chamomile - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Homemade Everything Bagel Seasoning and How to Use It

Chocolate Pomegranate Granola Bites

Poppyseed Dukkah-Stuffed Baked Apples with Coconut Caramel

Bhel puri recipe | bhel poori | bhel puri chaat | bhel recipe










chamomile vegetarian recipes

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes

January 1 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes Lauren Haynes is a folk herbalist, medicine maker, plant enthusiast, and the founder of Wooden Spoon Herbs, a small apothecary line based in the Appalachian mountains. Take a look at Lauren’s shop offerings, and you’ll be immersed in a world of plant-powered tinctures, salves, oxymels, and teas, each one more magical than the other. In this interview, Lauren tells us about self-care as a form of self-respect, kindness as a form of beauty, her favorite plants for stress, beauty, and colds (and more!), the importance of sourcing her ingredients locally and working with what’s available, as well as exercise, sustenance, inspiration, procrastination, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Oh, open and free, absolutely. Since I work from home, things end up being pretty routine: tea, emails, breakfast. But if I have my way I love to see how the day unfolds uninhibited. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. Most mornings start with a hot tea or something creamy with raw milk and occasionally marshmallows. I check and return emails first thing, then Ill meditate and make some breakfast and get to work. On lazier mornings well go into the small town nearby and eat eggs benedict and read the paper. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? My new favorite nighttime tool is the Flux app for my computer. It gradually turns your screen from blue light to orange with the arc of the day, so the blue light doesnt deter melatonin production come bedtime. Other than that, just reading a great book until my eyes get tired. Living out in the county where its dark and quiet helps me sleep soundly every night. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – smoked salmon omelette with sauteéd greens Lunch – egg salad sandwich with a bowl of good soup Snack – fruit or hummus or a little chocolate Dinner – soul food: pinto beans, cornbread, a baked sweet potato and collard greens, topped with hot sauce and ferments and a slice of blue cheese -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I drink tea most mornings. Sometimes matcha or Earl Grey, or sometimes just ginger and lemon balm, to ground and calm myself before a hectic day. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? Um... yes, check. I have a major sweet tooth and Lilys stevia-sweetened chocolate bars save my life. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? Right now my regimen includes fish oil, Mothers Best beef liver pills, a tincture of medicinal mushrooms, and evening primrose oil. I also love using lymphatic herbs steeped in vinegar throughout the year. Every spring I steep whatever edible herbs are coming up naturally in raw apple cider vinegar: plantain, violet leaf, dead nettle, dandelion greens, chickweed and cleavers. That lasts me all year and keeps me feeling vital, just a spoonful a day. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I try to exercise but if I have a full schedule its the first thing I cut out. I live on a tract of wilderness, so walking a few miles a day is super easy and I do that interspersed with yoga when Im feeling too tired to get outside. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? A little bit of both! Its definitely hard to make the time for it since I work from home and just go, go, go. I definitely find walking in the woods pleasurable, so that keeps me motivated to exercise. I cant even imagine going to a gym... Maybe someday. Exercise is something Im starting to get excited about. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? True beauty is when someone makes you feel like your soul is illuminated by the way that they treat you. Thats what is beautiful to me. If I want external beauty, Ill just scroll Instagram for a bit, you know? But true kindness is actual beauty. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Laidback is how I would describe my skincare routine. See also: erratic. I use a rosewater and witch hazel toner daily (Poppy & Someday), followed by a blend of rosehip and carrot seed oil (Zizia Botanicals). Sometimes I use a gentle rose quartz scrub on my face (Aquarian Soul), followed by oil cleansing, but usually Im pretty lowkey. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Yes! Nettle and alfalfa infusions, and also evening primrose oil internally. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Drink tons of water, sleep as much as you can, and wear red lipstick. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Consistent routines are hard for me, but I am constantly checking in to make sure I dont get overwhelmed by stress, even if that means five minutes of yoga in the middle of the day. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I really love regular acupuncture treatments and massage, as well as daily meditation and moxibustion. Calming teas that ease tension, like ginger and chamomile. Also just goofing off as much as I can get away with. You cant be silly and stressed at the same time. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? My first line of defense is a few dropperfuls of fire cider. I make one called Sunshine Cider with turmeric and rosehips, but my friend Gretchen made me some with habanero peppers and that always helps me stay on the right side of health. Fire cider, a shot of elderberry syrup and then some red root tincture, an amazing lymphatic herb that relieves a sore throat. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? They definitely bleed together, as I work from home and run my business with my partner. I try to take the weekends off and get out of the house daily to break up the work mode, even if its just a drive to the post office. Luckily, I love my work because its a huge part of my life. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Honestly, mindfulness is key. Just checking in with myself constantly to see how Im feeling, why Im feeling that way and what I need. I just take little tea or chocolate breaks or go put some sun on my face or make a nourishing meal. A hot shower if Im feeling cold. Self massage if Im feeling anxious. Shutting the computer if Im getting tired. And making time for the little things that make me happy, like reading a book. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Cleaning up my diet was key for me in resolving a lot of health issues. In college I was just eating garbage and drinking alcohol and doing all the teenage things. Once I realized that youre literally what you eat, and started treating my body with respect, a lot shifted for me. I really feel like that small change helped align me with the path Im on now, which is 100% what Im supposed to be doing. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Im usually brimming with ideas and running myself ragged trying to make them all happen, so if I struggle with anything its occasional procrastination. Usually this looks like doing the easier things on my to-do list before the hard-hitting work chores, which isnt such a bad thing. I just kind of let myself have some slower times, because I work really hard. I may sip tea and pull tarot cards and then eventually get a burst of energy. Or sometimes I do nothing for like two full days. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. So, so many. I love The Gift of Healing Herbs by Robin Rose Bennett and Wild Fermentation by Sandor Katz, as well as so many books from the 70s by obscure hippies and natural living advocates. Living on the Earth by Alicia Bay Laurel, for example. Knowledge -- What was your path to studying herbology and founding Wooden Spoon Herbs? I came to herbs when looking for a path to self-sufficiency. I romanticized living off the land, providing all that I would need for myself through my connection to the earth. And thats basically how it happened. I got all the books I could find about herbalism, read them, and started making herbal remedies. I started selling them slowly and it just kind of took off. Then I got to put my business hat on and thats been such a rewarding challenge. -- Can you talk a little bit about your decision to work only with herbs native to your home region of Appalachia? Theres so much to say about this. When I started opening my eyes to the bounty that surrounded me, it struck me as absurd to order herbs from suppliers that sourced from the far corners of the earth, when we had so many of the same herbs that could be sourced from the bioregion of Appalachia. For example, why am I going to order nettle that comes from Croatia when my friend has an acre of it on her farm? And no offense to Croatia or the herbalists that use those sources, but it just wasnt for me. I saw the opportunity to create a righteous supply chain and source from local farmers and forage my materials. To this day I still source directly from small organic farms around the country. Appalachias medicinal herbs are legendary: ginseng, goldenseal, bloodroot. People from all over the world use these herbs exclusively. And many of the herbs used in Traditional Chinese Medicine grow in Appalachia, because when the continents were Pangea parts of what is now China and parts of Appalachia were the same land. The geography of these regions is still very similar, and that is really special. So I wanted to learn about these plants for myself, because they are my neighbors and we share the same space. Not to mention that my family has been on this land for at least five generations, probably more. Its my most recent ancestral tradition, and I think its really important to learn about the traditions of your own ancestors so that youre not co-opting someone elses. Our pasts are precious. Finally, I believe in slow, local medicine for the same reasons I believe in slow, local foods – because theyre more potent and they taste better. -- What are some of your best-selling products and what herbs is your customer most excited about at the moment? My bestsellers are the Anxiety Ally, Brain Tonic, Moontime Magic and Migraine Melter tinctures. Elderberry Sumac Syrup is always a hit, as well as the Golden Cocoa (adaptogenic golden milk meets hot chocolate). I also have some new, more esoteric offerings based on the elements, and the Spirit one has been selling really well. I think my customers are just always after herbs that ground and expand the spirit, which is super beautiful. That and herbs for stress, always. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment?  Podcasts! All the podcasts: Medicine Stories, Thats So Retrograde, So You Wanna Be A Witch, Being Boss. That and the color cobalt blue. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I love seeking out hot springs, getting massages and acupuncture, going to the movies with my partner and eating at good restaurants. In the summer, swimming in the river behind my house and lying in the sun. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Caravan by Stephen Gaskin Song/­­Album – Tried So Hard by Gene Clark Piece of art – the entire Motherpeace tarot deck -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? My favorite mohair cardigan, a striped shirt, high-waisted leggings and denim, Poppy & Somedays Gypsy Rose Toner, whatever books Im reading, a notebook and Uniball pen, magazines, calming tinctures, bagged tea, thermos, Ricardo Medina botines, charcoal toothbrush -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Jess Fuery, Beatrice Valenzuela, Shiva Rose, the founders of Cap Beauty, Ashley Neese, Connie Matisse of East Fork Pottery, jeweler Annika Kaplan, Erica Chidi Cohen, Rachel Craven, Beth Kirby of Local Milk, Rachel Budde of Fat and the Moon, Kristen Dilley of Nightingale Acupuncture, and, naturally, Ilana Glazer Photos by Beth Kirby and Lauren Haynes You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

No-Recipe Cozy Vegan Latte

October 22 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

No-Recipe Cozy Vegan Latte This happens to me pretty much every day at around 3 o’clock, providing that I’m working from home. I get up from my desk, put on the teapot, throw a bunch of things in the blender, whirl it all together, and end up with a cozy and satisfying latte-ish drink that gets me through to dinner time. I don’t drink caffeine anymore, because I’ve always been very sensitive to it, and found that avoiding it altogether really helps with even energy levels (I may have made a few exceptions in Italy :)). But this little ritual takes me back to the days when 3 o’clock meant a cup of really good tea or a matcha. There’s really nothing better. I end up making a different drink every time, based on my mood and the ingredients I have on hand, but the general formula is the same. There’s always something for creaminess, something for flavor, something for an energy boost… So I thought I’d give a ‘no-recipe’ recipe here, as well as a few of my favorite combinations. Midday super-latte making is a really fun routine to add to your day if you’re around a blender, and it’s good for your in a number of ways: it gets you out of the busyness of the day and nudges you to take a break, it’s creative, and the beverage you’ll end up with will likely be good-for-you, warming and tasty. Tahini Hot Chocolate This was one of our most popular recipes last winter. It’s an incredibly satisfying blender hot chocolate that comes together in seconds. Rosemary Hot White Chocolate Another hot chocolate, but this one is a white hot chocolate infused with rosemary. A great case for using cacao butter in drinks, which lends both its chocolatey flavor, as well as a richness and a froth. Spirulina Latte Another blender latte, but this time boosted with all the green benefits of spirulina, without the swampy taste. Chamomile Latte The most grounding and delicious latte to drink before bed. Herbal Mocha with Chicory and Maca Playing off New Orleans-style coffee, this herbal mocha is a great option for those trying to take a break from coffee and missing it dearly. Chicory brings a coffee-like richness, while maca and cacao boost energy. Honey Miso Latte This is basically a golden milk latte, but boosted with the flavor and health benefits of miso and raw honey. I like to drink this one before plane journeys, since miso might be helpful when it comes to countering the radiation we are exposed to on any given flight. Hibiscus Ginger Latte This latte gets is beautiful color and a pleasant sour note in the flavor from steeped hibiscus flowers. Pear Cranberry Chai Any modesty aside, this is the best chai I’ve ever had or made in my life. A great example for how creative you can get with your beverages, this one uses both fruit and a bunch of healing spices to achieve an otherworldly flavor. No-Recipe Vegan Cozy Latte Start With: This is your base liquid, which will determine what other ingredients you will add to your blender. Choose one or a couple. Hot water is a blank canvas, while herbal coffee and tea will give you a base flavor, which you can play off off with your other ingredients. - hot water - chicory coffee or Dandy Blend - tea – herbal, black, green, etc. - hot plant milk – coconut, almond, cashew, oat, etc. Creamy: Add one of these ingredients or a combination of a few of them for a rich, extra-creamy latte, especially important to include if you are just using hot water as the base. - coconut butter - tahini - almond butter/­­cashew butter/­­any other nut butter - tocos - cacao butter Frothy: This is optional if you already have a creamy element, but adding some extra fat to your latte contributes to the most beautiful froth. Also, if your base is something with caffeine like a black or green tea, this will help slow the absorption of caffeine for a more even boost of energy (like in Bulletproof coffee). - Coconut oil/­­MCT oil - Ghee Sweet: Add as much sweetness as you need, tasting as you go. - dates - raw honey - maple syrup - date syrup Flavor: Play off your drink base while adding some flavor. Both cacao powder and turmeric do well in creamy, milky drinks, while spices, herbs and vanilla can be used millions of ways (just see the drink round-up above). - cacao powder - cacao butter - turmeric - other spices like cinnamon, cardamom, nutmeg, ginger - vanilla - herbs - miso Extras & Boosts: My absolute favorite energy-boosting ingredient for drinks is maca powder – it instantly wakes me up and tastes so delicious. But there are a ton of other boosters you can add to your lattes, some ideas below. - maca powder - cacao butter - other adaptogens: chaga, reishi, lion’s mane, cordyceps, ashwagandha - more: pearl powder, tocos, mucura pruriens, spirulina, etc. etc. Blend all your components until frothy and enjoy :) You might also like... Berry Kombucha Float Peach and Zucchini Smoothie Avocado Kiwi Smoothie and a Jus by Julie Cleanse Giveaway Honey Miso Latte .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post No-Recipe Cozy Vegan Latte appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Strawberry Guacamole

May 21 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Strawberry Guacamole Earlier this spring, I talked a little bit about what an explosive strawberry season we experienced this year. I couldn’t keep myself away from our nearby organic strawberry farm, and as a result ended up with lots of berries that needed to find a home in one dish or another, since my freezer can only fit so much. I made this pie, a cobbler, and sprinkled the berries over everything from morning bowls to salads. I also remembered that strawberries work surprisingly well in guacamole, as proven to me by a friend years ago. I love how every family seems to have their own specific guacamole recipe, and my friend came from a clever bunch that dealt with an influx of home-grown strawberries by enjoying them in guacamole. I can’t say enough about how much the combination of creamy avocado, sharp red onion, cilantro, jalape?o, and lime benefits from the juicy, sweet bursts of strawberries. It’s heaven. I could easily eat a bowl all to myself. Give this guac a try one hot day this summer with some good chips and a glass of something cold and fizzy, you won’t regret it! There is a quick step-by-step video above and weekend links below. Sunday hugs to you, friends :) Fields Of Study – currently participating in this four day online meditation workshop for anxiety and stress, and can’t say enough about it. There’s breath work, reading, exercises, and recorded guided meditations, as well as all kinds of practical tips on the use of minerals, flower remedies, etc. as tools for grounding and stress relief. My Place – liking this video series on Nowness The Hippies Have Won – yay Dear Sugar – a new-to-me podcast I’ve been enjoying The Planted One – a seriously inspiring meal-planning instagram Excited to get my hands on these books – Just the Essentials, The Wellness Project Strawberry Guacamole   Print Serves: 4-ish Ingredients 2 large, ripe but firm hass avocados 2 cups strawberries - hulled, sliced in half or quartered 1 cup cilantro leaves ¼ small red onion - finely chopped 1 small jalapeno - seeded and minced juice from 1 large or 2 small limes sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste Instructions Cut the avocados in half vertically and remove their pits. Scoop the avocado flesh into a medium bowl, using a spoon. Mash with the avocado with a fork. Add the strawberries, cilantro, onion, jalape?o, lime juice, salt and pepper to taste. Mix until well combined. Serve with your favorite tortilla chips. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Ramp Flatbread Pizza with Garlic Cream Pear Cranberry Chai Baked Latkes with Beet and Avocado Salad Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream -- Ice Cream Sunday .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Strawberry Guacamole appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Sweet Potato Toast, Two Ways

March 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Sweet Potato Toast, Two Ways I finally got around to trying sweet potato toast this week, a concept that I’ve been seeing circulating around the internet. Our instagram post about it generated a lot of interest, so I thought I would go into more detail here today. Basically, the whole idea is replacing bread with thinly sliced, toasted sweet potato and topping it as you would any toast. I know, why mess with an already perfect concept like toast? For one, it’s great for those trying to take it easy on grains or gluten. It’s also perfect for sweet potato lovers just looking to change things up for breakfast, snack, etc. (me). It’s a fun way to eat a nutritious root vegetable, and I have a feeling that it could easily be made very kid-friendly. It is decidedly its own thing, not toast, but totally stands on its own as tasty and filling fare. As with any toast, there are infinite possibilities when it comes to the toppings, since sweet potato gives a pretty neutral base. I offer my favorite sweet and savory options below. In the sweet one, earthy and creamy tahini is studded with jammy, smashed raspberries (I use frozen and defrosted ones this time of year), drizzled with honey/­­maple syrup and sprinkled with cacao nibs and seeds, and that combination is incredibly lovely. The savory one is (surprise!) avocado toast, but made a bit more substantial with the addition of balsamic lentils, a dusting of nutritional yeast and seeds. On a technical note, the whole reason behind the sweet potato toast craze is that you can cook the sweet potato slices right in the toaster. The catch is that I don’t own a toaster, so what I like to do is cook the slices in the oven the night before and then re-heat them, either in the oven or in a pan on the stovetop whenever I’m ready to eat my ‘toast.’ You could even cook a bigger batch for the week ahead, since the roasted sweet potatoes hold up well in the refrigerator. But if you do have a toaster, by all means cook the potato slices in there. I offer directions for both methods in the recipes. There are some weekend links below, Sunday hugs to you :) What The Health – a new film from the creators of Cowspiracy, this time targeting health organizations. Really excited to watch it, it’s available to stream on their website now. Hugh Forte’s Food Photography – just learned that the photographer behind Sprouted Kitchen has a separate Instagram account for his dreamy food photos, I can stare at them for ages. How Millions of Kids Are Being Shaped by Know-It-All Voice Assistants Sweet Potato Sheet Pan Dinner Salad – looks perfect, and those photos are amazing. The Avocado Show – an Amsterdam cafe centered around everything avocado, look at that. What We Eat When We Eat Alone – recently discovered this gem by Deborah Madison. Raspberry-Tahini Sweet Potato Toast   Print Serves: 4-6 toasts Ingredients 1 medium sweet potato ½ tablespoon coconut oil - soft (if using the oven) 2-4 tablespoons sesame tahini ¼ cup raspberries (fresh or frozen and thawed) honey or maple syrup for drizzling mixed seeds for garnish (I used cacao nibs, hemp, pumpkin seeds) Instructions Peel and slice the sweet potato into even, ¼-thick slices. If you have an organic sweet potato, you can leave the skin on, but I prefer it peeled. If using an oven, preheat it to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet and place the sweet potato slices on the sheet. Add the coconut oil and mix with your hands to coat. Put the baking sheet into the oven and cook for 15 minutes. Flip the slices and cook another 10-15 minutes until cooked through. Add toppings and enjoy right away or refrigerate in an air-tight container until ready to eat. Reheat in a 350° F (175° C) oven for about 5 minutes, then top. If using a toaster, place the sweet potato slices in the toaster and toast on high for about 5 minutes, until cooked through and toasty at the edges. Cooking time will vary slightly for different toasters. Spread tahini on each slice. Add raspberries, mashing them a bit with a fork. Drizzle each slice with the desired amount of honey/­­maple syrup and sprinkle with mixed seeds. Enjoy! 3.5.3226   Avocado-Lentil Sweet Potato Toast   Print Serves: 4-6 toasts Ingredients 1 medium sweet potato ½ tablespoon coconut oil - soft (if using the oven) ⅓ cup cooked black or French lentils 1 teaspoon olive oil ½ teaspoon balsamic vinegar, plus more for drizzling 1 small, ripe avocado juice of ½ small lemon sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste nutritional yeast for garnish mixed seeds for garnish (I used hemp, flax, pumpkin, and sunflower seeds) Instructions Peel and slice the sweet potato into even, ¼-thick slices. If you have an organic sweet potato, you can leave the skin on, but I prefer it peeled. If using an oven, preheat it to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet and place the sweet potato slices on the sheet. Add the coconut oil and mix with your hands to coat. Put the baking sheet into the oven and cook for 15 minutes. Flip the slices and cook another 10-15 minutes until cooked through. Add toppings and enjoy right away or refrigerate in an air-tight container until ready to eat. Reheat in a 350° F (175° C) oven for about 5 minutes, then top. If using a toaster, place the sweet potato slices in the toaster and toast on high for about 5 minutes, until cooked through and toasty at the edges. Cooking time will vary slightly for different toasters. In a small bowl, combine lentils, olive oil, balsamic vinegar, half of the lemon juice, salt and pepper. In another small bowl, mash the avocado with the remaining lemon juice, salt and pepper. Spread mashed avocado onto each sweet potato slice, followed by the lentils and a sprinkle of nutritional yeast and mixed seeds. Drizzle with more balsamic vinegar and enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... A Salad for the Weekdays Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream -- Ice Cream Sunday Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices Superfood Cherry Garcia Pops with a Chocolate Core - Ice... .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Sweet Potato Toast, Two Ways appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy

January 8 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy It’s interesting how motivating the tiniest tips from people you care about or respect can be. I was recently on a short flight and read the autobiography of a certain Soviet-era singer, whose music I grew up with. It was a thin, throwaway paperback that I read back to back during the flight, but something about her positivity really made an impression on me. This singer is almost eighty years old, but looks great and has stayed incredibly active, and the book is studded with small, often old-school tips of how she believes she’s managed to keep up her health. She walks everywhere she goes, covering large distances on foot in Saint Petersburg, Russia, and her two drinks of choice are carrot juice in the morning and chamomile tea at night. Sure enough, I’ve been noticing myself drinking both of those with more frequency and taking longer walks whenever possible. And it doesn’t matter to me how silly of a motivation that was, if it helps me get from point A to point B in taking more care of myself, I’m all in. So here’s the carrot-based tonic I’ve been inspired to drink more often. Since I don’t love pure carrot juice, I doctor it up with ginger, turmeric, lemon and honey, which makes it a true remedy and a preventative for winter colds and flu. It’s delicious – potent, refreshing, spicy and sinus-clearing, and a little goes a long way – I like having a shot or a small glass at a time. Some weekend links after the jump, stay warm this Sunday :)   Yvon Chouinard of Patagonia on the How I Built This Podcast (scroll down a few) Mark Bittman on Changing the Food Industry and Living Dangerously – on Tim Ferriss’s podcast Ron Finley, Gangsta Gardener Amy Revier, Weaving Worlds Beyond Words   Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy   Print Serves: 1 large glass Ingredients 8-10 large carrots - peeled if not organic 1 piece ginger or more - peeled if not organic 1 piece fresh turmeric root - peeled if not organic 1 lemon 1 teaspoon raw honey Instructions Run the carrots, ginger, turmeric and lemon through a juicer. Pour juice into a blender, add the honey and blend until the honey is incorporated. Enjoy. Notes 1. I like to use organic lemons for this juice, so that I can run the peel through the juicer and get its oils and benefits into the tonic. 2. I generally use a bit more than 1 of ginger for this amount of juice, but I like things really fiery. If you are the same way, add some more ginger. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Jujube Ginger Tea Quinoa Collard Wraps from the Sprouted Kitchen Cookbook Root Vegetabe Chickpea Flour Quiche Late Summer Oat Milk Smoothie with Figs and Grapes .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

A Summer of Ice Cream

September 3 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

A Summer of Ice Cream Somehow, we’ve reached the weekend that is considered by many to be the last hurrah of summer. It always goes by in a blink, and every year, the blink seems like the fastest one yet. Though very sentimental, I also can’t help but feel some excitement toward the cooler temperatures, fall produce and general coziness to come. At the beginning of this summer, we gave ourselves a challenge to come up with a new ice cream to post here every Sunday. We are happy to have fulfilled the plan, and the result consists of twelve original ice cream recipes that we are very proud of (+1 recipe from an author we love). Sometimes, I really love setting difficult-but-realistic goals for myself that I know will make me grow, whether personally or professionally – this one made me grow in both ways. Some weeks, it was definitely challenging to think up yet another frozen treat, but mostly, it was very rewarding and quite fun. I generally find myself having a more lighthearted approach, when it comes to ice cream recipe development, as opposed to the more serious savory recipes. The abundance of summer produce made the process of coming up with new flavors quite fluid, and I worked with what was available. Below, a round up of our summer of ice cream. It’s neat to see it all lined up chronologically, starting with rhubarb in the early summer, followed by strawberries, peaches, very light sorbets for the hottest of days, tropical milkshakes, and my youngest daughter’s birthday cake. We are currently brainstorming ideas for a similar weekend series to run during the colder months of the year, and would love to hear from you on what kind of recipes you’d like to see (snacks? sandwiches? soups? It doesn’t have to start with an S!). Have a lovely weekend :) Rose and Rhubarb Frozen Yogurt – Frozen yogurt is one of the easiest frozen treats to make, especially if you have an ice cream maker. All it takes is some good yogurt, whatever secondary ingredients you choose for flavor, and a quick whirl in the machine. Ive always found rose flavor to be very invigorating, and combined with the subtle tartness of the rhubarb and creamy tanginess of the yogurt, this is dessert and aromatherapy all in one bowl. Emma’s Strawberry Thai Basil Sorbet – Aside from eating them just as they are, nothing showcases seasonal fresh berries more than homemade sorbet. This one is from Emmas beautiful cookbook, My Darling Lemon Thyme - Recipes from My Real Food Kitchen. One of the things I adore about Emmas cooking style is her love of fresh herbs. Just like her, I often include herbs in sweet dishes, its a little trick to turn many ordinary desserts into a completely unique and memorable treat. The inclusion of Thai basil in this recipe is genius and makes this creamy sorbet even more refreshing, aromatic and summery. Its also hard to believe that this intense crimson colour comes just from strawberries - a real show stopper. Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits – My go-to vegan lavender ice cream recipe with the addition of rich and decadent chocolate-tahini bits. It has a creamy, luxurious texture, which combines so well with the refreshing flavors of lavender and chewy, bittersweet pieces of chocolate. Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream – Chamomile, honey and lemon are flavors that seem to have been made for one another. In this ice cream, they unite into a subtle taste that I can only describe as soothing, steadying and balancing. Theres that unmistakably floral quality from the chamomile, sweetness from the honey, a sour citrus note from the lemon, all combined in a cooling and smooth ice cream. Green Smoothie Pops – A green smoothie on a stick that can be easily eaten for breakfast on a very hot day, or as an extra nutritious dessert, on any day. Papaya Lime Sundae – Papaya always pairs amazingly well with lime - both are tropical in flavor, and lime gives creamy and mild papaya just the right hint of brightness and zing. Presented here as a very refreshing version of a sundae, with delicious and healthful add-ins - desiccated coconut, cacao nibs (which we sprinkle on everything sweet in this house), and a drizzle of Lady Date pure date syrup. Pi?a Colada Milkshake – A recreation of my favorite beachside cocktail in non-alcoholic, vegan milkshake form. Peach, Honey and Thyme Lemonade Popsicles – These lemonade popsicles, with a bit of zing from ginger, have been in my beat-the-heat arsenal for many summers now - a dessert for the toastiest of days, requiring minimal effort. The lemonade can also be had in its original, un-frozen state, and is an incredibly refreshing, summery drink. Tahini Ice Cream Bars with Miso and Caramel and Chocolate – These vegan tahini ice cream bars, covered with a generous drizzle of miso caramel and chocolate, very distantly remind me of Snickers ice cream bars, which I used to love, but these particular ones are much more healthful and interesting in flavor. Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops with a Chocolate Core –  A recreation of my favorite Ben & Jerrys ice cream flavor, made vegan and nutritious with the addition of a few energizing superfoods, and complete with a decadent chocolate core. Mint and Chocolate Milkshake with Aquafaba Whipped Cream – A classic ice cream flavor in milkshake form. Its creamy, with little hard specs of cacao nibs, invigorating with the addition of fresh mint, and topped with a chickpea-based vegan whipped cream. Pistachio and Raspberry Fields Ice Cream Cake – Paloma’s birthday cake, named for her obsession with the Beatles. Pistachio and raspberry complement each other perfectly here, the pistachio flavor being nutty and earthy, while the raspberry becomes its perfect, juicy and fruity pair. The cacao buckwheat crust adds just the right hint of chocolate and crunch to the mix. Berry Creamsicles with White Chocolate Drizzle – These beauties are a breeze to make, requiring no ice cream maker, and are colored lilac with all of summers sweetest, sun-ripened berries. The white chocolate drizzle, made with cacao butter and cashews, adds a nice, extra bit of texture to the creamy berry base, but the creamsicles are great on their own as well, in case you dont want to bother with the drizzle. The post A Summer of Ice Cream appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Beet & Berry Yoats + Big Love

July 25 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Beet & Berry Yoats + Big Love A few years ago we had a section on this blog called Big Love where we shared links and things that inspired us at the moment - high and low. We’re reviving it today as we have too many unanswered emails and comments asking about everything from our favorite places, books, ceramics and camera gear. We also added a couple of other things to the list, like Elsa’s favorite song. Of course we’re also sharing the recipe for these Yoat jars further down in this post. Big Love! o Our cookbook shelf is always overflowing, here are our two latest additions. My Darling Lemon Thyme (by Emma Galloway) is a truly great book with recipes right up our alley (all vegetarian and gluten free). Tasting Rome (by Katie Parla and Kristina Gill) brings back so many memories from the time I was living there. Beautiful photography both of the city and its food. o Luise is in love with the apron that Sara from Sprouted Kitchen made in collaboration with her sister from Stone Cold Fox. Luise is wearing it in this blog post and it can be found here. o The ceramics from this Danish family company will make any food look pretty. Here are two examples where we have used it {uno | due}. o If you are visiting Scandinavia, make sure to check out these links to some of our favourite places in Stockholm and Copenhagen. o Our smoothie book is coming out in the US next week and can be pre-ordered here! o For those of you asking about camera gear. I have a Canon EOS 5D mark iii with two different lenses. A 50 mm f/­­1.2 for all top shots and a 100 mm f/­­1.8 macro lens for all close-ups. I use the same equipment when I film videos for our youtube channel. When we travel I use this camera bag. o If you love kombucha you should check out this incredible guide by Sarah from My New Roots. o Even if it is our third time around, I will never get tired of seeing Luise’s tummy growing. o Elsa is constantly humming on this song by two 14-year old Norwegian twin brothers (gone are apparently the days when she just played with teddybears and sang Twinkle Twinkle…). o Isac’s new hair style - the boy-bun. We call this quick breakfast recipe Yoats. It is a mashup of yogurt and oats (and a few other simple ingredients) that we prepare in jars for a simple outside breakfast in the sun. In a way, this recipe is similar to a bircher muesli as you can leave it in the fridge overnight, but because the yogurt loosens up the oats real quickly, it can also be indulged right away. For flavour and extra va-va-voom, we layer it with a rather thick raspberry and beetroot smoothie (maybe puree is a more describing word?) and also add some of it to the oats for a beautiful pink hue. The layers are not only visually appealing but also more interesting as the flavours change as you work your way through the jar. Beetroot for breakfast might sound scary but the earthiness from the root is perfectly balanced with tanginess from the lemon, sweetness from dates and fruitiness from the raspberries. We’ve tried the yoats recipe with coconut yogurt (as a vegan option) and Greek yogurt and they both taste great. Obviously you can change the flavour by simply making a different smoothie/­­purée. Beetroot & Raspberry Yoats Serves 4 Yoats 2 cups /­­ 500 ml plain thick yogurt, Greek or Turkish (vegans can use Coconut Yogurt) 1 cup /­­ 90 g rolled oats 1/­­4 cup /­­35 g sunflower seeds 1 small apple, cored and roughly grated on a box grater 1 pinch ground vanilla or vanilla extract 1 tsp freshly grated ginger or ground ginger Beet & Raspberry Purée 1 cup /­­ 125 g raspberries (fresh or thawed frozen) 1 small raw beetroot (approx 65 g /­­ 2 oz), peeled and coarsely chopped or grated (depending on the strength of your blender) 1/­­2 lemon, juice 2 tbsp water 2 soft dates, pitted To serve raspberries fresh mint leaves, chopped bee pollen Place all ingredients for the yoats in a mixing bowl and gently stir to combine. Set aside. Meanwhile prepare the purée. Add all ingredients to a high speed blender and blend until smooth. Taste to see if more lemon juice, water or dates are needed. When done, mix  1/­­4 cup of the purée with the yoats. Then divide the rest of the purée into 4 glass jars. Spoon the pink yoats into each jar. Eat right away or store in the fridge for up to a couple of days. Ideally make the recipe in the evening and serve for breakfast the following morning. Top with fresh raspberries, chopped mint and bee pollen before serving.

Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits -- Ice Cream Sunday

June 5 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits -- Ice Cream Sunday This Sunday’s flavors are lavender, chocolate and tahini. I’ve talked about my love for lavender on this blog quite a lot, and it’s hard not to sound like a bit of a broken record, but this small flower really does hold a special place in my heart (I cannot wait to make this milkshake and tart sometime this summer). I’m sharing my go-to vegan lavender ice cream recipe with the addition of rich and decadent chocolate-tahini bits. It has a creamy, luxurious texture, which combines so well with the refreshing flavors of lavender and chewy, bittersweet pieces of chocolate. Read on for some weekend links + a few more snaps, and enjoy your Sunday. Rachel Roddy’s Instagram – author of the Five Quarters cookbook shares snaps from her very Italian kitchen. Love the ‘real’ photography style and all the beautiful produce/­­dishes (also, her recipes at The Guardian). Aquafaba – have you tried cooking with it yet? I haven’t, but gearing up to. Olafur Eliasson – loved this feature on him and cannot wait to check out his cookbook, Food is more important than art. You die from not having food. You die from not having art, too--just not as fast. Ingredients in an all natural banana do not sound as natural as one would think – a fun infographic, plus blueberry and coffee bean Claire Cottrell on Apiece Apart Woman – enjoyed this interview and photos (love her Instagram as well) I found this to the point Q&A about antibiotic resistance to be very clear and helpful Things the world’s most and least privileged people say – for some perspective Blog Love – turmeric honey almond butter, vegan onigiri, white chocolate mousse with strawberry compote Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients for the chocolate tahini bits ½ cup dark chocolate chips or chopped chocolate ¼ cup tahini pinch of salt for the lavender ice cream 2 cans full fat Thai coconut milk ¼ cup plus 1 teaspoon dried lavender flowers ¼ cup maple syrup ½ teaspoon xanthan gum or 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder handful blueberries - for color (optional) Instructions to make the chocolate tahini bits In a double boiler, combine chocolate, tahini and salt. Gently heat to melt and stir to achieve a smooth mixture. Prepare a parchment paper-covered tray or cutting board. Spread the chocolate over the parchment in a thin layer. Place in the freezer to harden until ready to use. to make the ice cream In a medium saucepan, combine coconut milk and ¼ cup lavender. Bring to a boil over a medium-high heat, reduce to a simmer and let cook for 5 minutes. Remove from heat, let cool to a room temperature and strain. In a blender, combine the lavender milk with the remaining 1 teaspoon of lavender flowers, maple syrup xanthan/­­arrowroot, blueberries if using, and blend until smooth. Place the mixture in the refrigerator and let cool thoroughly, preferably overnight. Process in an ice cream maker for 20 minutes or according to the manufacturers instructions. When the ice cream is almost done, remove the hardened chocolate out of the freezer and chop. Add to ice cream machine with the motor still running. Spoon ice cream into a container. Serve immediately as soft serve or place the ice cream in the freezer for 4 hours/­­overnight to harden. Remove from freezer 5-10 minutes before serving to let soften. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Melon Basil Summer Rolls Raw Summer Fruit Samosas and a Guest Post for My Sweet Faery Kohlrabi Avocado Salad Raw Chocolate Layer Cakes with Black Cherry and Orange .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits -- Ice Cream Sunday appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Chamomile & Turmeric Evening Tea

November 25 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

It was soon a year ago that we crammed Elsa, baby Isac, ourselves, our backpacks and a pram into a tiny campervan and drove around New Zealand. Our memories of green mountains, turquoise volcano lakes, enchanted forests, star-filled nights and sheep-covered fields are still vivid. Campervan life wasn’t super comfortable and our cooking wasn’t extravagant but it was the trip of a life time. We made this tea part of our evening routine while we were driving around the chillier south island of New Zealand. It was the perfect way to end the day after having driven for hours, taken mountain hikes and played on the windy sand beaches. Sitting on wobbly plastic chairs next to the car, watching the sunset and drinking this warm and soothing evening tea before going to bed. Oh happy memories! And with the first snow starting to fall here in Scandinavia, we have now begun making that tea again. Unfortunately our view isn’t that amazing here in our Stockholm apartment, but we close our eyes, take a sip and pretend that we have lush mountains behind our backs and a wild ocean dancing in front of us. Warm chamomile tea with honey is indeed a good sleep-aid. Chamomile is calming and honey is anti-bacterial. We kept a huge jar New Zealand Manuka with us in the van and it felt like such a luxury. Active Manuka honey is known for its medicinal properties. If you can’t find it or afford it, choose another unheated quality honey. Coconut oil is a true super food with a long list of health benefits, add it to your daily routine and always choose a cold pressed quality oil. It gives tea a round and rich consistency and leaves you more satisfied. It can however feel a little oily and unusual if you are not used to it, so I recommend starting with a little less. Turmeric, ginger and cinnamon add great flavour as well as immune-boosting and anti-inflammatory properties. Chamomile & Turmeric Evening Tea Serves 4 2 cups drinking water 2 tbsp dried chamomile in a tea bag or 2 chamomile tea sachets (organic if possible) 1 tbsp raw honey (Manuka honey if possible) or more to taste 1-3 tsp cold-pressed coconut oil 1/­­2 tsp ground turmeric 1/­­4 tsp ground ginger 1/­­4 tsp ground cinnamon 1 1/­­2 cup unsweetened plant milk of choice Bring water to a boil in a sauce pan. Turn off the heat, then add chamomile and let steep for 3-5 minutes. Discard the chamomile. Now stir in honey, coconut oil, turmeric, ginger, cinnamon and milk. Taste and add more honey, coconut oil or spices if you prefer. Re-heat on low heat if needed. Enjoy!

A Guide to Cruelty-Free Summer Beauty

July 1 2015 Vegetarian Times 

A Guide to Cruelty-Free Summer Beauty Summertime, and the livin should be easy. So, simplify your grooming routine, and get your (sun-damage-free) glow on ?with an assist from naturally sourced, ?cruelty-free goods. Cut the Fuss Streamlining the basics of your skin-care regimen to ?a gentle cleanser, toner, and moisturizer will keep skin balanced while also reducing summer primp time. Danny Neifert of Santa Barbara, Calif.-based Skin Harmonics suggests nurturing skins natural protective barrier with products containing rosewater to soothe dryness and irritation, hyaluronic acid to help skin retain moisture, and natural oils to seal in hydration. Oil-rich moisturizers should be used in two phases, Neifert says. Pat and glide on more than you think, wait five minutes, then massage in to even it out. Other calming, hydrating ingredients to seek out include cucumber and aloe. To prep your face for your pared-down routine and help clear clogged pores, Claudia Colombo, founder of Fábula Skincare & Wellness in New York, advises a weekly exfoliating treatment; for those with ultra-sensitive skin, she suggests a patch test before trying bi-monthly exfoliation. And she recommends using a mild exfoliant with papain and bromelain, found in papayas and pineapples. Product picks for fresh, ?dewy skin: Nourish Organic Face Cleanser ($13.99/­­6 oz.; nourishorganic.com) Andalou Naturals 1000 Roses Floral Toner ($12.95/­­6 oz.; andalou.com) Acure Sensitive Facial Cream ($19.99/­­1.75 oz.; acureorganics.com) Alba Botanica Pineapple Enzyme Hawaiian Facial Scrub ($13.99/­­4 oz.; albabotanica.com) Cover Up in the Sun Slathering on the sun protection is a must when it comes to your daily routine. Sun damage is one of the biggest controllable factors that accelerates aging and skin cancer, says Alan Dattner, MD, a pioneer in the field of holistic dermatology. While a small amount of sun exposure is important to getting natural vitamin D, people often apply too little sunscreen and forget the parts that show age more quickly, like the hands, décolletage, ears, and lips. Thick application and consistent reapplication is key. Dattner recommends a physical sunscreen for its staying power and reduced likelihood of causing skin irritation. Physical sunscreens contain one or both of the active ingredients zinc oxide and titanium dioxide, natural minerals finely ground into powders that create a physical barrier between your skin and the sun. While the physical sunscreens of yesteryear had a reputation for leaving a sticky, ghostly-white pallor when applied, modern-day options are more pleasantly lightweight. Be sure to look for broad spectrum on the packaging of any sunscreen you choose. This signals the product will protect you from both types of the suns ultraviolet rays: UVA and UVB. The most recent evidence implicates both UVA and UVB in sunburn as well as premature aging and skin cancer. Jessica Krant, MD, of the Laser & Skin Surgery Center of New York and assistant clinical professor of dermatology at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, also cautions against direct baking in the sun between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m., when the suns rays are the most potent. Shield yourself further by donning chic protective clothing and gear, such as wide-framed sunglasses, broad-brimmed hats, and swimsuits and cover-ups that boast UPF (ultraviolet protection factor), the apparel industrys version of SPF (sun protection factor). Product picks for foolproof ?sun defense: LiViTY Outernational Private Beach ?Hat ($39.99; ?livitystyle.com) California Baby Super Sensitive Broad Spectrum ?SPF 30+ Sunscreen ($19.99/­­2.9 oz.; californiababy.com) Hurraw! ?SPF 15 Sun Balm ?in Tangerine Chamomile ($4.29/­­0.15 oz.; hurrawbalm.com) Create the Look To replicate summers sun-kissed radiance and breezy allure--without risking damage from the sun and parching winds--Katie OSullivan ?(aka The Green Product Junkie) recommends products that conjure bronzed skin, a healthy flush, just-bitten lips, and dreamy beach waves. A tinted, illuminizing moisturizer with SPF 30-plus will even your complexion and shield it from the elements while imparting a just-got-back-from-vacation glow. And because its tinted skin care, you can reapply it during the day, focusing on the cheekbones for extra radiance; use it on arms, hands, and décolletage for sun protection in a pinch; and even rub it into legs to lend color and evenness. To enhance lips and cheeks with a vibrant flush of in-the-sun color, OSullivan suggests a multitasking tint. Apply it to lips first, and then pat whatevers left on your fingers onto the apples of cheeks for a natural blush, or even onto eyelids, especially if its a neutral tan or peach hue, for extra pop. For a tousled, ocean-breeze-swept mane, a texturizing sea salt spray lends volume and texture: just spritz and scrunch at the root and down the length of your hair. A natural salt spray with moisturizers such as coconut and aloe can also be used to revive limp hair when you hit the snooze button too many times to catch a shower. Product picks for breezy, bronzed beauty: Juice Beauty SPF 30 Tinted Mineral Moisturizer, shown in Sand ($29/­­2 oz.; juicebeauty.com) Aster & Bay Beet Root + Hibiscus Lip Stain ($12/­­0.25 oz.; asterandbay.com) The Gnarly ?Whale Cucumber Melon Hair Beach Waves ($12/­­8 oz.; ?thegnarlywhale.com) 

Strawberry-Chamomile No-Churn Frozen Yogurt

April 23 2015 Vegetarian Times 

1 | Roughly chop 1 cup strawberries; set aside. Blend remaining strawberries, yogurt, honey, chamomile, lemon juice, and vanilla seeds in blender until smooth, making sure no unblended bits of dried chamomile remain. Pour into 9-inch square metal pan, and fold in chopped strawberries. 2 | Freeze yogurt 45 to 60 minutes. Whisk yogurt with fork or whisk until creamy. Return to freezer, and freeze 2 hours more, whisking every 30 minutes, or until smooth. Cover with plastic wrap, and store in freezer. Remove yogurt from freezer 10 to 15 minutes before serving.

Sarah Bs Bubble Tea

August 19 2014 My New Roots 

Sarah Bs Bubble Tea I get some pretty interesting recipe requests from you, my readers, and although I receive far more than I could ever fulfill, I do like to rise to the occasion. I am especially inclined to answer the call if more than one person asks for the same thing: gluten-free vegan lasagna, healthy cookies, and easy breakfasts are just a few of the cravings Ive tried to satisfy. It seems that over the past year, bubble tea has become a popular item for health-ifying, and Ive gotten several emails about this very thing. How can we take a pretty sugar-laden, artificially-coloured-and-flavoured beverage and turn it into something beneficial, light, and refreshing? Here I am to the rescue! But can I make a confession? Ive never actually tried it before. Most of the time I do my research in order to gear up before making something out of my wheelhouse, but this time it was just too much to swallow. I actually did go to a teashop though, with my best intentions to sample a bevy of bubbles. I walked in, saw all the crazy colours, dubious juices and syrups, pulled a 180 and headed straight to the health food store instead. I did leave with bubble tea straws, of course. That much I know is essential. So, that all said, if I get this totally wrong, I do apologize. This is my version and I quite like it. Sarah Bs bubble tea is not pretending to by anything other than what it is - a bubble tea all its own. Tapioca Pearls of Wisdom What makes those darn bubbles anyway? Its tapioca, in fact. Tapioca is the dried starch from the root of the cassava plant, a tuber native to South America. It has a naturally sweet taste, which is why it is so often used in candies and desserts, most familiar of them being tapioca pudding. Tapioca also the amazing ability to absorb and thicken liquid. Being naturally gluten-free, it is has become a popular gelling agent to use in foods, as opposed to fillers containing wheat. You can use tapioca flour /­­ starch /­­ powder in place of arrowroot or cornstarch in most recipes. Tapioca is a staple food in many countries throughout the world due to its high concentration of carbohydrates, low levels of fat and dietary cholesterol, and its vitamin and mineral balance. Key nutrients in tapioca include calcium to support bone health, magnesium to help control inflammation, phosphorus for protein synthesis, and vitamin A for glowing skin. You can find tapioca at most health food stores where it is often sold in powder, flaked, or pearled form. For bubble tea, look for large pearls instead of the small ones that are typically used to make tapioca pudding. Make sure that the only ingredient in the pearls is tapioca starch, and organic if possible. Many novelty pearls contain food coulouring and flavouring agents, and its best to avoid those for obvious reasons. Natural peals are pure white and are almost completely flavourless, except for a hint of sweetness. Peaches and plums have just come into season, so Ive decided to use those as the fruit base for my teas. You can use whatever is available where you are of course, and match the brewed tea flavours accordingly. I chose chamomile to pair up with the peach and green tea to go with the plum. These were really delicious combinations, but are by no means the only options. Rooibos would be tasty with peaches too, and maybe jasmine with plums? Im just guessing here - get creative!     Print recipe     Sarah B’s Peach and Plum Bubble Tea Serves 4-6  Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup large pearl tapioca 6 cups water, divided 2 - 3 Tbsp. maple syrup or raw honey (to your taste) 4 peaches 4 plums 2 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 Tbsp. dried chamomile flowers (or 2 chamomile tea bags) 1 Tbsp. loose leaf green tea (or 2 green tea bags) milk of your choice for serving (optional) Directions: 1. Bring 3 cups /­­ 750ml water to a roiling boil, add the tapioca pearls and stir. Reduce the heat to simmer and let cook for 25-30 minutes, then turn off the heat and let sit covered, for another 30 minutes until the pearls are translucent (if a few of them have slightly white centers, this is okay, but test one to make sure that it isnt powdery in the middle). 2. While the pearls are cooking, add 3 cups /­­ 750 ml of cold water to a large glass jar or container. Stir in the liquid sweetener of your choice to dissolve. Once the pearls have cooked, add them to the jar of cold sweetened water and let sit in the fridge until ready to use. If the water does not entirely cover the pearls, add just enough water to do so. 3. Brew the tea. Bring enough water for 4 cups of tea to the boil. Let cool slightly and pour over tea bags (I used two different tea pots for the two different flavours). Let steep for at least 10 minutes. Remove tea bags and discard. 4. Peel the peaches and plums. Add peaches and 1 teaspoon lemon juice to a blender and blend on high until totally creamy and smooth. Repeat with plums and remaining lemon juice. Set aside. 5. To serve the tea, place desired amount of tapioca pearls in each glass, fill 3 glasses about half full with chamomile and the others with green tea. Spoon peach purée into the chamomile glasses and plum purée into the green tea glasses. Add a squirt of milk if desired. Stir with a large straw, sweeten to taste and enjoy. So what else do you want to know about? What other kooky experiments will you have me diving into? Bring ‘em on! If you are so inclined to send me an email, type “recipe request” as the subject line and I’ll squirrel it away for a time when I’m a bit stumped for what to make next. And you never know, I may just answer your call. Hope you are all having a gorgeous summer! Sorry for the radio silence on my end – I’ve been giving the cookbook so much attention, it’s hard to keep the blog up to speed. I promise it will be worth the wait though. Good golly am I excited!!! *   *   *   *   *   * Show me your bubble tea on Instagram: #MNRbubbletea

Spirulina Latte

March 12 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Spirulina Latte Checking in really quickly with this trippy spirulina latte. Half the fun of eating spirulina is its color, the other half is knowing its many incredible health benefits, while the swampy, algae flavor is no fun at all. I usually just include spirulina in smoothies, where the flavor gets masked by the sweetness of the fruit, but that also means that its magical, aquamarine color will get lost among the numerous berries that I put in my smoothies. This latte is a more direct and, let’s say, conscious way of consuming spirulina – it’s fun to make, warm, cozy, slightly sweet, and not at all swampy in taste. Drinking a beverage of this color will definitely make you appreciate spirulina in all its glory and provide you with a bright start to your morning or a smile during your afternoon break. There are some links after the jump, enjoy your Sunday! Immigrant Food Stories 25 Songs That Tell Us Where Music Is Going (have your sound on) Scott Chalky, America’s Favorite Farmer – interviewed on Here’s the Thing Laura Miller’s Talking in Circles This ‘Poke’ Bowl! Speaking of Superfood Lattes – check out the Good Sort’s… Enjoyed This Zadie Smith Interview on Fresh Air (from November ’16) Spirulina Latte   Print Serves: 2-3 Ingredients 2 cups almond milk or other plant milk of choice (I used homemade hazelnut) 1-2 teaspoons organic spirulina powder 1 teaspoon maca powder (optional) ¼ - ½ teaspoon ground ginger 1 tablespoon honey or more to taste 1 teaspoon coconut butter (optional) 1 teaspoon sunflower lecithin (optional) beet powder mixed with coconut sugar - for garnish (totally optional) Instructions Pour the milk into a medium saucepan and warm over medium high heat until pleasantly warm but not boiling. Put the warmed milk into the blender together with the rest of the ingredients, except the beet powder garnish. Blend until smooth and frothy. Distribute between cups, garnish with the beet powder and enjoy warm. Store the leftovers refrigerated in an airtight container. This latte can also be enjoyed chilled or iced. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Lavender Milkshake and Chamomile Latte Juicing Elderflower Lemonade Honey Miso Latte .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Spirulina Latte appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Miso Caramel Popcorn

December 18 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Miso Caramel Popcorn This popcorn is the treat I’ll be gifting my friends and bringing to holiday parties this coming week. After spending some time contemplating the bags of caramel popcorn for sale at the grocery store, I became curious about making it at home. After a few trials, I’m pleased to say that it’s quite easy and satisfying to put together on your own, delicious and – I have to warn you – extremely addictive. The caramel here is on the healthier side of the spectrum, made with coconut milk and coconut sugar instead of butter/­­regular sugar, and the addition of miso adds a nice, salty hint to contrast all the sweetness. If you’ve never made stovetop popcorn before, we’ve got some tips to help you through the process in the recipe. There are some weekend links after the jump. Stay warm this Sunday :) Fire Cider – this recipe from Kimberley of The Year in Food looks amazing, going to give it a shot to keep the bugs at bay Chyawanprash – just ordered this Ayurvedic herbal jam that stimulates the metabolism, aids digestion and helps strengthen the body in face of stress. So curious to try it out! Has anyone had it before? Interview with Nahvae Frost on Local Creatives – can’t wait to visit her cafe Durga Chew-Bose’s Twitter – captivated with this writer’s words The Well Woman – new instagram crush McKel Hill on Chris Ducker’s podcast – stripping back a personal brand success story Miso Caramel Popcorn   Print Serves: 12-15 cups Ingredients for the miso caramel 1 can full fat usweetened Thai coconut milk 1/­­2 cup coconut sugar 1 tablespoon neutral extra virgin coconut oil 2 teaspoons vanilla extract (optional) 1 tablespoon sweet miso paste for the caramel popcorn 1½ tablespoons coconut oil ½-3/­­4 cup popcorn kernels (see note) miso caramel (from above) 2 tablespoons chopped dark chocolate (optional) Instructions to make the miso caramel Combine coconut milk and coconut sugar in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil over medium high heat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for about 30 minutes, stirring, until thickened to a caramel consistency. Remove from heat and whisk in coconut oil, vanilla extract and miso paste, until smooth and well combined. to make the caramel popcorn Warm a large, heavy bottomed pot (pot must have a tight fitting lid) over high heat. Add coconut oil and let it melt and heat up for about 30 seconds. Drop in 3 popcorn kernels to test the heat and shake the pot a bit to cover them with oil. Once those kernels pop, your oil is hot enough and you are ready to add all the popcorn kernels. After adding all the kernels to the pot, cover it with a lid and begin moving the pot back and forth over the burner, to ensure that all the kernels are being covered with oil and to keep them from burning. Once you hear that the popcorn has started popping, turn down the heat to medium low and keep moving/­­shaking the pot quickly. Youll know that all/­­most of the kernels have popped when you hear the popping slow down - once there are about 5 seconds between each pop, remove the pot from the heat, your popcorn is ready. If you smell any burning at any point, remove the pot from the heat. Preheat oven to 250° F (120° C). Place two oven racks in the top and bottom third of the oven. Prepare two parchment paper-covered baking trays. Pour caramel into the pot with the popcorn, a little bit at a time, mixing it in every time. If possible, have someone help you - one person can pour and the other can mix. Immediately distribute the popcorn between the two baking trays in a single, even layer. Place in the oven and bake for about 1 hour, mixing every 15 minutes, until caramel is candied. Once popcorn is ready, optionally sprinkle the chopped dark chocolate over one of the trays of popcorn while its still hot and mix to coat to make chocolate caramel popcorn. Keep the popcorn in an airtight container or distribute between paper bags for gifts. Notes 1. The amount of popcorn kernels you use depends on what kind of popcorn you want. If you want popcorn thats completely covered in caramel (like the second photo in this post), use ½ cup kernels. If you want popcorn with bits of caramel here and there, with some white still showing (like the first photo in this post), go for the ¾ cup. 2. Caramel popcorn technique adapted from The Kitchn. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Welcome Spring Raw Cake from Karolina Eleonóra Cosmic Sweet Potato Chocolate Truffles Raw Rutabaga and Crispy Sage Pizza Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream -- Ice Cream Sunday .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Miso Caramel Popcorn appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops with a Chocolate Core

July 31 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops with a Chocolate Core This week, I wanted to re-create my favorite Ben & Jerry’s ice cream flavor, making it vegan (though B&J came out with their own non-dairy ice cream, which is so awesome) and nutritious with the addition of a few energizing superfoods. Another thing I know people can’t get enough of in B&J’s ice cream are their decadent cores, so I went ahead and gave these Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops a chocolate core to really drive the point home. If you’re wondering why the pops are minty-colored, it’s due to the addition of spirulina, along with other nutritionally dense ingredients like hemp hearts and cacao nibs. A bonus – no ice-cream maker is needed for these. Moving to the U.S. from small-town Russia in the 90s and going to a Ben & Jerry’s ice cream shop for the first time was completely mind-blowing because a) back home, we did not have dedicated ice cream shops, b) ice cream flavors I grew up with were very basic and I had never seen so many extensive flavor options c) they sold little tubs of ice cream to take home, which was unheard of in Russia at the time d) everything tasted incredibly decadent and delicious. So here’s my B&J tribute, as a thanks for opening my eyes to possibilities I didn’t know existed. Read on for some weekend links and have a peaceful Sunday. Kids Taste-Test the New Ben & Jerry’s Vegan Ice Cream  Essentials – since we get many questions about our chosen kitchen and photography tools, we’ve made a page with links to all our favorite and most-used products – Kitchen Tools here, Photography here (also working on a round-up of favorite health-related books/­­cookbooks and natural beauty!) The Sad, Sexist History of Salad – Americans, in particular, strongly associate healthy or light foods, such as salad, chicken, and yogurt, with women, and unhealthy or heavy foods, such as beef, potatoes, and beer, with men, both men and women preferred unhealthy foods with masculine packaging and healthy foods with feminine packaging. Fascinating. The World’s Most Innovative Companies in 2016 – according to Fast Company Julia Turshen on the One Part Podcast – loved this, especially her point on asking for credit/­­compensation – if you don’t ask, you will never know what the possibilities are. You may know Turshen from co-authoring Gwyneth Paltrow’s cookbook, along with many others. Cannot wait for her own cookbook to come out. Meryl Streep: A League of Her Own, also, Taste of Streep!? Obama After Dark – how one can average only 5 hours of sleep a night AND run the country is beyond me, also Obama Sets the Record Straight on His 7-Almond Habit :) About Us – we’ve updated our about page a bit, with very important info like our zodiac signs ;) Snapchat – follow @golubkakitchen for all behind-the-scenes Superfood Cherry Garcia Pops with a Chocolate Core   Print Serves: 7-10 pops Ingredients for the cherries 1 heaping cup cherries - pitted and halved 1 tablespoon maple syrup 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder 1 tablespoon water for the spirulina mix 1½ cup raw cashews - soaked for 2-4 hours 1 cup canned unsweetened full fat Thai coconut milk 3 tablespoons maple syrup or more to taste ½-1 tablespoon spirulina powder ½ tablespoon vanilla extract ½ teaspoon xanathan gum or 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder (optional) 1 tablespoon shaved dark chocolate or raw chocolate 1-2 tablespoons cacao nibs for the chocolate core ⅓ of the spirulina mix 2 tablespoons shaved dark chocolate or raw chocolate 3 tablespoons raw cacao powder for the pops 7-10 tea cups, small glasses or pop molds neutral coconut oil for oiling the cups spirulina mix (recipe above) chocolate core (recipe above) 7-10 wooden sticks - soaked for 2 hours or overnight hemp hearts cacao nibs Instructions to prepare the cherries Combine cherries with maple syrup and bring to a boil in a small saucepan. Reduce the heat to a simmer and simmer for 2 minutes. Combine arrowroot powder with water in a small bowl and add to the saucepan, while stirring. The cherry compote should thicken slightly. Remove from heat and let cool. to make the pops Make the spirulina mix. Drain and rinse cashews and put into an upright blender, preferably high-speed. Add coconut milk, maple syrup, spirulina, vanilla, and xanathan gum/­­arrowroot powder, if using and blend until smooth. If not using a high-speed blender, optionally strain mixture through a fine-mesh strainer for the most smooth and velvety texture. Spoon about ⅓ of the spirulina mix into a medium, heat-proof bowl and set aside. Add shaved chocolate and cacao nibs to the blender with the remaining ⅔ of the spirulina mix and pulse to combine briefly. Transfer the mixture into a separate bowl, then fold in the cherries. Make the chocolate core. Place the reserved ⅓ of the spirulina mix onto a double boiler, add chocolate and let it melt, stirring to incorporate. Remove from the heat, add in cacao powder, mix to combine and let cool. Make the pops. Oil your cups/­­molds generously with coconut oil and spoon the spirulina-cherry mix in, leaving a well in the center for the core. Spoon the chocolate core into the well. Even out the surface and insert the wooden stick. Repeat with the rest of the pops. Freeze until completely firm. Prepare a plate with cacao nibs and hemp hearts for coating, along with a parchment paper-covered surface for placing pops onto. Take cups with pops out of the freezer and place into a dish with hot water for a minute, for easier removal. Remove popsicles from cups, pulling them out by the sticks. Dip the top of each pop into the prepared hemp/­­cacao nib mixture and press gently to make the pieces stick. Place onto a parchment paper-covered surface and keep frozen until ready to eat. Take the popsicles out of the freezer 5-10 minutes prior to eating. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Barley Tomato Salad Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream -- Ice Cream Sunday Mung Bean Falafel Bowl with Pickled Rainbow Chard Rose and Lavender Parfait and a Breakfast with Friends .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops with a Chocolate Core appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream -- Ice Cream Sunday

June 12 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream -- Ice Cream Sunday To continue with the herbal/­­floral theme from last week, this Sunday, we’ve got Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream. We’ve been having quite a steady supply of fresh chamomile at the local market, and those bouquets fill the house with the most calming, quiet aroma, which I usually associate with bedtime and all things peaceful, due to the herb’s well-studied chill-out properties. I’ve had a note to make chamomile ice cream ever since I made chamomile sorbet years ago, which was essentially frozen chamomile tea and honey – sounds so simple, but its refreshing flavor left quite an impression for all these years. Chamomile, honey and lemon are flavors that seem to have been made for one another. In this ice cream, they unite into a subtle taste that I can only describe as soothing, steadying and balancing. There’s that unmistakably floral quality from the chamomile, sweetness from the honey, a sour citrus note from the lemon, all combined in a cooling and smooth ice cream. Read on for the recipe and some weekend links, and have a chill Sunday :) Is sugar really bad for you? – starting in 2018, nutrition labels on packaged foods will have to list the amount of added sugars in addition to total sugars, and this article answers some important questions in regards to that. Obviously, we love sweets, so – everything in moderation :) Aloe Vera – summer beauty food The Voyageur – a favorite, dreamy online travel journal All You Need, You Already Have – an inspiring post on Zen Habits Kid Friendly Herbs – to go with the theme of this post, a round up of herbs that are ok to give to children Sarah Britton interview – “It was about three years before I got a comment from someone whose last name wasn’t mine.” One Part Podcast – been listening to this while doing things around the kitchen. So far loved episodes with Bryant Terry, Dana Shultz, Laura Wright. Blog love – we are in complete awe of The Artful Desperado’s food photography, green caesar non-alcoholic cocktail, soft meringue s’mores with blood orange, roasted artichoke and cauliflower with creamy harissa dip. Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 2 cans full fat Thai coconut milk ¼ cup dried chamomile flowers ¼ cup honey - divided, plus more for drizzling juice and zest of 1 lemon 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder Instructions Combine coconut milk and chamomile in a medium saucepan. Bring to a gentle simmer, preferably on a double boiler, or over regular heat. Simmer for 15 minutes. Remove from heat, cover and let infuse and cool to room temperature. Strain chamomile milk. In a blender, combine milk with 2 tablespoons honey, lemon juice and arrowroot. Blend until smooth. Chill the mixture well in the refrigerator, preferably overnight. Process mixture in an ice cream machine for 20 minutes or according to the manufacturers instructions. Spoon ice cream into a container in layers, drizzling the remaining honey between the layers. Serve immediately as soft serve or place in the freezer to harden further for at least 4 hours. Remove from freezer 10-15 minutes before serving. Garnish with lemon zest and more honey when serving. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Tarragon and Mint Ice Cream Raw Blackberry and Lime Miniature Tarts with Cardamom Ice Cream Bee Pollen and Manuka Honey Ice-Cream Beet Tahini Snack Bars .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream -- Ice Cream Sunday appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Homemade Chamomile Tea with Fresh Flowers from The Garden

May 29 2016 Vegan Thyme 

Homemade Chamomile Tea with Fresh Flowers from The Garden The flowers of the chamomile plant resemble a carpet of mini-daisies blanketing a small, sunny corner of my vegetable patch.  They're lovely, actually. Hardy, too. Tonight I made my first batch of chamomile/­­mint tea.  By the way, mint is the other "easiest herb in the world to grow"--you simply cannot kill it.  Trust me.  So back to chamomile: I snipped a small bouquet of the white and yellow flowers and placed them in my coffee mug with a few sprigs of mint leaves. I poured warm water over and set the timer for about five minutes.  I strained the liquid into another mug, and like magic, we had homemade chamomile tea. Your tea will taste nothing like the dried bags of herbal chamomile tea you may have tried.  The fresh-flower variety of tea is very herb-y. A bit of a lemony taste, too. It's delicious.  Chamomile tea is said to be good for helping ease stomach upset and to help with sleep. The best chamomile herb to buy is one of German origin matricaria retutica, or so I've read.  I basically used common sense and bought the herb from the nursery with the tag that said, Excellent for Making Tea!  Side-by-side growing mint with green beans. I KNOW!  But it works.  Make sure you strain the tea. Once you do, you'll have this lovely pale greenish-yellow brew.  Comfort in a cup. In other news. This is Frankie. She's a giant. We just adore her and her sissy tolerates her. 

Lavender Milkshake and Chamomile Latte

July 20 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Lavender Milkshake and Chamomile Latte Cooking with edible flowers has been one of my greatest pleasures in the kitchen. Floral infusions provide amazing flavor and can add beneficial, healing properties to any dish or drink. My favorite was the Rose Ice Cream and Rose Petal Mille Feuille I made a few years ago with organic rose petals and the purest essential rose oil from my perfume maker friend. The oil was so concentrated that a tiny drop turned a portion of ice cream into a magical bowl of aromatherapy. Here are two refreshing drinks we’ve been enjoying this summer, featuring some of the most loved, calming culinary flowers – lavender and chamomile. Chamomile is an amazing little flower, and its oils are anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antifungal and antiallergenic. It has long been used as a sleep aid all over the world. Having a cup of chamomile tea before bed has become one of my daily rituals – it really does the job of getting me ready for some wholesome rest. Lately, I’ve been loving this creamy chamomile latte. My favorite way to enjoy it this summer is cold, but it also makes for a comforting warm drink for the cooler parts of the year. Lavender, with its own share of antiseptic and anti-inflammatory properties, is king of the aromatherapy world – even the smallest whiff sends a relaxation signal to the mind. This milkshake combines lavender and blueberries, as the two are a match made in heaven. Drink it as a refreshing mid-afternoon snack after some time in the sun or even as dessert after dinner. The most important variable when cooking with dried edible flowers is their freshness. If a flower is freshly dried, a little of it will go a long way, while older dried flowers have likely lost their potency. It’s also important to remember that the best way to extract the beneficial oils from herbs such as chamomile and lavender is gently heating them in a double boiler for longer periods of time. Directly pouring boiling water over the herbs is a harsher method, which kills off many of their benefits. We are off to Sochi for the last stretch of our Russian vacation. Black Sea, here we come. Chamomile Latte serves 2 1 1/­­2 cups water 4 tablespoons dried German chamomile flowers – make sure to get them from a store with a good rotation 1/­­2 cup almond milk (I like homemade unsweetened) honey to taste – optional Combine water with chamomile in a small, heatproof bowl. Place the bowl into a heavy bottomed pot or pan. Add water to the pan, making sure that water level in the pan is lower than the bowl. Bring water in the pan to a simmer and simmer for 15 minutes. Let cool enough for safe handling. Strain chamomile tea, mix with almond milk and honey, if using. For an extra creamy and foamy consistency, blend the tea and almond milk in a blender. Drink warm or chilled in the fridge. I like it best cold and unsweetened. Lavender Milkshake serves 2 1 1/­­2 cups almond milk or other plant milk (I like homemade unsweetened almond milk) 1 tablespoon edible dried lavender flowers (make sure to get them from a store with a good rotation – flowers should be lavender, rather then grey in color, with a fresh, strong aroma) 6-8 scoops of your favorite vanilla, blueberry or lavender ice-cream handful of fresh or frozen blueberries – optional, for color handful of ice cubes – optional, for smoother texture splash of maple syrup – optional, to taste seeds of 1 vanilla bean or splash of vanilla extract – optional Combine almond milk and lavender flowers in a small saucepan and bring to a boil. Remove from heat, cover and let cool. Strain and chill in the refrigerator. Combine lavender milk and the rest of ingredients in a blender and blend to a smooth and thick milkshake consistency. If your lavender flowers are very fresh and aromatic, you can skip the infusion step and simply blend almond milk, 1/­­2 tablespoon (or to taste) lavender and blueberries, in a high speed blender until completely smooth. Then add the rest of ingredients and blend to a smooth and thick milkshake consistency.  

Shop Like a Chef: How to Make the Most of Summer Produce

May 28 2015 Vegetarian Times 

Shop Like a Chef: How to Make the Most of Summer Produce Welcome to our new column, Shop Like a Chef, in which we ask chefs at Natural Gourmet Institute to offer expert tips on choosing vegetarian staples. Fresh summer produce is on the verge of running rampant. Hurray! There are endless, easy ways to incorporate variety, color, and vibrant flavors into your warm-weather cooking. Simply follow these tips for using seasonal fruits and veggies--whether you picked them up at your neighborhood farmers’ market, closest grocery store, or your own rooftop garden. 1. Go Local (and Organic) Summer is the perfect time to support small local farms--a surplus of produce means inexpensive, seasonal finds. Buy organic whenever possible, especially when it comes to favorites such as strawberries, grapes, peppers, cucumbers, and tomatoes. Anything with a thick outer skin like corn or cantaloupe is less prone to pesticide exposure. (Check out the EWG’s Dirty Dozen and Clean Fifteen for a complete list.) 2. Store with Care If refrigerating produce, store in a loose-fitting bag with a towel to absorb extra moisture, and don’t wash it until you’re ready to eat or cook it. Got a variety of fruits and vegetables? Fruits give off high levels of ethylene, which causes ripening, so keep them separate from the veggies. Lastly, set your refrigerator to 40° F or lower, and dont overfill it, so as to maintain proper cooling. 3. Get Creative To keep things exciting, try switching up how you prepare summer produce. A few foolproof ideas: o Pickling and infused oils Pickle items like okra, cucumbers and jalapenos in a warm mixture of vinegar, red chili flakes, and sea salt. As for fresh herbs like basil or chives, steep them in oil to make a flavorful base for salad dressings. o Fruit granita Create a refreshing dessert by blending fresh fruit like cherries, peaches, or watermelon, then freezing and occasionally scraping the mixture with a fork until frozen. o Infused water Choose anything from fresh chamomile flowers to peaches, and add to ice water for more enticing hydration. o Grilled salsa and relishes Char anything from tomatoes to corn to zucchini and toss in a vinaigrette to serve with fresh mozzarella or your favorite protein. o Vegetable carpaccio Cut your favorite vegetables like zucchini, summer squash, or tomatoes paper-thin, and toss with a small amount of salt to release moisture. Drizzle with a simple vinaigrette, and sprinkle with fresh herbs. 4. Waste Not If you have too much to eat, don’t toss it. You can always blanche and freeze extra greens for soups and sauces; blend large amounts of fresh produce down to a juice, chilled soup, or gazpacho; throw produce on the grill to use in weekday salads and sandwiches; or dehydrate items like stone fruit for a quick snack or to use in a favorite recipe. Still stumped? Schedule a dinner party or impromptu picnic with friends! Meet the Author Chef Olivia Roszkowski is a graduate of Natural Gourmet Institutes Chefs Training Program and a full-time instructor. She holds a bachelors degree in neuroscience and behavior from Columbia University, has worked at various well-known NYC restaurants, including The Mercer Kitchen and Momofuku Ssam Bar, and is a master at root-to-frond cooking.

How to Freshen Up Skin with Cleansing Grains

January 13 2015 Vegetarian Times 

How to Freshen Up Skin with Cleansing Grains Looking to freshen up rough, drab winter skin? When ground into a fine powder, grains such as rice, oats, quinoa, and millet make for gentle cleansers that leave skin supremely smooth. Plus, cleansing grains mild sloughing action may aid in restoring skins glow. Using exfoliators made with grains helps get rid of dead cells, which allows your skin to reflect the light better and makes it more radiant, explains Patricia Farris, MD, a dermatologist and clinical associate professor at Tulane University. Naturally rich in antioxidants, grains could also assist in keeping skin vibrant. Oats, for instance, might boost overall skin health by fighting inflammation (a key culprit in acne and sagging complexions), Farris says. In fact, research suggests that certain antioxidants found in oats may ease inflammation when applied to the skin. Farris does advise against reaching for cleansing grains more than once or twice a week. You have to be careful not to overdo it, since too much exfoliation can strip away surface oils to the point where your skin ends up dry and irritated, she cautions. Another reason to choose cleansing grains: theyre an eco-friendly alternative to scrubs made with plastic microbeads, which wash down drains and spill into waterways, threatening turtles, fish, and seagulls that ingest the bits of plastic. Easy-Peasy Oatmeal Scrub: For a homemade grains-based facial slougher, DIY Face Masks and Scrubs author Stacy Karen recommends mixing 2 teaspoons ground oats, 1 teaspoon wheat germ or cornmeal, and 1 1/­­2 teaspoons water or cooled chamomile tea. After massaging the scrub onto your skin, wash off with warm water and a face cloth. Product Picks Zatik Cleansing Grain for Normal/­­Oily Skin ($10/­­2 oz.) Bellaroma Pineapple Enzyme & Quinoa Cleansing Grains ($22/­­4 oz.)


You will enjoy these as well ...

Found an error?
Help to fix it! Tell it us!



Our sites missing something? Suggest new content or features!



Have you any comments?
Send it us!