it was just re-educating the guys about what food looks like. Once they realized they could have lasagna, enchiladas and mac and cheese in plant-based form, they were so stoked , she said. Charity cooks up plant-based dishes for many of the players, whove found that the meals leave them energized and ready to play. A lot of them tell me they feel faster on the field, they feel more energetic , Charity said of the players, adding that many said they didnt feel sluggish like they normally do after a big lunch.  Chef Charitys recipes are always evolving, but there are a few staples she said the players request on the reg. Her plant-based truffle mac and cheese is by far the players most beloved recipe, and her tacos, which she makes with soyrizo, black beans, bell peppers, onion and garlic are another favorite.  While there is a wealth of information around plant-based eating, Chef Charity said protein is often the players first concern when they sign up for her meals. She said being an educator comes as part of her job as a chef: Once she breaks down the beneficial nutrients in foods like vegetables, lentils and legumes, she said the players worries are easily quelled. The chef labels all of the players meals clearly so they know what to expect before digging in, and every dish is protein-packed. Her Pro-Bowl, a mix of lentils, chickpeas, hemp seeds, kale and spinach, is incredibly protein-dense.  While many of the Titans have incorporated plant-based eating into their lives (and their training), not all have committed as wholly as the Morgan family has — and, as Chef Charity put it, thats completely OK. I tell people all the time, even if you start with Meatless Monday, thats great. I encourage that , she said, adding that Meatless Monday often ends up being a gateway to even more plant-based eating. People realize they create their own [unnecessary] barriers, but once they try [to eat a little less meat], they start to realize that its really not so difficult. We create our own roadblocks that dont really exist in reality, she said.  So while conventional wisdom may tell us that professional football players need a meat-heavy diet to perform their best, the real proof is in the Titans.  Learn more about plant-based athletes from the experts - check out Game Changers the movie . A UFC fighter discovers an elite group of athletes proving everything he’d been taught about protein was a lie . This documentary breaks down the stereotypes, myths and realities of protein and strength around plant-based eating for professional athletes. Check it out in your local theaters. The post Plant-Based Power Chef Charity Morgan on Fueling The Tennessee Titans with Plants appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Difference between Besan and Chickpea Flour (Garbanzo Bean flour)

August 29 2019 Vegan Richa 

Difference between Besan and Chickpea Flour (Garbanzo Bean flour)Besan and Chickpea flour are Not the same. Besan or gram flour is a flour of chana dal or split brown chickpeas. Chickpea flour or garbanzo flour is ground up white chickpeas. Similar flavors, but not the same flour. Read below for differences and where to use which flour. Besan or gram flour is a flour of chana dal or split brown chickpeas. Chickpea flour or garbanzo flour is ground up white chickpeas. Both have similar flavor and behavior but enough difference that a substitution can sometimes mess up a recipe. Pictured above, the top bowl has chickpea flour which is lighter, coarse and fluffy. Bottom bowl has Besan which is finer, smoother and hence more compact. WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN BESAN AND CHICKPEA FLOUR? Besan and chickpea flour are not the same. Indian Besan, is the flour of brown chickpeas or chana dal (split brown chickpeas), or sometimes a mix of split chickpeas and split peas. It is a flour of a type chickpeas, so it can be labeled as chickpea flour. Chickpea flour is the flour of white chickpeas and is labelled as chickpea flour or garbanzo flour. Besan is usually much finer ground and needs much less water than chickpea flour. Chickpea flour if a coarse flour usually will need more water to make same consistency batter. On usage it will also yield a dryer result. They taste slightly different. Sometimes, you have to take these differences into account, when substituting one for the other in a recipe. In some recipes, subs work out just fine, while others need adjusting. They both taste a bit bitter when raw, so they are not a good candidate in raw flour recipes such as edible cookie dough. More Pictures of pulses, legumes and their names on this Page. As you can see from the pictures, Chana Dal is basically brown chickpeas that have been split and skin removed. This chana dal is made into a flour for besan. When the besan is of brown chickpeas with the skin, then that kala chana besan has a darker hue and earthier flavor. This besan is not used as commonly as regular chana dal besan.Continue reading: Difference between Besan and Chickpea Flour (Garbanzo Bean flour)The post Difference between Besan and Chickpea Flour (Garbanzo Bean flour) appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff

January 18 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff I really love January. To me, this month has a bright and sparkling clean feel to it. And even though the start of a new year is purely symbolic, it can be such great time to set some concrete intentions and start making lasting changes or small steps in a new direction. This year, much like the past few years, I’m inspired to simplify, minimize, and really think about the things that I bring into my life, and my impact as a consumer. In the past few years, we’ve tackled food waste and figured out a way to compost food scraps that’s sustainable for us. We’ve also done away with a lot of store-bought household products like paper towels and most single-purpose cleaning products, but there is still a lot of work to do in that area. Of course I find that cooking at home is always a top priority when it comes to simplifying in a sane way. Being prepared, having tried and true recipes and techniques under my sleeve, and having some trusted meal components stocked in the fridge or pantry always leads to less stress, less waste, and more enjoyment throughout the week. This Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff doesn’t have any particular ties to these January musings, beside the fact that it’s a cozy, wintery recipe that I’ll gladly plan to cook on any given week this winter. It’s a nostalgic flavor for us, since our family in Russia cooked it quite a bit, but we think that this plant-based version is even better than the original :) Below I’m sharing some of my plans, projects I’d like to tackle, and resources that I’ve found to be super inspiring when it comes to simplifying, minimizing my impact and beyond. Would love to hear yours! Goals: projects I’d like to tackle and a few (small but impactful) new habits I’d like to form this year – Stop buying single-purpose household cleaning products and make my own, super simple ones (key words: super simple). I already do this by making a 1 part vinegar, 1 part water all-purpose cleaner that I use on pretty much all surfaces. I sometimes infuse the vinegar with citrus peels for a week or add a few drops of essential oils for a more refreshing scent. That cleaner works really well for most things. But I’d like to make a few more site-specific mixes as well, since I sometimes panic and end up buying some shower cleaner I don’t actually need. Simply Living Well is an amazing resource for easy, home-care recipes. I’m going to make this shower spray, this floor cleaner, and this glass/­­window cleaner. All those recipes have really basic, interchangeable ingredients, which keeps them from being overwhelming. Please let me know if you have a favorite homemade laundry detergent recipe – still trying to figure that one out. – Repair things I have before buying new. I’ve always liked doing stuff with my hands, so for me this is an inherently relaxing activity that I’d like to make more time for. Right now, our linen duvet cover has decided to rip in many places at once, and instead of buying a new one, the plan is to mend it properly with tonal patches, which can look really cool. Julie O’Rourke has a super comprehensive darning and mending tutorial here in her IG stories (just flip through the doll-making part). Her whole account is super dreamy as well. – Make a pot of beans every single week. I’ve noticed that every time I make a big batch of beans, I end up thanking myself over and over again for all the easy meals I’ve made possible with that one step. I like to cook the beans with aromatics so that I also end up with a delicious broth that I can either eat with the beans or use later for soups, etc. Different kinds of beans yield such different flavor/­­cooking potential, so it’s easy to switch them up every week without getting bored. For example, I cook chickpeas with aromatics, then have them for dinner in their broth with greens and maybe other veggies wilted in. I freeze some of the broth to use later as veggie stock. I then eat the chickpeas as is in veggie bowls/­­salads, make hummus with them, marinate them, make crispy chickpeas, or make falafel/­­veggie burgers. You can of course do all of this with canned beans, but home-cooked ones are much tastier, more cost effective, less wasteful if you buy them in bulk, and the broth that you get from cooking them is super valuable! If I find that I can’t use up all of the beans, I just freeze them in their broth and again set my future self up for success. We have a lot of meal plans centered around whole pots of beans here. Inspiring Resources: – 75 Ways to Create a Low-Waste Home from Simply Living Well and Zero Waste, Plastic Free Alternatives Master List from Paris to Go are chock-full of ideas to slowly chip away at. – Jessie’s Produce Prep Ebook is such a wonderful guide to reducing food waste and enjoying the abundance of the plant food world. – Mama Eats Plants is the queen of low-waste living, vegan cooking, and a generally mindful lifestyle. – Live Planted is a great, short-format podcast about a practical approach to a low-waste lifestyle and much more. – This One Part Podcast interview with Kathryn Kellogg of Going Zero Waste is so full of positivity and details some actionable steps most of us can implement to decrease waste. Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 8 oz package tempeh - crumbled 2 teaspoons tamari 1 teaspoon maple syrup ½ cup cashews - soaked to soften if no high-speed blender 1 tablespoon white or chickpea miso 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar 1 cup purified water sea salt black pepper avocado oil or other cooking oil of choice 1 yellow onion - diced 4 garlic cloves - minced 2 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary 1 tablespoon tomato paste pinch of red pepper flakes (optional) 6 oz portobello mushroom caps (about 3 medium) - sliced into long strips ½ cup red wine 10-12 oz any pasta of choice fresh parsley - for serving (optional) Instructions Put the crumbled tempeh in a bowl. Pour the tamari and maple syrup over it, mix and let sit while making the cashew sauce. In an upright blender, combine the cashews, miso, mustard, apple cider vinegar, water, and salt and pepper to taste. Blend until very smooth. Taste for salt and pepper, adjust if needed. Set aside. Heat some oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the tempeh and stir once to coat with the oil, then let sit uninterrupted for 2-3 minutes, until the undersides are browned. Mix and let sit again for another 3-5 minutes, until browned. Push the tempeh to one side of the pan, if your pan is large enough, or transfer back to a bowl and set aside until later. Add more oil to the pan. Add the onions and a pinch of salt, and sauté for 7-8 minutes, until the onions are translucent. Add the garlic, rosemary, tomato paste, and red pepper flakes, if using. Stir until the garlic is fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the mushrooms, along with another pinch of salt. Sauté until the mushrooms are browned and all the liquid that they release has evaporated, about 8-10 min. Mix the tempeh back in. Add the wine, bring it up to a simmer, and let reduce for about 3 minutes. Add the cashew sauce, stirring it and letting it warm through for a few minutes. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Meanwhile, cook the pasta al dente in well-salted water, according to the directions on the package. Reserve about 1 cup of starchy pasta water for thinning out the sauce. Drain the cooked pasta and add it to the pan with the stroganoff. Start mixing the pasta with the sauce, adding splashes of the starchy pasta water to thin out the sauce and to get it to stick to the pasta, as needed. Enjoy right away, garnished with parsley, if using. 3.5.3226 The post Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Garlic Potato Spinach Stir fry – Lasooni Aloo Palak

January 12 2020 Vegan Richa 

Garlic Potato Spinach Stir fry – Lasooni Aloo PalakGarlic Potato Spinach Stir fry – Lasooni Aloo Palak. Potato Spinach curry with garlic and Indian spices. Vegan Gluten-free Nut-free Soy-free Recipe. Jump to Recipe Some days you just want a good potato side. This easy garlic potato spinach stir fry is like my Aloo Palak with cumin. This one has whole spices, well cooked golden garlic slices and more potatoes to spinach. Lasooni means Garlicky, Aloo means potato, palak means spinach. Its a great side with dals and curries and flatbread or Naan. Adjust the flavors to preference. Add in some cooked chickpeas to make it into a meal!Continue reading: Garlic Potato Spinach Stir fry – Lasooni Aloo PalakThe post Garlic Potato Spinach Stir fry – Lasooni Aloo Palak appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Tofu and Cauliflower in Kolhapuri Sauce

December 26 2019 Vegan Richa 

Tofu and Cauliflower in Kolhapuri SauceTofu and Cauliflower in Indian Kolhapuri Sauce. Creamy Spicy Pepper Coconut Sesame Sauce with baked veggies and Tofu. Vegan Gluten-free Nut-free Recipe.  Soy-free option. Jump to Recipe Kolhapuri cuisine is a regional cuisine from a town in the state of Maharashtra in India. The region has its own cuisine, various chilies and is know for hot, deep colored, spicy dishes and sauces. The cuisine has its own spice blend called kolhapuri masala which uses spices, coconut, fenugreek and chilies. I make a simplified version of the masala blend and the sauce and use it with Baked Tofu and Cauliflower here. I’ve made a version of this cooked with various veggies here (instant pot recipe). The sauce use whole spices and ingredients such as sesame and coconut that add a unique flavor. Try this sauce with baked veggies, chickpeas or chickpea tofu for variation.Continue reading: Tofu and Cauliflower in Kolhapuri SauceThe post Tofu and Cauliflower in Kolhapuri Sauce appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegan Butternut Squash Curry

December 13 2019 FatFree Vegan Kitchen  

Vegan Butternut Squash Curry This creamy vegan butternut squash curry with chickpeas, broccolini, and rice makes a hearty main dish. In September, I was fortunate enough to go to New York City with my husband, and we did what we always do in cities with lots of vegan options: Eat. And we were very lucky this time because Farmacy Kitchen, a London-based vegan restaurant, had just opened in Soho for a limited 6-months run. And it was within walking distance from our hotel, and we were able to get a reservation. Very fortunate indeed!(...) Read the rest of Vegan Butternut Squash Curry (938 words) (C) svoisin for FatFree Vegan Kitchen, 2019. | Permalink | No comment Post tags: Chickpea Recipes, Eat-to-Live, Gluten-free, Indian, Soy-free, Weight Watchers Points The post Vegan Butternut Squash Curry appeared first on FatFree Vegan Kitchen.

aloo chole recipe | aloo chole ki sabji | aloo chole ki recipe | alu chole

December 11 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

aloo chole recipe | aloo chole ki sabji | aloo chole ki recipe | alu cholealoo chole recipe | aloo chole ki sabji | aloo chole ki recipe | alu chole with step by step photo and video recipe. chickpeas or potato based curries are very common and popular choice for day to day use. more commonly the recipes are either made with just one of them as key ingredient in a spicy and tangy tomato and onion based sauce. yet there are other variations like aloo chole ki sabji where potato and chickpeas are used together to make a curry. The post aloo chole recipe | aloo chole ki sabji | aloo chole ki recipe | alu chole appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Aquafaba Pumpkin Pie

November 23 2019 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Aquafaba Pumpkin Pie photo by Kate Lewis Makes a 9-inch Pie Pumpkin Pie just got lighter, airier and way, way easier! Aquafaba (that’s cooked chickpea liquid) fluffs up as you puree literally every single ingredient together in the blender. So while it works, you can lean against the kitchen counter scrolling through Instagram and giggling at all the sillyheads that are still using eggs. Come on, it’s 2020, get with the program. But anyway, this pie is full of ginger and spice and everything nice; simply put it tastes the exact way you want pumpkin pie to taste. It also sets beautifully as you can see from those luscious fork marks. Long story short: cancel any other pies and get this on your table. Notes ~You will need 1/­­2 a cup of aquafaba. I highly recommend aquafaba from an organic can of chickpeas. That is what we tested it with and it worked beautifully! Homemade aquafaba will give you varying results in flavor and texture so experiment some time but if you’re new to this just buy the can. I am sure you will figure out some way to use those chickpeas. ~More about that can! I would suggest a 28 oz can because then you won’t need to scrape the bottom of a small can to make sure you get that full 1/­­2 cup. ~For crusts, you can use one off this site, or a storebought one, or a gluten-free crumb crust or whatever you want. No need to parbake. ~If you are using a high-speed blender (like Vitamix) then put it on a low setting. 2 sounds good. If it’s a regular old blender, do a 5 or 6. Ingredients 3 cups pumpkin purée 1/­­2 cup pure maple syrup 1/­­2 cup aquafaba (see notes) 2 tablespoons coconut oil at room temp 2 tablespoons organic cornstarch 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon ground ginger 1/­­4 teaspoon ground nutmeg Pinch of ground cloves 1/­­2 teaspoon sea salt 1 (9-inch) pie crust, unbaked and chilled Directions - Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Add the pumpkin, maple syrup, aquafaba, coconut oil, cornstarch, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, cloves and salt to a blender. Blend for about 3 minutes (less if using a high-speed blender), until light and fluffy. It should increase by 20 percent to 25 percent in volume. - Pour into prepared pie crust. Bake for about an hour, until the top is crackly, the filling is a little jiggly in the center and pulling away from the sides slightly. - Let cool for about 30 minutes at room temperature, then refrigerate for at least 3 hours. Slice and serve with whipped cream!

BBQ Chickpea Veggie Bowls

November 18 2019 Meatless Monday 

This recipe comes to us from The  Meatless Monday Family Cookbook  by Jenn Sebestyen. Jenn says: “This is another version of a grains, beans, and veggies bowl. These roasted vegetables are so good, in our house, the kids are eating them off the hot-from-the-oven pan. Were lucky if we have enough left to make our bowls. Im not complaining! With sticky BBQ sauce and addictive roasted vegetables, this dish is a winner!” Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 - 1 can (15 ounces, or 425 g) chickpeas, drained and rinsed - 1 head broccoli, chopped into bite-size florets - 2 red bell peppers, seeded and sliced (or color of your choice) - 1 red onion, halved and sliced - 2 tablespoons (28 ml) olive oil -  1/­­4 teaspoon salt, or to taste -  1/­­4 teaspoon black pepper, or to taste - 2 cups (390 g) cooked brown rice - 1 avocado, peel and pit removed, diced -  1/­­4 cup (4 g) cilantro, chopped - 1 cup (235 ml) Sweet-and-Spicy BBQ Sauce or store-bought BBQ sauce   Preheat the oven to 375°F (190°C, or gas mark 5). Line 2 rimmed baking sheets with parchment paper. Spread out the chickpeas, broccoli, bell peppers, and onion on the baking sheet. Drizzle with olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and toss to coat. Spread them out in one even layer. Roast for 20 minutes, mix the veggies, and swap the pans in the oven so the one on top is now on the bottom. Roast for another 10 to 15 minutes until the veggies are starting to char and the chickpeas are crispy (they will continue to crisp up as they sit). Add 1/­­2 cup (98 g) of cooked rice to each of 4 bowls. Divvy up the roasted vegetables, diced avocado, and cilantro equally among the bowls. Drizzle with the BBQ sauce. The post BBQ Chickpea Veggie Bowls appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Creamy Cajun Pasta with Breaded Tofu

October 5 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Creamy Cajun Pasta with Breaded TofuVegan Creamy Cajun Pasta with Crisp Breaded tofu. Nut-free Creamy Cajun Spice Sauce with Farfalle and Breaded Tofu. 23 Gm of Protein.Vegan Nut-free Recipe. Soy-free option. Easily oil-free Jump to Recipe My Cajun blend gets used up quickly right after my garam masala and berbere blends. Its a versatile blend that works in many types of meals. This Creamy Pasta Sauce has the cajun blend for a smoky delicious flavor profile. The sauce is creamy, fluffy and is made with tofu. I have started to make more Tofu sauces(Lemon Asparagus Pasta) as they are so much quicker than cashew sauces. They also amp up the protein in the meal! The peppers and onions add flavor. I top the pasta with a smoky breaded tofu. You can use other toppings such as roasted cauliflower or veggies, or chickpeas or vegan meat subs. Or just serve as is! See Recipe notes for tofu-free option.Continue reading: Vegan Creamy Cajun Pasta with Breaded TofuThe post Vegan Creamy Cajun Pasta with Breaded Tofu appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Supercharged Baba Ganoush (Eggplant Dip with Chickpeas)

September 18 2019 FatFree Vegan Kitchen  

Supercharged Baba Ganoush (Eggplant Dip with Chickpeas) This supercharged baba ganoush recipe is not your standard eggplant dip. Enriched with chickpeas and vegan yogurt, it makes a delicious plant-based appetizer or sandwich filling.(...) Read the rest of Supercharged Baba Ganoush (Eggplant Dip with Chickpeas) (707 words) (C) svoisin for FatFree Vegan Kitchen, 2019. | Permalink | 3 comments Post tags: Chickpea Recipes, Eggplant Recipes, Weight Watchers Points The post Supercharged Baba Ganoush (Eggplant Dip with Chickpeas) appeared first on FatFree Vegan Kitchen.

Chickpea Tahini Salad Sandwich

September 2 2019 Vegan Richa 

Chickpea Tahini Salad SandwichAmazing Chickpea Tahini Salad Sandwich. Summery, crunchy and refreshing Chickpea Salad with pecans, celery, onion, tahini and shawarma spice! Serve in lettuce wraps or sandwiches. Vegan Soyfree Recipe. Can be made nut-free Gluten-free  Jump to Recipe Try these easy Chickpea Tahini Salad Sandwiches just before we say bye to the Summer! Chickpeas are mashed with some tahini, then mixed with crunchy celery and onion and some toasted pecans. The flavors from herbs, shawarma spice and lime bring everything together for a delicious refreshing and spiced summer sandwich! The herbs and spice infuse the salad as it sits, so chill for some time before serving. Serve the salad as is or in lettuce cups for gluten-free. It takes just 15 minutes to put together makes for a protein filled meal. Hubbs scarfed it down with a drizzle of sriracha. because… Sriracha.Continue reading: Chickpea Tahini Salad SandwichThe post Chickpea Tahini Salad Sandwich appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Sesame Noodles with Lemongrass Tempeh Crumbles

August 23 2019 Vegan Richa 

Sesame Noodles with Lemongrass Tempeh CrumblesSesame Noodles with Lemongrass Tempeh Crumbles. Tempeh is marinated then roasted to make a delicious savory crumble which is served over quick noodles dressed in sesame oil and soy sauce. Vegan Gluten-free Nut-free Recipe. Jump to Recipe I had some noodles and tempeh to use up and that’s how this quick stir fry came about. Tempeh is marinated in ginger, garlic, soy sauce, lemon grass and sesame oil. Then cooked until it is golden. The noodles are tossed with sesame oil, rice vinegar, soy sauce and some garlic and sriracha and warmed, then served with the delicious tempeh crumbles. Add some blanched broccoli, or roasted veggies to the stir fry. Add in some peanut or almond butter to the noodles for creamy noodles. Use tofu or chickpeas! Loads of options. See soy-free option in notes. Lets make this!Continue reading: Sesame Noodles with Lemongrass Tempeh CrumblesThe post Sesame Noodles with Lemongrass Tempeh Crumbles appeared first on Vegan Richa.


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