cherry - vegetarian recipes

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cherry vegetarian recipes

Cherry Chocolate Banana Shake

October 23 2017 Meatless Monday 

Chocolate and cherries are a classic combination, but when better to execute it than on Meatless Monday morning? This ice cool breakfast shake is a surefire way to wake up feeling refreshed. This recipe comes to us from Lisa of Barefoot in Her Kitchen. Serves 3 -  1/­­2 cup ice - 1 banana, peeled - 10 cherries, pitted - 1 heaping tablespoon unsweetened cocoa powder - 1 teaspoon agave nectar* -  1/­­2 cup rice or soy milk - or -  1/­­2 cup nonfat milk - 1 1/­­2 cup ice cold water - 1 teaspoon chocolate flavored whey protein** * Agave (ah-Gah-vay) nectar is similar in taste & texture to honey but has a lower impact on blood sugar when compared other sweeteners. Agave can be found in the health food or specialty food aisle of most grocery stores. **optional. Found in health food stores. If you are not using the chocolate whey protein, double the cocoa powder and agave nectar in the smoothies.   Place the ice in a tall blender or pitcher if youre using a hand mixer. Add the banana, cherries, cocoa, agave nectar, milk, water and whey protein if using. If you are not using the whey protein, double the amount of cocoa and agave. If youre using a blender, pulse briefly until the mixture is somewhat crushed, but not pureed. If youre using a hand mixer, pulse the mixer in an up and down motion until the ice is smashed and the fruit begins to soften and blend, but the mixture is not liquefied. After mixture is blended, cover the cup or pitcher and shake distribute the ice and fruit evenly. Serves immediately and enjoy. The post Cherry Chocolate Banana Shake appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Blistered Sweet Pepper and Marinated Feta Salad with Arugula and Quinoa

October 16 2017 Meatless Monday 

Quinoa is a superstar. With no gluten yet high in protein, its a perfect grain. Its also sneaky, making sure it touches just about every ingredient in the salad so that with every forkful you get a sprinkling or more of quinoa. Hey! it says, You cant ignore me! And who would want to? Here it blends perfectly with honey, dill, fruity olive oil, briny olives, sweet cherry tomatoes, earthy roasted peppers, and creamy, crumbly feta cheese. This recipes comes to us courtesy of Fabio Viviani and is featured in his book, Fabios 30-Minute Italian.  Makes 4 servings - 1 cup red quinoa - 1 pound red bell peppers, sliced thin - 1 pound yellow bell peppers, sliced thin - 1/­­4 cup honey - 1/­­3 cup olive oil - 1 pint cherry tomatoes, halved - 4 ounces crumbled feta cheese - 3 tablespoons chopped dill - 1/­­4 cup chopped Italian parsley - 1/­­4 cup chopped Kalamata olives - 1/­­2 cup arugula - Salt and pepper - Olive oil Bring a large pot of water, 2 to 3 quarts, to a boil and add a touch of salt. Pour in quinoa and boil for 6 to 8 minutes. Turn off the heat and let sit for 3 minutes, then drain. While quinoa is cooking, heat a sauté pan on high heat. Add peppers to the pan and cook for 1 minutes. Toss and cook for another minute. Turn off the heat and add a touch of olive oil. Season with salt and pepper and toss for 30 seconds. Let sit in the pan for 2 minutes, and then transfer to a plate to cool. Mix the honey and olive oil in a large bowl. Add the tomatoes, feta, dill, parsley, and olives. Toss to combine. Once peppers have cooled to close to room temperature, add to the large bowl along with the arugula and quinoa. Season with salt and pepper and an additional drizzle of olive oil to bring everything together. From Fabios 30-Minute Italian by Fabio Viviani; published by St. Martins Press. Copyright (C)2017 by Fabio Viviani. All Rights Reserved. Used with Permission. Page 32-33. Photo by Matt Armendariz. The post Blistered Sweet Pepper and Marinated Feta Salad with Arugula and Quinoa appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Meatless Monday Pittsburgh Hosts Vegan Night with the Pittsburgh Pirates

October 2 2017 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Pittsburgh Hosts Vegan Night with the Pittsburgh PiratesLast Monday, September 26th, Meatless Monday Pittsburgh hosted the first ever Vegan Night with the Pittsburgh Pirates! The event was a great success with over 300 tickets sold. Each ticket included a corner box seat for the Pirates vs. Orioles game, as well as access to the exclusive vegan menu. Guests dined on delicious meatless fare including: - Pretzels, chips and dips (house chips with French onion dip, corn chips with smashed avocado salsa, pretzel sticks with local PA maple mustard) - Power chop salad (kale, cabbage, grilled vegetables, garbanzo beans, sunflower seeds, pepitas, citrus-dijon dressing) - Ultimate vegan burger (beefless beef patty, lettuce, tomato, dill pickles, vegan house sauce, sesame seed bun) - Buffalo cauliflower with vegan ranch dipping sauce - Sweet potato tacos (black beans, cilantro, salsa verde, tortilla threads, nondairy sour cream, flour tortilla) - Watermelon and berries for dessert     The delicious meat-free menu was enjoyed by vegetarians, vegans, and flexitarians alike. Everyone left the ballpark full and the Pirates bringing home a win was the cherry on top! The post Meatless Monday Pittsburgh Hosts Vegan Night with the Pittsburgh Pirates appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Veggie Tray Extra Everything

October 1 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Veggie Tray Extra Everything We’ve got a small, square shaped wooden table with three chairs + a highchair in our kitchen. I bought the table when I moved to my first 1-bedroom apartment and it was perfect for that tiny space. Back then I only had two chairs and the table mostly carried pasta dishes and red wine glasses. Eighteen years, four apartments and three children later, we still eat most our meals on it. It is honestly not very pretty and its wine stains are now mixed with blueberries, turmeric, coconut and all the stains, smudges and scratches that come from years of feeding babies. Because it is square shaped and we are five in the family, Luise or I end up either eating our meals standing up or snugged on an extra chair on a corner. Its a small but pretty striking symbol that: A) I am too sentimental about my furniture. B) We werent entirely prepared for how life with three children would be. I wrote a little text on Instagram about this. That behind glossy photos of food, travels and a kitchen that on good days looks picture perfect, we are still trying to figure out life. And find somewhere to sit. The plan is to get a round table that hopefully both will fit into the kitchen and have seats for the entire family. But until then, I’ll keep eating standing up. I first shared this recipe/­­method about a week ago on Instagram stories (hence the poor image quality above) and judging from the number of direct messages in my inbox, I thought I’d post an more outlined version here as well. We cannot get enough of tray bake dinners in our family. They are simply one of the easiest and most delicious weekday solutions we know and this recipe represents much of what we love about food. Easy to make, easy to like, easy to adapt. It combines warm and cold and sweet and savory. It is vegetable centered, comforting and leaves a minimum of dishes. And the kids like it too. Our twist is that we add lots of fresh ingredients to the tray once it’s ready in the oven; yogurt, pesto, lettuce, spinach, black beans and pomegranate seeds. They add texture and make it feel more like a proper meal. Some days we act like adults and put plates on the table. Other days we just stick the kids a fork each and we all eat from the same tray (sorry mum!). Weve shared the recipe exactly as we made it last week but weve also included a list of variations below the recipe. So don’t get hung up on any specific ingredients, simply use this more as a starting point. The important thing in this recipe is the combination of roasted ingredients + fresh veggies + fruit + something creamy. I hope you give it a try. All-in-One Veggie Tray We wrote a similar recipe for the September issue of Jamie Magazine. We added raw spiralized vegetables (makes it even prettier!) and halloumi instead of yogurt. We add kale and Brussels sprouts midway through roasting since they need less time. The goal is that they will be perfectly crunchy at the same time as the other vegetables are ready. It can be a little tricky to time it right on your first try but second time around you usually get the hang of it. Warm ingredients 1 kg /­­ 2 lbs potatoes 3-4 carrots, peeled 1 broccoli  250 g /­­ 1/­­2 lb Brussels sprouts 3-4 large kale leaves olive oil Cold ingredients 2 handfuls baby spinach 1 avocado 1 cup cooked black beans yogurt pesto (you can thin it out with a little olive oil) lemon Cut potato, carrots and broccoli into bite-sized pieces. Add to a large tray and drizzle with oil and salt. Bake at 200°C /­­ 400°F for approx. 15-20 minutes. Cut the Brussels sprouts in halves. Trim off the thick stalks from the kale and tear the leaves into smaller pieces. Drizzle with oil and salt, add to the tray and bake for 10-15 minutes more or so. The vegetables are ready when they are golden and tender and the kale chips are crunchy. Scatter baby spinach, sliced (or mashed) avocado, black beans, dollops of yogurt and pesto evenly over the vegetables. Squeeze over a little lemon and drizzle with oil. Dig in! Variations Roasted ingredients: Carrots /­­ Broccoli /­­ Cauliflower /­­ Cabbage /­­ Sweet potato /­­ Bell pepper /­­ Brussels Sprouts /­­ Kale /­­ Potatoes /­­ Parsnip /­­ Beetroot Fresh ingredients: Lettuce /­­ Aragula /­­ Spinach /­­ Avocado /­­ Cucumber /­­ Cherry Tomatoes /­­ Spiralized Carrots, Beetroot or Zucchini Fruit: Apple /­­ Orange /­­ Pear /­­ Pomegranate Seeds /­­ Grapes Sauce: Yogurt /­­ Tahini /­­ Pesto /­­ Romesco /­­ Hummus /­­ Dijon Vinaigrette /­­ Coleslaw Extra: Nuts /­­ Seeds /­­ Beans /­­ Boiled eggs /­­ Halloumi cheese /­­ Feta Cheese /­­ Goat’s Cheese

Kale Quiche with Cherry Tomatoes, Corn & Sharp Cheddar

September 10 2017 Oh My Veggies 

This veggie-packed kale quiche makes a delicious vegetarian lunch, dinner, or savory breakfast.

Stuffed Bell Peppers (Stuffed Capsicum)

August 29 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Stuffed Bell Peppers For these mouthwatering Stuffed bell peppers, I decided to make them into rings, which makes it easier and quicker to make. Bell peppers provide a very nice vibrant color to any dish. Stuffed bell peppers are delicious and can be served as appetizers or as a side dish. I hope you enjoy this recipe as much as I enjoy! - 2 bell peppers (capsicum, pahadi mirch) - 2 1/­­2 potatoes (boiled, peeled and roughly mashed) - 1 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 3 tsp coriander powder (dhania) - 1/­­2 tsp red chili powder - 1/­­2 tsp mango powder (amchoor) - 1/­­2 tsp garam masala - 1 Tbsp green chili (finely chopped) - 1 Tbsp oil (canola or vegetable) - Add all the spices to mash potatoes to make filling, salt, cumin seeds, coriander powder, red chili powder, mango powder, garam masala, and green chilies. - Cut tops and bottoms of bell peppers; discard seeds and membranes. - Stuffed the bell peppers and slice them in half inch thick, use sharp knife. Depends the size of bell peppers how many slices you will make. - Press them gently to make sure potatoes stays inside the bell pepper rings. - Heat the heavy flat bottom sauce pan on medium heat and generously grease the pan. - Spread the bell pepper rings into skillet, do not overlap. Cover the pan and let it cook for about 1-2 minutes. - Remove the cover and turn the rings gently and press them lightly to ensure potatoes stays into the bell pepper rings. I cover the pan to make sure bell peppers are cooked, make sure they are not mushy. Cook the bell peppers from each side till they are golden brown. Stuffed bell peppers ready to serve. - Stuffed bell peppers are ready, this is a very enjoyable dish, serve them as an appetizers or side dish. I like to serve them with stir-fry cherry tomatoes. Stuffed bell peppers are ready, this is a very enjoyable dish, serve them as an appetizers or side dish. I like to serve them with stir-fry cherry tomatoes. You can also use stuffed bell peppers to make sandwich, I like to use kaiser rolls with lettuce leaves, cheese, and slices of tomatoes. The post Stuffed Bell Peppers (Stuffed Capsicum) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Chocolate Brownie and Cherry Ice Cream Sandwiches

August 23 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Chocolate Brownie and Cherry Ice Cream Sandwiches We’re trying to get all of this summer’s most successful ice cream recipes out while it’s still prime time for frozen treats :) This one is our absolute dream-come-true ice cream sandwich with a no-bake chocolate brownie crust and a vanilla and cherry ice cream interior. Give us cherries and chocolate any time, and we’re in heaven. The chocolate brownie crust is no joke here – it’s rich, soft and so fudgy, very much like the real deal. All of that is achieved with a magical combination of coconut flour, tahini and cacao, sweetened with dates and banana. It’s a totally oven-free affair, too, which is always a bonus. The interior of the sandwich is store-bought, dairy-free vanilla ice cream (this one is my favorite), studded with fresh cherries. There’s a bit of waiting around for the layers to freeze, but otherwise, this sandwich is surprisingly easy and really fun to put together. The recipe makes sixteen sandwiches, and of course they keep well in the freezer. Make these, and you’ll have the tastiest, homemade dessert around your kitchen for a few weeks, possibly. Hope you’ll give this one a try! I will be making my third batch this coming weekend :) Chocolate Brownie and Cherry Ice Cream Sandwiches   Print Serves: 16 sandwiches Ingredients for the brownie 1½ cups tahini or any other nut/­­seed butter, or even a blend of two butters 6 large, soft Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in hot water for 10 minutes 2 ripe but firm bananas - try to choose ones that are not too ripe or overly sweet ½ cup raw cacao powder pinch of sea salt splash of vanilla extract (optional) ¼ cup coconut flour for the ice cream 2 pints dairy-free vanilla ice cream 1½ cups frozen or fresh, pitted cherries (we used frozen ones from Trader Joes, which are really sweet and juicy) Instructions to make the brownie Spoon the tahini into a food processor. Drain the dates, reserving the soaking liquid and add them to the food processor, followed by the bananas. Process until smooth. Add the rest of the brownie ingredients to the food processor and process until well combined. Add 1-2 tablespoons of the date soaking liquid if your processor needs help to get going. Transfer the mixture into a mixing bowl and finish mixing with a spoon, if needed. You should have about 3 cups of the brownie mix total. Cover a 9 x 9, rimmed baking dish with parchment paper, extending the edges of the paper up the sides. Spread half of the brownie mixture over the bottom of the pan in an even layer with wet hands. Carefully lift out this first brownie layer from the pan by the extended edges of the parchment paper and place it onto a cutting board. Transfer the board into the freezer. Re-line the same dish with parchment paper, extending the edges of the paper up the sides. Make the second brownie layer with the remaining mixture. Leave it in the dish and place in the freezer. Let the brownie layers freeze while you are mixing the ice cream. to prepare the ice cream Remove the ice cream from the freezer and let it soften at room temperature, until its just spreadable. Take care not to over-thaw. Scoop the ice cream into a mixing bowl and stir it until evenly smooth and creamy. Fold in the cherries. to assemble the sandwich Check your brownie layers and make sure that they have solidified in the freezer, so that you can spread the ice cream layer over them, without smudging the brownie. Remove the dish with the brownie layer from the freezer and spread the ice cream over the brownie in an even layer. Remove the cutting board with the other brownie layer from the freezer and quickly invert the brownie over the ice cream to make the top layer. Peel off the parchment paper. Lightly press on the brownie to adhere all the layers together. Place the dish back in the freezer until completely frozen, preferably overnight or at least 4 hours. When your sandwich is ready to be cut, take the pan out of the freezer and lift out the sandwich onto a cutting board, using the extended edges of the parchment paper. Run your knife under hot water. Optionally, trim off the uneven edges for a cleaner appearance. Slice the sandwich in half lengthwise and crosswise,into 4 large squares. Proceed to slice each square diagonally into triangles, then slice each triangle in half one more time to end up with 16 triangular sandwiches. Enjoy right away or keep frozen. Remove from the freezer 5-10 minutes prior to eating. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Strawberry Coconut Cream Pie Wild Blueberry Daisy Cake and a Cookbook Giveaway Roasted Parsnip and Apple Soup with Radish Greens Raw Apricot Lavender Tart and a Giveaway .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Chocolate Brownie and Cherry Ice Cream Sandwiches appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Watermelon & Halloumi Salad with Magic Sauce

August 9 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Watermelon & Halloumi Salad with Magic Sauce Hello! This is David & Luise. Remember us? During our almost eight years of blogging we have never left it silent for two months before. We’re going to do what we always do in these situations and blame the kids. Wether we miss a dentist appointment, forget to answer a text message, get a parking ticket or are two months late with a blog post, it’s always our kid’s fault. In this case however it’s actually somewhat true. We simply underestimated how much time and attention three kids on summer holiday takes. They have sooo much energy. I (David) have been thinking of ways to connect them (and with them I mean Isac) to the power grid so that they (he) could replace a nuclear power plant or two. And I could perhaps cash in a Nobel price for saving the world. Anyway, after a couple of weeks of feeling bad about not having a single second over to blog new recipes, we instead decided to give ourselves a summer break from it all. So we have been trying to keep up with our children’s pace (obviously impossible) and play on their rules (also impossible because they ignore rules) this summer. It’s been fun and much needed. But we are here now with plenty of new recipe ideas and projects. Lots of other things have happened during the summer. We almost bought ourselves a tiny smoothie bar in a park, we burnt pancakes from Green Kitchen at Home inside a jam-packed little book store in Bath and we have planned the release of the European languages next month, but we’ll find time to talk more about all that. For now, let’s just talk food. Before the summer and watermelon season is all over. This recipe has been going on repeat all summer. It’s actually a combination of two recipes which we recently realized work brilliantly together. A simple watermelon and halloumi salad and our Magic Green Sauce. We first got the idea to combine watermelon with halloumi from a recipe photo in a supermarket pamflett and from that combo, we’ve added some chickpeas, cherry toms and pumpkin seeds to make it less of a side and more of a meal. It’s a really nice combination. Rich and chewy halloumi, sweet and fresh watermelon, crunchy pumpkin seeds and a tangy, flavorful and slightly spicy sauce. If I wasn’t such a humble guy, I would say that it’s probably one of the best watermelon salads you’ll try this summer. Luckily, I’m super humble and will just say that it’s pretty good. A simple vegan option would be to replace the halloumi with marinated tofu. Just make sure to squeeze out the liquid before marinating it, so it soaks up all the flavor. Quinoa, black lentils or rice could also be a great addition if you want to make this salad more substantial. Here is a little salad assembling action by Luise. Technically, the Magic Green Sauce is just our take on Chimichuri with a more hippie name. We use lime juice instead of vinegar and have added a little avocado to give it the right balance between creamy and chunky and also a few drips maple syrup to round off the sharpness from the other flavors. The magic lies in its ability to transfer any simple dish into something flavorful. Apart from this salad, we also use it on scrambled eggs, as a dip for raw crudités, inside rye sandwiches and on top of shakshuka. We have made it with a number of different herb combinations and found that anything goes (but parsley, cilantro/­­coriander and mint is still a fav). Watermelon & Halloumi Salad with Magic Green Sauce Serves 4 Watermelon & Halloumi Salad 1 kg /­­ 2 lb watermelon 200 g /­­ 7 oz halloumi 150 g /­­ 1 cup good quality cherry tomatoes  1 can /­­ 200 g /­­ 1 cup cooked chickpeas  60 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup pumpkin seeds /­­ pepitas 2 large handfuls Mâche lettuce (or any tender lettuce) 2 tbsp olive oil 1 lime Salt Magic Green Sauce 1 large handful (30 g /­­ 1 tightly packed cup) mixed fresh herbs (we used parsley, cilantro and mint) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 120 ml olive oil Juice from 1 lime 1 tbsp capers 1 tsp maple syrup 1 clove garlic 1 small chili 1/­­2 avocado 1/­­2 tsp sea salt flakes Start by preparing the sauce. Add all sauce ingredients to a food processor and pulse a few times until coarsely mixed, check the flavor and consistency and add more salt, herbs or oil if needed. If you don’t have a food processor, finely chops herbs, capers, garlic and chili, mash the avocado and mix everything in a bowl together with olive oil, lime juice and maple syrup. Add salt to taste. Then set aside. Dice the watermelon and halloumi, quarter the tomatoes and rinse the chickpeas. Toast the pumpkin seeds on medium heat in a dry pan with a little salt until they begin to pop, then transfer them to a chopping board and chop coarsely. Add a little oil to the pan and fry the halloumi for a couple of minutes until golden on all sides. Arrange the lettuce in a bowl or on a serving platter. Add chickpeas, tomatoes, watermelon and halloumi. Squeeze over a little lime juice and drizzle with oil and toss until mixed. Top with pumpkin seeds and Magic Green Sauce, with extra in the side. Enjoy! ***************** PS! We are off to Rome now to celebrate that it was 10 years ago that my drunk feet tried to seduce dance Luise on a club by the Tiber while simultaneously using ALL my Italian pick up lines on her (took me approx 1 hour before I realized that she was Danish and not Italian!). We’re bringing all the kids this time and we’d really appreciate a comment if you know any good places to eat, fun playgrounds, outdoor pools or your favorite gelato bars. Grazie!

Meatless Monday on the Foodservice Conference Trail at NACUFS 2017

August 7 2017 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday on the Foodservice Conference Trail at NACUFS 2017Nashville, Tennessee recently hosted the annual conference of the National Association of College & University Foodservice. The three-day event convened over 1,000 college and university campus dining professionals and industry partners for inspirational learning, idea and product sharing, collaboration, and peer-to-peer networking. Many of the 334 exhibitors promoted their plant-forward services and products. Cherry Dumaual, PR & partnerships director for The Monday Campaigns, attended the conference and networked on behalf of Meatless Monday. She had the opportunity to visit booths, attend interest sessions and talk with foodservice dining directors, chefs, and product representatives about trends in meat reduction and plant-based menus. Food Management magazine held a roundtable session attended by foodservice dining directors including Bernie Chung-Templeton of Bryn Mawr College. A liberal arts college with about 1,300 undergraduate students, Bryn Mawr ranked number 10 on Princeton Review’s 2017 list of Best Colleges for Food. Chung-Templeton said that Bryn Mawr implemented Meatless Monday around seven years ago: There has always been a demand for meatless entrees that are delicious and nutritious. We created a Mostly Meatless station, which we modeled after looking at Meatless Monday materials. We don’t take meat away but introduce additional meatless options both at this station and on the standard menu to provide more meatless opportunities and to showcase how meatless can be tasty and good for you. Chung-Templeton said that this fall will see the launch of an evolution of Meatless Monday, a plant-based, totally meatless, local, organic, sustainable, ethical, health-forward concept. She shared examples of their vegan dishes. Meatless Monday dishes at Bryn Mawr Cherrys first stop in the exhibit hall was the Humane Society of the United States Meatless Monday booth. Ken Botts, food and nutrition director for HSUS, shared his insights and observations on the direction of campus dining: The conversation of how to create delicious plant-based menus is top of mind for the college and university foodservice operators. This demand is being driven by their students for a variety of reasons; health, spirituality, sustainability and animal welfare. The plant-based conversation was once a trend but in 2010 it started becoming the norm, and now it is here to stay. The folks who attended NACUFS were looking for resources to develop plant-based menus and NACUFS delivered! Cherry and Ken Botts at the HSUS Meatless Monday booth Other stops focused on tasting samples of new, delicious, nutritious plant-based food products. Erik Henry, foodservice director at Bushs Beans, drew in attendees samplings of their new hummus, which the brand will launch on campuses in August. Asked about Meatless Monday, Henry said, If people would take one day a week to simply eat plants, theyll realize it makes them feel good. Erik Henry promoting the new Bush’s Beans hummus Danny OMalley, sales manager for Beyond Meat, offered his take on Meatless Monday which he believes is a great transitional day to motivate omnivores and carnivores to try plant-based foods like Beyond Meats products. Danny O’Malley offers Beyond Meat samples Cherrys final stop was the Pinnacle Foodbooth where Suzanne Tenuto tempted attendees with flavorful Gardein meatless meatballs, describing them as meatless, well done. She added: Adding Gardein meatless meatballs to a Meatless Monday menu makes for a quick and easy spaghetti and meatball dish or sub sandwich. Meat lovers wont know the difference. Suzanne Tenuto with Gardein’s meatless meatballs Nashville was truly the perfect backdrop for NACUFS, where plant-based initiatives and campaigns were part of the biggest growing food trends on campus. The post Meatless Monday on the Foodservice Conference Trail at NACUFS 2017 appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Cedar Plank Grilled Tofu with Cherry Salsa

July 26 2017 Oh My Veggies 

These marinated tofu slabs are grilled to smoky perfection on cedar planks and served with fresh salsa made from juicy summer cherries.

6 Unique Kitchen Gadgets for Easy Summer Produce Prep

July 18 2017 VegKitchen 

6 Unique Kitchen Gadgets for Easy Summer Produce Prep Summer is the time to enjoy lots of fresh produce and herbs straight from the garden or farm market. Here are a few unique kitchen gadgets -- tools that are inexpensive, compact, and will help ensure that you use up and enjoy your market finds to the fullest! 6 Cool Kitchen Gadgets Cherry Pitter Midsummer […] The post 6 Unique Kitchen Gadgets for Easy Summer Produce Prep appeared first on VegKitchen.

Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight

July 12 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight This post was created in partnership with Whole Earth Sweetener Co. Turkish delight is one of those old-school sweets that was always around during my childhood in the Soviet Union, which is surprising because treats were scarce and mainly homemade. There was a tiny store a short walk away from our home, where they carried neat, white paper boxes, lined with tissue and filled with delicate pink, sugar-dusted Turkish Delight squares. We called the treat rahat lokum (just another commonly used name for Turkish Delight). I spent my childhood convinced that it was fairy food, and cherished every pleasantly jelly-like, aromatic bite from the magical paper box. I’ve since completely forgotten about rahat lokum, dismissing it as an outdated sweet of my semi-hungry childhood, until I was in Moscow a few months ago. There is a high-vibe sweets brand sold in some grocery stores in Russia, which makes chocolate, wafers and such, with surprisingly wholesome ingredients, cool herbal add-ins, and a pleasantly low amount of non-refined sugar. I always make a point of hunting down some of their stuff to bring back home. This time around, I discovered a new product of theirs, which was a healthier, green tea-flavored Turkish Delight. It was delicious and disappeared in no time once my family got a taste of it back in Florida. I quickly got the urge to figure out my own recipe, as I often do with these types of obsessions. Thankfully, I’m no stranger to the thickening and gelatinizing properties of arrowroot (starch from a tropical tuber) and agar-agar (sea vegetable). Both make for the perfect, allergy-friendly and healthful alternative to cornstarch, which is traditional to Turkish Delight recipes. After some consideration, I decided to color my delight with hibiscus tea, as a tribute to the pink treats of my childhood, and because I’m generally obsessed with hibiscus and its million health benefits. For an extra aromatic finish, I added some orange blossom water instead of the more commonly used rose water, which truly takes this treat to the next level. When coated in arrowroot powder, this Turkish Delight looks surprisingly professional, as though it was store-bought. The cool thing is that in reality it’s pretty easy to make at home, just take a look at the video above to see the whole process. For sweetener in this recipe, I used an organic blend of stevia and honey from Whole Earth. I’ve had a pretty turbulent relationship with stevia over the years. I’ve always wanted to get into it as a sugar substitute, knowing that it’s totally natural, free of calories, and a zero on the glycemic index, but I just cannot get used to its potent, powerful flavor (when extracted it’s something like 200 times sweeter than sugar!). Any time I add pure stevia extract to anything, it’s all I can taste, and that flavor lingers in my mouth for hours in an unpleasant way. Thankfully, Whole Earth Sweetener Co. figured out that when mixed with other, more traditional sweeteners, stevia is barely distinguishable, and they offer a few carefully considered stevia blends. The neat thing is that because of stevia’s potency, you only need half of the amount of their sweetener in any given recipe. In other words, this Turkish Delight recipe only calls for 1/­­4 cup of the honey and stevia blend, while you would need twice the amount (1/­­2 cup) of pure honey or maple syrup to achieve the same sweetness without the stevia. After trying the Whole Earth stevia-honey blend, as well as their stevia-raw sugar blend, I’m totally on board. I love being able to use less sugar in my sweet recipes, and I’m hoping that these products can help me ease into a love affair with pure stevia, some day :) I’m curious to hear about your guys’ experience with stevia. Do you use it? Did it take you some time to get used to it? Any tips and stories are much appreciated! Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight   Print Serves: about 48 pieces Ingredients 3½ cups purified water 2 tablespoons dried hibiscus flowers ⅔ cup plus ¼ cup arrowroot powder, divided ¼ cup stevia-honey blend or ⅓ - ½ cup pure honey or maple syrup 4½ tablespoons agar agar powder (not flakes) 1¼ teaspoon orange blossom water or rose water Instructions Combine the water with the hibiscus in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil. Remove from heat, cover and let the tea steep for 30 minutes. Prepare an 8 x 8-inch square, rimmed dish by lining it up with parchment paper. Set aside. Strain the hibiscus tea. Mix ½ cup of the tea with ⅔ cup of the arrowroot powder in a medium bowl. The mixture will be quite thick and difficult to mix at first. Set aside. Pour the rest of the hibiscus tea into the same saucepan used for brewing the tea. Add the sweetener and the agar agar powder, whisk to combine and bring to a boil over medium high heat. Lower the heat to a simmer and simmer for 5 minutes, whisking periodically. At the end of the 5 minutes, give the prepared arrowroot mixture a good stir and slowly pour it into the saucepan with the agar mixture, stirring vigorously. The mixture will be very thick and stretchy. Remove from heat and add in the orange blossom water, whisking to combine. Immediately spoon the mixture into the prepared dish, evening it out as much as you can. Place the dish into the refrigerator for 1-2 hours, until the mixture is completely set. Once set, lift the delight square out of the dish onto a cutting board, using the extending ends of the parchment paper. Slice into around 48 cubes and roll them in the remaining ¼ cup arrowroot powder to coat. Store refrigerated in an airtight container. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... Cosmic Sweet Potato Chocolate Truffles Almost Savory Raw Chocolate Raw Honey Maca Pancakes, a Weekend Breakfast Honey-Roasted Pears with Vanilla Cashew Cream .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Cherry Tomato Cobbler

July 10 2017 Meatless Monday 

This easy-going cobbler puts little tomatoes front and center on the dance floor with a tangle of sweet fresh onions. This recipe comes to us from Kim O’Donnel‘s new book PNW Veg. KITCHEN NOTES: Like any fruit cobbler (after all, the tomato is botanically a fruit), there will be some residual juice at the bottom of the dish. You could spoon this juice over the biscuits or coat the tomatoes in a tablespoon of flour before adding to the pie plate to slow the juicy flow. No buttermilk? Substitute 3/­­4 cup milk and 2 teaspoons lemon juice or white vinegar, stirred together. (c) 2017 by Kim ODonnel. All rights reserved. Excerpted from PNW Veg by permission of Sasquatch Books. Serves 6 - 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, well chilled - 2 cups thinly sliced Walla Walla or yellow onion (from about ?1 large onion) - 1 teaspoon fine sea salt -  1/­­2 teaspoon ground black pepper - 2 pounds cherry tomatoes (about 2 pints), stemmed - 1 cup all-purpose or white wheat flour - 2 teaspoons baking powder - 1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves, finely chopped (or 1/­­2 teaspoon dried) - 1 cup grated sharp cheddar cheese - 3/­­4 cup buttermilk - A few dashes of Tabasco or favorite mild hot sauce Measure out 2 tablespoons of the butter, then return the rest to the refrigerator until ready to make the topping. Place the butter in a 9-or10-inch skillet and melt over medium heat, tilting the pan to coat. Add the onion and turn with a wooden spoon or pair of tongs until well coated. Cook until very soft, about 20 minutes, adjusting the heat as needed to avoid burning. Season with 1/­­4 teaspoon of the salt and 1/­­4 teaspoon of the pepper. Transfer the onions and any residual butter to a 9-or 9 1/­­2 -inch pie plate and spread around until the bottom of the pan is covered. Slice the tomatoes as needed (larger cherry tomatoes will cook more evenly if cut in half). Layer the tomatoes on top of the onions. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Meanwhile, make the biscuit topping. In a large bowl, stir together the flour, baking powder, thyme, and the remaining 3/­­4 teaspoon salt and 1/­­4 teaspoon pepper. Cut the remaining 4 tablespoons cold butter into small dice. With your hands, cut in the butter with the tips of your fingers until the mixture looks like fluffy sand. You should not be able to see clumps of butter. (You can also use a food processor, pulsing briefly to incorporate.) Stir in the cheese. Make a well in the center of the flour, then add the buttermilk and hot sauce. With a wooden spoon or rubber spatula, gently stir the batter until it just comes together; it will be wet and sticky. With a tablespoon, drop the batter all over the tomatoes, gently spreading until the fruit is thoroughly covered. (Dont worry if you miss a spot; the batter spreads during baking.) Place the pie plate on a sheet pan and bake for 50 to 55 minutes. The topping should be golden brown and firm to the touch, and the filling should be actively bubbling. Let cool for about 15 minutes before serving warm or at room temperature. Store in the refrigerator for up to 2 days (if it lasts that long!). Reheats well. The post Cherry Tomato Cobbler appeared first on Meatless Monday.

4 Ways to Use Cherry Tomatoes (that aren’t in a salad!)

July 1 2017 Oh My Veggies 

Cherry tomatoes are more than just a salad topper. Here are 4 of our favorite ways to use cherry tomatoes!

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King

September 17 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Today’s self-care dialogue is with LA artist and meditation teacher, Lauren Spencer King. We first learned about Lauren a few years ago, when we came across her bimonthly moon writings that ring incredibly true and clear up a lot of things for us every month. Since then, we’ve fallen in love with Lauren’s art and meditation work, which is centered around breath work and her extensive knowledge about the healing powers of minerals. Lauren was kind enough to open up a space for us in her 4 day online meditation workshop for stress and anxiety, and we had the most lovely and calming time following her techniques and suggestions, which we often use to this day. Lauren’s self-care routine is as inspiring as it is down to earth, with a focus on finding the wisdom in the inner self. In this interview, Lauren tells us about the Ayurvedic cleanse she’s on, what minerals she keeps next to her bed, her ideas about exercise and beauty, why she sees the concept of a work-life balance as a myth, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I think in my everyday things do feel open and free, its part of the benefit of being an artist and working for yourself. But, I do find routine within that freedom. Days are also made up of habits (good and bad), and trying to prioritize things that are important and meaningful. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I like to have a few hours to wake up and start my day. I like the quiet of the mornings, the possibility of a new day. Sometimes if I happen to wake up really early for some reason, like 5:00am, I like to read in bed for a bit, or watch a scary movie early in the morning. Its weird... I know. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? On good nights I am in bed early and read before I go to sleep. I love reading in bed, there is something about it that feels so intimate. On a not so good night I will work too late, and fall asleep to a movie. I do like to sleep with a few minerals next to my bed, some make their way under my pillow at certain times: purple fluorite to relax my mind, danburite for sweet dreams, aquamarine for calming, a piece of dream quartz, and a piece of shungite that is next to my phone (on airplane mode). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: I am on an Ayurvedic cleanse right now. I have been working with this great Ayurvedic practitioner, her name is Meredith Carter. Years ago I did panchakarma (here), and if I could afford it I would do it annually. Its incredible. What I am doing now is like panchakarma lite! Breakfast – In the morning I make homemade almond milk. I will warm the almond milk and mix in my herbs and adaptogens, sometimes I will add fresh turmeric. I have been obsessed with making sweet potato toasts. I will top them with tahini and a cooked fruit compote (been loving cherry, wild blueberry, or pear ginger), with some pistachio nuts or pumpkin seeds. If I need some protein then I will eat two eggs toped with basil, and a tangerine. Lunch – I make fresh dahl with special non-heating spices and ghee, all of which I get from Surya Spa, they have the best mung beans and spices. Dahl is very healing. I will have a bowl full with some steamed chard or beet greens, black lava sea salt, toasted pumpkin seeds and lots of parsley or coriander on top. Snack – right now cherries are in season and they are making me so happy, I will have a bowl full of them with a handful of pistachios (lets be honest, like 1/­­2 a bag, I love pistachios). And some fresh ginger tea. Or I will make some beet hummus and have that with my favorite almond crackers. Dinner – I have been getting really into making soups! My two favorite are a green soup made with celery /­­ chard /­­ beet greens /­­ asparagus /­­ Japanese sweet potato. And a kabocha /­­ carrot /­­ginger soup. Or I will cook a big artichoke and dip the leaves into a melted ghee, lemon dip. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? None, I have never even had a cup of coffee. I usually have a huge jar of warm water with lemon or fresh ginger in the morning. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to when I was younger, until I developed all sorts of health problems because of it, some that I still deal with even over a decade later. I was living in Paris and eating nothing but delicious breads and sweets! It really took a toll on my body and since then I have cut both out. But, I still dream of flaky French almond croissants. Maybe in another life I will get to enjoy them again. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I love eating a spoonful of Chyawanprash in the morning. My good friend who runs Rebbl and develops all of their delicious drinks sent me a wellness mixture, it has very high grade reshi, ashwaganda and maca in it. I have that every morning. I love QuintEssentials 3.3 minerals. I also swear by Alexis Smarts flower remedies, she is amazing! I also almost always tend to all ailments physical and emotional with a homeopathic remedy from her. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I have an aversion to most forms of exercise, especially any kind of class where an instructor is wearing a headset and yells things at you like, Its almost swimsuit season, ladies. But sometimes I get into a routine where I go to yoga. I like to take hikes and go on walks, and I love to dance. But, my favorite is swimming. Recently I was swimming laps, and was having one of those days where I was feeling very unkind and judgmental of my body, and there was this older man in the lane next to me, he was a very serious swimmer, he might have even been a swim coach at some point, you could just tell. And I stopped to catch my breathe and he asked me how I had such a strong breaststroke. I told him it was because I was on swim team for years as a kid and maybe because I was tall. We talked for a bit about it and then I got back to my laps. And I started to think that in day to day life what I criticize most about my body in other contexts I use to my advantage. In this case, that my un-slender legs and bigger hips and butt actually made me a stronger swimmer and made my stroke more powerful. It really changed the way I thought about my body. I try to remember this. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I really love natural beauty, which to me means being whole and owning all of who you are. You know, there are times when I see someone crying, and they dont maybe look their best, but they are so beautiful to me, because they are so present and authentic. Bodies arent meant to be perfect, thats not why we have them. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I love oils and go through different phases of them on my face and body. Right now at night I use a hazelnut or arnica oil from a Paris apothecary for my face. I am also completely obsessed with Sans Ceuticalss Activator 7 Oil. I use it everywhere – body, face and hair! I dont really wear make up but when I do it is from RMS. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I either dry brush or do abhyanga massage with basil oil every day, its more for the internal lymphatic system, but it makes my skin really nice. Eating well and drinking enough water are also key. And a little sun is always nice. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. I love using my jade face roller to refine the tone of my skin as well as relieve some tension I carry in my jaw. I also am into my second year of no bra, for the most part. For a few reasons, one of them being that they actually arent good for your body. No products with chemicals. My mum was a natural beauty, she really taught me what that was, she had a style that was all her own. She was radiant from the inside out. I sometimes think this is something you are born with. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Stress is often what I teach most about in class, because it has been the biggest teacher to me. I feel I am always at a growing edge with it. I try not to over schedule myself. Rest is a big part of being healthy for me. I have gone through some very difficult periods in my life of having sever adrenal fatigue, which comes from stress of all kinds. So, I have to listen really carefully not to push myself too hard, despite at times wanting to ignore my limitations. Recently I have been working with someone to understand the deeper level of stress that I unconsciously take on from people around me and from living in a city. It has been fascinating. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Yes, sometimes stress can not be avoided, like when I have a show, or need to be on the computer all day, or travel. Those are the big ones for me. I have to really work hard to stay grounded. Its really all sorts of little things, that when I do them really add up. And I just do the best I can, its not about perfection. Even stopping to dance the stress out of my body for five minuets really helps. Stress is more physical than we think. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Stop everything. Get into bed in something comfy with socks. Sleeping as much as I can. Raw garlic. Olive Leaf supplements. Colloidal silver. Apple Cider Vinegar if I have a sore throat. Hot shower (or bath) with eucalyptus oil. Thieves oil on my chest and throat. Lots of water. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? I honestly think this idea of work /­­ life balance is a myth. At least it is for me. Sometimes its only about working on Fields of Study, sometimes I am all about being in the studio, sometimes its more relaxing and I can see friends and go on a trip or a weekend getaway. There is balance within the year if I am lucky. I recently just let this idea go, I was making myself feel so bad trying to make that ideal happen on a daily or even weekly timeline. I am also a bit of a workaholic, never feeling like I am doing enough. Thats something I am trying to work on. But, this pressure for balance seems like a modern day version of the women can have it all mantra. There are always compromises and I think its more empowering if we own that and voice it and have conversations about it. Instead of silently thinking that there is something wrong with us. Motivation -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Its not one single thing, but if it was it would be learning to listen to my body. My health and understanding of health has come from a bumpy road of making lots little shifts. I dont believe in a one size fits all mentality for health. I think we are all different and in every moment we need different things. I am wary of the companies and self proclaimed health gurus out there right now that give sometimes ill informed blanket recommendations. I think it is up to us to empower ourselves and take the time to learn about our bodies and ourselves. Its important to have support and create a team of people that can help you. I have an amazing doctor, a homeopathist, an Ayurvedic practitioner, a woman who I do energy work with, and a therapist that have all at different times saved my life in various ways. It can take time, but finding the people that resonate with your understanding of health is key. I have learned so much about my body and what health and healing is from working with all of them. And remembering that deep and true healing takes time. Its always a process. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. What came to mind was this movie Agnes Martin made called Gabriel. Its terribly long and boring. It is about the boy on a walk in nature, and it is very stripped down and minimal, no dialog and most of the movie is silent, it has one tiny part with music. But, I think it relates to the way I think about self-care in a way because it is about listening to the subtleties, and how all of that gets lost when there is a lot going on. Once I really started refining my diet, routine, relationship to my energy, my intuition, etc... I started to really be able to notice those subtle changes and messages my body was sending me, and as time goes on I keep going deeper and deeper. Its like in Martins paintings, when color is introduced, it feels monumental. Like for me, bananas are just too sweet now. Knowledge -- You are well-versed in so many amazing practices! Could you tell us a little bit about each of them: – Your art (would love to know more about your process on the mineral paintings) After graduate school I started making my own watercolors out of historical pigments, mostly from minerals and some earth pigments. I taught myself how to make paints the way they were made for centuries before there were synthetic colors. The mineral monochromes are just one aspect of the work I make, and they are about many things. But, the main ones are a redirection of how we think about representation. I think of them as representational paintings, as they are made of the very thing they are depicting: malachite, azurite, agate, epidote... They are also about an interest in the healing powers of art. They are made with the intention that the viewer and the space receive the same healing properties of the minerals and the earth from which they are sourced. I usually pair them with a highly rendered graphite drawings or watercolors. –  Fields of Study and mineral meditations Some years back after teaching meditation for a bit I was longing for an alternative to what I was seeing in the ways of spiritual teachings and mediation work, both in approach and aesthetic. I wanted to support people and teach them tools they could use in their every day life, while also creating a container for all the things I was interested in and all the things that I brought into my own spiritual practice, which I feel I am always shaping and discovering. Something that would allow for a deep conversation that also had breadth, and was based in every day life and could be accessible. Something that could be malleable and evolve as I did. And Fields of Study was born. I originally wanted to open up a non-profit space that would be like a modern day community center with classes and workshops for the community, as well as have a little shop and a residency space. And someday this might happen. But for now its just me – working to change the world, one person at a time. I say this with some humor, but its also a very real desire to be in service and help instigate change. The same goes for how I teach about minerals, I want to present an alternative, something that resonates with me and represents how I grew up with minerals in my home because of my mother, who was a silversmith. The goal of all those workshops is really to show people that they know more than they think they do, about most things, minerals included. And its not really about helping people feel like they know everything, but showing them that when they ask and they trust themselves they can source the answers. The participants really end up teaching the workshop, which I think is pretty amazing. – Your Moon writings I have been writing about the moon twice a month for about six years now. It really came out of a desire to understand its energy on a deeper level, and also to check in with myself about what I was feeling on a bimonthly basis. Its hard to take credit for the writing as I feel I have gotten to a place with it where I just sit down to write and something comes through me. As out there as that sounds, thats really what happens. I just listen as best as I can, I have gotten pretty good at listening. Writing in this way has really strengthened my intuition, its really incredible. Its also nice to get conformations from people when they write to tell me how right on it was for them. It reminds me that we are all connected. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Swimming in the ocean. The hot springs in Ojai or a trip to Joshua Tree. A bad movie. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Golden Bough and She by Robert A Johnson Song/­­Album – Gamelan Orchestra music, JD Emmanuel, and Neil Youngs album Harvest Moon, particularly Natural Beauty. Its my favorite song. Movie – The Color of Pomegranates Piece of Art – Fragonard, Brancusi, and John McCracken. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? Funny enough I just re-read this essay from The White Album where she talks about her packing list related to her being a journalist. At the very end she mentions that the one thing she never had was a watch, which she supposes is some reflection of the climate of the late 60s. But, a watch is the thing I always have, perhaps that says something about me and the times we are living in now. When I travel I also always wear this gold Victorian compass. You never know when you will have to find your way home. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? My Ayurvedic practitioner – Meredith Carter, my Homeopath – Alexis Smart, or anyone of the ladies on the @onigiriemoji Instagram feed I am a part of. Its a feed where a group of friends post what they are cooking and eating. Also, I wish you could have interviewed my mum, she was the best cook, I wish I learned more about cooking from her. Photos by Lauren Spencer King, Claire Cottrell and from Lauren’s shop. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Creamy Vegan Pesto Pasta & Cauliflower

September 5 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Creamy Vegan Pesto Pasta & Cauliflower Now that we are back doing more frequent recipe posts again, we also wanted to throw some super simple, everyday type dinners into the mix. Family style! The hands-down easiest dish that I (David) know (and make when I’m alone with the kids and have max 10 minutes to prepare dinner) is to cook a package of fresh gnocchi, mix a store-bought pesto with mashed avocado, add a little extra lemon and olive oil and just stir everything together with some canned chickpeas and cherry tomatoes on top. Its a lazy dinner but the kids devour it, its super easy and most importantly QUICK. Today’s recipe is a riff on that. We are fully aware that you hardly need yet another recipe for spaghetti al pesto. But we have got a few twists that turn this simple Italian classic into a rather nutrition packed meal. And a really tasty one as well. Although our version is so far from the original that we probably never will be allowed back into our beloved Italy again ... - Try chickpea (or lentil) pasta. These new-style pastas made on chickpea or lentil flour taste good, have surprisingly pleasant texture and are more protein packed than regular pasta. If you want to use ordinary pasta, we’d recommend adding some cooked chickpeas to the dish as well. They taste great tossed with pesto. - Add avocado to your pesto. It will be much creamier, fluffier, richer and rounder. It will also be more fat, but it’s the gooood fat. If you want to make it lighter, replace half of the oil in the pesto with water. Also, use half basil and half baby spinach for a more affordable and nutrient packed pesto. - Make it vegan by adding nutritional yeast to your pesto and make a quick nut dust instead of parmesan. - Add roasted vegetables. Pesto pasta is good, but adding roasted vegetables is simply better. You get more flavors and something to actually chew on (because we all slurp spaghetti, right!?). It takes like 5 minutes to prepare one tray of roasted vegetables (oven time obviously not included), so if you have 5 minutes to spare, do it. Also, if you are smart, you’ll roast a second tray of vegetables simultaneously and you are halfway through dinner prep for tomorrow. We went with roasted cauliflower and zucchini coins this time because it was what we had at home and we know that the kids love ’em. Broccoli or parsnip or carrots would of course be just as good. - If you are not vegan and want to make a luxury version of this, try serving it with some torn burrata cheese on top. Vegan Pesto Pasta with Roasted Cauliflower & Cheesy Nut Dust Serves 4 We’ve kept this dish vegan but if you are not vegan you probably don’t have nutritional yeast at home and in that case you can just grate vegetarian parmesan or pecorino instead. The obvious shortcut here is to buy a pesto, mix it with avocado and follow the rest of the recipe. Roasted veggies 1 cauliflower 1 zucchini 2 tbsp olive oil sea salt Cheesy Nut Dust and Vegan Pesto 1/­­2 cup /­­ 70 g almonds 1 tbsp nutritional yeast 1 large handful basil 1 large handful spinach 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80 ml olive oil 2 tbsp lemon juice a few pinches salt 1 small avocado (use half if you have a large and serve the rest on the side) chickpea pasta or pasta of choice, for 4 persons To serve  Lettuce or baby spinach cherry tomatoes, quartered Set the oven at 200°C /­­ 400°F. Break the cauliflower into small florets and chop the stem inte bite-size pieces. Slice the zucchini. Toss cauliflower and zucchini with a little oil and salt and spread out on a baking sheet. Roast for 25-30 minutes or until soft and golden. Meanwhile, cook the pasta according to instructions on the package (reserve a little bit of pasta water when draining) and start making cheesy nut dust and pesto. Add almonds, 2 teaspoons nutritional yeast and a large pinch sea salt to a food processor. Pulse on high speed until all nuts are mixed/­­pulverized into coarse sand/­­dust. Place half of the cheesy nut dust in a small bowl and leave the rest in the food processor for the pesto. Add 1 more teaspoon nutritional yeast, basil, spinach, olive oil, lemon juice and a little more salt. Mix until smooth, taste and adjust. This is your basic vegan pesto. Now add avocado and pulse for an even creamier pesto, you might want to add a little more lemon and olive oil at this point. Toss half of the pesto with the cooked pasta and a little bit of pasta water (add chickpeas, if using regular pasta). Arrange the pasta on four plates, add roasted cauliflower, zucchini slices, lettuce, tomatoes and a few dollops pesto on top. Sprinkle with cheesy nut dust and a little olive oil. Enjoy! ************ PS - Here are a few other things that we have been up to recently! Some of you might remember my trip to Turkey, meeting displaced Syrian families last year? Echo and UN’s World Food Programme have made this little video from my trip and from our home here in Stockholm. I talk a bit about how similar our priorities are even though our situations are vastly different. And the importance of the support these families get from WFP to gain a sense of normality again. I don’t like hearing my own voice and I had an eye infection when we filmed this but there are lots of cute kids in the footage and the topic is very close to my heart. You can watch it here. We have also shared a week’s worth of family friendly recipes in the latest issue of Jamie Magazine which is out now (in the UK). The feature is photographed by Simon Bajada.  And we recently shot a Fridge Raider feature talking about a few of our favorite ingredients in the latest issue of Olive Magazine. Also out now (in the UK). Aaaand, we have also worked on a campaign for Swedish organic brand Kung Markatta with recipes, tips and videos focused on reducing food waste at home (only in Swedish though).  Phew, looking at it like this, I now realize why this summer felt so intense ;)

Vegan Fettuccine Alfredo with Mushrooms. Nut-free

August 27 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Fettuccine Alfredo with Mushrooms. Nut-freeThe Best Vegan Mushroom Garlic Alfredo with no nuts. Garlicky, Creamy, Amazing Vegan Fettuccine Alfredo. Nut-free, Easily Gluten-free, soy-free. 21 gm of protein per serving! This Fettuccine Alfredo packs a flavor punch with the browned mushrooms, wine, herbs, and creamyness from cauliflower, potato and hemp seeds.  I have several nut-free alfredo options on the blog and this is an addition to the list. You can use Cauliflower Alfredo  Lasagna, Pumpkin seed Alfredo or my garlic sauce with the mushroom mixture too.  Mushrooms add an amazing flavor. They are cooked to caramelize with onions then simmered with wine and vegan worcestershire sauce. The alfredo is blended up and added to simmer with the browning mushrooms, so the sauce picks up that caramelized flavor. Delicious, Smooth and amazing. Garnish with fresh basil and pepper flakes and serve. Continue reading: Vegan Fettuccine Alfredo with Mushrooms. Nut-freeThe post Vegan Fettuccine Alfredo with Mushrooms. Nut-free appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegan Black Forest Shake

August 13 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Black Forest ShakeBlack Forest Shake. Summer Ice cream Blizzard with layers of Vanilla and Chocolate shake with cherry compote. Vegan Gluten-free Recipe. Can be nut-free. Add protein powder to make into black forest smoothie.    The heat has been creating all kinds of problems in the PNW, mainly trapping the smoke from the wildfires up north, which adds to the breathing issues. I think the oven has stayed off for about 4 weeks now which is a record.  No cookies or cakes means they get needed in alternate forms. Cookie Dough Blizzards or this Black Forest Shake.  Chocolate ice cream, frozen non dairy milk and some cherries blended in to make the chocolate cherry layer. Vanilla ice cream blended in for the creamy vanilla layer. Add some cherry compote between the 2 and boom! The shake can be easily made into smoothie or protein shake for breakfast with frozen banana instead of ice cream, some protein powder and seasonal fruits frozen. Easy and Amazing! Whats your favorite Summer Dessert?Continue reading: Vegan Black Forest ShakeThe post Vegan Black Forest Shake appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegan Cherry Blueberry Crisp – No Bake

August 7 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Cherry Blueberry Crisp – No BakeEasy 1 Pot No Bake Cherry Blueberry Crisp. Seasonal Berries cooked to a compote and topped with Toasted Crisp Oat crumble. Serve with favorite ice cream. Vegan Berry Crisp Recipe. Can be gluten-free, nut-free. It has been hitting 90s this past week in the PNW. Who wants to bake in this heat! I made these stove top No Bake crisps the other day and they worked out amazingly. I generally use whichever berries I have on hand. For this post I used cherries and Wild blueberries.  The blueberries add an amazing color and flavor with the tangy cherries. Use any seasonal berries of choice. The crisp is Easily made gluten-free with oat flour or other gluten-free flour. You can also bake the mix for 30 to 40 minutes. Easy, Gorgeous and perfect to use up all the fruit. 1 Skillet and 30 Minutes to Berry Bliss. Continue reading: Vegan Cherry Blueberry Crisp – No BakeThe post Vegan Cherry Blueberry Crisp – No Bake appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Summer Veggie Tartines

August 6 2017 Oh My Veggies 

These summery tartines are made with crusty slices of toast topped with a creamy chickpea spread, juicy roasted cherry tomatoes and eggplant.

Cherry Tomato Gazpacho with Mint Pesto Croutons

July 24 2017 Oh My Veggies 

This refreshing cherry tomato gazpacho is served with crispy homemade mint pesto croutons and is perfect for serving on hot summer days.

Cherry Tomato and Peach Salsa

July 13 2017 VegKitchen 

Cherry Tomato and Peach Salsa I love salsa of all kinds, and there are quite a lot of good ones on the market. But when midsummer rolls around, theres nothing like a fresh homemade salsa using summer tomatoes. Homemade salsa tends to get watery from the tomatoes juices, but I discovered that using cherry (or grape) tomatoes helps mitigate that. […] The post Cherry Tomato and Peach Salsa appeared first on VegKitchen.

Author Kim O’Donnel Brings the Pacific Northwest to Your Table

July 10 2017 Meatless Monday 

Author Kim O’Donnel Brings the Pacific Northwest to Your TableKim ODonnel, the very first Meatless Monday blogger, discovered the wealth of vegetables and other produce in the Pacific Northwest region and compiled a new cookbook chock full of vegetarian recipes. As the author of two previously published vegetarian cookbooks, Kim ODonnel became curious about the bounty in her own backyard, the Pacific Northwest. After some digging and searching, ODonnel found more vegetables available than she had bargained for and knew she had to take advantage of her local harvest for her new book. While not a strict vegetarian herself, she was excited to find that it wasnt just easy to eat vegetarian in the land of the geoduck and the Dungeness crab, it was extraordinary. In PNW Veg: 100 Vegetable Recipes Inspired by the Local Bounty of the Pacific Northwest, ODonnel offers up small plates, entrees, and desserts with produce from the Pacific Northwest in starring roles. Photo by Charity Burggraaf ODonnel, a longtime supporter of Meatless Monday, knew that the PNW was mostly well-known for its wild seafood offerings. But when she moved to Seattle and started visiting the local farmers markets, a cornucopia awaited her - several varieties of legumes, fiddlehead ferns, and rhubarb, plus classic late-summer and fall produce that would last through November. Fortunately for the rest of the country, many of these vegetables are available in other regions, so PNW Veg doesnt have to be PNW-exclusive. In a recent interview with The Washington Post, ODonnel says: I learned that what I think is the most esoteric or hard-to-get ingredient in the book actually does appear in other parts of the country. Is everybody going to be able to get their hands on nettles or fiddlehead ferns? No, Im aware of that. But eggplant, peppers, tomatoes, radishes -- sure. I feel like the large majority of the recipes are going to appeal to folks in different parts of the country. Using a few kitchen pantry staples and herbs, the flavor of the Pacific Northwest can easily make its way into your Meatless Monday menu! With over 100 recipes to choose from, your only challenge is settling on one! Start with ODonnels Cherry Tomato Cobbler. The post Author Kim O’Donnel Brings the Pacific Northwest to Your Table appeared first on Meatless Monday.

INDIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

July 7 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

INDIA vegan cookbook on KickstarterMy newest cookbook, The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA just launched on Kickstarter! watch the video: PRE-ORDER the the INDIA cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2uGbsog My new INDIA cookbook has been years in the making - with recipes, stories, artwork & photographs inspired by 8 trips to my most favourite country. It’s a culinary love story of my favorite cuisine - based on a total of nearly two years in India and 25 years of devotion to Indian cooking. My first trip to India was in 2001: mostly North India and Nepal. I spent 4 months on that journey, then another 6 weeks in South India in 2006. I visited twice more, in 2009 & 2010, followed by living and working for a year (as an art teacher) in Central India, returning to Berlin in 2011. In Autumn 2016 & Spring 2017, I went back to India to taste and explore the last regions (and cuisines) of India still waiting for me. I traveled across Kashmir & Ladakh, trekking through mountain villages and exploring towns and cities, staying mostly with families and cooking together in their kitchens. Then I went deep into the Northeast: West Bengal, Assam, Sikkim, and Nagaland. I even met with world famous chefs at their restaurants - and homes - for incredible eats and great times in the kitchen. Now I’m back in Berlin, recreating the culinary wonders of the Indian subcontinent in my own kitchen. As with my previous 4 cookbooks, I have written, illustrated, cooked, photographed, and designed this book myself. It’s a labor of love and the ultimate combination of my passions: art, travel, vegan cooking, and photography. I’m back on Kickstarter for my 5th international cookbook project. You can join the crowdfunding which makes everything possible. It’s an adventure in itself, complete with backer-only updates, behind the scenes sneak peaks, exclusive travel videos & stories, recipe testing groups, and more. Pre-order a signed copy of The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA (including worldwide shipping, stickers & e-book for EUR25!) My INDIA Cookbook at a glance: - My 5th cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide - 192 pages with 90+ recipes and over 70 full-page color photos - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by 8 trips /­­ 21+ months of travel around India and over 25 years vegan cooking experience - Total variety of regional cuisines: Rajasthani, Gujarati, Punjabi, Kashmiri, Sindhi, Maharashtrian, Tamil, Kerelan, Karnatakan, Goan, Hyderbadi, Bengali, Assamese, Sikkimese, Ladakhi, Tibetan, Nepali - Indian classics & family favorites, timeless treats, new culinary wonders, mind-blowing mega-metropolitan snacks, fabulous village feasts, scrumptious street food, and insanely delicious desserts - Discover new flavors, tasty spices, and awesome cooking skills - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients (Cook everything, anywhere!) - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Shahi Bengan – Roasted Stuffed Eggplant Gobi Pakoras – Batter-fried Cauliflower Saag Paneer – Spinach & Fried Tofu Cubes Pani Puri – Street Food Favorite Aloo Paratha – Grilled Potato-Stuffed Flatbreads Shahi Paneer – fried tofu cubes in creamy tomato sauce Seitan Vindaloo – Goan Tangy Curry Samosas! Fried Potato-Stuffed Pastries Gajur Halava – Bengali Carrot Pudding Gulab Jamuns – Doughballs in Rose Syrup Berry Halava – Fruity Semolina Dessert Recipes in The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA: - Garam Masala, Sambar Masala, Chaat Masala & Panch Puran - Tamarind Ginger, Pineapple, Tomato, Coconut, Chili & Bhang Chutneys - Aam Achar – Mango Pickle - Amitar Khar – Assamese papaya starter - Handvo – Gujurati zucchini cake - Uttapam – South Indian rice & lentil pancakes with tomatoes - Idly Paper Dosa – Karnatakan crispy rice & lentil crepes - Rava Dosa – Tamil semolina crepes - Dahi Vada Chaat – lentil cakes with yogurt & chutney - Hariali Paneer Tikka – Punjabi tofu skewers with spices & herbs - Gobi Pakora – batter-fried cauliflower - Mirchi Vada – Rajasthani batter-fried chillies - Aloo Tikka – spicy, fried potato cakes - Samosa – vegetable-stuffed fried pastry - Pani Puri – potato-stuffed fried pastry with tamarind spice water - Pav Bhaji - spicy vegetable mash with fresh baked buns - Momos – Tibetan vegetable dumplings - Shapaley – Tibetan vegetable pies - Kolkota Kathi Roll – spicy soymeat & shredded cabbage wrap - Sambar Bandhgobi Rolls – stuffed cabbage leaves - Aloo Dum – Kashmiri tomato potato curry - Shahi Tamatar – roasted stuffed tomatoes - Shahi Bengan – roasted stuffed eggplant - Shahi Mirch – roasted stuffed peppers - Shahi Paneer – tofu cubes in creamy, tomato curry - Paneer Jalfrezi – spicy tofu cubes - Saag Paneer – spinach & tofu cubes - Mutter Paneer - peas & tofu cubes - Xaak – Assamese greens, potatoes & cherry tomatoes - Bengan Bhartha – Kashmiri roasted aubergine - Malai Kofta – potato dumplings in creamy tomato curry - Bindi Aloo Tawa Masala – spicy stir-fried okra & potatoes - Khumb Kaju Makhani – Rajasthani cashew mushroom curry - Shukto – Bengali eggplant, potato & plantains - Pumpkin Posto – Bengali squash in creamy poppy seed curry - Seitan Vindaloo – Goan tangy curry - Black Sesame Seitan – Assamese spicy curry - Tamatar Pitika – Assamese tomatoes with herbs & spices - Aloo Pitika – Assamese potatoes with herbs & spices - Bol Tenga – Assames lentil dumplings in tangy curry - Mas Tenga – Assamese tangy jackfruit curry - Chupke – Tibetan dumpling soup - Tarka Dal – Punjabi lentil curry - Chana Masala – spicy chickpeas - Rajma - Kashmiri red kidney bean curry - Lobia Palak – black-eyed peas with lemon & spinach - Golden Rice - with turmeric & spices - Chana Pulao – rice with chickpeas - Pulihora – Tamil tamarind rice with peanuts & spices - Classic Biryani – Kashmiri rice dish with vegetables, nuts & spices - Jackfruit Biryani – Tamil coconut rice dish with spicy jackfruit - Tupula Bhaat – Assamese sticky rice steamed in banana leaves - Aloo Paratha – grilled flatbread stuffed with potatoes - Tibetan Bread – fried breakfast snack - Makki Roti – grilled cornbread - Roti – wholewheat grilled flatbread - Garlic Naan – traditional baked flatbread - Poori – deep-fried flatbreads - Date Ladoo – date & nut sweets - Besan Ladoo – chickpea sweet - Gajur Halava – spiced carrot pudding - Berry Halava – strawberry & blueberry semolina sweet - Mysore Pak – traditional sweet squares - Gulab Jamun – deep-fried dough balls in rose syrup - Rasmalai – cheese balls in saffron mango milk - Jalebi – fried, syrupy sweet - Peda – lemon cashew creamy sweet - Kheer – Kashmiri rice pudding with cardamom, nuts & raisins - Mishti Doi - Bengali sweet curd - Shrikand - Maharashtran yogurt dessert - Pista Kulfi – pistachio ice cream - Pitha – Bengali sesame & date pastry - Narikol Ladoo – Assamese shredded coconut balls - Kadala Parippu – Keralan sweet chana dal dessert - Ginger Chai – spiced black tea - Kahwa – Kashmiri green tea with almond & saffron - Badam Dudh – almond milk with cardamom & cinnamon - Anjoor Kaju Dudh – cashew shake with fig & date - Strawberry Mint Lassi – yogurt smoothie The post INDIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango + Giveaway

June 28 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango + Giveaway This post was created in partnership with Raw Rutes. We’ve got a zinger of a hot weather dish for you today. Have you ever tried cucumber noodles in favor of the more common spiralized zucchini? I’m obsessed. They are the perfect, cooling and hydrating food, especially when dressed with plenty of lime juice, herbs and a kiss of spice. They’re great with tropical fruit, creamy avocado, and a sprinkling of toasted seeds, as well as tofu for more substance and a savory element. The glazed tofu recipe I give here is an absolute favorite of mine and generally very special, easy, and able to transform any tofu hater into a true believer. It’s garlicky and spicy, and with a touch of sweetness. You can see the video of the whole process above. I love cooking with tofu because it’s a flavor sponge and therefore extremely versatile. One of the most important steps in achieving outstanding tofu involves draining it of the liquid that it comes in. Generally, the less liquid tofu holds, the better it is at absorbing all the surrounding flavors. That’s where the beautiful, stainless steel Tofu Press from Raw Rutes comes in. Raw Rutes is a charming, online shop full of back-to-basics kitchen tools, from dreamy fermenting crocks to home brewing supplies, dehydrators and even freeze dryers (!). They sent me their Ninja Tofu Press to try out, and though I’m often skeptical of single-purpose kitchen tools, this one stole my heart. Previously, I would make a contraption of two plates, kitchen towels and a large jar of water for draining tofu, and I’m pretty relieved that I no longer have to make that much mess for such a simple step. This tofu press looks great and comes with a 4.5 lb weight, which gets all the liquid out of the tofu quickly and efficiently, with no required effort on your part. It can also be used for making your own homemade tofu (still on my list of things to try), as well as getting moisture out of pretty much any foods that fit. I’ll definitely be using it for my homemade nut cheeses. Some other items on my Raw Rutes wish list include this terra-cotta sprouter, this fermenting crock, and this crazy cherry pitter (why not?). Discount Code and Giveaway! For 11% off any items on Raw Rutes, enter code GOLUBKA at checkout through July 31st, 2017. To enter to win one Ninja Tofu Press, leave a comment here with your favorite item from the Raw Rutes offering or favorite way to prepare tofu until July 5th, 2017 (USA only). Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the glazed tofu 1 14 oz (398 g) package firm tofu (I used sprouted tofu) 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice - divided ½ tablespoon tamari 1 teaspoon sriracha 1 tablespoon miso paste ½ tablespoon honey or maple syrup 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil 4 garlic cloves - minced for the bok choy (optional) 1-2 baby bok choy - sliced into wedges splash of tamari juice of half a lime for the cucumber noodles 2 English cucumbers - spiralized or julienned ½ -1 lime sea salt pinch of red pepper flakes 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil large handful each basil and cilantro leaves for serving 1 ripe, firm avocado - thinly sliced 1-2 small ripe, sweet mangoes - thinly sliced toasted sesame seeds basil/­­cilantro/­­mint leaves - for garnish Instructions to prepare the glazed tofu Press the tofu for 15-30 minutes to drain it of as much liquid as possible. Slice it into cubes. Combine 1½ tablespoons lime juice together with the tamari and sriracha in a small bowl. Set aside. In another small bowl, combine the miso paste, honey/­­maple syrup and the remaining ½ tablespoon lime juice, and set aside as well. Warm the coconut oil in a medium sauté pan over medium heat. Add the tofu and sauté, flipping periodically until golden on all/­­most sides. Add more oil if needed throughout the process. Drizzle 1 teaspoon of the sesame oil over the tofu and add the minced garlic, sauté for 30 seconds until fragrant. Add the tamari mixture, bring it to a boil and cook until reduced and syrupy, for 1-2 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the miso mixture into the pan and toss until well-combined. Remove the tofu from the pan and set it aside. to cook the bok choy Return the pan to the heat and add the bok choy. Cook for about 2 minutes on each side, or until the white parts are lightly golden. Add a splash of tamari and a squeeze of lime juice, and stir until most of the liquid is evaporated. Remove from heat. to prepare the cucumber noodles Place the spiralized cucumber into a medium/­­large serving bowl. Squeeze the lime juice over the noodles, sprinkle with salt and red pepper flakes, and drizzle with sesame oil. Add the herbs and toss gently to coat. to serve Distribute the noodles between serving bowls. Arrange the avocado slices on top of the noodles, followed by the mango, bok choy and spicy tofu, toasted sesame seeds and herbs. Enjoy right away. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Kaffir Lime Mango Ice-Cream Turnip Blueberry Muffins Roasted Yellow Plum and Rosemary Popsicles Grapefruit Smoothie .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango + Giveaway appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.


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