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Madras Curry Tofu Casserole

July 14 2021 Vegan Richa 

Madras Curry Tofu CasseroleDinner just got easier with this Madras Curry Tofu Casserole! A simple one-pot meal with baked tofu in a flavorful Indian gravy! Serve with rice and store leftovers for meal prep!  Madras Curry Tofu Casserole – a celebration of two of my favorite things, Tofu and Madras curry, combined into a warming, comforting one-pot dinner that basically cooks itself! Easy prep work and next to no dishes to clean. What’s not to love? Homemade madras curry powder and a simple madras sauce that you can use with tofu, veggies or chickpeas/­­beans! What is Madras Curry Powder? You might already know that there is no such thing as “curry powder” in Indian cuisine as each curry dish has its own combination of spices that makes it unique. There’s more – every family also has their own recipes for spice mixes, so even classic Indian curries can taste vastly different from household to household. Curry powder is a western blend which came about to approximate a general North Indianish curry. Madras curry powder came about to approximate the spicier southern Indian cuisines (chettinad, Andhra etc ). For spicier curries, Madras curry powder is a great place to start your Indian cooking journey! You can control the heat, it is earthy, and oh so fragrant. I love making my own spice mixes, and I recommend you give my Madras Curry mix a try! There is nothing like the smell of freshly ground cumin, coriander, and cardamom wafting through your kitchen. And I guarantee it will take this Tofu Casserole to a whole new level. MORE DELICIOUS TOFU RECIPES FROM THE BLOG: - Crispy Breaded Tofu - Chili Garlic Baked tofu - Spiced Baked tofu for Butter Tofu - Orange Tofu - Cajun Tofu - Peanut Butter Tofu More Indian DISHES TO TRY - Balti Vegetables  - Butter Tofu GF - IP Tikka Masala Simmer Sauce , with Cauliflower. GF - Mushroom Matar Masala GF - Bombay Potato and Peas GF - Veggie Curry Casseole GF Continue reading: Madras Curry Tofu CasseroleThe post Madras Curry Tofu Casserole appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Spicy Sweet Potato Chickpea Salad Bowl with Tahini Dressing

June 6 2021 Vegan Richa 

Spicy Sweet Potato Chickpea Salad Bowl with Tahini DressingIf you need a healthy salad bowl recipe that feels like comfort food, make this spicy sweet potato chickpea salad bowl with creamy tahini dressing! Great as a lunch salad or for meal prep. Smoky bbq spiced baked veggies, leafy greens, nuts, seeds and a creamy vegan dressing! Coming at you with a ridiculously delicious salad bowl recipe loaded with three kinds of bbq spiced roasted vegetables and a creamy tahini dressing you will want to put on everything! Sweet Potato Chickpea Salad Bowls are here to make your lunches exciting again! Savory and sweet, subtly spiced, warming, comforting, wonderfully satisfying, and seriously flavorful while being super healthy!  What’s not to love? The spice mix for the roasted chickpeas and sweet potatoes is a fragrant blend of garlic powder, onion powder,  coriander, paprika, cumin, black pepper, cardamom, cayenne (optional) and ground mustard! I love this blend so much as it is the perfect mix of warming, smokey, spicy, and cozy! The chickpeas bake into crispy perfection and the sweet potatoes are crisp on the outside and pillowy on the inside. Bell peppers baked until soft and almost caramelized deliver the perfect sweetness! We add them to the chickpeas and potatoes later as they need less cooking time. While the veggies bake away, we whisk together a creamy dreamy tahini dressing! It’s so good that I recommend you make a double batch! MORE VEGAN BOWL RECIPES FROM THE BLOG: - Chili garlic Tofu Bowl with noodles and chard - Peanut Butter Roasted Cauliflower Bowl. GF - Quinoa Cauliflower Bowl with almond Sriracha sauce GF - Sprouted Lentil Bowl with Cajun Spied Sweet Potatoes GF - Turmeric Cauliflower Rice Bowl with Moroccan spice chickpeas.  GF Continue reading: Spicy Sweet Potato Chickpea Salad Bowl with Tahini DressingThe post Spicy Sweet Potato Chickpea Salad Bowl with Tahini Dressing appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Sheet Pan Cheeseburger Veggie Dinner with Garlic Mayo Dressing

May 8 2021 Vegan Richa 

Sheet Pan Cheeseburger Veggie Dinner with Garlic Mayo DressingThis Sheet Pan Cheeseburger Veggie Dinner served with creamy homemade garlic mayo dressing will turn into a family favorite in no time! Great for meal prep – Make lots and save some for lunch the next day! All the flavors of a cheeseburger incorporated into one big, filling veggie sheet pan dinner -meet my Sheet Pan Cheeseburger  Vegetable Bake. We have healthy veggies, we have plant-based protein thanks to tofu and chickpeas, we have all those burger flavors like ketchup, bbq sauce, and burger spices. AND,  we have a creamy dreamy vegan garlic mayo that we drizzle on top to take this sheet pan cheeseburger from good to OMG delicious! Make lots have have leftover for lunch the next day! This bowl is Glutenfree. Use Nutfree cream or vegan Mayo tk make it Nutfree! MORE VEGGIE GOODNESS FROM THE BLOG, - Peanut Butter Roasted Cauliflower Bowl. GF - Spanish Rice, Taco Spice Roasted Cauliflower Bowl. GF - Shawarma Chickpeas, Sweet Potato Buddha Bowl  GF - Quinoa Cauliflower Bowl with almond Sriracha sauce GF - Chili Garlic Tofu Bowl with Vermicelli. GF Continue reading: Sheet Pan Cheeseburger Veggie Dinner with Garlic Mayo DressingThe post Sheet Pan Cheeseburger Veggie Dinner with Garlic Mayo Dressing appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Sweet Sour Tofu Veggie Stir Fry

April 26 2021 Vegan Richa 

Sweet Sour Tofu Veggie Stir FrySweet and Sour Tofu Veggie Stir Fry is as simple and easy as it gets! The tofu is baked to crisp perfection with a perfect meaty texture and the sweet and sour Asian stir-fry sauce is so delicious! A quick vegan dinner that comes together in a cinch whenever that craving for takeout hits.  Be prepared to convert tofu haters into lovers with this sweet and sour tofu stir fry! Crispy tofu coated in a sweet and sticky sauce along with crisp colorful veggies! Oh yes, I love me a good tofu dish! Have you tried my Tofu Katsu Curry? A reader favorite! Tofu can be so delicious when prepared right. And in this quick sweet and sour stir-fry we really give it the treatment it deserves! As with many tofu recipes, the trick for this dish is to rid the tofu of excess moisture. Because no one likes soggy tofu! Then we fry it up real nice or bake it in the oven. Once fried or baked crispy,  we toss the tofu cubes in a super irresistible sweet and sour sauce and some sauteed veggies. DONE! Serve it up on a fresh bed of rice like I did, on quinoa or mashed potatoes, or on top of some cooked veggies or cauliflower rice! MORE DELICIOUS TOFU RECIPES FROM THE BLOG: MORE BAKED TOFU - Crispy Breaded Tofu - Chili Garlic Baked tofu - Spiced Baked tofu for Butter Tofu - Orange Tofu - Cajun Tofu - Peanut Butter Tofu  PAN FRIED TOFU - Curried Tofu for Banh Mi - Sticky Sesame tofu - Palak Tofu Paneer - Tofu Lalabdar - Tofu with Creamy Tomato ginger sauce Continue reading: Sweet Sour Tofu Veggie Stir FryThe post Sweet Sour Tofu Veggie Stir Fry appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Roasted Cauliflower Pasta with Raisins, Capers, and Chard

February 3 2021 Golubka Kitchen 

Roasted Cauliflower Pasta with Raisins, Capers, and Chard Chard is one of our favorite greens. It’s stunningly beautiful and abundant at our farmers market even in the winter. It’s also delicious and edible in its entirety, both stems and greens, which is always a treat. We have simple, garlic sautéed chard as a side dish pretty often, and lately we’ve been adding raisins and capers to it, for bigger flavor. One night recently, without a real plan in mind, I roasted a head of cauliflower and added it to pasta, along with the raisin and caper chard. We loved the interaction of the caramelized cauliflower with the sweetness of the raisins and saltiness of the capers, as well as the slightly bitter, garlicky chard. My favorite dishes often come out of off the cuff cooking like that, this pasta being no exception. Hope you’ll give it a go! Roasted Cauliflower Pasta with Raisins, Capers, and Chard   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients 1 large head cauliflower, cut into bite-sized florets olive oil sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1 large bunch chard, stemmed, stems thinly sliced, leaves torn 4 garlic cloves, sliced ⅓ cup raisins (golden or regular) 2 tablespoons capers, roughly chopped 10-12 oz pasta of choice Instructions Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a large, parchment-lined baking sheet. Put the cauliflower on the baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste, and stir to coat. Roast the cauliflower for 40 minutes, stirring halfway, until very soft and caramelized in parts. Heat a large skillet over medium heat and add enough olive oil to generously coat the bottom. Add the chard stems to the skillet, along with a pinch of salt, saute for 5 minutes, until the stems are just beginning to soften. Add the garlic, raisins, and capers, saute for another 5 minutes, or until the chard stems and garlic are soft and the raisins are plump. Add the chard leaves to the pan, along with another pinch of salt, and cook until wilted and soft, another 3-5 minutes. Add the roasted cauliflower to the pan, mix well with the rest of the ingredients. Meanwhile, cook the pasta in very well salted water until al dente, following the package instructions. Reserve about 1 cup of the starchy pasta water. Add the cooked pasta to the pan with the cauliflower and chard, along with a splash of the pasta water. Gently mix to coat, letting the pasta take on the flavors in the pan for about 1 more minute. Add another splash of the pasta water if needed. Serve the pasta right away, drizzled with more olive oil. Notes Though regular raisins are pictured here, golden raisins would be delicious in this pasta. 3.5.3226 The post Roasted Cauliflower Pasta with Raisins, Capers, and Chard appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Aloo Matar – Easy Pea & Potato Curry (Vegan)

March 1 2020 Vegan Richa 

Aloo Matar – Easy Pea & Potato Curry (Vegan)This easy Indian Aloo Matar – Pea & Potato Curry is done in 30 minutes, requires only a few basic ingredients and is such a simple and quick plant-based weeknight meal. Gluten-free, dairy-free, soy-free. Oil-free option included. Jump to Recipe Coming at you with a delicious Indian weeknight recipe that comes together quickly and needs very basic ingredients most of which you probably already have at home! One of those recipes that I can always make, even when I dont know what else to make because the fridge is almost empty! Aloo Matar! Bonus, it’s my mom’s recipe so obviously it’s the best and tested until perfect! What is Aloo Matar? Aloo translates to potato and matar to peas – potatoes and peas, that’s what we’re cooking today. But in the most delicious manner! This is a simple vegetarian Indian dish originating in the Punjab region of India. It is made of potatoes and peas in a spicy thick onion tomato gravy. The dish is made throughout the country in a few different versions. While some Aloo Matar recipes use a creamy coconut base, others simmer the potatoes in a tomato sauce. We are cooking the tomato version which is a bit lighter and lower in calories. Potatoes are used in tons of Indian recipes. Often they are paired with other vegetables like cauliflower in aloo gobi or spinach or beans! I love cooking with potatoes as they are a.) available all year long, b) cheap, c) delicious and oh so comforting. Right in the end, I listed you all my favorite Indian potato recipes. This recipe has just potatoes, green peas, onion, garlic, ginger, green chili, tomatoes, and a few basic Indian spices. A very simple and beginner-friendly recipe that you just cannot go wrong with. Its lightly spiced, so absolutely doable even for kids and/­­or sensitive tummies. Ingredients needed for making this Indian Pea & Potato Curry: - Peas: You can use fresh or frozen peas. Make sure not to overcook them or they will lose their pretty color. - Potatoes: Make sure to cut them into even-sized cubes so that they are all cooked at the same time. If you chop them too small, they will get mushy and might dissolve in the curry. As a short-cut, or if you have leftovers to use up, you could add boiled potatoes. Obviously, this takes off some of the cooking time. - Ground Spices: Cumin, coriander, turmeric, cayenne pepper, garam masala. Flavor central! - The holy trinity of ginger, onion, and garlic is added to the toasted spices to form the base of the gravy. - Fresh green chilie adds a bit of heat, but don’t worry – this dish is not spicy. Thai green chili pepper or Serrano pepper works well here. However, if you don’t tolerate any spice, leave it out. - Fresh tomato puree is added for color, body, and texture. I make it from scratch pureeing two fresh tomatoes. You could use canned diced tomatoes and puree them or  half the amount of canned tomato puree as it is more concentrated. Tips and Substitutions for making Aloo Matar: - To make this recipe oil-free, skip the first step. Saute spices in broth or water. You could also use boiled potatoes instead of raw. - Keep in mind that, as this dish sits the gravy will get thicker as the potatoes tend to absorb some of the liquid. When reheating, you might have to add a splash of water or broth. - To make the gravy even more fragrant, sprinkle garam masala into the gravy towards the end. - I also like to sprinkle some dried fenugreek leaves on top for additional flavor. How to make the best Aloo Matar: Heat oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add potatoes and cook them for 3 to 5 mins, stirring occasionally. Meanwhile coarsely crush the seeds in a grinder or mortar and pestle and chop the onion, garlic, ginger, chili by knife or using a food processor. Transfer the potatoes to a bowl. Heat a tsp of oil over medium heat. Add the crushed seeds and cook for half a minute. Now, add in the onion, garlic, ginger, chilies and cook for 3 mins or until translucent. Mix in the ground spices and stir in the tomato puree. Let everything cook for 3-4 mins to thicken it some more. Add the potatoes, salt and water, and cover and cook for 15 mins. Check for seasoning (add salt, if needed) and add more water if it has gotten too thick. Add the peas and half the cilantro and cover and cook until potatoes are fork-tender. Garnish your vegan Aloo Matar with more chopped cilantro and crushed pepper flakes. What shall I serve with Aloo Matar? I like serving this potato and pea curry with plain Basmati rice or a bowl of fragrant seasoned rice like this turmeric lemon rice. However, this pea potato curry also pairs extremely well with roti or any vegan flatbread of choice. More delicious Indian potato curry recipes from the blog: - Instant Pot Saag Aloo (Sweet Potato and Chard) - Potato Eggplant Curry - Chickpea Sweet Potato Spinach Curry - Aloo Gobi -Baked    Mums Aloo Matar This easy Indian Aloo Matar Pea & Potato Curry is done in 30 minutes, requires only a few basic ingredients and is such a simple and quick plant-based weeknight meal. Gluten-free, dairy-free, soy-free. Oil-free version included.   - 2 tsp oil (divided) - 3 medium potatoes cubed small. - 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds - 1 tsp coriander seeds - 1/­­4 cup chopped onion - 4 cloves of garlic (finely chopped) - 1 inch ginger (finely chopped) - 1/­­2 hot green chile (finely chopped) - 1/­­2 tsp turmeric - 1/­­3 to 1/­­2 tsp cayenne - 2 medium to large tomatoes (pureed) - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1 cup water - 1/­­2 cup peas - 1/­­2 cup chopped cilantro (loosely packed divided) - optional additions: sprinkle garam masala towards the end (1/­­2 tsp dried fenugreek leaves) - Heat oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add potatoes and Cook for 3 to 5 mins, stirring occasionally. Meanwhile coarsely crush the seeds in a grinder or mortar and pestle and chop the onion, garlic, ginger, chili by knife or a food processor. -  Transfer potatoes to a bowl. Heat a tsp of oil over medium heat. Wait till it's get hot. Add the crushed seeds and cook for half a minute. - Add the onion, garlic, ginger chilie and cook for 3 mins or until translucent. - Add the ground spices and mix in. Add tomato puree and cook for 3-4 mins to thicken. - Add the potatoes, salt and water and cover and cook for 15 mins. - Check and add more water if needed. Add the peas and half the cilantro and cover and cook until potatoes are tender to preference. -  Taste and adjust salt and flavor. Garnish with more cilantro, pepper flakes. - To make this recipe oil-free, skip the first step. You could also use boiled potatoes instead of raw. - Keep in mind that, as this dish sits the gravy will get thicker as the potatoes tend to absorb some of the liquid. When reheating, you might have to add a splash of water or broth. - To make the gravy even more fragrant, sprinkle garam masala into the gravy towards the end. - I also like to sprinkle some dried fenugreek leaves on top. - The nutrition facts do not include rice or any sides.        The post Aloo Matar – Easy Pea & Potato Curry (Vegan) appeared first on Vegan Richa.

One Pot Vegan Creamed Beans and Greens with Chili Oil

December 18 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

One Pot Vegan Creamed Beans and Greens with Chili Oil Every day, around 4pm, my husband and I start texting about dinner. If there aren’t any leftovers or a previously thought-through dinner plan, my most common proposition is ‘greens and beans?’ Those two are such staples and always leave us feeling really nourished. I have a million variations on the subject that I can throw together super quickly. Sometimes, for a quick and lazy lunch, I’ll just crisp up cooked chickpeas and kale in a pan with lots of salt and pepper and be totally satisfied. I always push off from there for our dinners, then add more vegetables, a sauce, a grain, crunchy toppings, etc. etc. I vary the kinds of greens and beans I use depending on season and mood, and what’s on hand. These one pot creamed beans and greens are my cozy, wintery version of our staple meal, and they definitely hit the spot every single time. The beans of choice here are white beans, since they are extra creamy in texture and go so well with lemon and pepper – both key ingredients. The green of choice is chard. I kind of think chard doesn’t get enough love? I love it because it wilts quickly, usually costs less than kale, and the stems are totally edible. The secret with the stems is cooking them first until they soften. Usually they’ll end up melting into a dish and become almost indistinguishable, but will still contribute some substance and extra plant power. If you use rainbow chard, the stems will give some of their color to whatever you’re cooking, so that’s fun as well. Chili oil is the component that takes this meal to that extra special place. I don’t recommend skipping it. We just quickly crisp up some red pepper flakes in olive oil and let it infuse while making the meal. A generous drizzle of that will really make everything sing. Hope you’re enjoying this sometimes crazy pre-holiday time! Let’s all remember to be nice to ourselves and stay warm and nourished. Sending you lots of love. One Pot Creamed Beans and Greens with Chili Oil   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the chili oil ¼ cup olive oil 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes pinch of sea salt for the creamed beans and greens avocado oil or olive oil 1 yellow onion - diced 1 medium-large bunch of chard - stems thinly sliced, leaves chopped sea salt freshly ground black pepper 5 cloves of garlic - minced a few 1 strips of lemon zest (from 1 lemon) 2 15 oz cans or 3½ cups cooked white beans 2 cups vegetable broth 2 bay leaves (optional) 1¼ cup oat milk or cashew milk juice from 1 lemon Instructions to make the chili oil Combine the oil and red pepper flakes in a saucepan over medium heat, cook, swirling, for 3-4 minutes until the pepper flakes are crispy. Add a pinch of salt. Set aside to infuse while making the beans and greens. to make the creamed beans and greens Heat oil over medium heat in a soup pot. Add the onion and chard stems, along with a pinch of salt and plenty of black pepper, and sauté for 10 minutes, or until the chard stems are very soft. Add the garlic and lemon zest, and stir until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the beans, vegetable broth, bay leaves, if using, and another pinch of salt. Bring to a boil, establish a simmer and let simmer and reduce, uncovered, for 10 minutes. Remove the bay leaves and lemon zest strips (this should be easy, since they should float up to the top). Add the chard leaves and cover the pot for a few minutes for the leaves to wilt. Remove the lid and stir in the wilted leaves. Add the milk and bring everything back up to a boil, then turn off the heat. Stir in the lemon juice. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Serve warm, drizzled with the chili oil (recipe above). Notes We prefer to use original Oatly oat milk or homemade cashew milk (1 cup cashews, 3 cups water) in this recipe, it does best with something really creamy and rich. 3.5.3226   Our New Ebook: Golubka Kitchen Sweets! Filled with our favorite, vegan and gluten-free dessert recipes in the world. The post One Pot Vegan Creamed Beans and Greens with Chili Oil appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Sauteed Lentils & Dandelion Greens

November 2 2019 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Sauteed Lentils & Dandelion Greens Serves 4 If there arent delicious aromatics wafting through the air, have you even cooked? Shallot, onion, olive oil.. now thats dinner! This method is what I use time and time again with whatever I picked up at the anarchist co-op (ok fine Whole Foods) and whatever beans I have burning a hole in my cupboard. So try it with spinach, arugula or chard. Or just go ahead and try it with dandelion greens like the goddam recipe says. It takes only 15 minutes or so (if your lentils are cooked ahead of time or from a can) and it tastes like it took 20. At least. This recipe is from I Can Cook Vegan. Notes There’s a hidden gem to be learned in this simple recipe. If you cook the nutritional yeast for a minute with the shallot and stuff it gets a deep toasty flavor like a roux! It makes it taste extra special and thickens the sauce, too. So much winning. Ingredients 1/­­2 cup walnuts 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 cup thinly sliced shallot 2 cloves garlic, minced 1/­­2 teaspoon dried tarragon Fresh black pepper 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast 1/­­4 cup dry white wine 1/­­2 cup vegetable broth 1 large bunch dandelion greens 1 1/­­2 cups cooked brown or green lentils 2 cups thinly sliced radicchio Directions 1 – Preheat oven to 350 F. Spread walnuts onto a small baking tray and toast for about 10 minutes. Remove from oven, let cool, and roughly chop. In the meantime, proceed with the rest of the recipe.  2 – Preheat a large pan over medium heat. Saute shallots in olive oil with a pinch of salt until lightly browned, about 5 minutes. Add garlic, tarragon and black pepper and saute another minute. 3 – Add nutritional yeast and stir with a wooden spatula to toast for about 1 minute. Add white wine and to deglaze the pan. Let cook for about 3 minutes. 4 – Add vegetable broth and bring to a boil. Add the greens and cook down for about 5 minutes. Add the lentils and toss to heat through. Serve topped with walnuts!

Kale Pakora (Crispy Chickpea Flour Fritters) Gluten-free

October 26 2019 Vegan Richa 

Kale Pakora (Crispy Chickpea Flour Fritters) Gluten-freeBaked Kale Pakora. Pakoras or Pakoda are fried Crispy Indian fritters which are served for snacking. Use other greens such as spinach for Spinach Pakora or chard for variation. Gluten-free, soy-free, nut-free, and vegan. Jump to Recipe Pakoras are a frequent snack especially around the festive season. People visit friends and family with a collection of sweets and snacks, hang out and eat fresh pakoras and drink masala chai! Festivities begin on Dhanteras (the day of forture), where people clean up the house, set up lamps and lights and buy something new(new metal to bring good luck) for the house, to invite positivity, prosperity and happiness. Today is Choti (small) Diwali (day of knowledge), tomorrow will be Diwali (day of light), which is celebrated with lamps and amazing food to celebrate the victory of good over various kinds of evil. This Pakora uses a few ingredients, is simple and baked. Bake till just about crisp and like pakoras or bake longer for crispier kale chips like result. serve with chutneys or dips of choice. You can use this same method to make vegetable pakora (chop the veggies small and use less amount so that you have enough batter), or with onions(use thinly sliced onions). Bake them or fry them! Another veggie pakora which is simpler as you chop everything in the food processor can be found here. Lets make this kale pakora!Continue reading: Kale Pakora (Crispy Chickpea Flour Fritters) Gluten-freeThe post Kale Pakora (Crispy Chickpea Flour Fritters) Gluten-free appeared first on Vegan Richa.

45 Best Tofu Recipes! Stir-fries, Marinated, Curries, Sandwiches & More

July 8 2019 Vegan Richa 

45 Best Tofu Recipes! Stir-fries, Marinated, Curries, Sandwiches & More45 Best Tofu Recipes to Try. Stir-fries, Marinated and Baked, Curries, Pasta, Crispy Breaded Tofu, Sandwiches & More. No Bland tofu! Gluten-free Options. Delicious Vegan Tofu Recipes. Tofu is an interesting ingredient. In the initial years when we transitioned to eating vegan, I used to dislike tofu. That was probably because of the tofu I tried in restaurants which was bland or just fried and added to things. No marination, no spices or herbs. Then, I started cooking with it myself and the challenge was to see if would like tofu. Challenge accepted and then some. Try my Indian butter tofu, Orange Tofu, Cajun Baked Tofu, lemon asparagus pasta, Chili garlic baked tofu, Tofu in Amritsari sauce and then try the rest of the recipes as well. What is Tofu? Tofu is basically bean curd. It is made by curdling soy milk (milk from soybeans) and then pressing the resulting curds into blocks. The process is similar to making cheese curds from dairy milk. During transition, I didn’t particularly eat much Tofu or miss eating it. There were plenty of beans, lentils and legumes in our diet. Tofu is easily more available in restaurants and when travelling, so its a good protein to get to like. And that’s what happened when I started to prepare it in various ways. If you are avoiding soy, you can use other protein subs in most of these recipes, such as chickpea tofu, cooked chickpeas or beans, roasted veggies, seitan, meat subs etc. Most recipes have the alternatives mentioned to make them soyfree when possible.Continue reading: 45 Best Tofu Recipes! Stir-fries, Marinated, Curries, Sandwiches & MoreThe post 45 Best Tofu Recipes! Stir-fries, Marinated, Curries, Sandwiches & More appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Meatless Mother’s Day Breakfast Recipes Your Mom Deserves

May 6 2019 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Mother’s Day Breakfast Recipes Your Mom DeservesMothers Day is approaching. If youre still struggling to come up with a gift for the inspiring maternal figure in your life, weve got you covered with some mouthwatering recipes! Cooking up a meatless, homemade breakfast is the perfect way to show your love - brownie points if you serve it to her in bed. Weve put together some of our favorite morning meals that mom - and the whole family - will adore. Why not use Mothers Day as an opportunity to get kids cooking? Our sister campaign, The Kids Cook Monday , encourages families to set aside the first night of every week for cooking and eating together. When kids are involved in preparing meals, theyre empowered to consider portions, vitamins and nutrients. Cooking also helps to reinforce skills like math, teamwork and following instructions. Find some truly tasty breakfast recipes below from The Kids Cook Monday that the whole family can get involved in. Avocado Toast with Fresh Beet Hummus Chocolate Chip Zucchini Muffins from Inspired RD   Potato, Black Bean and Swiss Chard Hash from Potato Goodness Quinoa Cranberry-Almond Granola from School Nutrition Plus PB&J French Toast from The Gourmand Mom Overnight Egg, Spinach & Hash Brown Strata from Jackie Newgent, RD Walnut Cinnamon Quinoa from The Veggie Converter Are you cooking for mom? Let us know what youre making on our Facebook  page or post it using #MeatlessMonday. Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post Meatless Mother’s Day Breakfast Recipes Your Mom Deserves appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Inspired by New York City Schools Going Meatless Monday? Here’s How Your School Can Join the Movement

March 18 2019 Meatless Monday 

Inspired by New York City Schools Going Meatless Monday? Here’s How Your School Can Join the MovementNew York City schools, the largest public school system in the world, will launch Meatless Monday for all 1.1 million students beginning this fall. Students will have access to an all-vegetarian breakfast and lunch every Monday. The citywide Meatless Monday program is an expansion of a pilot program that began with 15 schools in Brooklyn in 2018. Positive student feedback from the pilot encouraged city officials to make Meatless Monday an official program for all schools. The Meatless Monday menu will include kid-friendly menu items such as veggie tacos, meatless chili and grilled cheese. Students will also have the opportunity to weigh-in on the menu before its finalized. The program was announced by NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio, plant-based advocate and Brooklyn Borough President, Eric Adams and School Chancellor Richard Carranza at a press conference attended by the Meatless Monday team. Click here for more photos, press and TV coverage . Bring Meatless Monday to Your School - Free Resources and Expertise to K-12 Schools Students and schools around the country are taking action to address climate change and health issues. Meatless Monday is a simple and effective program that helps students, parents and administrators develop long-term healthy eating habits that also address environmental issues. Schools looking to implement Meatless Monday programs can consult with our team, which includes experts from the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future .  Free resources include: o Research on the health and environmental benefits of choosing plant-based foods instead of meat o Implementation guides for starting Meatless Monday in school cafeterias o Marketing materials that can be used to promote Meatless Monday on site or through digital and social media o Downloadable cookbooks and weekly newsletters  with Meatless Monday recipes o Sign-up to become a Meatless Monday Ambassador Questions? Contact us now  for additional information or to learn how to implement a program at your school. Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post Inspired by New York City Schools Going Meatless Monday? Here’s How Your School Can Join the Movement appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Penne with Chard and Beans

March 8 2019 VegKitchen 

Penne with Chard and Beans Chard is a beloved kitchen-garden vegetable in Italian cuisine, from which this pasta dish is inspired. Combined with beans and fresh tomatoes, this stick-to-your-ribs late summer pasta dish will satisfy the heartiest of appetites. A big salad and fruity dessert complete the meal. Continuing reading Penne with Chard and Beans on VegKitchen

Vegetable Congee

February 4 2019 Meatless Monday 

Vegetable congee can be eaten any time of the day or year, but it’s particularly enjoyable as a warm and comforting breakfast. This recipe is nourishing, delicious and easy to make. Its a perfect recipe to make on a slow morning, or make it the night before and simply reheat it in the morning.   This recipe comes to us from Tina Jui of The Worktop . Find the original Vegetable Congee Recipe  and additional photos on The Worktop.   Serves 4 1  cup  brown short grain rice 4  cups  vegetable broth  (water also works) 1  small knob  ginger 1/­­2  cup  dried sliced shiitake mushrooms 1/­­2  cup  dried mixed mushrooms  (such as a mixture of porcini, charcoal bumer, honey fungus, black trumpet and chanterelle)  1  small  sweet potato 1  small bunch  collard greens (or other dark leafy greens such as kale, chard or cabbage)  (about 2 cups when cut)   Rinse the rice well and drain. In a large pot, add the rice, vegetable stock or water, and ginger. Bring to a boil, then turn the heat down and simmer, covered, stirring occasionally. As the rice is cooking, in a large bowl, soak the dried mushrooms in 4 cups of warm water. Set aside. Peel and cut the sweet potato into 1-inch cubes. Set aside. Wash and cut the collard greens into 1-inch strips, removing any tough stalks. Set aside. When the congee has been cooking for 45 minutes, and the mushrooms are fully rehydrated, add the mushrooms into the congee. Slowly pour in the soaking liquid, discarding the last bits of liquid where any dirt and grit may have accumulated. Stir in the sweet potatoes. Cover and continue simmering, stirring occasionally, for another 30 minutes. After 30 minutes have passed, stir in the collard greens. Continue to simmer, stirring occasionally, for another 15 minutes. At this point, the rice grains should have fully softened and absorbed most of the water. If the congee is too watery, simmer without the covering the pot to allow some steam to escape for the last 15 minutes. If the congee is too thick, you can add additional water as needed. Serve warm with desired toppings, such as kimchi, green onions, a splash of soy sauce and a bit of hot chili oil. PREPARE THE NIGHT BEFORE. You can make this congee the night before, cover and store in the refrigerator. Alternatively, enjoy some congee for dinner, and have the leftovers in the morning. Simply heat up the congee in the morning before serving. The post Vegetable Congee appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Sheet Pan Ratatouille with Polenta

March 17 2021 Vegan Richa 

Sheet Pan Ratatouille with PolentaThis bright and colorful Baked Sheet Pan Ratatouille is a modern twist on the classic French chunky summer vegetable stew, rich with olive oil and fragrant with plenty of herbs. Serve over creamy polenta for the perfect summer dinner. Ratatouille – I LOVE this classic French stew made from eggplant, zucchini, peppers and tomatoes and summer is the prime time to make this easy vegan dinner with local produce. This sheet pan Ratatouille is indeed the perfect recipe to serve all those beautiful farmers’ market veggies that are popping up during the warm months! As we know, roasting veggies really boosts their flavor and brings out their natural sweetness so an oven baked ratatouille is seriously the best way to showcase summer vegetables! Its so easy, its healthy and it’s versatile. You can make a big batch of Baked Ratatouille on a Sunday, then serve it up in different ways during the workweek! I love serving my baked veggies over creamy polenta, but I also really like this served with pasta, mashed potatoes, and even over toast! Whether made on a sheet pan or a casserole dish, baked Ratatouille is so simple yet flavorful with those dried herbs – trust me, you wont tire of it. This simple casserole version takes only 15 minutes of prep work before the pan goes into the oven to roast. The only hands-on part of this recipe is chopping the eggplant, summer squash, zucchini, bell pepper, tomatoes, and onion. Then it gets all tossed with olive oil,  herbs, salt, and pepper and then roasted in the oven for about 45 minutes during which your house will start to smell incredible. Once done, you can either dig in right away or store your ratatouille in the fridge for the workweek. Or freeze it! MORE VEGGIE GOODNESS FROM THE BLOG, - Peanut Butter Roasted Cauliflower Bowl. GF - Spanish Rice, Taco Spice Roasted Cauliflower Bowl. GF - Shawarma Chickpeas, Sweet Potato Buddha Bowl  GF - Quinoa Cauliflower Bowl with almond Sriracha sauce GF - Chili Garlic Tofu Bowl with Vermicelli. GF Continue reading: Sheet Pan Ratatouille with PolentaThe post Sheet Pan Ratatouille with Polenta appeared first on Vegan Richa.

VT Tried It: Wild Zora Real Fruit Snacks

October 2 2020 Vegetarian Times 

Wild Zora is a women-owned, family-run business that self-manufactures in Northern Colorado. Wild Zora decided against a co-packing (contract manufacturing) option to ensure quality control -- they see every ingredient come into the building and every product leaving the building, and are committed to only using high-quality ingredients. These air-dried fruit mixes have very straight-forward ingredient lists: 3 organic fruits for each mix, and thats it. There are no dyes, sulfates, or preservatives. I was introduced to Wild Zora at a trade show when I tried one of their no added sugar or preservatives apricots (found in their Orchard Fruit Mix), and it was so tasty, it haunted me for weeks after. All three flavors are perfect for office snacks, hiking trips, or airplane treats. An insider tells us that youll be able to pick them up at REI soon, or buy now -> Orchard fruit mix: contains cherries, apple, and apricots. Finally, Orchard mix, we are reunited! All of the fruits are chewy and the cherries are a pleasantly tart contrast. Harvest fruit mix: contains orange, figs, and pear. Dried orange, you say? The peel is a bit bitter (try adding it to your tea or cocktail), but the orange slices translate surprisingly well to dried fruit. The figs are what fig newtons dream of, and the dried pears balance the other flavors nicely. Tropical fruit mix: Contains mango, banana, and pineapple. I love dried mango, but was apprehensive about banana and pineapple after so many flavorless and cardboardy dried fruit in the past. Never fear: both banana and pineapple are chewy and tasty! The post VT Tried It: Wild Zora Real Fruit Snacks appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Pasta with Greens, Chickpeas, and Olives

January 13 2020 VegKitchen 

Pasta with Greens, Chickpeas, and Olives This quick and nourishing year-round pasta recipe calls for chard, kale, or spinach, but you can use a combination or even substitute broccoli rabe or mustard greens. My personal favorite in this dish is chard, as it’s so good in the Italian-style trio of pasta with greens and legumes. Just add a colorful salad and you’ve got a meal. The post Pasta with Greens, Chickpeas, and Olives appeared first on VegKitchen.

Anja Schwartz Rothe

December 15 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Anja Schwartz Rothe Anja Schwartz Rothe is an herbalist, gardener, medicine maker, and writer, based in New Yorks Hudson Valley. Anja is the alchemist behind Fat of the Land, a small batch herbal apothecary with a focus on cultivating connection to self, environment, and the cycles by which we live. We interviewed Anja about her daily routines and practices, approach to food, exercise, skincare, her work and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? A nice balance of both! I need to exist inside a structured, but flexible container. A little bit of routine allows me to make the most of my time, while feeling free and inspired. -- Do your routines change with the seasons? Definitely, it is one of the biggest factors that informs the way I live – acknowledging the seasonal shifts within and without and using that information to alter how I show up to take care of myself. -- What do your mornings look like? I dont like alarms, so I usually wake up naturally, somewhere between 6:30 and 8, depending on the time of year. Then I drink a bunch of water, sometimes with lemon and sometimes not. I try to get out in nature almost immediately. I live right next to a bird sanctuary on the Hudson River, so I bring a hot bevvie and do a long walk there. I always leave my phone at the house so I have a chance to really check in with myself, do some breathing, and connect before the day starts. After that, its breakfast and usually emails. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I usually wash my face and do some facial gua sha. Its so relaxing and helps me unwind. Then, I have little ritual of turning down the house, where I close the curtains, turn off the lights, and say goodnight to everything. It sounds like a small detail, but its a gesture I really like, acknowledging the animacy of the home energies, thanking them, and setting it all to rest for the day. In my bedroom, I try to keep good sleep hygiene, which for me means low technology and minimal artificial lighting. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice? Honestly, I think my whole life is a mindfulness practice. Isnt that what mindfulness is all about, practicing showing up in the mundane of the day-to-day in the fullest capacity? Sustenance -- Describe your typical or favorite meal for each of these: Breakfast – Usually some combination of eggs and ferments. In the summer, hard-boiled with smoked salmon and sauerkraut. Right now, Im on a scallion and ginger congee kick – a simple Chinese rice porridge served with a soft boiled egg and miso. Its so good. Lunch – Sometimes an open-face sandwich or leftovers from the night before. Lately, Ive been working through lunch and having an early dinner. Snack – Fruit and chocolate. Its apples, pears, and citrus right now. Dinner – Currently: soup and sourdough bread with lots of ghee. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I make myself a matcha latte with oat milk and a couple droppers of our brain tincture almost every day. On weekends, I might have a cup of coffee and I sometimes do a mushroom tea/­­dandy blend/­­cacao mixture as an afternoon pick me up. I really try not to have too much caffeine though, it makes me a bit of a mess and dehydrates me way too much, always trying to find that balance. -- What is your grocery shopping routine like? Are there things that always make it in your basket? Its pretty broken up between farmers markets, the local food shop, and the co-op in the next city over. In the summer, primarily farmers markets for that good good fruit and veg. Right now, my staples are eggs, potatoes, citrus, oatly, broccoli, and cauliflower. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? Definitely. I like to keep my kitchen stocked with what I call hippie treats and lots of fruit. I dont buy a lot of packaged food, which means if I want to have sweets in the house I have to prepare them myself. I love baking, and will usually make a treat at least once a week – recently, its been sticky apple ginger date cake and berry crisps from a stocked freezer of gleaned summer berries. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I do, but with much variability. In the past, I’ve been really into running, yoga, and rock climbing — and these things come back in waves. In the summer, I’m cycling a lot, and right now I’m getting back into my ephemeral winter gym flow. Sometimes, my exercise is just doing squats in the kitchen while waiting for the kettle to boil. Thats actually my favorite kind. Beauty -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I definitely subscribe to the less is more skincare model. I wash with just warm water, am very liberal with hydrosols, and then use a serum and/­­or balm. I make all my own hydrosols in my garden during the summer and offer some of them in the apothecary. Im currently really loving Dragon Balm by Apis Apotheca, a farm and skincare line run by my friend Aviva, who really knows her shit. Most days I also do a quick little gua sha facial massage afterwards – I always see instant results and it feels too good. -- Do you have any beauty tricks that you’ve found to be especially useful? Drinking lots of water and herbal infusions. My present go-to is nettle, raspberry leaf, goji berry, and fresh ginger root. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines for managing stress? Big Calm tincture in every pocket, purse, and drawer. I lean heavily on nervines and deep breathing. Getting outside is also really important — and socializing! -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? To be honest, I havent gotten so much as a cold in more than ten years! I owe this mostly to a naturally strong constitution, but also a pretty large emphasis on tonic, preventative medicine and lifestyle. Cooking with medicines, like infused vinegars, dank broths, and elderberry syrup, are big, but getting enough rest is the biggest. Im constantly doing micro check-ins throughout the day to see how I can best give myself what I need to prevent burnout, fatigue, and illness. -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? Theyre so fluid in my life. I enjoy the hell out of the work I do, and I’d probably be doing most of it even if it wasnt my job, but Im also pretty good at allowing myself to turn off when I’m tired and not place undue expectations on myself all the time. I find allowing myself to take frequent mini vacations is the most helpful — getting out of my environment is the only thing that really turns off my work brain, plus it brings in a fresh influx of new inspiration and perspective. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming an herbalist? My first job in high school was at the local health food store. There were a couple older women who worked there and would walk me through the vitamin and bulk aisles, teaching me all about the different herbs and supplements. This was a sort of epiphany for me, viewing plants in this way. I then studied anthropology in university, focusing mostly on traditional sustenance and healing practices. After finishing school, I knew I needed to immerse myself in plant medicine, so I enrolled in an herbal medicine program in Appalachia. -- How do you approach foraging the ingredients for your apothecary and seasonal wellness boxes? Do you have a plan in mind for each season or is it more about going with the flow? I definitely have a plan in mind, but I usually have to surrender it while remaining open to new inspiration. It can be a challenge to have expectations for a season, nature doesnt really work that way, and thats been both a constant source of inspiration for me, as well as a lesson in boundaries and respect. I could be inspired to make one thing, but if its not a particularly fecund year for a certain plant, I have to cede to that. Making things from intuition and by listening to the seasons and cycles is probably not the best business model, but its the only way I want to work with plant medicine. -- What are some offerings youre working on currently? Im getting ready to re-release a little book I wrote last year, Always Coming Home: a guide to seasonal wellness, with some edits and new content. Im also refining the 2020 Seasonal Wellness Box subscription that will soon be available. -- How were you able to grow a business with your interests and loves in mind? Its been a very slow chipping away for me to remain really clear on the things that matter and the things that dont in growing my business. It turns out, remaining true to creating medicine that is intimate, small batch, and well cared for is much more important than being able to mass produce things or being on every shelf in the country. I want my values to be foremost and my business to be second. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Going full hibernation this January. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Put my legs up the wall, get a massage, go hiking with a friend, sweat, travel, in the summer I go swimming multiple times of day in various bodies of running water, thats my favorite. -- We love the Catskills so much. What are some of your favorite places to visit in the area? Montgomery Place farm stand for all your fruit and veg needs, there are so many great trails in the mountains, Colgate Lake for a swim, Talbott and Arding picnic at the Saugerties lighthouse for lunch and Lil Debs Oasis for dinner. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Im reading The Overstory by Richard Powers right now, and it is SO GOOD. A vignette of short stories written about trees and so much more. Song/­­Album – Hildegard von Bingen forever. Movie – Fantastic Fungi! Just saw and highly recommend, mushrooms will save the world. Piece of Art – All things Andrew Wyeth. Photos by Jenn Morse, Gabrielle Greenberg and Anja herself. The post Anja Schwartz Rothe appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Mushroom Pot Pie with Sweet Potato Crust

October 29 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Mushroom Pot Pie with Sweet Potato CrustVegan Mushroom Pot Pie with Sweet Potato Crust. Easy Mushroom Gravy Pot pie with mushrooms, cannellini or white beans, chard, topped with sliced sweet potato. Vegan Nut-free Recipe. Can be made gluten-free, Soy-free and oil-free Jump to Recipe  This pot pie brings together all my favorite flavors. Caramelized onion and mushroom, earthy balsamic vinegar, herbs, and a crisp sweet potato topping! I like to make individual portions, but you can easily make one large dish. The pot pie can be made without gluten or grain and can be made without oil as well. Use other greens of choice and change up the topping for variation. Top with vegan puff pastry for a decadent pie. Or just make the filling and serve over mashed potatoes or veggies. The mushroom bean filling is a mix of savory mushroom gravy and beans and works amazingly with mashed veggies as well.Continue reading: Vegan Mushroom Pot Pie with Sweet Potato CrustThe post Vegan Mushroom Pot Pie with Sweet Potato Crust appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Mushroom and Onion Cauliflower Bake from Whole Food Cooking Every Day

October 4 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Mushroom and Onion Cauliflower Bake from Whole Food Cooking Every Day Happy October! Today we’ve got the coziest recipe for ushering in the first full month of fall – a cauliflower bake from Amy Chaplin’s beautiful new cookbook, Whole Food Cooking Every Day. This recipe has everything we ever want in a comforting, fall dish: mushrooms, caramelized onions, chickpeas, and hearty greens, all covered by a fluffy, almost cheesy blanket of vegan cauliflower souffle. We’ve been so excited for the release of this cookbook, being huge fans of Amy’s work. Her first book is a true bible of whole food cooking, filled with kitchen wisdom and an incredible variety of plant-forward recipes. We learned so much from that volume, like the fact that it’s best to cook beans with a sheet of kombu for better digestion and that making a curry spice blend at home is very much worth it for the unbelievable flavor. Much like Amy’s first cookbook, Whole Food Cooking Every Day is monumental and thorough, with beautiful photography woven throughout. The book is organized in a brilliant way – each chapter presents a base recipe, which is then elaborated on with different ingredient variations. The Cauliflower Bake chapter that we worked from features a recipe for a fluffy cauliflower topping, which can go over a number of different fillings. Here are some examples of other base recipe chapters: Genius Whole-Grain Porridges, Gluten-Free Breads, Simple and Healing Soups, Baked Marinated Tempeh, Seeded Crackers, Easy Cakes. Don’t all of those sound amazing? If you’re ever in the market for a trusted resource on colorful, everyday whole food cooking, look no further. We hope you’ll enjoy the cozy bake Mushroom and Onion Cauliflower Bake from Whole Food Cooking Every Day   Print recipe from Whole Food Cooking Every Day by Amy Chaplin Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the cauliflower topping 1 large head (2½ lbs) cauliflower - cut into 1½ florets ½ cup raw pine nuts, cashews, or macadamia nuts 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 3 tablespoons nutritional yeast, plus more to taste ½ teaspoon fine sea salt, plus more to taste for the mushroom and onion filling 3 tablespoons extra-virgin coconut oil 1½ lbs shiitake mushrooms - stems removed and caps thinly sliced 2 tablespoons chopped fresh thyme 3 medium onions - quartered and thinly sliced lengthwise ½ teaspoon fine sea salt, plus more to taste 6 cups (6 oz) sliced Swiss chard - tough stems removed 1½ cups cooked chickpeas (1/­­4 cup cooking liquid reserved) or 1 15 oz can (drained) 1 tablespoon tamari 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar ¼ cups filtered water if using canned chickpeas 2 teaspoons arrowroot powder 1 tablespoon filtered water freshly ground black pepper Instructions to make the cauliflower topping Set up a steamer pot with about 2 inches of filtered water in the bottom (the water shouldnt touch the bottom of the basket) and bring to a boil over high heat. Arrange the cauliflower florets in the steamer basket, cover, and steam for 10-12 minutes, until the cauliflower is cooked through but not falling apart. Remove from the heat and set aside. Put the nuts, olive oil, yeast, and salt in a high-powered blender and add the steamed cauliflower. Starting on low speed and using the tamper stick to help press the cauliflower down, blend, gradually increasing the speed to high, until completely smooth and thick; use the tamper stick to keep the mixture moving and to scrape down the sides as you go. This will take a couple of minutes. Season with more nutritional yeast and salt to taste and blend to combine. to make the mushroom and onion filling, and assemble Preheat the oven to 375°F (190° C). Warm a large skillet over medium-high heat and pour in 1 tablespoon of the oil. Add half the shiitakes and the thyme, stir to coat with oil, and cook for 10-12 minutes, stirring only every minute or two (to allow the mushrooms to brown), until the shiitakes are golden brown. Transfer to a bowl and set aside. Repeat with another tablespoon of oil and the remaining mushrooms. Wash and dry the skillet if there are blackened bits on the bottom. Add the remaining tablespoon oil to the pan, then add the onions and cook over medium heat for 8 minutes, or until beginning to brown. Cover the pan, reduce the heat to low, and cook for 10 minutes, or until the onions are soft and lightly browned. Remove the lid, add the salt, and cook uncovered for another 5 minutes, or until the onions are caramelized. Add the chard, cover, and allow to steam for 3 minutes, or until tender. Add the chickpeas, cooked mushrooms, tamari, balsamic vinegar, and chickpea cooking liquid or ¼ cup water, raise the heat, and bring to a simmer. Dissolve the arrowroot in 1 tablespoon water, stir, and drizzle into the simmering mixture, stirring constantly. When the mixture has returned to a simmer, remove from the heat and season to taste with pepper and more salt. Transfer the mixture to an 8-inch square or equivalent baking dish and smooth the surface. Spread the cauliflower topping evenly over the filling. Bake for 30 minutes, or until the filling is bubbling and the topping has begun to set. Turn on the broiler and broil the bake for 3 to 6 minutes, until the topping is golden and browning in parts. Remove from the oven and allow to sit for a few minutes before serving. Once cooled, leftovers can be stored in the fridge in an airtight container for up to 3 days. To reheat, put the bake in a baking dish, cover, and warm in a 400° F (200° C) oven until heated through. Notes Here are some modifications we made while making the recipe based on what we had on hand. It turned out delicious this way as well. - We used half shiitakes and half crimini mushrooms. Crimini take a little longer to brown but otherwise work well here. - We used sage instead of thyme and also topped the bake with some crispy fried sage. - We used coconut aminos instead of tamari - those two are pretty interchangeable. - When baking, the filling tends to bubble up and drip out of the dish, so its helpful to set the baking dish over a baking sheet, to catch the drippings and avoid a smoking oven. 3.5.3226 The post Mushroom and Onion Cauliflower Bake from Whole Food Cooking Every Day appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

45 Best Tofu Recipes to Try! Stir-fries, Marinated, Curries, Sandwiches & More

July 8 2019 Vegan Richa 

45 Best Tofu Recipes to Try! Stir-fries, Marinated, Curries, Sandwiches & More45 Best Tofu Recipes to Try. Stir-fries, Marinated and Baked, Curries, Pasta, Crispy Breaded Tofu, Sandwiches & More. No Bland tofu! Gluten-free Options. Delicious Vegan Tofu Recipes. Tofu is an interesting ingredient. In the initial years when we transitioned to eating vegan, I used to dislike tofu. That was probably because of the tofu I tried in restaurants which was bland or just fried and added to things. No marination, no spices or herbs. Then, I started cooking with it myself and the challenge was to see if would like tofu. Challenge accepted and then some. Try my Indian butter tofu, Orange Tofu, Cajun Baked Tofu, lemon asparagus pasta, Chili garlic baked tofu, Tofu in Amritsari sauce and then try the rest of the recipes as well. What is Tofu? Tofu is basically bean curd. It is made by curdling soy milk (milk from soybeans) and then pressing the resulting curds into blocks. The process is similar to making cheese curds from dairy milk. During transition, I didn’t particularly eat much Tofu or miss eating it. There were plenty of beans, lentils and legumes in our diet. Tofu is easily more available in restaurants and when travelling, so its a good protein to get to like. And that’s what happened when I started to prepare it in various ways. If you are avoiding soy, you can use other protein subs in most of these recipes, such as chickpea tofu, cooked chickpeas or beans, roasted veggies, seitan, meat subs etc. Most recipes have the alternatives mentioned to make them soyfree when possible.Continue reading: 45 Best Tofu Recipes to Try! Stir-fries, Marinated, Curries, Sandwiches & MoreThe post 45 Best Tofu Recipes to Try! Stir-fries, Marinated, Curries, Sandwiches & More appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Very Green Spring Pasta

April 29 2019 Meatless Monday 

This Very Green Spring Pasta uses both whole wheat pasta and zucchini noodles, making it full of heart-healthy fiber but lighter and lower on the carbs. This recipe comes to us from Parsnips and Pastries . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 6   - 12 ounce s whole wheat spaghetti - 2 tablespoon s olive oil plus more for serving - 1  bunch asparagus trimmed and thinly sliced on a bias - 1  large shallot diced - 3  cloves garlic minced - 1  bunch rainbow chard chopped, stems and leaves separated - 2  zucchini spiralized - 1 cup  fresh English peas if using frozen, see notes - Zest and juice of 1 lemon - 1/­­4 cup  Chardonnay - 1/­­2 cup  grated parmesan plus more for serving - 1/­­4 cup  basil finely chopped, plus more for serving - Sea salt and pepper to taste   Bring a large pot of water to a boil for the pasta and cook spaghetti until al dente. Reserve some of the pasta water before draining. While the pasta is cooking, heat the olive oil in a large, deep saute pan. Add the shallot and cook until softened. Add the asparagus, garlic, and chard stems, and season with salt and pepper. Cook one minute. Add in the wine and lemon juice and zest. Bring the wine to a simmer and toss in the peas, chard leaves, and the zucchini noodles. Toss everything and cook until the chard is wilted, the zucchini noodles are just softened, and the asparagus is tender but still retains a bite. Toss the vegetable mixture with the cooked spaghetti, basil, and parmesan. Season to taste with additional salt and pepper, if needed. Add a few tablespoons of the starchy cooking water, if desired, to loosen the sauce. Serve drizzled with olive oil and topped with additional parmesan and basil. Note: If using frozen peas, add the peas into the boiling pasta during the last 3 minutes of cooking and drain the pasta and peas together. The post Very Green Spring Pasta appeared first on Meatless Monday.

NYC Expands Meatless Monday to All Schools — Reaching 1.1 Million Students Every Week

March 11 2019 Meatless Monday 

NYC Expands Meatless Monday to All Schools — Reaching 1.1 Million Students Every WeekNYC Mayor Bill de Blasio, Schools Chancellor Richard A. Carranza, and Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams announced that Meatless Monday will be expanded to all New York City public schools beginning in the 2019-2020 school year. Meatless Monday is a global movement encouraging everyone to cut out meat one day a week, for personal and environmental health. In Spring 2018, 15 schools in Brooklyn piloted Meatless Monday; in the Fall, the test program was then expanded to include additional City schools. As a result of the success of the broader pilot program, Meatless Monday will now cover all NYC schools and will provide 1.1 million students with healthy, all-vegetarian breakfast and lunch menus every Monday. See the press release here . The announcement that Mayor de Blasio has expanded Meatless Monday to all New York City public schools marks a major milestone. Through this united effort, New York Citys schools take a leadership role in getting our children on a healthier track, as well as making a positive impact on our environment. Sid Lerner, Founder, Meatless Monday Movement The Meatless Monday pilot expansion evaluated student feedback on a broad scale. Results of the test showed that participation in meals on Mondays remained stable and the DOE decided to officially bring Meatless Mondays citywide for 2019-20. The Meatless Monday program is cost-neutral and the DOEs Office of Food and Nutrition Services will meet with students to get feedback on the menu before its finalized. Cutting back on meat a little will improve New Yorkers’ health and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, said Mayor Bill de Blasio. We’re expanding Meatless Mondays to all public schools to keep our lunch and planet green for generations to come. Meatless Mondays are good for our students, communities, and the environment, said Schools Chancellor Richard A. Carranza. Our 1.1 million students are taking the next step towards healthier, more sustainable lives, and we should all follow suit. Im looking forward to joining our schools in the Meatless Mondays movement next year! I am grateful to Mayor de Blasio and Chancellor Carranza, as well as our incredible parent and student advocates who have made this a reality, said Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams. I could not be more energized by our progress and more ready to take on the work ahead. Reducing our appetite for meat is one of the single biggest ways individuals can reduce their environmental impact on our planet, said Mark Chambers, Director of the NYC Mayors Office of Sustainability. Meatless Mondays will introduce hundreds of thousands of young New Yorkers to the idea that small changes in their diet can create larger changes for their health and the health of our planet. The announcement was made at PS 130 The Parkside, one of 15 schools that participated in the pilot program in Brooklyn. On Mondays, the school serves a variety of all-vegetarian meals including vegetarian tacos, grilled cheese, and a salad bar. Meatless Monday builds on the Citys efforts to provide free, healthy meals to all students. This initiative will also be part of New York Citys Free School Lunch for All, which launched in the 2017-18 school year and provides free healthy breakfast and lunch to all participating New York City schools. In the 2017-18 school year, more than 150 million breakfasts and lunches were served free of charge. Join the Movement - Meatless Monday Offers Free Resources and Expertise to K-12 Schools Schools looking to implement Meatless Monday programs can consult with our team, which includes experts from the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future .  Free resources include: o Research on the health and environmental benefits of choosing plant-based foods instead of meat o Implementation guides for starting Meatless Monday in school cafeterias o Marketing materials that can be used to promote Meatless Monday on site or through digital and social media o Downloadable cookbooks and weekly newsletters  with Meatless Monday recipes o Sign-up to become a Meatless Monday Ambassador Questions? Contact us now  for additional information or to learn how to implement a program at your school. Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post NYC Expands Meatless Monday to All Schools — Reaching 1.1 Million Students Every Week appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Make it a Meatless Monday Mardi Gras Celebration with Green Gumbo

March 4 2019 Meatless Monday 

Make it a Meatless Monday Mardi Gras Celebration with Green Gumbo Every year, people around the world celebrate Mardi Gras and Carnival, a festival of parades, music and eating decadent foods leading up to Lent. Millions of people observe Lent by fasting or foregoing treats and meats for 40 days. Fun fact, the term carnival is from carnelevare, or to remove meat. So thats what were doing, removing the meat, but keeping the delicious flavor of the popular Mardi Gras dish gumbo. This Creole stew from Southern Louisiana usually features strong-flavored stock, meat, or shellfish, but, with a few simple swaps, it’s a perfect vegetarian dish. Green Gumbo is a popular plant-based version that includes a variety of greens and herbs that give it an amazing color and rich flavors. Richard McCarthy, Member of the Executive Committee for Slow Food International and a Meatless Monday ambassador , shares his green gumbo recipe and great tips for making this plant-based dish taste authentic. Richards essentials for cooking green gumbo: Cook with what you have. Use collard greens, kale, mustard greens, turnip greens, spinach, and herbs like parsley, dill, etc. Green gumbo appears throughout the Lenten culinary calendar as meatless and on Holy Thursday in famous restaurants (like Dooky Chase) with meat stock. Begin by making a roux. Heat the pan with vegetable or olive oil, add flour, and mix with a wooden spoon until dark brown. The color of the gumbo will be determined by how dark you make the roux. The roux gives butter beans and lima beans a great base of flavor. Or, consider any medley of vegetables. Add Shiitake Bacon to get the traditional umami flavor. Umami is the savory flavor that many eaters say is missing in vegetarian recipes. One way to add umami to green gumbo is to make shiitake bacon, which provides the missing depth of flavor. Dont forget the rice. Rice is a traditional accompaniment to gumbo. While a saucepan is perfectly good for preparing rice, rice cookers are also an easy way to prepare perfect rice every time. Any grain or variety of rice can work, but long-grain rice is best since it provides the gumbo with more surface areas to cover with flavor.  McCarthy recommends a simplified version of the recipe crafted by Richard Stewart, the former chef of Gumbo Shop. Green Gumbo Serves 4 Ingredients: Gumbo: 1/­­4 cup of vegetable or olive oil 1/­­4 cup of flour 1 large onion, minced 4 stalks of celery, minced 1 bell pepper, minced 2 bunches of available greens (collard, mustard, kale, turnip, and/­­or spinach), chopped 1/­­4 cup of chopped parsley 2-4 cups of water (or enough to make a soup) 2 bay leaves Salt and pepper, to taste Cayenne pepper or hot sauce, to taste 1 cup of dried field peas (or Sea Island red peas, on the Slow Food Ark of Taste ) Vegetable stock, to taste (optional) Mushroom Bacon: 1 dozen fresh shiitake or button mushrooms 1 TBS of liquid smoke, smoked salt and/­­or smoked paprika 1/­­4 cup of vegetable or olive oil 1 TBS of salt or soy sauce (to taste) Rice: 1 cup of long-grained rice 2 cups of water Preparation: Field peas: Rinse, then boil field peas in salt water until soft. Drain peas of excess water and either store or immerse immediately into the gumbo. This step can be done in advance in order to cut down on preparation time on the day of serving. You can even prepare and freeze the peas days before, drop them into the hot soupy pot mid-way through the process. Make the gumbo: Heat a soup pot at a medium setting and make a roux (the soup base). Roux: add oil to the pot, once sizzling, add flour and mix with a wooden spoon. When the flour starts to smell delicious, it will then begin to turn a brownish color. Stir fairly vigorously to avoid burning. Once its a dark brown (5-10 minutes), add minced onions, celery and bell pepper. Stir the ingredients well to blend the flavors. Add salt, pepper, and more oil and/­­or water (or wine) to deglaze the pan. The roux will become bubbly and smell almost sweet. At this point, start adding water and turn down the heat a little. Add bay leaves, other seasonings, and the chopped greens and herbs. They will soon turn from bright green to dark green. Add field peas and any additional vegetables, like chopped carrots or turnips, whatever you have in the kitchen. Let simmer for at least 60 minutes. Once the gumbo is hot, tasty and ingredients cooked down into dark greens, and soft field peas, it is ready to serve. Tasting it at the end is important: Is it salty or spicy enough? If not, add more cayenne or hot sauce, black pepper, salt, etc. Mushroom bacon: Slice fresh mushrooms vertically in thirds, depending upon the size of the mushrooms. (Button mushrooms are fine and usually easily available, feel free to select shiitake or other exceptionally tasty varieties.) In a mixing bowl, add 1/­­4 cup of oil, 1 TBS of liquid smoke, salt or soy sauce. Mix the ingredients, and then add the fresh mushrooms and mix until they are coated. Spread sliced mushrooms across a baking sheet and bake for 20-30 minutes at 375 degrees F. Check after 15 minutes and turn over ones that are browned and crisp. Once crispy, turn off the oven and let cool slowly in oven. Rice: If you have a rice cooker, prepare as usual. If not, wash 1 cup of rice under running cold water to remove any excess dust, etc. Boil in 2 cups of water until soft (usually 25-30 min). Final Preparations: Place 1/­­4 cup of rice in the middle of a shallow soup bowl. Pour gumbo around the rice, making sure that there are equal amounts of greens and liquid. Take the dried, crispy mushroom bacon from the cooled oven and add a handful on top of the rice, and serve. Invite your friends and family to celebrate a plant-based Mardi Gras with this Green Gumbo recipe. If youre looking for other meatless recipe inspiration throughout the Lenten season, check out our recipe gallery . Happy Mardi Gras! Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post Make it a Meatless Monday Mardi Gras Celebration with Green Gumbo appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Pasta e Ceci – The Coziest Pasta and Chickpea Soup from Abruzzo

January 24 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Pasta e Ceci – The Coziest Pasta and Chickpea Soup from Abruzzo We had the most transcendent experience eating this simple, Italian peasant soup during our retreat in Abruzzo this past fall. We had just returned to our b&b from a beautiful mountain hike, where we foraged rosehips and mint, and everyone was very ready for lunch after that good dose of exercise and fresh air. Our hosts at the bed and breakfast served a homemade pasta e ceci (pasta and chickpea soup), and it really hit the spot with its coziness and simplicity. There are still spots open for our retreat in Abruzzo this coming October! You can read all about our past retreat here, complete with photos and testimonials. This time around, we will be focusing on re-centering and relaxation, together with exploring beautiful Abruzzo. We are super excited to have an on-site yoga/­­meditation instructor and an on-site acupuncture physician, both offering daily services. There will be lots of fun and useful cooking workshops with us, as well as visits to an olive grove, winery, and a family truffle plantation. You can see our whole sample itinerary below, and book here! Click Here to book a spot at the retreat! Abruzzo 2019 Retreat Sample Itinerary *details are subject to change /­­ all meals are vegan with a vegetarian option DAY 1 – Pick up in Rome at 1:30 PM, Piazza Bologna – Drive to Abruzzo – Unpack and relax – Aperitif and dinner prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team DAY 2 – Morning yoga and meditation with our on-site certified yoga instructor – Breakfast prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team, with superfood latte/­­smoothie demonstration (different recipe every day) – Diagnostic consultations, facial and/­­or body gua sha massage, and acupressure with our on-site Acupuncture Physician (1 individual appointment included in the cost of the retreat, additional charge for all follow-up appointments) – Lunch prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team – Time to relax, forest bathe, and hike the grounds after gua sha/­­acupressure appointments – Dinner at a local restaurant – Optional evening meditation DAY 3 – Morning yoga and singing bowl meditation – Breakfast prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team, with superfood latte/­­smoothie demonstration – Diagnostic consultations, facial and/­­or body gua sha massage, and acupressure with our on-site Acupuncture Physician (1 individual appointment included in the cost of the retreat, additional charge for all follow-up appointments) – Lunch prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team – Foraging walk to gather herbs + medicinal jam and herbal tea workshop with the Golubka Kitchen team – Dinner prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team – Optional evening meditation DAY 4 – Morning yoga + sun gazing/­­A.M. sun therapy – Breakfast prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team, with superfood latte/­­smoothie demonstration – Visit to an olive grove with 600 year old trees + meditation and grounding in the orchard – Sample olive oil made with the olives from the grove + light picnic-style lunch – Plant-based cooking & meal planning workshop with the Golubka Kitchen team – Dinner – Optional evening meditation * Option to bypass any of the P.M. activities for an additional gua sha massage/­­acupressure appointment with our on-site Acupuncture Physician (at additional cost). DAY 5 – Morning yoga and singing bowl meditation – Breakfast prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team, with superfood latte/­­smoothie demonstration – Truffle hunting in Villa Santa Lucia – Truffle lunch in a locals home – Pasta-making workshop with an Abruzzo local + vegan cheese workshop with Golubka Kitchen – Pasta and vegan cheese dinner – Optional evening meditation * Option to bypass any of the P.M. activities for an additional gua sha massage/­­acupressure appointment with our on-site Acupuncture Physician (at additional cost). DAY 6 – Morning yoga and meditation – Breakfast prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team, with superfood latte/­­smoothie demonstration – Visit a 200-year-old family-run winery + wine tasting and light lunch – Magic Moisturizer + homemade skincare workshop with the Golubka Kitchen team – Goodbye dinner at a local restaurant – Optional evening meditation * Option to bypass any of the P.M. activities for an additional gua sha massage/­­acupressure appointment with our on-site Acupuncture Physician (at additional cost). DAY 7 – Breakfast – Head back to Piazza Bologna in Rome (12:30 PM drop-off) Click Here to book a spot at the retreat! Let’s talk more about the soup! Pasta e Ceci is not a strictly Abruzzese dish, it’s made all over Italy, in slightly different variations. This recipe is inspired by the Abruzzo version. This soup completely blew us away with its ratio of simplicity to flavor. All the ingredients are very, very modest. You start out by making a good broth, with chickpeas and some aromatics. Then while the broth simmers, you make a very rustic, eggless pasta dough, which is then cut into short, flat noodles, called sagne pasta. The pasta then gets cooked right in the chickpea broth, and everything is served as a chunky soup, with plenty of olive oil and some spicy red pepper on top. There’s also an ingenious, crispy element that helps switch up the textures in the soup. Some of the fresh pasta gets toasted on a dry skillet, until it turns into crispy strips, that are then used to garnish every plate. It is so good. This is a great time to say that you can totally use store-bought pasta here! The eggless sagne pasta is easy to make, but it’s still much more of a project than just opening up a package and being ready to go (just skip the crispy pasta element). If you’re ever craving something resembling chicken soup from your childhood, this is a great, vegan version that still hits all of those comfort notes. Enjoy! Pasta e Ceci - The Coziest Pasta and Chickpea Soup from Abruzzo   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the soup 1 cup chickpeas - soaked overnight in purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar 2 ribs celery - sliced in half 1 yellow onion - quartered, skin on 2 cloves garlic - smashed 2 bay leaves 10 cups water sea salt black pepper 2 medium carrots - grated red pepper flakes - to taste handful chopped parsley - for garnish olive oil - for garnish fresh sagne pasta (recipe below) or about 12 oz dried store-bought pasta for the sagne pasta 1½ cups spelt, whole wheat, or sprouted spelt/­­wheat flour ½ teaspoon sea salt 1 tablespoon olive oil ½ cup purified warm water, plus more as needed Instructions to make the soup Drain and rinse the chickpeas. In a large soup pot, combine the chickpeas, celery, onion, garlic, bay leaves, and water. Bring up to a boil over high heat. Turn down the heat and simmer, covered, or until the chickpeas are cooked and tender (this might take up to an hour or even longer for older chickpeas). Make the pasta while the broth is cooking. Salt the broth well at the end. Remove the aromatics (celery, onion, garlic, bay leaves) with a slotted spoon and discard. Add black pepper to taste to the broth, along with the carrots and red pepper flakes. Bring everything up to a boil, then simmer for 10 more minutes, or until the carrots are cooked through. Meanwhile, heat a dry pan over medium-high heat. Add ¼ of the amount of the pasta to the pan and toast, stirring often, until the pasta becomes crispy. Use the crispy pasta to garnish the soup. Bring the soup back up to a boil, add in the rest of the pasta (recipe below) and cook for 30 seconds to 2 minutes, until al dente. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve the soup, topped with crispy sagne pasta, parsley, and a drizzle of olive oil. If using dried store-bought pasta, cook it into the soup until al dente, and skip the crispy pasta step. to make the sagne pasta Mix the flour and salt together in a large bowl with a fork. Make a well in the center and pour in the oil and water. Begin to mix with a fork, slowly incorporating the flour into the well of oil and water. When all the flour is mixed in, transfer the dough to a floured surface and knead it for 10 minutes, until smooth and elastic. All flour takes on water differently, so add more water, 1 tablespoon at a time, if your dough seems dry. It should feel smooth, but not too wet, with no cracking. Form a ball with the dough and tightly wrap it in plastic wrap, or cover with a damp kitchen towel in the bowl. Let the dough rest for 30 minutes at room temperature. Place the dough back on the well-floured work surface and knead it for another 10 minutes, until even more springy. Cut the dough in half and keep one half covered with a damp kitchen towel while you roll out the pasta. Keep your working surface well-floured. Roll one piece of dough at a time into a paper-thin sheet. Cut the rolled-out dough into the sagne pasta shape, about 1½ x ¼, using a pizza cutter or a knife. Transfer the pasta to a parchment-covered tray, sprinkled with plenty of flour to prevent sticking. Continue rolling out and cutting the rest of the dough. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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