celery - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Plant-Based Pantry Meals We’ve Been Cooking, Pt. 1

Bombay mixture namkeen | bombay spicy nut mix | mumbai mixture chivda

Dates halwa recipe | khajoor ka halwa | khajur ka halwa

Sewing Face Masks for Healthcare Workers










celery vegetarian recipes

Vegan Chocolate Chunk Blondies (somehow I must've known it would come to this)

March 12 2020 Vegan Thyme 

Vegan Chocolate Chunk Blondies (somehow I must've known it would come to this) I threw these blondies together as I prepped a big batch of black bean burgers to freeze for later. (Yes, I am food prepping.) Probably made over a dozen batches of these cookies over the past few months. As usual, I took a break from sugary carb-craving in February. Things are much different now. Even though the grass is beginning to green up and my daffodils are blooming, the urge to bake and soothe my soul with comfort foods normally reserved for dark, winter months has returned with a vengeance.  (As a news-obsessed individual, I'm sure you can guess why.) My cookbooks lining the kitchen walls are more precious to me than ever right now. I've collected hundreds over the decades. I drop into flea markets looking for Pyrex and instead find myself with a two-dollar cookbook I'd wanted years ago. One more for the collection. Call me crazy, but in my Marie Kondo cleaning frenzy last spring--very few cookbooks left this house. Very. Few. One of my old stand-by cookbooks, an Alice Medrich classic, stands the test of time.   Published in 2010, my dog-eared, taped-page and post-it noted guides indicate the cookbook's utility.  Here's my vegan version blondie--and don't bake these in an 8" square pan. Use instead a rectangle if you can. Mine is 10 x 6" pan I purchased for eight bucks at the grocery store. Once you add the batter to the pan, you may look at it and think: this cannot be right--there's barely enough batter to cover the bottom of the pan. Trust the recipe, they bake up beautifully. And after a night in the fridge, even better.  Vegan Blondies (adapted) 3/­­4 cup unbleached AP flour 1/­­4 cup whole wheat flour 1/­­2 t. baking powder 1/­­4 t. fine sea salt 1 stick vegan butter 3/­­4 cup light brown sugar 1 t. vanilla extract 2 T. ground flax, plus 3 T. water, 1 t. olive oil (vegan egg) 2/­­3 cup walnuts or pecans 1/­­2 cup chocolate chunks Preheat oven to 350. Line pan with parchment paper, lightly spray. Mix dry ingredients together, set aside. Place small saucepan over low heat, add butter and sugar and stir until butter melts and sugar is mostly dissolved. Remove from heat. Add vanilla extract and flax egg. Mix well. Add dry ingredients to butter mixture. Mix just until flour is mostly incorporated. Add half nuts and half chocolate. Spread batter in pan, then sprinkle remaining nuts and chocolate over. Bake for about 20 minutes or just until the sides begin to turn golden. Let cool completely, then cut into squares and store in fridge. With all the bleak AF stuff out in the world lately, my own version of self-care includes a nice vitamin rich juice first thing in the morning. I've had my juicer for a dozen or so years now. It's come in very handy lately (even though it sat literally unused for about eight of these). If you think, "Hey, nice blondie recipe, but then juicing...how's that work?" Um, resistance is futile. I will always have chocolate in my life in one form or another. This is my favorite juicing recipe: 1 beet 1 carrot 1 celery stick 1 knob ginger 1 granny smith apple juice of half a lemon When I can, I make enough for two small pints (one before I eat oatmeal for breakfast, another to drink later in the day--you know, around three in the afternoon when I'd rather scarf down a whole package of M&Ms). I've been a believer in juicing for ages...has it helped? I have no damned idea. It makes me feel good. So yes. It "helps". Also been intermittent fasting. So basically the day goes like this: Eat between nine and five. Stop.  Went to my local WM on Tuesday, just as a precaution, trying to get my hands on bleach cleaner. Wow. I happened to turn the corner and spotted an out of place single bottle left. I was like: "Thank you retail-eagle-eye for helping me spot the thing that wasn't like the other things."

Hearty White Bean & Millet Soup

February 17 2020 Meatless Monday 

This warming soup features a host of veggies, a touch of flavorful white wine and Parmesan cheese, and millet, a whole grain that cooks up quickly and gives the soup a hearty consistency. This recipe comes to us from Maria Tadic, RD, who blogs at Bean A Foodie. Serves 4-6 - 2 tbsp olive oil - 2 carrots, diced - 1 medium onion, diced - 2 ribs celery, diced - 1 head roasted garlic, minced - 28 oz can crushed tomatoes - 1/­­3 cup dry white wine - 1 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1 tsp pepper - 15.5 oz can white beans, rinsed and drained - 3/­­4 cup millet - 1 bag baby spinach, roughly chopped - 6-7 cups vegetable broth (add more or less depending on your desired consistency) - 2 bay leaves - 1/­­2 cup grated Parmesan cheese (or vegan parmesan cheese) - 1/­­4 cup parsley, chopped Heat the olive oil in a large soup pot over medium high heat.  Add in the carrots, onion and celery and sauté for about 5-7 minutes or until the vegetables start to soften and brown slightly. Add in the roasted garlic and sauté for another 2-3 minutes.  Add white wine and scrape the bottom of the pot with a wooden spoon removing any browned bits.  Cook for 3-5 minutes or until wine has reduced by half. Add in the all the ingredients from crushed tomatoes to Parmesan cheese.  Bring soup to a boil.  Cover and reduce heat to low.  Simmer soup on low for 30-45 minutes. Before youre ready to serve, stir in the chopped parsley.  Serve hot soup with extra Parmesan cheese and parsley if desired. The post Hearty White Bean & Millet Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Mushroom Bourguignon

February 6 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Mushroom Bourguignon This Mushroom Bourguignon is one of my favorite things to cook on a winter weekend. It’s so fun to put together (makes you feel a little bit like Julia Child), it fills the house with the most incredible, cozy smells, and the result is a savory, earthy dream. My husband and I cooked this for Valentine’s Day last year, and I shared the whole process on our Instagram stories. The amount of recipe requests I got afterwards had me thinking that I should write it up for the blog. Finally sharing it a whole year later! Make this with your love or friend, or just for yourself on Valentine’s day or any other day when you’ve got some time to cozy up in the kitchen. I think you will really love it. I find that this recipe does well with some time and care – it’s not really a weeknight type of deal, and that’s truly the fun of it. For one, I highly suggest making your own mushroom, veggie and miso broth for this stew. You can use store-bought broth and your Bourguignon will still be really delicious, but the homemade broth will take it to that next, next level. This dish is all about layers of deep flavors, and the broth is a true backbone of that. Making your own broth is also not hard at all – it’s just a matter of throwing things in the pot and letting them do their own thing. When I made the Mushroom Bourguignon pictured here, I made the broth in the morning, and it was there waiting for me when I started cooking the stew later in the day. No big deal. I love that this dish is made mostly with very straightforward, common, pantry and crisper-friendly ingredients, but the flavor is so special and so much greater than the sum of its parts. These kinds of recipes are always my favorites. You can see how this Bourguignon comes together step-by-step on our Instagram stories later today. Enjoy! Mushroom Bourguignon   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the mushroom bourguignon olive oil or avocado oil 1 lb crimini or other mushrooms of choice - stemmed if necessary, sliced sea salt 20 Cipollini or pearl onions 1 yellow onion - diced 2 medium carrots - sliced 2 tablespoons fresh thyme leaves - chopped ½ teaspoon smoked paprika freshly ground black pepper 5 cloves garlic - minced 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1 cup red wine 3½ cups mushroom veggie broth (recipe below) or store-bought broth, plus more if needed 2 bay leaves 1½ tablespoon all-purpose flour mashed or smashed potatoes - for serving parsley - for garnish for the mushroom veggie broth 1 oz dried porcini 1 large carrot 2-3 celery ribs 1 yellow onion - skin on 1 leek - white and green parts 5 cloves of garlic - smashed handful fresh thyme 1-2 pitted dates - for deeper flavor (optional) sea salt 1 tablespoon white miso Instructions to make the mushroom bourguignon Heat a soup pot over medium heat. Add enough oil to coat the bottom of the pot, letting it heat up. Add the mushrooms and begin browning. Stir once to coat the mushrooms in the oil, then let sit completely undisturbed. Depending on the variety of mushrooms youre using, they will likely release lots of water. Wait for the water to cook off almost completely before stirring, about 10 minutes, that way the mushrooms will brown properly. Stir, add a generous pinch of salt, and let the mushrooms cook for a few more minutes. Transfer the mushrooms to a bowl and set aside until later. Wipe the bottom of the pan if necessary and add another generous pour of oil. Add the Cipollini/­­pearl onions, stir to coat in the oil and let shimmer for the undersides to brown, about 2-3 minutes. Stir to flip and let brown for another 2-3 minutes. Add the yellow onion, carrots, thyme, smoked paprika, a generous pinch of salt, and lots of of black pepper. Sauté until the vegetables are soft, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic and tomato paste, and sauté for 1 more minute. Add the cooked mushrooms back to the pot and stir to incorporate with the other ingredients. Add the wine to the pot, bring it up to a simmer and let simmer and reduce for 3-5 minutes. Add the broth, bay leaves, and another pinch of salt, making sure to add enough broth to achieve a chunky stew consistency. Bring the stew up to a simmer and simmer, covered, for 1 hour, adding more broth if necessary. Discard the bay leaves at the end. Put the flour in a small bowl. Take a small ladle-full of the broth from the stew and pour over the flour. Whisk together until smooth. Pour the slurry back into the stew, mix, and let simmer for another 5 minutes for the stew to thicken. Serve the Mushroom Bourguignon over mashed or smashed potatoes, garnished with parsley. to make the mushroom veggie broth Combine all the ingredients in a large pot with at least 10 cups of purified water. Salt well. Its not necessary to include all the vegetables listed, but the more you include, the more flavorful the broth. You can also include any other ingredients that you like in your veggie broth like peppercorns, bay leaf, etc. Bring up to a boil, reduce to a simmer and simmer, covered, for about 1 hour. Put the miso in a small bowl and pour a little bit of the broth over it. Whisk together until you have a smooth paste. Pour it back into the pot with the broth and mix well. You will have leftover broth after making the bourguignon. Its delicious to sip on its own or in any other stew or soup, and it freezes very well. Notes We used crimini and white beech mushrooms for the Mushroom Bourguignon pictured here. 3.5.3226 The post Mushroom Bourguignon appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways

January 26 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways Here’s something fun that you can make to set yourself up for endless future wins in the kitchen. This freezer bouillon is a great thing to have on hand for those times when you don’t have veggie stock or just don’t want to buy any. Add a few teaspoons to your soup or sauce, and you’ll end up with a rich flavor base with very minimal effort. Inspired by both curry paste and a brilliant ‘Souper Mix’ recipe from The River Cottage Preserves Handbook, this freezer bouillon is essentially just a combination of different, whole food aromatics that you’d typically find at the base of any soup or broth, plus salt. The beautiful thing about this recipe is that there are no strange preservatives or weird ingredients that you might find in store-bought bouillon – just good old veggies and a few other, non-sketchy flavor enhancers. Today we’ve got two variations on the theme: a ‘classic’ freezer bouillon, based on the mirepoix trio of onion, celery, and carrot, and a ‘fiery’ variation, kind of like curry paste but without all the spices, starring, ginger, shallots, garlic and more. To make both of the bouillon variations, you just pulse up veggies and salt into a fine, pesto-like paste in the food processor. Distribute the bouillon among containers, label, and keep in the freezer. Because of the fair amount of salt in the recipe, the paste doesn’t completely freeze in the freezer and is easily scoopable. The salt also helps it keep for a really long time – pretty much indefinitely in my experience. This is a concentrated product and a little is meant to go a long way, so if you taste it as is, it will taste very salty and strong. I like to use the ‘classic’ bouillon variation in all kinds of legume-based soups like lentil soup and minestrone, and in rich sauces like mushroom bolognese. The ‘fiery’ version is really lovely in all kinds of curries and healing soups, meant to help clear the sinuses. But really, there are no rules for how and where you can use this bouillon, it’s really fun to experiment with. Just the other day, I cooked up a pot of plain chickpeas (just chickpeas and salt) and wanted to make a quick, single serving of chickpea soup for lunch. I heated up some olive oil in a small pot, added about a teaspoon of the classic bouillon, and let it get fragrant for about a minute. I then added the chickpeas to the pot with about 2 cups of their cooking water, brought everything up to a simmer for a few minutes, and wilted in some spinach at the end. I ended up with the coziest bowl of soup and a very flavorful, warming broth in just a few minutes. Hope you’ll give this a try this year! Classic Freezer Bouillon   Print Serves: about 4½ cups Ingredients 1 yellow onion - peeled, roughly chopped 1 leek - white and light green part only, roughly chopped 2 medium carrots - roughly chopped 3 celery ribs - roughly chopped 1 head garlic - cloves peeled 1 bunch parsley - stems included, roughly chopped 1 tablespoon tomato paste (optional) 1 tablespoon olive oil ¼ cup sea salt Instructions Combine all the vegetables in a food processor in batches, roughly pulsing them and adding more as you go. Periodically scrape down the sides of the food processor to get everything nicely incorporated. Add the tomato paste, if using, oil, and salt, and finish processing into a pesto-like paste. Add another tablespoon of oil if your food processor is having a hard time getting going. Let the paste cool down to room temperature if it got warm while processing. Distribute the bouillon paste among sealable containers, leaving about 1 of space at the top (the paste will expand when frozen). Close and label the containers and place in the freezer. The bouillon should keep frozen indefinitely - it will not freeze solid because of the salt in the recipe. To use: use about 1 teaspoon of the bouillon per 1½ - 2 cups of water. Either add the paste directly to boiling water or sauté it up in oil for a few minutes before adding water. 3.5.3226 Fiery Freezer Bouillon   Print Serves: about 3 cups Ingredients 2 shallots - peeled, roughly chopped 6-8 total of ginger pieces - peeled if not organic, roughly chopped 1 head garlic - cloves peeled 2 medium carrots - roughly chopped 1 jalape?o or serrano pepper - seeded, roughly chopped (optional, include for more heat) 1 bunch cilantro - stems included, roughly chopped 1 tablespoon white miso (optional) 1 teaspoon turmeric powder (optional) 1 tablespoon avocado oil or olive oil ¼ cup sea salt Instructions Combine all the vegetables in a food processor in batches, roughly pulsing them and adding more as you go. Periodically scrape down the sides of the food processor to get everything nicely incorporated. Add the miso and turmeric, if using, oil, and salt, and finish processing into a pesto-like paste. Add another tablespoon of oil if your food processor is having a hard time getting going. Let the paste cool down to room temperature if it got warm while processing. Distribute the bouillon paste among sealable containers, leaving about 1 of space at the top (the paste will expand when frozen). Close and label the containers, and place in the freezer. The bouillon should keep frozen indefinitely - it will not freeze solid because of the salt in the recipe. To use: use about 1 teaspoon of the bouillon per 1½ - 2 cups of water. Either add the paste directly to boiling water or sauté it up in oil for a few minutes before adding water. 3.5.3226 The post Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Lisa O’Connor

December 8 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Lisa O’Connor Lisa O’Connor is a Toronto-based Holistic Nutritionist, Healing Alchemist, and host of the Glow Deep Podcast. We interviewed Lisa about her daily routines and practices, approach to food, exercise, skincare, healing and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Both! Im a naturally disciplined soul, so I have no problems at all committing to something. I thrive off of routine, but Ive been learning to be way more in flow these past few years. Especially with creating my own schedule and building my business /­­ practice, and now with the arrival of our puppy. My schedule got shifted around quite a bit, as he needs A LOT of attention and training at this moment! Im learning to find my own rhythm between routine, and free flow. Which I believe is always a dance for us as we transition through different seasons, and times of our lives. -- What do your mornings look like? Now with a puppy things have shifted! -We are morning people – getting up anywhere between 5-6am -A liter of water first thing -A walk in nature with the pup -A little play time with him & then putting him in his crate for a nap, so I can have me time -Kundalini -Meditation -Matcha latte -Reading – I commit to 30-45 min daily reading in the morning -Smoothie or whatever else Im feeling -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? To be honest, I dont have a lot of bedtime rituals, as I dont really have a problem with sleep. Whats important for me is turning my phone on airplane mode a good 45min- 1 hour before sleep, having a shower to shift my energy, magnesium cream, and reading a book in bed with my husband, or sometimes we watch a little something on Netflix to just switch completely off! -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  -Meditation -Walking in nature and being present -Kundalini -Im not a massive journal writer, but when it calls I listen! Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Smoothie & homemade matcha latte (I have the matcha first, and probably wait an hour or so and then have the smoothie!) Lunch – Honestly on client days I often keep it light and just snack – green juice here, smoothie there, some veggies, coconut water! And some days I just have liquids (juices, smoothies, water until dinner) on other days it could be a light salad, or a lunch out with a friend at a local healthy restaurant Snack – Im not too much of a snack person! But I would say nuts /­­ seeds, green juice, maybe a piece of fruit in the summer Dinner - Green salad, roasted veggies, curries, soups, brown rice -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I do :) I drink matcha during the week, and on the weekend when I can savour a beautiful organic Americano when Im at a cafe with my husband, its just that much more special. -- What is your grocery shopping routine like? Are there things that always make it in your cart? We do our big haul on Saturdays at a place here called Organic Garage. Everything is organic, and is so reasonable in price. In the summer I also add in local markets, and farmers markets. That being said, I feel like Im always grocery shopping on the daily, as Im always picking up fresh greens, or picking up supplemental things for dinner that we didnt get during our big shop on Saturday morning. Things that we always include: -Variety of leafy greens -Olives -Bananas -Apples -Mushrooms -Celery -Lemons -Frozen berries -Avocados -Brown Rice -Fresh herbs -Variety of proteins -Cucumbers -ACV -Pumpkin seed butter -Zucchinis -White & Sweet potatoes -Garlic -Ginger -Dates -Variety nuts & seeds -Seasonal vegetables -Hemp seeds +++ More but those are always staples!  -- Do you have a sweet tooth? I know people wont like this answer, but I actually dont! I can eat 95-100% chocolate, and feel super satisfied. If Im sweetening anything I use dates, bananas, and/­­or a touch of raw honey. -- Are there any particular foods that you find to be helpful with your energy levels and general wellness? Greens!!! I am a greens monster, and feel so deeply connected to them. I love to consume their liquid sunshine properties. Potatoes are also a huge staple for me, as they are easily digested, high in fiber, and the natural sugars are burned as energy for me. Berries – I love wild blueberries and raspberries Spices /­­ herbs – Ginger, garlic, cayenne, nettle, turmeric Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I dont have anything particular right now! My favourite form of exercise is walking! Its highly underrated in my opinion. I live in a big city, without a car, so my mode of transport is Me. I find it meditative, calming, and great exercise. I also practice Kundalini yoga, and will sometimes do some resistance work (P.Volve). -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I find it to be an extension of me, and I dont ever have to force it. I trust my body and flow with what it wants and feels in the season of life that Im in. At the moment Ive been the least active Ive ever been, but its what feels best for me, and my body is welcoming it, and responding beautifully to it. In other seasons of my life Ive done intense and hard workouts at least 4 -5 x per week, and other times Ive done daily exercise. If there is anything Ive learnt along the way, is that nothing good comes from force. When we practice, and learn to tune- in, we will always be guided to what our body needs. In 2020 I want to get back into doing Ballet Beautiful though, as I did it for over two years and felt so graceful, feminine, yet toned. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty, both internal and external? My idea of beauty will always be that is stems from within. And not just the foods that we eat, or supplements we take, but the thoughts we think, our mood, mental state, stress levels, how kind we are...etc. I struggled with really bad acne for years, and addressing all of the above, with nutrition + curated herbs /­­ supplements, actually brought my skin back better than before! Beauty in my eyes is always a projection, and energetic force with regards to whats going on inside. When things are aligned within, I feel beauty just radiates regardless of how we *think* we look. This beautiful energetic force truly knows no bounds. I do still enjoy to take care of my external skin, and body, but I would say its only about 10% of my regime. Everything else stems from internal work! -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? MINIMAL. People are so surprised how little I do, as I really do practice what I preach. When we focus on the internal, the external will always reflect that. I use all natural products – Face wash, rose spray, and oil (I rotate a few of my favourite brands – including Living Libations, F. Miller & Marie Veronique) In the summer I mask more (May Lindstrom or just the Aztec Clay mask) I find them too harsh for the winter, so I love a good Manuka honey mask during the winter. -- Do you have any beauty tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Less is more. When I was healing my skin I tried EVERYTHING. I used too many products, stripped my skin, and it all just made it worse. I find my skin is the best the less that I do. Sweating is key, so are hot /­­ cold (contrast showers), kundalini (breathwork) and again coming back to nurturing and feeding (Physical & Mental) your Internal Self, which then shows up Externally. The key is to get things moving & flowing. Digestion, lymph, liver, as this ultimately shows up on the skin. No flow, no glow. Stress, Etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines for managing stress?  -Meditation (nothing fancy, or prescriptive, just sitting with myself) -Dog walks in nature -Kundalini Yoga -Reading -Nutrition -Seeing loved ones -Spending time with my husband, and puppy -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? -REST /­­ SLEEP – seriously the simplest thing one can do, I just believe we feel as a society that we cant just Be, or cant just take a break -Green juicing -Hot /­­ cold showers to stimulate lymph flow and detoxification -Ginger tea -Broths /­­ soups Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Im quite simple, easy-going, yet Ive always been disciplined, and my husband might say stubborn (my Ukrainian genes :) ). I dont find it that difficult to honour my body, mind, and soul. Ive also been on a deep healing journey since 2006 (got diagnosed with Lyme Disease in 2012), so truly these arent even actions or steps I take, they are just Me. I dont force anything, and allow for flow, ease, while still knowing, and honouring when I need to heal something deeper, take a new direction, and take care of my inner child. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Hmmmm I dont think there is just one thing, as I see things very holistically, and connected. I would say mind work. Focusing on mental strength, vitality, and honouring my subconscious mind, as this is where all of our habits, programs, and deep belief systems live. Our mind is everything, as the body is the unconscious mind.  -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Take a break! It could be an afternoon, a day or even a few. I have a tendency to force things, and when I do nothing flows. Ive learned this the hard way many times over, so I create space to go within. On the other hand, I can get inspired easily via images, nature, people, environments, so its always there for me. Its cheesy, but inspiration can hit at any moment, so I stay open. But when Im stuck, I take a step back or I schedule a brainstorming session with my husband. Just so I can talk things through, get a different perspective ( hes very smart, yet practical). In my business its just me, myself, and I, so it can get pretty insular. Although my goal for 2020 is to hire my first employee!  -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. To be honest, nothing outside of myself influenced this or my view. It was losing my health, and healing on a deep level that has brought me to where I am with self-care. Its never been anything to do, if anything its how I practice Being. Ive come to see, and know deeply that our relationship to Self – On a body, mind, and soul level is everything. If we dont show up for ourselves, than we cant for others. But if I were to pick anything in terms of external energy, I would say the book Magdalen Manuscript, its a channeled script of Mary Magdalen. It speaks about Ka energy (life force), and the power of energy that courses through all of Us. The only way to channel this energy, is to nourish ourselves from the inside out. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming a holistic nutritionist? When I started to become ill in 2006, it set me on my path. At first it started with my own experiments, lifestyle changes, and reading /­­ self-knowledge for close to six years. Then from there, I took it further to get certified, and study formally. While Im a HN, Ive expanded my view of my work, as I go *much* deeper than just food. My story is WILD, so I wont go into all the details, but when you experience something so deep, intense, and beautiful on your own, you want to help others heal via your journey, knowledge, and gifts (which I believe we all have! Its just up to us to cultivate them). I dont believe I chose this profession, as Ive never felt more called to something. Knowing how crazy, and wild it is to lose one’s health, its my mission to help others tap themselves into their own innate healer. -- What is your healing philosophy? How do you approach working with clients? Ive come to see healing as alchemy. As a society weve been taught that we should just focus on one body part, one thing, one pill, and weve become so singular in our view point and scope of healing /­­ practice. I.E. if we are having back pain, focus on the back. Where as I see everything, and I mean everything holistically. I see the alchemy, and connection between it all – Body, Mind, and Spirit. While we might be having physical pain some place (i.e. back), yes we must look and take care of the cellular body (which I do), but we also have to look at our emotions, trauma, history, and deeper work into the soul, and subconscious. While this isnt the easy work, to me its the only way I know! So when taking on a client, this is where we go. I look at each soul as a unique and individual being. No one is alike, so there isnt a pill or protocol that fits just because someone has been diagnosed with X, and so has their friend. Those two people are so different, have been raised uniquely, have most likely experienced trauma in their own way, and are navigating different life pathways, and stressors. We navigate the deeper parts, so we can heal holistically, sustainably, and in connection with our whole Self. We arent just a body, we are so much more. When we focus on just the body, I dont believe we do ourselves any favours. This is whats often missing in chronic care of  humans and why so many people are just living and coping with pain and dis-ease. We are seeking greater depth, purpose, and fulfilment, yet were left confused, hopeless, and overwhelmed. If I can just bring someone to see that they DO have the power to heal, than man oh man, it just means everything to me! Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Our new puppy Rumi! Hes a Rhodesian Ridgeback, so he will grow to be a big boy, but we are soaking up all the puppy cuddles right now. Also ending off a decade, ushering in a new one , and entering into the year 2020. There is a lot of potent energy coming forth, and Im feeling really charged, clear, and ready for it all. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Nothing really special, I love just the simple things in life. A hot shower, getting into my robe or a grey sweat suit, eating a nourishing dinner, and cuddling with my husband & puppy! Sometimes I will treat myself to a facial, and when I can infrared sauna sessions.  -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Anatomy of the Spirit and Course in Miracles Song/­­Album –   Anything by Bon Iver or Ben Howard or White Sun Movie –   Dirty Dancing (forever & always my favourite) Piece of Art –  I adore a lot of art  /­­ creative work, but some of my favourites include: Renaissance art, Matisse, Unconditional Magazine, Picasso, Christiane Spangsberg. This post contains Amazon Affiliate Links Our New Ebook: Golubka Kitchen Sweets! Filled with our favorite, vegan and gluten-free dessert recipes in the world. The post Lisa O’Connor appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Massaged Kale Salad with Cranberries and Cashews

November 8 2019 VegKitchen 

Massaged Kale Salad with Cranberries and Cashews Here’s a basic recipes for massaged kale salad, with lots of ways to modify it. You can toss in some slivered baby carrots, substitute another kind of nut, add a bit of thinly shredded red cabbage for extra color, or add some sliced celery or bok choy for extra crunch. Even in its simplest form, as presented here, its luscious, festive, and just as welcome for every day as well as holiday meals. The post Massaged Kale Salad with Cranberries and Cashews appeared first on VegKitchen.

Cozy Pantry Stew

September 29 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Cozy Pantry Stew Hello friends! We’re back from a little hiatus having to do with my wedding. I married my love of many years under the September full moon in upstate NY, and it was such a fun party. The wedding took all of our time and energy, since we did everything we could ourselves together with friends and family. That’s why it’s been extra quiet around here. I’m sharing a few wedding photos at the bottom of this post, but otherwise it’s back to regular programming around here! We’re excited to cook with all the fall produce popping up right now and have a few digital cookbook projects in the works for the coming months. We missed this space and YOU. On to this life saver of a stew. I don’t know if this is the case for you, but in our house, when we say we have nothing to eat, most of the time it’s not really true. That type of talk usually comes from laziness or not being in the mood for whatever ingredients we do have on hand. Both my husband and I are avid home cooks and generally obsessed with good food, so we have a well-stocked pantry. This year, we’ve been trying to be more mindful of those ‘nothing-to-eat moments’ and have been cooking more from the pantry. The results always save us money and end up tasting more nourishing than any takeout ever would. This stew is something that we make all the time, using pantry staples and odds and ends from the fridge. It’s flavorful, soul-warming, and so easy. Scrapping together meals out of seemingly nothing is one of my favorite ways to cook – I love anything having to do with economy in the kitchen. (Tamar Adler’s An Everlasting Meal is one of my favorite books). It’s like a game and so endlessly satisfying when that meal appears out of ‘thin air.’ I know everyone’s pantries are vastly different, but if you’re a vegan/­­vegetarian-inclined cook, I have a hunch that you’ll have at least some of these ingredients on hand. I love keeping red lentils around because they cook almost instantly and taste great – these make up the base of our stew. Then come the aromatics. Dig up those unused carrots and celery out of the crisper (soak them in cold water for a few hours if they’re really limp) and find an onion (or an unused half of one!), shallots, or leeks. That classic trio of onion, celery, and carrots help build great flavor for soup like nothing else does. Then, see if you have some leftover white wine in the fridge and grab a few cloves of garlic. Wine gives this stew that extra something and truly takes it to the next level. If you don’t have an open bottle, you could also open one to cook with and enjoy with dinner. Any other extras are up to you and your pantry/­­fridge. When it comes to spices, dried herbs are great, as well as turmeric, but you could also add coriander, cumin, or even curry. The stew pictured here has cherry tomatoes and sweet potato. Tomatoes add umami and I wouldn’t skip them, but if you don’t have fresh ones, you could add a little bit of canned tomatoes or even tomato paste. Sweet potato is totally optional, but use it here if you have one, or a regular potato, squash, or even cauliflower. At the end, wilt in some greens and finish the stew off with lemon juice for brightness. Add any garnish you like or have, like yogurt, herbs, or pan-fried mushrooms (as pictured), and you’re done! The description is long because I wanted to lay out our logic, but the stew itself comes together very quickly. Hope you’ll give this one a try

Chickpea Tahini Salad Sandwich

September 2 2019 Vegan Richa 

Chickpea Tahini Salad SandwichAmazing Chickpea Tahini Salad Sandwich. Summery, crunchy and refreshing Chickpea Salad with pecans, celery, onion, tahini and shawarma spice! Serve in lettuce wraps or sandwiches. Vegan Soyfree Recipe. Can be made nut-free Gluten-free  Jump to Recipe Try these easy Chickpea Tahini Salad Sandwiches just before we say bye to the Summer! Chickpeas are mashed with some tahini, then mixed with crunchy celery and onion and some toasted pecans. The flavors from herbs, shawarma spice and lime bring everything together for a delicious refreshing and spiced summer sandwich! The herbs and spice infuse the salad as it sits, so chill for some time before serving. Serve the salad as is or in lettuce cups for gluten-free. It takes just 15 minutes to put together makes for a protein filled meal. Hubbs scarfed it down with a drizzle of sriracha. because… Sriracha.Continue reading: Chickpea Tahini Salad SandwichThe post Chickpea Tahini Salad Sandwich appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Panzanella

June 17 2019 Meatless Monday 

This classic Florentine salad of bread and tomatoes is ideal for a light summer meal. Until the twentieth century the salad was based on onions rather than tomatoes, but its evolution takes advantage of tomatoes when they’re at their best. This recipe come to us from The Meat Free Monday Cookbook by our friends at Meat Free Monday. Foreword by Paul, Stella and Mary McCartney. Published by Kyle Books. Photography by Tara Fisher. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox!   Serves 4 -  1/­­2 loaf ciabatta - 6 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil - 2 garlic cloves, 1 peeled, 1 crushed -  1/­­2 teaspoon dried oregano - 2 tablespoons good-quality red wine vinegar - 2 tablespoons freshly chopped flatleaf parsley - 1 tablespoon baby capers, drained - 6 plum tomatoes, roughly chopped - 1 small red onion, finely sliced -  1/­­2 cucumber, deseeded and cut into chunks - 2 celery stalks, finely sliced - 12 fresh basil leaves, ripped - 50g stoned black olives, halved - salt and freshly ground black   Cut the ciabatta in half and brush the cut sides with a little extra virgin olive oil. Heat a ridged grill pan or normal grill and toast the ciabatta until crisp and golden. Rub the peeled garlic clove over the cut sides of the bread, tear the bread into rough chunks and set aside. In a small bowl whisk together 5 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, the crushed garlic clove and the red wine vinegar. Season well with salt and freshly ground black pepper and add the freshly chopped flatleaf parsley. In a large bowl, mix together the bread and baby capers, plum tomatoes, sliced onion, cucumber, sliced celery, basil leaves, and black olives, and toss with the dressing. Season to taste. The post Panzanella appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Celery and Spinach Soup

May 4 2019 Oh My Veggies 

Simple, delicious, and full of vitamins, this “cream all dressed in green” will please the whole family! You can serve it both cold and warm.  

Meatless Brown Rice Jambalaya

April 8 2019 Meatless Monday 

Here’s a vegan take on a southern classic. This brown rice jambalaya gets a Tex-Mex-inspired flavor from an assortment of spices, including paprika, cayenne and cumin. Black-eye peas and collard greens add both texture and nutrients to the dish that makes for a filling and dinner. Maybe best of all, this recipe serves six, which means it can make plenty of leftovers if you’re feeding a smaller group. This recipe is from Phoebe Lapine for Think Rice . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 6 - 4 Tbsps Olive Oil, divided - 1 Bunch Collard greens, thick stems removed and thinly sliced - Sea Salt & Pepper - Small Yellow Onion - Red Bell Pepper, finely diced - 2 Celery Stalks, thinly sliced - Large Jalapeno, minced, seeds & ribs removed - 2 Cloves Garlic, minced - 1 Tsp Smoked Paprika - 1 Tsp Paprika - 1/­­2 Tsp Ground Cumin - 1/­­4 Tsp Cayenne - 2 Cups Chopped Tomatoes - 2 Bay Leaves - 4 Sprigs Fresh Thyme - 8 Cups Vegetable Stock - 2 Cups Dried Black-Eyed Peas, soaked overnight - 2 Cups U.S. Long Grain Brown Rice - 1 Bunch Scallions, thinly sliced - 2 Tbsps Chopped flat-leaf parsley   In a large pot over medium-high heat, add 2 tablespoons of the olive oil. Add the collard greens and stir-fry until wilted and tender, about 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper and remove to a plate. Set aside. Add the remaining olive oil along with the onions, bell pepper, and celery, and sauté until soft, about 5 minutes. Stir in the jalapeno, garlic, smoked paprika, regular paprika, cumin, cayenne, and salt. Cook for 2 minutes more, until very fragrant, then add the tomatoes, bay leaves, and thyme. Bring to a simmer and allow the tomato mixture to thicken slightly. Pour in the stock, black-eyed peas, and brown rice. Bring to a boil, partially cover, and reduce the heat to medium-low. Simmer for 35 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the peas and rice have grown in size, but still have quite a bite to them. Cover the pot completely and continue cooking over low heat, undisturbed, until tender (but not mushy) and all of the liquid has been absorbed, another 20 minutes. Fold in the collard greens and half the scallions. Cover and cook until the rice has absorbed all the liquid and the veggies are tender, about 10 minutes longer. Remove from the heat. Season the vegetarian jambalaya with parsley, the remaining scallions, and serve warm. Note: If you dont have time to soak the peas in advance, you can a) cover them with boiling water for 10 minutes, or b) start with canned black-eyed peas. For the latter, simply cut the amount of stock in half, and add the rinsed beans to the pot when you fold in the collard greens in step 4. The post Meatless Brown Rice Jambalaya appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Roasted Cauliflower and Mushroom Chowder

March 23 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Roasted Cauliflower and Mushroom Chowder We’re very ready for spring and all of its tender, green produce, but unfortunately it’s still very much soup weather around here. I think that soups are such lifesavers for busy people. They’re simple to make, hard to mess up, and can be customized millions of ways. You can make a giant soup for the week and have warming, wholesome meals right at your fingertips when you don’t have the energy to cook. They’re easy to bring to go in a mason jar or thermos. It’s also great to freeze some soup, which will always be appreciated later, in the midst hangry emergencies. We had two goals for this chowder – we wanted it to be creamy, filling, and comforting, but also light and a bit different from the squash and root vegetable soups that are always around in the winter. Just a little nod to spring :) The creaminess in this chowder comes from blended roasted cauliflower, mushrooms, and chickpeas. There’s no cashews or any nut-based products, since we wanted to go for a lighter soup. I think that cauliflower works so well in creating both a chowder-like consistency and flavor here, while the roasted mushrooms bring an extra depth of flavor. There are also green peas for more springy vibes, along with a base of mirepoix (onion, carrot, celery), and smoked paprika. When it comes to creamy soups, we still love having some chunky texture present, so we leave some of the cauliflower, mushrooms, and chickpeas whole here. The chowder just tastes more like a meal this way, but it could definitely also serve as a side in smaller portions. We’ll be showing the step-by-step process for preparing this chowder on our Instagram Stories later today, and we’ll also save it in our Highlights. Hope you try this one and have a great weekend :) Roasted Cauliflower and Mushroom Chowder   Print Serves: 6 Ingredients olive oil toasted sesame oil (optional) 1 yellow onion - chopped 1 medium carrot - cubed 1 stick of celery - sliced sea salt 3 cloves of garlic - minced 1 teaspoon smoked paprika 1 teaspoon nutritional yeast (optional) ¾ cup dried chickpeas - soaked overnight or up to 24 hours 8 cups purified water 2 bay leaves 1 large head of cauliflower - cut into bite-sized florets 10 oz crimini mushrooms - cut into quarters or eighths for bigger mushrooms freshly ground black pepper 1 cup frozen peas juice from 1 lemon fresh herbs - for garnish Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Warm a soup pot over medium heat. Add a generous drizzle of olive oil and sesame oil, if using. Add the onion, carrot, and celery to the pot, along with a pinch of salt. Cook the vegetables for about 10 minutes, until soft. Add the garlic, smoked paprika, and nutritional yeast, if using, and stir around for about 30 seconds to 1 minute, until fragrant. Drain and thoroughly rinse the chickpeas and add them to the pot, stirring to coat. Add the water and bay leaves, bring the liquid up to a simmer and cook, with the pot lid askew, for 30 minutes. Taste a few chickpeas after the 30 minutes, they should be cooked and creamy inside. If the chickpeas are not yet done, cook them longer. This process can take up to an hour or even longer with some older chickpeas. Generously salt the chickpea broth towards the end of the chickpea cooking time. While the chickpeas are cooking, prepare two rimmed, parchment paper-covered baking trays. Place the cauliflower on one of the trays and the mushrooms - on the other one. Drizzle both the cauliflower and mushrooms with olive oil (or other roasting oil of choice), sprinkle with salt and pepper, and stir. Place both trays in the preheated oven and roast for 30-40 minutes, stirring halfway, until the cauliflower is soft and caramelized. The mushrooms will release water while roasting, so thats why using a rimmed baking tray helps. Once the chickpeas are cooked and the vegetables are roasted, add the cauliflower and mushrooms to the pot with the chickpeas, stirring to combine. Add about half of the soup to an upright blender, making sure to catch plenty of chickpeas, cauliflower, and mushrooms for creaminess. Blend until smooth and return the blended liquid to the soup pot, mixing everything together. Bring the soup back up to a boil and simmer for 5 more minutes for the flavors to merge. Turn off the heat and stir in the peas, which will thaw immediately in the hot soup. Stir in the lemon juice. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Serve the chowder, garnished with fresh herbs, a drizzle of sesame oil or olive oil, and with a side of toasted sourdough bread or croutons. Enjoy! Notes You can also make this soup with canned chickpeas! Just use one to two 15 ounce cans of chickpeas and less water (start with about 5-6 cups). Since the chickpeas are cooked, you dont have to simmer them for 30 minutes. Otherwise, proceed as written out in the recipe. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Vegan Nashville Hot Cauliflower Bites

March 12 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Nashville Hot Cauliflower BitesVegan Nashville Hot Cauliflower Bites. These Nashville Style Hot Cauliflower wings are flavorful, hot and Delicious! Serve with vegan ranch or other dips. Add to wraps or bowls. Vegan Nutfree Soyfree Recipe. Glutenfree option  Jump to Recipe Weekend fare some days for events, potlucks these days is some gardein strips with various hot sauces. One of those times, I made this nashville style peppery hot sauce that hubbs loved. I mean gone in 10 seconds kind of loved. So I decided to use it with some crispy Cauliflower! Cauliflower florets get tossed in a simple batter. No dipping each floret one by one! Just dump into the bowl and toss to coat, then spread the florets in baking dish and bake. Then toss in the sauce and bake again. The Nashville sauce is HOT! It doesn’t feel that hot when you start eating the cauliflower, but just wait for 5 mins. Boom! You can adjust the overall sauce to be less hot, add more tang(vinegar), some more oil, garlic and sweet paprika instead. Serve with cooling dips such as vegan ranch. You can also add these bites to tacos, wraps or bowls! Continue reading: Vegan Nashville Hot Cauliflower BitesThe post Vegan Nashville Hot Cauliflower Bites appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Make it a Meatless Monday Mardi Gras Celebration with Green Gumbo

March 4 2019 Meatless Monday 

Make it a Meatless Monday Mardi Gras Celebration with Green Gumbo Every year, people around the world celebrate Mardi Gras and Carnival, a festival of parades, music and eating decadent foods leading up to Lent. Millions of people observe Lent by fasting or foregoing treats and meats for 40 days. Fun fact, the term carnival is from carnelevare, or to remove meat. So thats what were doing, removing the meat, but keeping the delicious flavor of the popular Mardi Gras dish gumbo. This Creole stew from Southern Louisiana usually features strong-flavored stock, meat, or shellfish, but, with a few simple swaps, it’s a perfect vegetarian dish. Green Gumbo is a popular plant-based version that includes a variety of greens and herbs that give it an amazing color and rich flavors. Richard McCarthy, Member of the Executive Committee for Slow Food International and a Meatless Monday ambassador , shares his green gumbo recipe and great tips for making this plant-based dish taste authentic. Richards essentials for cooking green gumbo: Cook with what you have. Use collard greens, kale, mustard greens, turnip greens, spinach, and herbs like parsley, dill, etc. Green gumbo appears throughout the Lenten culinary calendar as meatless and on Holy Thursday in famous restaurants (like Dooky Chase) with meat stock. Begin by making a roux. Heat the pan with vegetable or olive oil, add flour, and mix with a wooden spoon until dark brown. The color of the gumbo will be determined by how dark you make the roux. The roux gives butter beans and lima beans a great base of flavor. Or, consider any medley of vegetables. Add Shiitake Bacon to get the traditional umami flavor. Umami is the savory flavor that many eaters say is missing in vegetarian recipes. One way to add umami to green gumbo is to make shiitake bacon, which provides the missing depth of flavor. Dont forget the rice. Rice is a traditional accompaniment to gumbo. While a saucepan is perfectly good for preparing rice, rice cookers are also an easy way to prepare perfect rice every time. Any grain or variety of rice can work, but long-grain rice is best since it provides the gumbo with more surface areas to cover with flavor.  McCarthy recommends a simplified version of the recipe crafted by Richard Stewart, the former chef of Gumbo Shop. Green Gumbo Serves 4 Ingredients: Gumbo: 1/­­4 cup of vegetable or olive oil 1/­­4 cup of flour 1 large onion, minced 4 stalks of celery, minced 1 bell pepper, minced 2 bunches of available greens (collard, mustard, kale, turnip, and/­­or spinach), chopped 1/­­4 cup of chopped parsley 2-4 cups of water (or enough to make a soup) 2 bay leaves Salt and pepper, to taste Cayenne pepper or hot sauce, to taste 1 cup of dried field peas (or Sea Island red peas, on the Slow Food Ark of Taste ) Vegetable stock, to taste (optional) Mushroom Bacon: 1 dozen fresh shiitake or button mushrooms 1 TBS of liquid smoke, smoked salt and/­­or smoked paprika 1/­­4 cup of vegetable or olive oil 1 TBS of salt or soy sauce (to taste) Rice: 1 cup of long-grained rice 2 cups of water Preparation: Field peas: Rinse, then boil field peas in salt water until soft. Drain peas of excess water and either store or immerse immediately into the gumbo. This step can be done in advance in order to cut down on preparation time on the day of serving. You can even prepare and freeze the peas days before, drop them into the hot soupy pot mid-way through the process. Make the gumbo: Heat a soup pot at a medium setting and make a roux (the soup base). Roux: add oil to the pot, once sizzling, add flour and mix with a wooden spoon. When the flour starts to smell delicious, it will then begin to turn a brownish color. Stir fairly vigorously to avoid burning. Once its a dark brown (5-10 minutes), add minced onions, celery and bell pepper. Stir the ingredients well to blend the flavors. Add salt, pepper, and more oil and/­­or water (or wine) to deglaze the pan. The roux will become bubbly and smell almost sweet. At this point, start adding water and turn down the heat a little. Add bay leaves, other seasonings, and the chopped greens and herbs. They will soon turn from bright green to dark green. Add field peas and any additional vegetables, like chopped carrots or turnips, whatever you have in the kitchen. Let simmer for at least 60 minutes. Once the gumbo is hot, tasty and ingredients cooked down into dark greens, and soft field peas, it is ready to serve. Tasting it at the end is important: Is it salty or spicy enough? If not, add more cayenne or hot sauce, black pepper, salt, etc. Mushroom bacon: Slice fresh mushrooms vertically in thirds, depending upon the size of the mushrooms. (Button mushrooms are fine and usually easily available, feel free to select shiitake or other exceptionally tasty varieties.) In a mixing bowl, add 1/­­4 cup of oil, 1 TBS of liquid smoke, salt or soy sauce. Mix the ingredients, and then add the fresh mushrooms and mix until they are coated. Spread sliced mushrooms across a baking sheet and bake for 20-30 minutes at 375 degrees F. Check after 15 minutes and turn over ones that are browned and crisp. Once crispy, turn off the oven and let cool slowly in oven. Rice: If you have a rice cooker, prepare as usual. If not, wash 1 cup of rice under running cold water to remove any excess dust, etc. Boil in 2 cups of water until soft (usually 25-30 min). Final Preparations: Place 1/­­4 cup of rice in the middle of a shallow soup bowl. Pour gumbo around the rice, making sure that there are equal amounts of greens and liquid. Take the dried, crispy mushroom bacon from the cooled oven and add a handful on top of the rice, and serve. Invite your friends and family to celebrate a plant-based Mardi Gras with this Green Gumbo recipe. If youre looking for other meatless recipe inspiration throughout the Lenten season, check out our recipe gallery . Happy Mardi Gras! Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post Make it a Meatless Monday Mardi Gras Celebration with Green Gumbo appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Is Your Winter Meal-Plan Menu Seasonal Produce Friendly?

December 23 2019 Meatless Monday 

Is Your Winter Meal-Plan Menu Seasonal Produce Friendly?Despite the frigid temperatures and seemingly barren landscapes all around, the winter months can be surprisingly abundant. In fact, much of our most popular produce is actually in-season during this chilly time of year. Thats right, apples, beets, broccoli, cabbage, broccoli rabe, Brussels sprouts, carrots, cauliflower, celery, citrus fruits, fennel, garlic, leeks, mushrooms, onions, parsnips, pears, pomegranates, sweet potatoes, turnips, rutabagas, and radishes all fair pretty well in colder temperatures. But we dont. Thats why weve compiled a list of our warmest, most comforting meatless recipes -- all of which use seasonal winter produce -- to help you and your family stay toasty through the frosty months. Make them this Monday for a cozy start to the week. Carrot Soup with Parsnip Chips   Cauliflower and Chickpea Curry   Cranberry Balsamic Brussels Sprouts   Creamy Vegetable Noodle Soup Meaty Mushroom Stew over Garlic Mashed Potatoes Red Onion Soup with Shiitake Broth Roasted Fennel with Tofu and Oranges Roasted Garlic Parsnip Spinach Shepherds Pie Vegetable Fritters with Green-Chile Coconut Chutney   Interested in adding more Meatless Monday recipes to your cooking repertoire? Click here to access our recipe archives full of easy-to-make meatless and plant-based dishes.   The post Is Your Winter Meal-Plan Menu Seasonal Produce Friendly? appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Creamy Vegetable Noodle Soup

November 17 2019 Meatless Monday 

This recipe comes to us from The Meatless Monday Family Cookbook by Jenn Sebestyen. Jenn says, “This thick and creamy soup reminds me a bit of potpie filling, but in soup form. The small ditalini pasta rings are the same size as the diced vegetables, making it easy for kids to scoop up a bit of everything in one bite. Made with no cream, not even homemade cashew cream, you wont believe how creamy it is. Youll be heading back for seconds in no time.” Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 6 - 2 tablespoons (28 ml) olive oil - 1 yellow onion, diced - 3 carrots, peeled and diced - 2 ribs celery, diced - 1 red bell pepper, seeded and diced - 1 tablespoon (1 g) dried parsley - 1 teaspoon dried basil - 1 teaspoon dried thyme -  1/­­2 teaspoon dried dill - 1 1/­­4 teaspoons salt, or to taste -  1/­­4 cup (32 g) all-purpose flour - 2 cups (475 ml) unsweetened almond milk or milk of choice, divided - 4 cups (946 ml) low-sodium vegetable broth - 2 tablespoons (8 g) nutritional yeast (optional) - 1 cup (110 g) dry ditalini pasta or similar small pasta shape (gluten-free, if desired)   Heat the olive oil in a soup pot over medium heat. Add the onion and sauté for 5 to 6 minutes until soft and translucent. Add the carrots, celery, and bell pepper and sauté 4 to 5 minutes until starting to soften.   Add the parsley, basil, thyme, dill, salt, and flour and stir to combine, scraping up any bits of flour on the bottom of the pot. Slowly pour in 1/­­2 cup (120 ml) of milk while whisking continuously, again scraping up any bits of flour on the bottom; a flat whisk is convenient here, but a balloon whisk will work as well. Whisk until the flour is completely incorporated.   Add the remainder of the milk, vegetable broth, and nutritional yeast, if using. Whisk to combine. Increase the heat to high and bring to a boil. Once boiling, add the pasta, and then reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer for 10 to 15 minutes until the pasta is cooked through, stirring often to prevent the pasta from sticking.   Taste and adjust the seasoning, if necessary.   Swap it! For a gluten-free option, use brown rice flour instead of all-purpose flour. The post Creamy Vegetable Noodle Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Don’t Get Spooked by Sweets — Try These 10 Better-for-You Halloween Treats

October 28 2019 Meatless Monday 

Don’t Get Spooked by Sweets  —  Try These 10 Better-for-You Halloween TreatsHalloween season is here, so its time to bust out the bloody bandages, clean out the old cast-iron cauldron, and study up on your seances. And theres no better way to honor the scariest holiday of the year than with a proper Halloween bash (or monster mash, or graveyard smash)? Whether its a spooky soirée for you and your friends or a party for some little monsters , the focal point of the celebration (as with all parties) is the finger food -- minus the fingers, of course. You can always go with the traditional frightening fare -- candy apples, ants-on-a-log, popcorn balls, devils food cake -- but we wanted to offer some more imaginative options that are not only tasty, easy to make, and freaking cute, but theyre also better-for-you! Check out the list below for some hauntingly yummy Halloween treats. Peanut Butter Apple Monsters With sunflower-seed teeth and a strawberry tongue, these gremlin-looking green apples are the perfect snack for guests who are scared of eating too much sugar. Photo courtesy of @nutriacure . Fiendishly Frightening Fruit Platter Ghostly red peppers, Frankenstein kiwis, and cantaloupe tombstones make for a very frightening fruit platter. Photo courtesy of @foodbites . Ghostly Chocolate Cupcakes These are not your ordinary cupcakes. Tucked away within each fluffy chocolate cake is a hint of tangy guava and sweet beet puree. Topping each cupcake is a crown of coconut-milk frosting. Drizzle some thinned out guava juice over the top for an even more ghastly effect. Photo courtesy of Goya . Mummys Favorite Jalape?o Poppers These jalape?o poppers are almost too cute to eat... almost. Photo courtesy of @thepurplepumpkinblog . Ghastly Gluten-Free Zombie Fingers These are almost as scary as someone with a gluten intolerance eating a piece of bread. Made primarily from dates, peanut butter, and oats, these zombie fingers are easy to assemble, and they most definitely look the part. Photo courtesy of Recipes from a Pantry . Boo-nana Popsicles The ideal non-dairy frozen treat for your guests. Not too messy, these popsicles will be gone so fast youll begin to wonder if they ever existed at all... Photo courtesy of Well Plated . Candy Corn Parfait These have the candy-corn look, but with added tropical flavor. Just layer some pineapple, tangerine, and a shot of whipped cream to capture the aesthetic of classic candy corn.  Photo courtesy of Family Fresh Meals . Bat Energy Bites All you need is 20 minutes, a microwave, and a mixing bowl to put these scary snacks together. These ones are just as fun to make as they are to eat. Photo courtesy of Chelsea’s Messy Apron . Tangerine Pumpkins Rushing to complete the Halloween party preparations? These tangerine pumpkins dont require much assembly: Just peel and pop a little wedge of celery on top to give them that pumpkin look. Photo courtesy of Bren Did . Ahhhhh Vegetables! For some, nothing is scarier than a platter of roasted vegetables, but we think these spooky shaped beets, carrots, and squash are just devilishly delightful. Photo courtesy of Live Eat Learn .   Making one of these creepy creations? Tag @meatlessmonday and well repost the scariest photos (and maybe the cutest). The post Don’t Get Spooked by Sweets — Try These 10 Better-for-You Halloween Treats appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Baked Lentil Empanadas

September 9 2019 Meatless Monday 

Lentils, cremini mushrooms, and pimento-stuffed olives give these baked empanadas flavor to spare. This recipe comes to us from chef Jodi Taffel , one of the finalists in the Western Foodservice Show Meatless Monday Rapid Fire Challenge. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Makes 24 empanadas - 7 eggs - 1 cup yellow onion, roughly chopped - 1 cup sliced carrots - 1/­­2 cup diced celery - 8 oz sliced cremini mushrooms - 2 tbl olive oil - 1 tbl minced garlic - 2 tsp Kosher salt - 1 tsp cracked black pepper - 1/­­2 tsp paprika - 1 cup dry green lentils - 2 tsp dried tarragon - 4 cups vegetable stock - 1 cup martini olives (green with red pimentos), roughly chopped - 24 empanada wrappers - 2 tbl water, divided - 1/­­2 cup toasted garlic & avocado finishing oil   Directions 1. Submerge 6 eggs in a pot of water set over medium heat and bring to a boil. Remove from the heat, cover with a tight fitting lid and let sit 12 minutes. Remove eggs and place in an ice bath. When cool enough to touch, peel and roughly chop. 2. While eggs are cooking, set a heavy bottomed soup pot over medium heat and sauté onion, carrots, celery and mushrooms the olive oil until softened. 3. Add the garlic, salt, pepper and paprika and cook 1 additional minute, or until fragrant. 4. Add the lentils and toss with the vegetables, then add the tarragon and stock. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer. 5. Simmer 30 minutes, stirring every few minutes, or until lentils are tender and all the liquid has been absorbed (if lentils are still a bit crunchy after liquid is absorbed, add another cup of stock and continue to cook until they are tender). 6. Transfer lentil mixture to a large bowl and allow to cool 15 minutes while you preheat the oven to 400 degrees. 7. Fold eggs and olives into lentil mixture. 8. Working with 1 at a time, place 3-4 tablespoons lentil mixture in the center of each empanada wrapper. Dab your finger in water and moisten all around the outer edge of the empanada wrappers. Fold empanadas in half, seal the edges with the tines of a fork, and place on a parchment or silicone lined sheet pan. 9. Beat remaining egg with remaining tablespoon of water and paint the tops of the empanadas with it. 10. Bake 30-40 minutes, or until beautifully browned. 11. Remove empanadas from the oven and pain tops with finishing oil while still hot. The post Baked Lentil Empanadas appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Open-Faced Peppers

July 15 2019 Meatless Monday 

A play on traditional stuffed peppers, these Open-Faced Peppers get a protein boost from beans and quinoa (instead of ground beef). Plus, theyre colorful on a plate and easy to complement with just about any side dish. Try them with a side of jicama salad! This recipe comes to us from OMD: The Simple, Plant-Based Program to Save Your Health, Save Your Waistline, and Save the Planet , by Suzy Amis Cameron. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 - 4 large bell peppers, your choice of color  - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1/­­2 red onion, chopped   - 2 celery ribs, chopped - 1 teaspoon ground cumin - 1/­­2 teaspoon chili powder - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1 cup cooked pinto beans, rinsed and drained - 1 cup frozen corn kernels, drained - 1 cup cooked quinoa - 1/­­2 cup chopped fresh cilantro - 1 cup shredded vegan cheese 1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. 2. Arrange the bell peppers on the baking sheet and bake until they begin to so en, 20 minutes. Set aside to cool. 3. Meanwhile, in a large skillet, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Add the onion, celery, cumin, chili powder, and salt. Cook until the onion begins to so en, 3 to 4 minutes. Add the beans, corn, quinoa, and cilantro. Turn on the heat and stir the bean mixture until thoroughly combined. Set aside. 4. Remove the peppers from the oven and let sit until just cool enough to handle; keep the oven on. Slice the peppers in half lengthwise and carefully remove the stem and seeds. Return the pepper halves to the baking sheet, cut side up. Divide the quinoa filling evenly among them. Top evenly with the cheese, return the peppers to the oven, and bake until the cheese begins to brown, 15 minutes. The post Open-Faced Peppers appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Buffalo Chickpea Salad Sandwich

May 30 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Buffalo Chickpea Salad Sandwich It seems like we come back every year with a bean salad idea similar to today’s buffalo chickpea variation (see this sandwich and this salad). Beans do so well when combined with all kinds of sharp, punchy ingredients, like pickled items, herbs, and spices. Dressed up like this, they make for a flavorful and satiating component to include in sandwiches, bowls, salads, etc. They last a while in the fridge, which makes them great for meal prep and generally for thinking ahead. This buffalo chickpea version features a balance of spicy, savory, sweet, and briny. It’s especially delicious in a sandwich format, but it can definitely be enjoyed a bunch of different ways. The chickpeas are mashed and dressed with buffalo sauce, lemon juice, mustard, etc., and bulked up with pieces of roasted red pepper, olives, red onion, celery, and dried cranberries (which provide perfect little pockets of sweetness). Most of the ingredients here are pantry items for us/­­things that we almost always have in the fridge, so this type of lunch-saver is always at an arm’s reach. Maybe that’s the case for you as well? We hope you’ll give this one a try :) Buffalo Chickpea Salad Sandwich   Print Serves: around 6 sandwiches Ingredients 3 cups cooked chickpeas (2 15 oz cans) 3 roasted red bell peppers - cut into bite-sized pieces juice from 1 lemon 2 tablespoons to ¼ cup Buffalo hot sauce 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon olive oil ¼ cup olives and capers or just olives - chopped packed ¼ cup dried cranberries - chopped 1 large celery stalk - finely chopped ¼ of a red onion - finely chopped 1½ teaspoon garlic powder 1½ teaspoon onion powder handful of herbs of choice like dill, basil, parsley, chives - chopped salt and pepper - to taste Instructions Put half of the chickpeas and all of the roasted red pepper in a large bowl and mash with a masher until fairly smooth. Add the rest of the chickpeas and mash them in, leaving some pieces intact for texture. Add the lemon juice, hot sauce, mustard, olive oil, olives/­­capers, cranberries, celery, red onion, garlic powder, onion powder, herbs, and salt and pepper. Mix everything through, taste for salt and adjust if needed. You can also do all of the mixing in a food processor. Keep the buffalo chickpea salad refrigerated in an airtight container. Serve in sandwiches with fixings like lettuce, cucumber/­­tomato slices, or in salads, bowls, etc. Enjoy! Notes Buffalo hot sauce varies greatly in hotness from brand to brand, so taste as you go when you add it, until you have the desired level of heat. 3.5.3226 The post Buffalo Chickpea Salad Sandwich appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Stadiums Up Their Game with New Meatless Options

April 15 2019 Meatless Monday 

Stadiums Up Their Game with New Meatless OptionsWhether youre in it for the love of the game or the delectable ballpark eats, baseball season is in full swing. In 2019, stadiums are offering more meatless options than ever before: From the Impossible Burger to falafel-packed pitas to meat-free Philly cheesesteaks, theres no shortage of tasty ways to fill up at the concession stands. Find a few notable favorites below. Photo Credit: Beyond Meat Dodger Stadium Burgers and hot dogs are ballpark staples, and now meatless options are, too, at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles. Find the Impossible Burger topped with herb mayo, lettuce, tomato and onions at Field Section 47 and Reserve section 29, according to Eater . Beyond Meat is also available, in the form of a Dodger Sausage , at Field 10, Loge 133, and Reserve 4.   Citi Field Mets fans can whet their appetites at the Goya Burrito Bar (Section 414), where they can choose from bean, rice and veggie burritos, bowls, or nachos, Eater reported. In the mood for something else? Youre in the right place, as AM New York highlighted. Score a margarita pizza cupcake (Jim Beam Highball Club on the Promenade),  Shake Shacks Portobello Shroom Burger (Section 140, Field Level Concourse), a veggie taco at El Verano Taqueria (Section 139, Field Level Concourse), or a veggie dog at Hain Celestial Gluten Free & Organic Stand (Section 105).   Globe Life Park Stadium The Texas Rangers provide their fans with a meatless haven at Globe Life Park Stadium . The Ballpark Vegan (near section 16) serves up a variety of meatless eats, including a Beyond Burger topped with vegan cheese, street tacos loaded with Beyond Meat crumbles and vegan chili.   T-Mobile Park If you have tickets to a Seattle Mariners home game, come hungry ! Find the seemingly ubiquitous Impossible Burger at Lil Woodys Burger & Shakes (at the Pen). This version is built the old fashioned way, topped with chopped onion, diced pickle, tomato, lettuce, ketchup and mayo. Hit It Here Café (Right Field Hit It Here Terrace) serves a fully vegan Beyond Burger, which is paired with vegan Just Mayo. At The Natural (Section 105), Beyond Meat is served in the form of a sweet and spicy sausage. Here you can also order avocado toast - not yet a ballgame staple, but whos to judge? At Paseo (Edgars Cantina and Edgars Home Run Porch), you can chow down on the Tofu Delight Sandwich, which features sautéed organic tofu with garlic aioli, caramelized onion, cilantro, pickled jalape?o and romaine lettuce, all served on a toasted baguette.   Yankee Stadium Yankee Stadium boasts tons of meatless dining options. At Bareburger (section 132), choose between the Beyond Sausage sandwich, avocado bites or the Changeup Burger (Impossible Burger, pickled red onions, spinach, guacamole, spicy pico de gallo on a sprout bun). At the Toyota Terrace (in the right field bleachers), try a crispy buffalo cauliflower bun thats served with celery slaw and creamy bleu cheese. If youre craving something sweet, its important to know theres a Ben & Jerrys Scoop Shop located in Sections 125 and 318.   Oracle Park The three-time World Champion San Francisco Giants are winners in more ways than one: Their stadium food options are truly trophy-worthy. The venue hosts a culinary garden behind the centerfield wall, from which two restaurants source fresh produce like kale and avocado. Beyond an assortment of fresh veggies, there are tons of meatless meals available here. The Garden Table offers an Impossible beef-based chili, and the standard Impossible Burger is available at Derby Grill outposts. Guests can go beyond classic ball game fare with the rice bowl (baby bok choy and baked tofu) or the noodle bowl (roasted eggplant, wok-seared bell peppers, crispy tofu) at Fongs , located on the second floor promenade.   Citizens Bank Park Grammy Award-winning musician Questlove has certainly upped the Philadelphia Phillys cool factor. Launched at the end of March 2019, the teams Citizens Bank Park is now serving Questloves Cheesesteak , a meatless riff on the citys iconic dish made with - you guessed it - Impossible Meat (Sections 108 and 120). In addition to the new menu item, plant-based meals can be found at Shake Shack, the first sit-down Shake Shack in a sports venue (near the Third Base Gate) and at Harry the Ks Broadcast Bar and Grille, which is serving up curry cauliflower lettuce (Left Field Gate).   Did we miss one your meatless stadium faves? Tell us about it by leaving a comment on our Facebook  page or post it using #MeatlessMonday. Want to bring Meatless Monday to your local stadium or community? Become a Meatless Monday Ambassador today ! Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post Stadiums Up Their Game with New Meatless Options appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Lentil Sloppy Joes Instant Pot (Saucepan Option)

April 4 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Lentil Sloppy Joes Instant Pot (Saucepan Option)Instant Pot Vegan Lentil Sloppy Joes! 1 Pot, 30 min, freezer friendly tangy flavorful sloppy lentils. Serve in sandwiches with slaw or over tater tots or baked potato. Vegan Glutenfree Soyfree Nutfree Oilfree Recipe Jump to Recipe Lentil Sloppy Joes are a quick meal filled with protein and tons of flavor. They pair well with various condiments. Serve these with some pickled onion, slaw or other toppings. Serve them in wraps or sandwiches or over baked potato, baked fries or potato salad. Make a bowl with some veggies, dip and toasted bread! Lentils come in various colors and have different cook times. They also vary in flavor. I use green lentils for these vegan sloppy joes as they are more hardy and don’t get mushy easily. They are cooked with onion,pepper, carrots, celery, seasonings such as taco, chili or bbq, and tomato. The result is this hearty flavorful saucy sloppy joes. You can vary the flavor with other herbs and blends, add more or less tomato to preference. Lets make these! As always, saucepan option is in the notes.Continue reading: Vegan Lentil Sloppy Joes Instant Pot (Saucepan Option)The post Vegan Lentil Sloppy Joes Instant Pot (Saucepan Option) appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vol-au-Vents

March 23 2019 Oh My Veggies 

For this vol-au-vent sauce, I chose carrots, corn, and green peas as vegetables, but there are so many possible variations: mushroom, zucchini, celery, squash… To complete it all, you can serve the vol au-vent with a salad!

Raw Mock Tuna

March 11 2019 Meatless Monday 

Nuts, seeds, seaweed, and kelp come together to create a convincing plant-based take on tuna that can be enjoyed in a lettuce wrap on a sandwich, or wherever you’d use tuna salad. This recipe comes to us from Heidi Liv Tompkins, Co-Founder, CFO, product development manager, Heidis Health Kitchen . It was the winning entry in the Meatless Monday Rapid Fire Challenge at the 2019 International Restaurant & Foodservice Show of New York. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 6 - Ingredients: - 1 cup sunflower seeds, raw - 1 cup almonds, raw - 1/­­3 cup water - 1/­­4 cup lemon juice, fresh - 2-3 tbsp vegan fish sauce substitute (such as Fysh Sauce) - 1/­­2 tsp garlic powder - 1/­­2 tsp dulse powder - 1 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1 cup cashew mayo (recipe below) - 1/­­4 cup onion, chopped - 1/­­4 cup celery, chopped - 1/­­4 cup fresh parsley, chopped - 2 tsp kelp powder - 1/­­1/­­2 tsp garlic, minced - Yum Yum Ginger Sauce (recipe below)   - Cashew Mayo -  1/­­2 cup water -  1/­­2 cup fresh-squeezed lemon juice - 1 cup raw macadamia nuts - 1 cup raw cashews - 1 Tbsp. garlic - 1 1/­­2 tsp. Celtic sea salt   - Ginger Yum Yum Sauce -  1/­­2 cup fresh lemon juice -  1/­­2 cup water -  1/­­2 cup coconut aminos -  1/­­2 cup coconut nectar -  1/­­2 cup tahini - 2 inches ginger root, peeled - 2 cloves garlic - 1/­­2 bunch mint leaves   Directions: 1. Soak almonds, sunflower seeds, cashew, and macadamia nuts in water, separately, overnight. 2. In a food processor, process almonds, sunflower seeds, water, lemon juice, fysh sauce, garlic powder, dulse, & salt until fairly smooth. 3. Transfer to mixing bowl. Add Cashew Mayo and incorporate thoroughly. 4. Fold in finely chopped onion, celery, parsley, powdered kelp and freshly minced garlic. 5. Serve in lettuce wraps with Yum Yum Ginger Sauce, on sandwiches or on toast.   For the Cashew Mayo: 1. Blend ingredients until smooth. 2. Store in a glass jar & refrigerate.   For the Ginger Yum Yum Sauce: 1. Blend ingredients until smooth. 2. Store in a glass jar & refrigerate. The post Raw Mock Tuna appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Pasta e Fagioli Soup (and my gardener's lament: winter poison ivy!)

March 3 2019 Vegan Thyme 

Vegan Pasta e Fagioli Soup (and my gardener's lament: winter poison ivy!) Dear Soup, Thank you for always reminding me there are better days ahead. Soups are mainstays around here, especially with snow on the ground and temps hovering in low twenties to single digits tonight, plus more cold on the horizon this week. And poison ivy. (Yup.) I've probably made six batches of this already this winter. It involves a food processor and a soup pot. That's it. Comes together in approximately five minutes and is satisfying, warm and delicious. Here's my take on this soup, which was originally inspired by this. Here's how I made my Vegan Pasta e Fagioli: 4 carrots 1 leek 6 cloves garlic 1 celery stalk 1/­­2 onion sliced thin 2 bay leaves 1/­­2 head of cabbage 1 can of cannellini beans (drained, rinsed) 1 can diced tomatoes 1/­­3 cup ditalini pasta (cooked in separate pot, then added to soup just before serving) 2 T. nutritional yeast 1 qt. veggie stock olive oil thyme oregano red pepper flakes salt & pepper to taste Add chopped veggies--carrots, leeks, garlic to food processor, pulse about ten times. Prep the soup pot with the olive oil over medium heat, add chopped veg. Cook till just tender. Add remaining ingredients and broth and seasonings, salt and pepper. Cover and let simmer two hours over low heat. Serve with a side of your best homemade bread. (Mine is Jim Lahey's --I made the ciabatta version). After a visit with the folks at Urgent Care yesterday for a infernal outbreak of poison ivy, I am now awaiting an agonizing three weeks for this painful mess to clear up. Or longer. Why does Mother Earth require such an evil, toxic plant? What purpose does it serve? I've been struck by this havoc on only a handful of times in my life because I am so gawdawful afraid. Sounds impossible. But trust me when I tell you: only to me, the Master Gardener, and in winter no less. And above is the culprit.  Our home is undergoing a transformation of sorts in a few weeks which will finally rid us of these old railroad timbers and be replaced with a more substantial wall of stone. (That will hopefully outlive us and beyond.)  So I found myself outside on a warm-ish day earlier last week in a bit of a snit over the demise of some cherished plants I couldn't bear to loose. I've spent fifteen years tending and planting, so obviously there are plants I want to keep. Out with the shovel and buckets and pots. Everything's dormant, ground was soft, sun was out: perfect. Until later that night when I woke with what I imagined to be some sort of bug bite. Then to the next afternoon when my arm reached up to scratch my wrist (pulling the long sleeve back and discovering to my horror what really had happened). OMG. WTH? Could this be? . . . is this? Noooooo!  And then began the seven stages of grief: shock, denial, guilt, anger and bargaining, depression and loneliness to reconstruction (the UC visit) and finally acceptance. Yes, I accept that I have the rash of the spring and summertime, of gardeners, campers, hikers and landscapers, the poisonous fury of: Leaves of Three Let it Be! Ah, but what about the roots?  I had come in contact with said dormant plant--through the roots. I had oh-so carefully lifted plants and divided, setting each clump aside. Gloves and long sleeves. I have replayed this moment back through my mind a hundred times: as I reached under one of my plants, I must have accidentally, on an exposed part of my wrist, come in contact with the worst plant root on the planet, unbeknownst to me.  I am more allergic than most and so, this lovely little visitor and its prescribed remedy dosed out (the horrid steroid treatment) is, well. It's hell. The rash has traveled from my left wrist, up my right arm, to my abdomen, and leg. There's a perfect dot-to-dot landscape you can follow if you wanted. I can see the entry at every point. It's like an incredibly cruel irony and one I will face with tears, determination, agitation and regret. As for the remainder of the plants. They'll be destined for demolition. 


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