celery - vegetarian recipes

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Instant Pot Baingan Bharta Recipe – Spiced Mashed Eggplant

White Chocolate and Coconut Cookies

Snowballs

Tuscan Ribollita










celery vegetarian recipes

Tuscan Ribollita

December 10 2018 Meatless Monday 

Ribollita is a traditional Tuscan stew featuring a mix of dark leafy greens, tomatoes, carrots, celery and aromatic herbs. Serve this dish alongside a loaf of warm, crusty bread for the perfect winter meal! This recipe comes to us from Cindy of Cindys Table. Serves 4   - 1/­­2 cup extra virgin olive oil, divided - 1 large yellow onion, diced - 2 carrots, peeled and sliced - 2 large stalks, celery, chopped - 1 large white sweet potato, chopped - 2 cups cabbage, coarsely chopped - 5 kale leaves, trimmed and chopped - 4 Swiss chard leaves, trimmed and chopped - 4 cloves garlic, minced - 1 teaspoon sea salt, plus more - 1 teaspoon freshly ground pepper, plus more - 8 cups low sodium vegetable broth - 1 (28 ounce) can petite diced tomatoes - 3 sage leaves - 3 bay leaves   In a large cast iron pan or soup pot over medium high heat, add 3 tablespoons of olive oil. Once hot, add in onion and cook for about 5 minutes until translucent. Add in carrots, celery and sweet potato. Continue cooking for 5 minutes. Add in cabbage, kale, swiss chard and garlic. Then stir together with a wooden spoon. Cover and continue cooking for 10 minutes. Pour in vegetable broth and petite diced tomatoes. Drop in the sage and bay leaves. Bring to a boil then cover and lower to a simmer for 20 minutes. Remove from heat and let cool. Refrigerate over night and reheat for 20 minutes over a medium temperature. Ladle each bowl and drizzle with extra virgin olive oil for serving. The post Tuscan Ribollita appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Black Beans, Sweet Potatoes, Harissa

November 7 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Black Beans, Sweet Potatoes, Harissa We finally pulled together another meal plan! This ‘mini’ is very simple, seasonally-inspired, and will leave you with a bunch of nourishing food for the week. Everything starts out with a pot of black beans, a batch of roasted sweet potatoes, and a jar of homemade harissa (so easy to make, and such a flavor bomb ingredient!), which will then make their way into three interconnected savory meals and one snack. Ready? Menu - Roasted Sweet Potato and Black Bean Soup - No-Huevos Rancheros - Curried Cauliflower Rice and Beans - Harissa Black Bean Dip *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free, see the recipes for serving sizes Shopping List (Print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, its got all the ingredients youll need for the recipes in this meal plan mini. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Add whatever other ingredients you’ll need for the week here, if doing shopping for the whole week. Produce - 1 large head of garlic - 3 medium sweet potatoes - 3 large yellow onions - 1 large carrot - 2-4 celery ribs - 1 bunch kale (2 packed cups) - 3 limes - 2 lemons - 1 large bunch of cilantro - 2-3 avocados - 1/­­2 lb crimini mushrooms - 1 small head of red cabbage - 1 large head of cauliflower Bulk - 4 cups black beans - 2 cups Basmati rice - 3 large prunes Spices - black pepper - curry powder (1 tablespoon) - bay leaves - 8 dried chipotle chilis - whole caraway seeds - whole coriander seeds - whole cumin seeds - harissa paste – if not making your own Staples - neutral coconut oil or avocado oil - red wine vinegar - sea salt - tahini - kombu (optional) - balsamic vinegar (optional) Other - corn tortillas or other tortillas of choice - 8 sun-dried tomatoes Basic Prep 1) Cook the Black Beans Pot of Black Beans   Print Ingredients 4 cups black beans 2-3 garlic cloves - smashed 2-3 bay leaves 1 sheet of kombu (optional) sea salt Instructions Soak the beans overnight or up to 24 hours in plenty of purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar. Drain and rinse the beans. Place them in a large soup pot with plenty of purified water (about 10 cups). Add the garlic cloves, bay leaves and kombu, if using. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 30 minutes. Taste for doneness. If the beans are not completely soft and buttery inside, continue to cook until fully done. Salt at the last 10 minutes. Drain, saving the cooking liquid. Discard the bay leaves and kombu, if using. 3.5.3226   2) Cook the Rice Pot of Basmati Rice   Print Ingredients 2 cups basmati rice Instructions Cook 2 cups of basmati rice according to the instructions on the package (if your rice came in a package). Or cook the rice according the this method, or any other rice cooking method you prefer, like in a rice cooker, etc. You should end up with about 5-6 cups of cooked rice. 3.5.3226   3) Roast the Sweet Potatoes Roasted Sweet Potatoes   Print Ingredients 3 medium sweet potatoes avocado oil or other neutral oil of choice sea salt freshly ground black pepper Instructions Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare 2 parchment paper-covered baking trays. Peel and cube two of the sweet potatoes and place them on the trays. Sprinkle with avocado oil, salt and pepper, toss to cover and spread into a single layer. Leave the third sweet potato whole, just scrub it and prick with a fork, and place on one of the baking trays. Roast the sweet potatoes for 20-30 minutes, until the cubed ones are soft and browned in places. Toss at half time. The whole sweet potato will take a little longer to bake. Cook it until its easily pierced with a knife. Store the potatoes in an airtight container in the refrigerator. 3.5.3226   4) Make the Harissa (you can also buy harissa paste) Harissa   Print Adapted from Vibrant Food Serves: about 1 cup Ingredients 8 dried chipotle chilis 8 sun-dried tomatoes 1 tablespoon whole caraway seeds 1 tablespoon whole coriander seeds 1 tablespoon whole cumin seeds 1 large garlic clove - minced ¼ cup olive oil juice from ½ lemon 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 1 teaspoon sea salt Instructions Place the chipotle chilis and sun dried tomatoes in a medium bowl and cover with boiling water. Cover the bowl and let soften for about 30 minutes. Toast the caraway, coriander, and cumin seeds in a dry pan over medium heat until fragrant, about 2 minutes, stirring regularly. Grind the seeds using a spice grinder, dedicated coffee grinder, or mortar and pestle. Drain the chilis and sun-dried tomatoes. Remove the seeds and stems from the chilis (wear gloves to protect your hands if sensitive to spice). Place the chilis and sun-dried tomatoes in a food processor, add the toasted and ground spices, garlic, olive oil, lemon juice, vinegar, and salt. Process into a slightly chunky paste. Refrigerate in an air-tight container for up to 1 month. 3.5.3226   Recipes This soup is cozy and incredibly quick to put together once you’ve done all the prep. It gets its rich, earthy flavor from the black bean broth and harissa. Roasted sweet potatoes bring more depth and nourishment to the table, and kale provides a dose of dark leafy green magic. Roasted Sweet Potato and Black Bean Soup   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil or avocado oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped 1 large carrot - sliced 2-4 celery ribs - sliced thin 3 large prunes - chopped sea salt 3 garlic cloves - minced 3 cups cooked beans (from above) 3 teaspoons harissa or more to taste (from above) 5-6 cups black bean broth (from above) 2 cups packed chopped kale leaves 2 cups roasted sweet potatoes (from above) splash of balsamic vinegar (optional) juice of 1 lime cilantro - for garnish Instructions Warm the oil in a medium soup pot over medium heat. Add the onion, carrot, celery and prunes, and sauté for 8 minutes, until the vegetables are soft. Add salt and garlic, stir around for 1 minute. Add the beans, harissa and black bean broth, and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 30 minutes, until all the vegetables are completely cooked. Add the kale, sweet potatoes, splash of balsamic vinegar, if using, and more black bean broth, if needed. Bring back to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for another 10 minutes. Add the lime juice. Taste for salt and spice and adjust if needed. Serve over the prepped rice, garnished with cilantro. This soup freezes very well. 3.5.3226   This huevos rancheros-inspired dish utilizes crimini mushrooms, together with the already prepped black beans, sweet potatoes, and harissa, to make a delicious topping for warm tortillas. Everything comes together in a flash, and it’s a meal that can be easily eaten for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. No-Huevos Rancheros   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil or avocado oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped sea salt ½ lb crimini mushrooms - sliced 1½ cups cooked black beans (from above) harissa - to taste (from above) roasted sweet potatoes (from above) corn tortillas or other tortillas of choice - warmed or charred avocado - sliced or cubed shredded red cabbage - for garnish lime - for serving cilantro leaves - for garnish Instructions Warm the oil in a medium pan over medium heat. Add the onion and salt and sauté for 7 minutes, until translucent. Add mushrooms and sauté for 8-10 minutes, until all the liquid released by the mushrooms evaporates. Add the beans, harissa, and prepped sweet potatoes (amount to taste), and stir to incorporate and warm everything through. Serve the mushrooms and beans over tortillas, topped avocado, shredded red cabbage, a squeeze of lime, and cilantro. 3.5.3226   This re-imagined rice and beans recipe gets its bright flavor from the addition of curry, which is always great at providing a shortcut to flavor. It’s also full of cruciferous goodness from cauliflower, a little zing from lime, and some serious freshness from the essential topping of cilantro. Curried Cauliflower Rice And Beans   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil or avocado oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped 1 large cauliflower - chopped into small florets sea salt 5 garlic cloves 1 tablespoon curry powder, or more to taste 3 cups cooked black beans (from above) 3 cups cooked basmati rice (from above) juice of 1 lime cilantro - to garnish Instructions Warm the oil in a large saucepan. Add the onion, cauliflower and salt, and sauté for about 15-20 minutes, until the cauliflower is soft. Splash some water in the pan if things begin to stick. Add garlic and curry powder, and stir around for 1 minute. Add the beans and rice, and stir to mix everything together until warmed through. Pour the lime juice over top and stir to incorporate. Serve, garnished with cilantro. 3.5.3226   A flavorful dip is a great thing to have on hand at all times. It saves the day during snacking emergencies, but can also be spread on sandwiches and dolloped into bowls. Homemade dips are usually cheaper, healthier, and more flavorful than store-bought ones, and they’re easy to make. All of that is definitely the case with this black bean dip, which is made with the remaining, prep day black beans and whole baked sweet potato. If you happen to have any chipotle in adobo, those are a great addition to this dip as well. Harissa Black Bean Dip   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients the rest of the cooked black beans (from above, about 4 cups) 1 whole roasted sweet potato (from above) - peeled ¼ cup tahini juice from 1 lemon harissa (from above) - to taste sea salt black bean broth (from above) - for thinning, if needed Instructions Combine the beans, sweet potato, tahini, lemon juice, harissa, and sea salt to taste in a food processor and blend until smooth. Add some black bean broth if necessary to thin the dip out. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve, garnished with more harissa, toasted sesame seeds, and a drizzle of good olive oil. This dip freezes well if you end up with leftovers. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Sweet Potato and Kale Salad Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower Coconut-Ginger Eggplant Fried Rice Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Black Beans, Sweet Potatoes, Harissa appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegetables and Barley Soup

October 17 2018 VegKitchen 

Vegetables and Barley Soup What better way to start the week than a good soup full of seasonal vegetables? I learned to love soups in Italy, because there they make their soups with legumes and cereals, which makes them even more delicious. The preparation of the dish is fast, no need to stay close to monitor the cooking. The soup can be kept for two days in the fridge or may be frozen. You can add vegetables to the soup, depending on the season, or legumes, such as lentils. For a gluten-free version, replace barley with buckwheat or millet. Adapt the cooking times according to the cereals used. Preparation time: 15 minutes Cooking time: 40 minutes Serving: 4 Ingredients 1 can of tomato 4 cups of vegetable broth 200 g of pearl barley 1 celery stalk 2 potatoes 3 carrots 1 onion 1 clove of garlic 1 bay leaf Salt and pepper to taste Olive oil Preparation Wash the celery branch, carrots, and potatoes. Cut the vegetables into cubes. Peel and cut the onion and garlic clove. Pour the barley, all the vegetables, the onion, and the garlic into a sauce pan. Drizzle in olive oil, salt, and pepper to taste. Add the bay […] The post Vegetables and Barley Soup appeared first on VegKitchen.

Tofu and Vegetable Stew

October 10 2018 VegKitchen 

Tofu and Vegetable Stew My kitchen is a laboratory of vegetarian meals. These days, I’m still experimenting with new ingredients, new meal ideas, and revisiting classic dishes to make vegetarian versions. Last week, I wanted a comforting hot meal, and nothing is better than a good stew to get better! This stew is so consistent and comforting that it has even been gobbled up by my family members who aren’t vegetarian. The taste is amazing, the texture is interesting, and it has great nutritional value. Because of the tofu in the recipe, this stew provides plant-based protein to the body. Tofu is the traditional meat substitute that comes to mind when considering vegetarianism or a meatless diet. Despite its neutral taste and soy composition, the tofu quickly absorbs the flavor of the food with which it is prepared! Preparation time: 15 minutes Cooking time: 30 minutes Servings: 4 to 6 Ingredients 400 gr firm Tofu 3 Potatoes 3 Carrots 3 celery 1/­­2 cup puree of tomatoes 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 onion 1 clove garlic 1 teaspoon of dry oregano and basil 3 tablespoons of fresh coriander Salt pepper Instructions Over medium eat brown cook the onion and garlic in a little olive oil for 3 […] The post Tofu and Vegetable Stew appeared first on VegKitchen.

One Pan Brussels Sprout and Red Lentil Pie with a Root Vegetable Crust

December 27 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. Since this is our last recipe of 2017, we wanted to make sure that it’s a special one. It needed to check all the boxes we usually try to check with our recipes: nourishing, delicious, seasonal, beautiful, convenient, and a little bit unexpected. This veggie and lentil-centered one pan pie is all of those things. It’s very cozy and fun to prepare, too. If I had a choice, most of my savory dishes would be one-pan dishes :) Convenience is hard to beat. That little bit of initial effort you put into assembling all the ingredients for a single-pan dish pays off incredibly well when you end up with a big meal, plus a ton of leftovers for the week, having only used one pan or pot in the process. This one-pan dish is something like a vegetable pot pie, but the crust is made up of thinly mandolined winter roots – potatoes, sweet potatoes, and celery root. The filling is shredded Brussels sprouts, mushrooms, and red lentils (you can add barley, too, for a grain component) that cooks in a mixture of healing spices and coconut milk. The whole thing is packed with a great variety of plants. It’s perfect for those looking to up their intake of vegetables after the holidays, but still wanting to keep their cooking hearty and cozy. The ingredient that takes this dish into the complete meal category are the red lentils. Vegetable dishes are great on their own, but adding any kind of pulses (lentils, beans, chickpeas, dry peas) to your plant-centric meals will up their nutrition and ability to satisfy quite a bit. Pulses are incredibly nutrient-dense, like superfoods, but they are also very affordable, unlike most other superfoods, so it’s a win-win all around. Try adding about a half a cup of pulses to your meals a few times a week – your cooking will greatly benefit from them, and you’ll be on your way to discovering a whole new world of deliciousness (of you haven’t already, of course). Head here for more of our recipes using pulses, and be sure to check out Half Cup Habit. Happy New Year! Thank you so much for visiting GK, trying out our recipes, and reading up on the self-care series. It all means so much to us .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post One Pan Brussels Sprout and Red Lentil Pie with a Root Vegetable Crust appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vantra Eden – The Healthiest Restaurant In London?

November 29 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Very near the center of the city, 100 yards down the road after taking a left out of Goodge Street Station, lies some of the healthiest food in London. Vantra Edens fare, its sign proclaims, contains No Dairy, No Gluten, No Sugar, No Fried Food, Non GMO, No Peanuts & Cashew, No Garlic, No Vinegar, No Artificial Chemicals, No Unhealthy Cooking Methods - Vegan, Raw & Steamed, Halal & Kosher Friendly, Detoxing, Energising. No garlic? I ask Phun, Vantras owner. Makes people too horny. They cant meditate, he laughs in reply. Of course, there are bowls of garlic and chilis to add at the end of the buffet should you have other appetites planned for the rest of your day. Vantra Eden is first in the community of food tents at 79a Tottenham Court Road, across the street from Habitat. Theyre open Monday-Friday from 12-3 PM, a buffet with lunch boxes, juices, cakes, & more. A medium box is ?6, while a large is only ?7.50. Very reasonably priced. And the food is amazing. With the dishes either raw or steamed, the buffet selection offers the deliciously creamy ‘Vegan Stroganoff’ (Shiitaki Mushrooms, Celery, Mustard, Parsnips, Rosemary and Herbs), incredibly flavorful […] The post Vantra Eden – The Healthiest Restaurant In London? appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Chipotle Corn Chowder

October 24 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Chipotle Corn ChowderThis sweet, satisfying Chipotle Corn Chowder is made with frozen whole kernel corn. The garnish of pimientos and parsley adds a dash of color. Chipotle Corn Chowder - 1 tablespoon safflower oil - 1 medium onion, minced or shredded - 1 carrot, finely chopped or shredded - 1 russet potato, finely chopped or shredded - 1/­­4 teaspoon celery salt - 2 cups vegetable broth - 1 16-ounce bag frozen corn kernels - Salt and ground black pepper - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground coriander - 1/­­2 teaspoon liquid smoke - 2 cups plain unsweetened almond milk - 1/­­2 cup raw cashew pieces, soaked for 3 hours, then drained - 1 chipotle chile in adobo sauce - 2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley - 1 2-ounce jar chopped pimientos, drained - Heat the oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion, carrot, and potato. Cover and cook for 4 minutes to soften. Stir in the celery salt, broth, corn, and salt and pepper to taste. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to a simmer, stir in the coriander, liquid smoke, and almond milk, and cook, stirring frequently, for 5 minutes. - While the soup is simmering, combine the drained cashews and chipotle in a blender with 1 cup of the simmering broth from the soup. Blend until smooth and creamy, then add 1 more cup of the soup and blend until smooth. Stir the mixture back into the soup. Taste and adjust the seasonings. Ladle the soup into bowls and garnish with parsley and pimientos. Recipe from Cook the Pantry (C) 2015 by Robin Robertson. Photo by Annie Oliverio. Used by permission Vegan Heritage Press LLC. Save Save The post Chipotle Corn Chowder appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King

September 17 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Today’s self-care dialogue is with LA artist and meditation teacher, Lauren Spencer King. We first learned about Lauren a few years ago, when we came across her bimonthly moon writings that ring incredibly true and clear up a lot of things for us every month. Since then, we’ve fallen in love with Lauren’s art and meditation work, which is centered around breath work and her extensive knowledge about the healing powers of minerals. Lauren was kind enough to open up a space for us in her 4 day online meditation workshop for stress and anxiety, and we had the most lovely and calming time following her techniques and suggestions, which we often use to this day. Lauren’s self-care routine is as inspiring as it is down to earth, with a focus on finding the wisdom in the inner self. In this interview, Lauren tells us about the Ayurvedic cleanse she’s on, what minerals she keeps next to her bed, her ideas about exercise and beauty, why she sees the concept of a work-life balance as a myth, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I think in my everyday things do feel open and free, its part of the benefit of being an artist and working for yourself. But, I do find routine within that freedom. Days are also made up of habits (good and bad), and trying to prioritize things that are important and meaningful. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I like to have a few hours to wake up and start my day. I like the quiet of the mornings, the possibility of a new day. Sometimes if I happen to wake up really early for some reason, like 5:00am, I like to read in bed for a bit, or watch a scary movie early in the morning. Its weird... I know. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? On good nights I am in bed early and read before I go to sleep. I love reading in bed, there is something about it that feels so intimate. On a not so good night I will work too late, and fall asleep to a movie. I do like to sleep with a few minerals next to my bed, some make their way under my pillow at certain times: purple fluorite to relax my mind, danburite for sweet dreams, aquamarine for calming, a piece of dream quartz, and a piece of shungite that is next to my phone (on airplane mode). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: I am on an Ayurvedic cleanse right now. I have been working with this great Ayurvedic practitioner, her name is Meredith Carter. Years ago I did panchakarma (here), and if I could afford it I would do it annually. Its incredible. What I am doing now is like panchakarma lite! Breakfast – In the morning I make homemade almond milk. I will warm the almond milk and mix in my herbs and adaptogens, sometimes I will add fresh turmeric. I have been obsessed with making sweet potato toasts. I will top them with tahini and a cooked fruit compote (been loving cherry, wild blueberry, or pear ginger), with some pistachio nuts or pumpkin seeds. If I need some protein then I will eat two eggs toped with basil, and a tangerine. Lunch – I make fresh dahl with special non-heating spices and ghee, all of which I get from Surya Spa, they have the best mung beans and spices. Dahl is very healing. I will have a bowl full with some steamed chard or beet greens, black lava sea salt, toasted pumpkin seeds and lots of parsley or coriander on top. Snack – right now cherries are in season and they are making me so happy, I will have a bowl full of them with a handful of pistachios (lets be honest, like 1/­­2 a bag, I love pistachios). And some fresh ginger tea. Or I will make some beet hummus and have that with my favorite almond crackers. Dinner – I have been getting really into making soups! My two favorite are a green soup made with celery /­­ chard /­­ beet greens /­­ asparagus /­­ Japanese sweet potato. And a kabocha /­­ carrot /­­ginger soup. Or I will cook a big artichoke and dip the leaves into a melted ghee, lemon dip. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? None, I have never even had a cup of coffee. I usually have a huge jar of warm water with lemon or fresh ginger in the morning. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to when I was younger, until I developed all sorts of health problems because of it, some that I still deal with even over a decade later. I was living in Paris and eating nothing but delicious breads and sweets! It really took a toll on my body and since then I have cut both out. But, I still dream of flaky French almond croissants. Maybe in another life I will get to enjoy them again. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I love eating a spoonful of Chyawanprash in the morning. My good friend who runs Rebbl and develops all of their delicious drinks sent me a wellness mixture, it has very high grade reshi, ashwaganda and maca in it. I have that every morning. I love QuintEssentials 3.3 minerals. I also swear by Alexis Smarts flower remedies, she is amazing! I also almost always tend to all ailments physical and emotional with a homeopathic remedy from her. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I have an aversion to most forms of exercise, especially any kind of class where an instructor is wearing a headset and yells things at you like, Its almost swimsuit season, ladies. But sometimes I get into a routine where I go to yoga. I like to take hikes and go on walks, and I love to dance. But, my favorite is swimming. Recently I was swimming laps, and was having one of those days where I was feeling very unkind and judgmental of my body, and there was this older man in the lane next to me, he was a very serious swimmer, he might have even been a swim coach at some point, you could just tell. And I stopped to catch my breathe and he asked me how I had such a strong breaststroke. I told him it was because I was on swim team for years as a kid and maybe because I was tall. We talked for a bit about it and then I got back to my laps. And I started to think that in day to day life what I criticize most about my body in other contexts I use to my advantage. In this case, that my un-slender legs and bigger hips and butt actually made me a stronger swimmer and made my stroke more powerful. It really changed the way I thought about my body. I try to remember this. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I really love natural beauty, which to me means being whole and owning all of who you are. You know, there are times when I see someone crying, and they dont maybe look their best, but they are so beautiful to me, because they are so present and authentic. Bodies arent meant to be perfect, thats not why we have them. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I love oils and go through different phases of them on my face and body. Right now at night I use a hazelnut or arnica oil from a Paris apothecary for my face. I am also completely obsessed with Sans Ceuticalss Activator 7 Oil. I use it everywhere – body, face and hair! I dont really wear make up but when I do it is from RMS. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I either dry brush or do abhyanga massage with basil oil every day, its more for the internal lymphatic system, but it makes my skin really nice. Eating well and drinking enough water are also key. And a little sun is always nice. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. I love using my jade face roller to refine the tone of my skin as well as relieve some tension I carry in my jaw. I also am into my second year of no bra, for the most part. For a few reasons, one of them being that they actually arent good for your body. No products with chemicals. My mum was a natural beauty, she really taught me what that was, she had a style that was all her own. She was radiant from the inside out. I sometimes think this is something you are born with. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Stress is often what I teach most about in class, because it has been the biggest teacher to me. I feel I am always at a growing edge with it. I try not to over schedule myself. Rest is a big part of being healthy for me. I have gone through some very difficult periods in my life of having sever adrenal fatigue, which comes from stress of all kinds. So, I have to listen really carefully not to push myself too hard, despite at times wanting to ignore my limitations. Recently I have been working with someone to understand the deeper level of stress that I unconsciously take on from people around me and from living in a city. It has been fascinating. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Yes, sometimes stress can not be avoided, like when I have a show, or need to be on the computer all day, or travel. Those are the big ones for me. I have to really work hard to stay grounded. Its really all sorts of little things, that when I do them really add up. And I just do the best I can, its not about perfection. Even stopping to dance the stress out of my body for five minuets really helps. Stress is more physical than we think. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Stop everything. Get into bed in something comfy with socks. Sleeping as much as I can. Raw garlic. Olive Leaf supplements. Colloidal silver. Apple Cider Vinegar if I have a sore throat. Hot shower (or bath) with eucalyptus oil. Thieves oil on my chest and throat. Lots of water. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? I honestly think this idea of work /­­ life balance is a myth. At least it is for me. Sometimes its only about working on Fields of Study, sometimes I am all about being in the studio, sometimes its more relaxing and I can see friends and go on a trip or a weekend getaway. There is balance within the year if I am lucky. I recently just let this idea go, I was making myself feel so bad trying to make that ideal happen on a daily or even weekly timeline. I am also a bit of a workaholic, never feeling like I am doing enough. Thats something I am trying to work on. But, this pressure for balance seems like a modern day version of the women can have it all mantra. There are always compromises and I think its more empowering if we own that and voice it and have conversations about it. Instead of silently thinking that there is something wrong with us. Motivation -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Its not one single thing, but if it was it would be learning to listen to my body. My health and understanding of health has come from a bumpy road of making lots little shifts. I dont believe in a one size fits all mentality for health. I think we are all different and in every moment we need different things. I am wary of the companies and self proclaimed health gurus out there right now that give sometimes ill informed blanket recommendations. I think it is up to us to empower ourselves and take the time to learn about our bodies and ourselves. Its important to have support and create a team of people that can help you. I have an amazing doctor, a homeopathist, an Ayurvedic practitioner, a woman who I do energy work with, and a therapist that have all at different times saved my life in various ways. It can take time, but finding the people that resonate with your understanding of health is key. I have learned so much about my body and what health and healing is from working with all of them. And remembering that deep and true healing takes time. Its always a process. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. What came to mind was this movie Agnes Martin made called Gabriel. Its terribly long and boring. It is about the boy on a walk in nature, and it is very stripped down and minimal, no dialog and most of the movie is silent, it has one tiny part with music. But, I think it relates to the way I think about self-care in a way because it is about listening to the subtleties, and how all of that gets lost when there is a lot going on. Once I really started refining my diet, routine, relationship to my energy, my intuition, etc... I started to really be able to notice those subtle changes and messages my body was sending me, and as time goes on I keep going deeper and deeper. Its like in Martins paintings, when color is introduced, it feels monumental. Like for me, bananas are just too sweet now. Knowledge -- You are well-versed in so many amazing practices! Could you tell us a little bit about each of them: – Your art (would love to know more about your process on the mineral paintings) After graduate school I started making my own watercolors out of historical pigments, mostly from minerals and some earth pigments. I taught myself how to make paints the way they were made for centuries before there were synthetic colors. The mineral monochromes are just one aspect of the work I make, and they are about many things. But, the main ones are a redirection of how we think about representation. I think of them as representational paintings, as they are made of the very thing they are depicting: malachite, azurite, agate, epidote... They are also about an interest in the healing powers of art. They are made with the intention that the viewer and the space receive the same healing properties of the minerals and the earth from which they are sourced. I usually pair them with a highly rendered graphite drawings or watercolors. –  Fields of Study and mineral meditations Some years back after teaching meditation for a bit I was longing for an alternative to what I was seeing in the ways of spiritual teachings and mediation work, both in approach and aesthetic. I wanted to support people and teach them tools they could use in their every day life, while also creating a container for all the things I was interested in and all the things that I brought into my own spiritual practice, which I feel I am always shaping and discovering. Something that would allow for a deep conversation that also had breadth, and was based in every day life and could be accessible. Something that could be malleable and evolve as I did. And Fields of Study was born. I originally wanted to open up a non-profit space that would be like a modern day community center with classes and workshops for the community, as well as have a little shop and a residency space. And someday this might happen. But for now its just me – working to change the world, one person at a time. I say this with some humor, but its also a very real desire to be in service and help instigate change. The same goes for how I teach about minerals, I want to present an alternative, something that resonates with me and represents how I grew up with minerals in my home because of my mother, who was a silversmith. The goal of all those workshops is really to show people that they know more than they think they do, about most things, minerals included. And its not really about helping people feel like they know everything, but showing them that when they ask and they trust themselves they can source the answers. The participants really end up teaching the workshop, which I think is pretty amazing. – Your Moon writings I have been writing about the moon twice a month for about six years now. It really came out of a desire to understand its energy on a deeper level, and also to check in with myself about what I was feeling on a bimonthly basis. Its hard to take credit for the writing as I feel I have gotten to a place with it where I just sit down to write and something comes through me. As out there as that sounds, thats really what happens. I just listen as best as I can, I have gotten pretty good at listening. Writing in this way has really strengthened my intuition, its really incredible. Its also nice to get conformations from people when they write to tell me how right on it was for them. It reminds me that we are all connected. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Swimming in the ocean. The hot springs in Ojai or a trip to Joshua Tree. A bad movie. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Golden Bough and She by Robert A Johnson Song/­­Album – Gamelan Orchestra music, JD Emmanuel, and Neil Youngs album Harvest Moon, particularly Natural Beauty. Its my favorite song. Movie – The Color of Pomegranates Piece of Art – Fragonard, Brancusi, and John McCracken. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? Funny enough I just re-read this essay from The White Album where she talks about her packing list related to her being a journalist. At the very end she mentions that the one thing she never had was a watch, which she supposes is some reflection of the climate of the late 60s. But, a watch is the thing I always have, perhaps that says something about me and the times we are living in now. When I travel I also always wear this gold Victorian compass. You never know when you will have to find your way home. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? My Ayurvedic practitioner – Meredith Carter, my Homeopath – Alexis Smart, or anyone of the ladies on the @onigiriemoji Instagram feed I am a part of. Its a feed where a group of friends post what they are cooking and eating. Also, I wish you could have interviewed my mum, she was the best cook, I wish I learned more about cooking from her. Photos by Lauren Spencer King, Claire Cottrell and from Lauren’s shop. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Heart of Palm and Artichoke Cakes

July 25 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Heart of Palm and Artichoke Cakes These delectable Heart of Palm and Artichoke Cakes are crisp on the outside and moist and flaky on the inside with a flavor that is remarkably similar to traditional crab cakes thanks to Old Bay seasoning and a dash of nori flakes. This recipe makes six to eight cakes (depending on how big you like them) that can be enjoyed as a main dish, in sandwiches (theyre even good cold!), or as a component in Seitan Oscar.   Heart Of Palm And Artichoke Cakes - 1 tablespoon olive oil, plus more for frying -  1/­­2 cup minced onion -  1/­­4 cup minced celery - 2 teaspoons minced garlic - 1 (14-ounce) jar hearts of palm, well drained, patted dry, and roughly chopped - 1 (6-ounce) jar marinated artichoke hearts, well drained, patted dry, and roughly chopped - 2 teaspoons Old Bay seasoning - 1 tablespoon cornstarch - 1 teaspoon nori or dulse flakes -  1/­­4 cup vegan mayo -  3/­­4 cup panko bread crumbs - Lemon wedges, for serving -  Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the onion and celery and cook until softened, 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute longer. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool.  -  In a large bowl, combine the hearts of palm, artichoke hearts, Old Bay seasoning, cornstarch, nori flakes, and mayo. Add the cooled onion mixture and 1/­­4 cup of the panko, and mix well. Divide the mixture into 6 to 8 portions and shape into small patties. -  Place the remaining 1/­­2 cup panko in a shallow bowl. Coat the patties with the bread crumbs and refrigerate or freeze for 20 minutes or longer. -  Heat a thin layer of oil in a medium skillet over medium-high heat until hot and shimmering. Carefully place the patties in the skillet and cook until golden brown on each side, 3 to 4 minutes per side. Transfer the cooked patties to a plate. Serve hot with lemon wedges. Text excerpted from VEGANIZE IT! (C) 2017 by Robin Robertson. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. Photo by William and Susan Brinson. The post Heart of Palm and Artichoke Cakes appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Apple-Pecan Tempeh Salad or Sandwich Spread

June 21 2017 VegKitchen 

Apple-Pecan Tempeh Salad or Sandwich Spread  If youre a new vegan (or an aspiring one) you might be missing the heartiness of chicken salad, tuna salad, shrimp salad, and the like. Dont give in to temptation -- try this delectable tempeh sandwich spread or salad. Spiked with apples, celery, and pecans, this has all that umami and none of the animal […] The post Apple-Pecan Tempeh Salad or Sandwich Spread appeared first on VegKitchen.

Odds and Ends Homemade Spice Mix

April 25 2017 Vegie Head 

I’ve wanted to make my own spice mix for a long time – using more than just dried spices. I have been growing my own organic vegies and herbs for over a year now in my two Healthy Patches, and had an abundance of celery, chillies, oregano, rosemary and spring onions… and nothing to... The post Odds and Ends Homemade Spice Mix appeared first on Vegie Head.

Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna

February 22 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean LasagnaThis post was created in partnership with Newman’s Own Organics. I’ve always thought of lasagna as an intimidating dish in terms of its layered preparation, though I love the flavor and find myself craving it often during the cooler months. I set out to change my outlook with this simple and nourishing spaghetti squash version that tastes every bit as comforting as the original. Spaghetti squash performs impressively well as a lighter and more nutritious substitute for lasagna noodles that’s still hearty and substantial here. The uppermost layer of the squash that tops the lasagna becomes slightly crispy and golden in the oven and reminds me of my lacy, oven-baked latkes, for which I have a major weakness. The core of the lasagna is made up of the flavor-building trio of onions, carrots and celery, as well as affordable, protein-rich mung beans (you can also use lentils), kale and mushrooms. For the cheesy element, I went with my go-to almond ricotta that is a breeze to make, as well as fluffy, slightly tangy and cheesy, much like the real thing. I was very excited to partner with Newman’s Own Organics for this recipe for numerous reasons. Pasta sauce is one of the few things that I don’t mind buying pre-made, especially when I know that I can stand behind all the ingredients like I can with Newman’s. Their organic pasta sauce is made with real vegetables and herbs, all of which are organic, and that’s very much reflected in the delicious, classic flavor that works incredibly well in this lasagna. There’s no added sugar, either, the sauce just depends on the natural sweetness of the tomatoes. Another great reason to support the brand is that they donate 100% of their net profits to all kinds of charities around the world, which is an idea that got put into motion by Paul Newman in 1982 and has been carried out gracefully to this very day. This Paul Newman quote is at the core of the company’s mission and basically says it all: I want to acknowledge luck. The benevolence of it in my life and the brutality of it in the lives of others. Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna   Print Serves: one 9 x 13 baking dish or two 9 x 9 baking dishes Ingredients for the almond ricotta 2 cups almonds - soaked overnight in purified water 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast 1 garlic clove - chopped generous squeeze of fresh lemon juice pinch sea salt for the lasagna 1 large or 2 small spaghetti squash 3-4 tablespoons neutral coconut oil sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1 cup mung beans or French lentils - soaked overnight in purified water 1 large yellow onion - chopped pinch red pepper flakes dried thyme, oregano, marjoram - to taste (optional) 2 medium carrots - sliced 2 celery ribs - thinly sliced 1 lb crimini mushrooms - sliced two 24 oz jars marinara sauce or crushed canned tomatoes Instructions to make the almond ricotta Drain and rinse the almonds. Optionally, squeeze each almond to slip off the skin for a whiter, smoother ricotta, rinse well. Place almonds into the bowl of a food processor along with the rest of the ingredients. Add ¼ cup water and grind to a ricotta consistency. Add another 1-2 tablespoons of water, if needed. Use right away or refrigerate for up to 3 days. to make the lasagna Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Cut the squash in half lengthwise and scoop out the seeds. Generously oil the inside of each half with about 1 tablespoon of the coconut oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Place the squash cut side down on a parchment paper-covered baking tray and bake for 30-40 minutes or until tender. Remove from the oven and set aside. Reduce the oven temperature to 375° F (190° C). While the squash is roasting, drain and rinse the mung beans/­­lentils, place them in a medium saucepan and cover with purified water. Bring to a boil over high heat, lower the heat to a simmer, add salt and cook, partially covered, for 10 minutes. Taste for doneness, simmer for 2-5 minutes more if the beans are not yet tender. If using lentils, cook them for 20-30 minutes until done. Drain and set aside. Warm 2 tablespoons of coconut oil in a large saute pan over medium heat. Add onion, a pinch of salt, black pepper, red pepper flakes, and thyme/­­oregano/­­marjoram, if using, and saute for 5 minutes, until onion is translucent. Add carrots, celery and another pinch of salt and saute for another 5 minutes. Add mushrooms and saute for about 8 minutes or longer, until the liquid released by the mushrooms evaporates. Add mung beans and saute for 2 minutes, until coated and incorporated. Remove pan from the heat and set aside. Grease a 9 x 13 baking dish (or 2 smaller square dishes, about 8 x 8 or 9 x 9, as pictured) with the remaining 1 tablespoon of coconut oil. Spread ⅓ of the marinara sauce/­­crushed canned tomatoes over the bottom of the dish. Using a fork, scoop the spaghetti squash strands out of the skin and spread ⅓ of them over the marinara in an even layer. Reserve about 1 cup of the ricotta for garnish, if desired. Crumble ⅓ of the remaining ricotta over the squash. Top with half of the mung bean and vegetable mixture in an even layer. Repeat with ⅓ of the marinara, squash, ricotta and vegetables. Finish with the last layer of marinara and the squash. Cover and bake for 20 minutes. Increase the oven temperature to 400° F (200° C). Uncover the lasagna and bake for another 10 minutes, until the marinara is bubbling through to the surface. Optionally, turn the broiler on high and broil for a couple minutes, until top layer of the lasagna is golden in places. Remove from the oven, garnish with the reserved ricotta, if using, let cool slightly, slice and serve. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette Superfood Cherry Garcia Pops with a Chocolate Core - Ice... Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Black Lentil & Vegetable Bolognese

January 23 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Black Lentil & Vegetable Bolognese Pavarotti’s “Nessun Dorma” (none shall sleep) is blasting on repeat in my headphones. But it’s the opposite case over here. All the children are finally asleep and while Luise is taking care of the dishes, I’m trying to channel my inner Italian so we can publish this recipe before another year has passed. We wrote our last blog post in Copenhagen and this one is brought to you from a house we are borrowing, on the slope of the Table Mountains in Cape Town, South Africa. If we keep this trend of travelling south for every new blog post, we will be writing the next one from Antarctica. It feels a little weird writing about these comforting and wintery pasta bowls from here, but I’m trusting that Pavarotti will help me channelling my inner Italian and get me in the right mood. It’s summer in South Africa, we’ve got lemon trees growing in the garden, there is a small pool, a cute kitchen and Elsa and Isac are keeping occupied by throwing grapes at each other in some kind of never-ending grape war. In short, we are very happy and grateful to spend a month here. Apart from the children’s fights, the scene is vastly different from two weeks ago when we shot this recipe. Isac had pneumonia, Elsa and Gabriel were snoring with colds and we were all cozied up (or more like stuck) in our Stockholm apartment - pale, tired and gloomy, surrounded by cold winter. The only thing we craved then were simple and comforting pasta dishes like this. Vegetarian bolognese is perhaps not one of our most unique recipe ideas but it is January food at its best, so we thought it might be something you’d also be interested in maning. We often make a kids pasta sauce that contains tomatoes, grated carrot, grated zucchini and red lentils. As it simmers, the lentils dissolve into the tomato sauce and it all becomes quite sweet and smoothly textured. It’s a simple way to sneak extra nutrients in a meal that our kids always are happy to eat. This is a slightly more adult approach on that dish. The sauce has more texture and chunks and a deeper flavour from herbs and red wine. We use black lentils as they stay intact in the sauce. The lentils work as replacement for the meat in the classic bolognese ragu - they both add protein and have a nice and soft, chewy consistency. We combine chopped and grated carrots to get a mix of textures. You can of course add more veggies if you prefer. We kept it simple and used what we had at home because of sick kids and cold weather, but also because it is what Italians do. “Pochi ingredienti, tanto tempo” (few ingredients, long cooking time) is an Italian expression - that I just invented, but I’m pretty sure Pavarotti would agree. Simple cooking with great ingredients is key in the Italian kitchen. However, if you have some mushrooms or an eggplant/­­aubergine at home, either of them would work excellent in this recipe as well as they add meaty texture to the dish and make it even more vegetable packed. Enjoy! That’s it, blog post number two of the year. And no babies were neglected this time. I even managed to mention Pavarotti three times, talk about grape wars and make up my own Italian food expression. If that doesn’t qualify me as a full-blooded Italian, I don’t know what does. You can call me Davide from now on.  Vegetarian Bolognese Serves 4-6 2-3 tbsp olive oil 1 large onion, peeled and coarsely chopped 3 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed 2 large carrots, peeled 2 sticks celery, rinsed 4 tbsp green olives, stones removed and slightly bruised 1 tbsp fresh basil (or 1 tsp dried) 1 tbsp fresh oregano, rosemary or marjoram (or 1 tsp dried) 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup red wine 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked beluga lentils (or puy), rinsed 400 ml /­­ 1 1/­­2 cup vegetable stock (or water) 2 bay leaves 2 x 400 g /­­ 14 oz tins crushed tomatoes sea salt and freshly ground black pepper To serve pasta of choice (we used a lentil flour spaghetti) vegetarian parmesan style cheese fresh parsley olive oil Heat the oil in a large saucepan on medium heat. Add onion and garlic and sauté for a few minutes. Meanwhile, chop one of the carrots and the celery into 1 cm /­­ 1/­­2 inch chunks and add them to the pan along with olives and dried herbs (if using). Let soften for a couple of minutes, add the red wine and let cook until the alcohol evaporates. Add lentils, half of the vegetable stock, bay leaves, tinned tomatoes, fresh herbs (if using) salt and pepper. Grate the remaining carrot and add it as well. Bring to the boil, reduce the heat and let simmer for 30 minutes or until the lentils are cooked, stirring from time to time as not to burn the base of the sauce. Add the remaining stock or water, little by little, to loosen the sauce whenever it is looking dry. Cook your pasta of choice. Serve the sauce stirred through the pasta, topped with a sprinkling of grated cheese, fresh parsley or other herbs and a drizzle of oil. PS. We actually prepared one more blog post before we left and we will try to share it soon,  along with some photos and tips from Cape Town. Meanwhile you can see some snapshots from out trip on instagram.

Veggie Pot Pie

December 19 2016 Meatless Monday 

Satisfying and warm, this veggie pot pie is the perfect dish for a cold winter night. Seasoned with curry and turmeric, this dish’s unique flavor brings a twist to an otherwise ordinary evening. This recipe comes to us from Chelsey of C It Nutritionally. Serves 8 - 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil - 1 garlic clove, minced well - 1 cup onion, chopped - 3 cups mixed veggies, chopped, fresh or frozen and thawed (such as carrots, celery, onion, peas, corn, and string beans) - 1 1/­­2 cups mushrooms, sliced - 1 1/­­2 teaspoons whole wheat flour -  2/­­3 cup milk -  1/­­2 -1 teaspoon black pepper -  1/­­2 teaspoon curry powder -  1/­­4 teaspoon turmeric - Pinch of red chili flakes - Pinch of salt - 32 ounces vegetable stock - 1 15-ounce can great Northern beans or white cannelloni beans - 2 bay leaves - Optional: 8 servings puff pastry* & egg wash (1 egg white mixed with 1 tablespoon water) In a large soup pot heat oil and garlic over medium heat. Once pan is completely hot, add onions and mixed veggies. Saute until onions begin to appear translucent. Then add mushrooms and continue to cook until they soften. Add flour and milk and stir until combined. Add spices and stir to combine. Add stock, beans and bay leaves to the soup and stir to combine. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer. Allow to cook on low heat for about 20 minutes, until soup begins to thicken, and up to an hour. Taste, and adjust spices to your preference. Serve immediately, or allow to cool before storing in the refrigerator for up to a week. Enjoy! For puff pastry topping*: Follow package instructions and allow the puff pastry to thaw. Once you are able to work with it, outline the shape of your oven-safe bowl and cut the puff pastry to size. Brush with water or egg wash and bake for about 25-30 minutes (follow package instructions). The post Veggie Pot Pie appeared first on Meatless Monday.

One Soup - Three Ways

April 6 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

One Soup - Three Ways I feel extra enthusiastic about this post partly because I think we are on to something good here. But also because this headline speaks so much to my magazine-publishing-heart (my previous career). This is a dinner concept that we have played around with lately and it works particularly well for families with sensitive eaters or allergies. The idea is built around cooking one recipe base and then making some last minute add-ins to suit various preferences. Or to turn the leftovers of one dish into a new one the next day. The base can be anything from a salad, a basic stew, a cooked grain, a good sauce or, as here, a soup. In this recipe we are taking a simple tomato broth soup in three different directions. The kids love this with tortellini (or any other pasta) dropped into it. They actually prefer it to tomato sauce. Luise and I like to let a chunk of mozzarella (or burrata cheese) melt in the soup and serve it with some leftover cooked quinoa to make it more filling. Another favorite of ours is to stir chopped kale, chickpeas and a little chili paste into the broth and topping it with avocado for a chunkier vegan version. The way it usually works is that we cook one big batch of broth and then pour the kids version in a smaller sauce pan, drop in the ravioli and let it cook for another minute or two until soft. While we stir in or other add-ins to our version. It’s an excellent way to add some heat and more herbs to your own soup while keeping your kids or partners soup milder. You can of course keep it simple and just do one of these. Or mix them up, adding chickpeas to the ravioli or mozzarella to the kale. Or combine them all! Think of it as good base to build from and use the last minute add-ins to suit your personal preference. If you like this concept we might be back with the same ideas applied on other meals in a later post. Simple Tomato Broth Soup Serves 4 2 tbsp olive oil 1 onion, peeled and finely chopped 1 clove garlic, peeled and finely chopped 2 tbsp tomato puree 1 tsp ground paprika powder 3 carrots 3 celery stalks 1 x 400 g /­­ 14 oz can crushed tomatoes 4 cups /­­ 1 liter vegetable stock sea salt Fresh thyme Fresh basil Heat oil in a large thick-bottomed sauce pan on medium heat. Add tomato puree, onion, garlic and ground paprika and let sauté for 5 minutes. Peel and clean the carrots and celery and chop into bite-sized dices. Add to the pan and let sauté for a few more minutes. Then add chopped tomatoes and vegetable stock and let simmer under a lid for 15-20 minutes. Taste and adjust the flavoring, adding some fresh thyme or basil towards the end. You can also add more stock, if needed. Choose your favorite way of serving this soup, see recipe ideas below. Vegan Cavolo Nero & Chickpea Soup Serves 4 1 batch Simple Tomato Broth Soup (see recipe above) 5 leaves cavolo nero or kale, coarsely chopped 1/­­2 can cooked chickpeas (approx 100 g) 1 tsp harissa or another chili paste (optional) 1 avocado, to serve lemon zest, to serve olive oil Stir in chopped cavolo nero, chickpeas and harissa to the soup during the last minutes of cooking. Laddle the soup into serving bowls and top with avocado slices, lemon zest and a splash of olive oil. Tortellini Drop Soup 1 batch Simple Tomato Broth Soup (see recipe above) 1 bag good quality fresh tortellini micro greens or sprouts, to serve grated vegetarian parmesan cheese, to serve Simply drop the tortellini straight into the soup as its cooking on the stove. After about two minutes (check the pasta package for exakt time), its ready to serve. Divide into soup bowls, grate over parmesan cheese and top with micro greens and drizzle with olive oil. Quinoa & Mozzarella Melt Soup 1 batch Simple Tomato Broth Soup (see recipe above) 2 cups cooked quinoa 200 g buffalo mozzarella or burrata cheese Laddle the soup into serving bowls and add a couple of spoonfuls cooked quinoa to each bowl. Break the cheese into smaller pieces and let it melt in the hot soup. Top with a drizzle of olive oil, black pepper and fresh thyme.

Vegan Lentil Moussaka

December 6 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegan Lentil Moussaka This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. As our new cookbook release date approaches and we enter a really busy season of our lives (more on that soon!), we count on hearty and sustainable meals like this lentil moussaka to see us through periods of tiredness or stress. If you are feeling any kind of holiday season-related pressure, it might just be the perfect, comforting dish for you, too. I love casserole-style dishes – they take some initial effort to put together, but afterwards they turn into a meal that just keeps on giving. This moussaka is definitely like that – the portion is big enough to have dinner or lunch taken care of for a solid few days, it keeps well and only gets better with age, can be eaten hot or cold, and can even be re-imagined as, say, a toast topping, if its initial layered charm ever wears off.  Moussaka is cooked in numerous countries in the Middle East and the Mediterranean, and the recipe varies from region to region, but it usually involves layers of ground meat, eggplant or potatoes, and a béchamel or egg custard blanket on top. In our vegan version, protein-rich lentils take place of the ground meat. Once they are cooked in a mixture of mushrooms, carrots, onion, herbs, and crushed tomatoes, and layered with silky roasted eggplant, it’s incredible how savory and satisfying they become. We went with mashed potatoes for the top layer, in place of the custard or béchamel, which takes this dish even further into the cozy and wintery meal territory. The mashed potato blanket also gets the most incredible, crispy, golden crust on top after some time in the oven, which makes the whole thing even more irresistible. I suggest roasting the eggplant, making the mashed potatoes, and maybe even cooking the lentils in advance, that way assembling the moussaka will feel like a breeze. All the ingredients in this recipe are very affordable and widely available, and it’s amazing that such a satisfying meal can be made with just lentils and veggies. I generally make sure to keep a big jar of French lentils in my pantry, because they are very versatile and perfect for adding substance to all kinds of plant-based meals. Lentils fall under the category of pulses, together with chickpeas, beans and dry peas, which are all perfect vehicles for sustainable and nourishing meals. We’ve been having a ton of fun working with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada on creating accessible recipes, centered around pulses, as part of their Half Cup Habit initiative. Try adding a half cup of pulses to your meals a few times a week – they will up your whole healthy cooking game, I promise. For more of our pulses recipes, head here, as well as to the Half Cup Habit website. Enjoy :) Vegan Lentil Moussaka   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients 3 medium-large eggplants - sliced in ½ inch thick rounds 4 tablespoons neutral coconut or olive oil - divided sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1 cup dried French lentils - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of acv 4 medium Yukon gold potatoes - peeled and quartered 2 tablespoons olive oil or ghee, plus more for brushing the mashed potato layer 1 large yellow onion - chopped 2 medium carrots - sliced 1-2 celery ribs - sliced (optional) pinch of red pepper flakes 1 teaspoon each fresh or dried thyme, oregano and/­­or marjoram (optional) 3 garlic cloves - sliced 1 lb baby bella or crimini mushrooms - sliced 1 28 oz can of box of crushed tomatoes 1 tablespoon tomato paste ½ tablespoon smoked paprika ½ teaspoon cinnamon (optional) ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg (optional) handful of toasted pine nuts (optional) chopped parsley and dill - for garnish (optional) Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare two parchment paper-covered baking sheets. Arrange the eggplant slices on the baking sheets in a single layer, oil with 2 tablespoons of coconut oil/­­olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and roast for 20 minutes. Flip the slices and roast for another 15 minutes, until silky. Set aside. Lower the oven temperature to 375° F (190° C). While the eggplant is roasting, drain and rinse the lentils. Cover them with purified water in a medium pot, and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 10-15 minutes or until cooked, but not mushy. Add salt at the end. Drain over a colander and set aside. Place the potatoes in the same pot you used to cook the lentils, cover with purified water and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook until soft throughout. Add salt at the end, then drain, reserving ¼ cup of the cooking water. Return the potatoes to the same pot. Mash them with 2 tablespoons of olive oil or ghee, black pepper and ¼ cup of the reserved cooking water. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Continue to mash until smooth. Set aside. Warm the remaining 2 tablespoons of coconut oil/­­olive oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, carrots, celery, if using, salt and pepper, red pepper flakes and oregano/­­thyme/­­marjoram, if using. Sauté for 7 minutes, until the vegetables soften up. Add the mushrooms and sauté for another 8 minutes, until the water released by the mushrooms evaporates and they begin to brown. Add garlic and stir around for another minute. Add the lentils, crushed tomatoes, tomato paste, smoked paprika, cinnamon and nutmeg, if using, to the pot with the mushrooms. Stir to combine, then cover and cook for 5 minutes for the flavors to incorporate. Arrange half of the eggplant slices on the bottom of a 9 x 9 baking dish. Top with half of the lentil mixture, followed by the remaining eggplant slices and lentils. Spoon the mashed potatoes on top, evening them out with a spoon into a smooth layer. Brush more olive oil/­­ghee over the potato layer and place the dish in the oven. Bake for 30 minutes. Remove from the oven, sprinkle with the pine nuts and herbs, if using, and serve. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans Roasted Pepper Lasagna Italian-Style Lentil and Mushroom (Not)Meatballs from Pantry to Plate Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes and Black Rice .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Vegan Lentil Moussaka appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Stuffing Scoops

November 20 2017 Meatless Monday 

No need to cook a whole turkey when a stuffing craving hits. Baking stuffing on its own is easy and delicious. Ice cream scoops make these stuffing servings as adorable as they are flavorful. This recipe comes to us from Donna of Apron Strings. Serves 12 - canola oil spray - 4 cups dry bread cubes - 1 cup vegetable broth - 1 tablespoon butter - 1/­­2 onion, diced - 1 stalk celery, diced - 3 sage leaves, minced - 2 sprigs thyme - 2 tablespoons diced parsley - 1/­­2 cup diced dried sweetened cranberries - 1/­­2 cup diced pecans - 1 large egg Preheat an oven to 400 degrees. Prepare an ice cream scoop with a light layer of the canola oil spray. Toss the bread cubes with the vegetable broth and set aside in a large mixing bowl. Melt the butter in a skillet over medium-high heat. Add the onion and celery to the skillet and cook, stirring intermittently, for 4-6 minutes, or until softened. Transfer to the mixing bowl. Add the sage, thyme, parsley, craisins, pecans and egg to the mixing bowl and mix well, taking care to ensure the ingredients are evenly distributed. Use the prepared ice cream scoop to distribute portions of stuffing onto a baking pan. Transfer the stuffing scoops to the oven. Bake for about 20 minutes, or until lightly browned. The post Stuffing Scoops appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Clam-Free Chowder

September 19 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Clam-Free ChowderOyster mushrooms star in this vegan interpretation of New England clam chowder made with diced potatoes, onion, and celery with a creamy, cashew-based broth. If oyster mushrooms are unavailable, substitute white button mushrooms, chanterelles, or a combination of both.   Clam-Free Chowder - 2 tablespoons vegan butter - 8 ounces oyster mushrooms, chopped - 1 yellow onion, chopped - 1 celery rib, minced - 1 garlic clove, minced - 2 cups peeled and diced potatoes - 2 bay leaves - 1 teaspoon dulse or nori flakes -  1/­­2 teaspoon dried thyme -  1/­­2 teaspoon Old Bay seasoning - 1 teaspoon salt -  1/­­4 teaspoon ground black pepper - 2 cups vegetable broth -  1/­­4 teaspoon liquid smoke -  1/­­2 cup raw cashews, soaked in hot water for 1 hour, then drained - 2 cups unsweetened almond milk - 1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley - Heat 1 tablespoon of the butter in a large pot over medium heat. Add the mushrooms and cook for 5 minutes. Remove from the pot with a slotted spoon. Add the remaining 1 tablespoon butter to the same pot over medium heat. Add the onion, celery, and garlic and cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes, or until softened. Stir in the potatoes, bay leaves, dulse, thyme, Old Bay, salt, pepper, and vegetable broth. Bring to a boil and then decrease the heat to low and cook for 30 minutes, or until the potatoes are just tender. Remove the bay leaves and stir in the liquid smoke. - While the soup is simmering, blend the cashews and 1 cup of the almond milk in a high-speed blender until smooth. When the vegetables are tender, stir in the cashew mixture and the remaining 1 cup almond milk. Stir in the reserved mushrooms and heat the soup for a minute or two until hot. Taste and adjust the seasonings, if needed. Serve hot, garnished with the parsley. Text excerpted from VEGANIZE IT! (C) 2017 by Robin Robertson. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. Photo by William and Susan Brinson.   The post Clam-Free Chowder appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Easiest Buffalo Tofu Bites Ever

September 5 2017 VegKitchen 

Easiest Buffalo Tofu Bites Ever Im not sure who invented that Buffalo wings combo that contrasts spicy BBQ flavors with celery and creamy dressing. Its kind of weird, but obviously theres something about it that people love, because there are hundreds of vegan variations, let alone thousands of the non-vegan variety. In plant-based versions, cauliflower or tofu stand in for […] The post Easiest Buffalo Tofu Bites Ever appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegan Methi Malai Paneer Tofu – Tofu and Fenugreek/Greens in Creamy Sauce

July 6 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Methi Malai Paneer Tofu – Tofu and Fenugreek/Greens in Creamy SauceMethi Malai Paneer made vegan with Tofu and Cashews. Tofu and Fenugreek/­­Greens in Creamy Sauce. Easy Weeknight Restaurant style Indian entree. Serve over Naan or rice. Vegan Gluten-free Recipe. Soy-free Nut-free option. Methi Malai Matar (Fenugreek/­­Greens and peas in creamy white sauce), Methi malai paneer (fenugreek and Paneer cheese cubes in creamy sauce) are some Mughlai dishes you might find in some Indian restaurants. The dishes use malai or dairy cream and cheese or other dairy ingredients. Its like a spiced up Spinach dip, with lots of complex flavor! But this version is free of all that, tastes amazing, and comes together quickly as well. Fresh fenugreek leaves are a favorite to use in the dish when in season. If you find some then definitely use them fresh, else use dried fenugreek with greens of choice. Serve with hot garlic Naan or rice/­­grains or make a bowl with roasted veggies, add to wraps or on a pizza!. Dried fenugreek (kasuri methi) is available in Indian stores and online on amazon. Definitely get some, as I use it in many recipes, so it will not just get stored and expire :). Fenugreek has an amazing flavor profile, bitter but pleasing. You can use ground mustard + celery seed as a substitute when used in small quantities. Continue reading: Vegan Methi Malai Paneer Tofu – Tofu and Fenugreek/­­Greens in Creamy SauceThe post Vegan Methi Malai Paneer Tofu – Tofu and Fenugreek/­­Greens in Creamy Sauce appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Savory Yogurt Bowl + London

June 1 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Savory Yogurt Bowl + London We love yogurt in our family*. The unsweetened, thick, creamy and tangy kind. We enjoy yogurt for breakfast (with fruit) and sometimes dessert (with dates + chocolate + nuts). We top our soups with yogurt, we add it to smoothies and ice pops and we also dress our salads with it (Isac likes to dress himself with it as well). Yogurt works remarkably well both with sweet and savory flavors. And yet, the thought of making a yogurt bowl with savory toppings instead of sweet, had never struck us before. But as we were playing around with this crunchy cucumber and melon salad with spiced chickpeas, we (and with we, I humbly mean ME, MYSELF and I - as in, not David) had the simple idea to put them on a bed of yogurt instead of doing the usual yogurt dressing. In theory, it’s more or less the same thing but in reality it’s so much better. The warm, rich and spicy chickpeas on a bed of cold, thick and tangy yogurt, with the addition of a fresh salad with lots of crunch. It’s simple but yet so very good. And quick too. I’m sure there are plenty of savory yogurt bowls all over internet, but now they are also in our kitchen. *David and Isac are actually intolerant to dairy but yogurt is their weak spot. We buy oat yogurt for them but David often chooses a day of stomach ache just to enjoy a bowl of plain yogurt. And Isac has literally been caught with his hand in the yogurt jar more than once. Coconut yogurt has a fantastic taste and consistency but is simply too expensive to enjoy more than as an occasional treat (very keen on giving Ashley’s versions a try though!). Hey hey hey, wait a sec. This is David acting as proofreader today and I just noted Luise’s attempt at hijacking my idea. This recipe = my idea. Just wanted to make that clear. I’ll give the word back to her now. The salad is super quick as you just need to chop everything up. We found that crunchy vegetables like cucumber, celery, sturdy roman lettuce and radishes work really well here, with the avocado and melon adding softness and sweetness. The yogurt is, well, just yogurt. It needs to be quite thick to hold up the topping - our preference is Greek yogurt but choose whatever you prefer. The only thing that needs a little more preparation and heat are the spiced chickpeas. Even if the ingredient list looks long, it’s simply spices, oil and chickpeas and the result tastes way better than just using plain chickpeas. They have a rich, spicy and slightly nutty flavor which works so well with the freshness from the yogurt and the crunchy and sweet salad. VARIATIONS There are plenty of ways to vary this recipe and we’re going to leave you with a few ideas. - Whisk some creamy goat’s cheese into the yogurt. It will dissolve, become smooth and give the yogurt a more mature flavor. - If you don’t have all the spices at home for the chickpeas, use what you find. A bread spice mix works great along with a little cayenne. A turmeric or curry version would be interesting too. - You can skip the salad and pour the yogurt into small sealable jars with spiced chickpeas on top. Store them in the fridge for a quick snack. - Vegans can of course use a vegan yogurt option or simply settle for the salad with warm chickpeas stirred through. - Roasting the chickpeas in the oven together with eggplant or pumpkin could be amazing on top of the yogurt as well. Let us know if you have any other favorite variations on savory yogurt bowls and we can include them in this list. Savory Yogurt Bowl with Spicy Chickpeas & Cucumber Salad Serves 4, or 2 very hungry persons Cucumber & Melon Salad 1 cucumber 1 small (or 1/­­2 regular) melon (we used Piel de Sapo but honeydew would also work) 1 spring onion 2 celery stalks 10-15 fresh mint leaves 1 avocado 6 radishes 1/­­2 roman lettuce 1/­­2 lemon, juice 1 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil Spiced warm chickpeas 2 tbsp sunflower seeds 1 tbsp sesame seeds 2 tsp fennel seeds  1 tsp coriander seeds 1 tsp cardamom seeds 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 1/­­2 tsp ground cayenne 1/­­2 tsp ground cumin 1/­­2 tsp ground paprika powder 1/­­4 cup – 1/­­2 cup cold-pressed olive oil 1 x 14 oz /­­ 400 g can cooked chickpeas, drained and rinsed For serving 2 cups plain full-fat Greek yogurt  For the cucumber & melon salad:  Wash all produce. Cut cucumber and melon in large bite-size pieces. Trim and finely slice spring onion, celery and mint leaves. Cut the avocado in half and remove the stone, then cut into cubes. Trim the radishes and thinly slice them. And chop the roman lettuce. Place all prepared ingredients in a mixing bowl, squeeze over lemon juice, drizzle with olive oil and a little salt, give it a good toss and set aside. For the spiced warm chickpeas:  Add all seeds and spices (except for the ground spices) to a dry skillet, heat gently for a couple of minutes while stirring. When the spices starts to pop and smell fragrant, they’re done. Pour into a mortar and give them a few bashes with the pestle (alternatively on a cutting board and use the back of a chef’s knife). Transfer the seeds and spices back to the skillet. Now add oil (start with the lesser amount and add more later on if it looks dry), ground spices  and chickpeas and heat on low temperature for 2-3 minutes. Stir to combine. When the chickpeas are warm and covered in spices and seeds, remove from the heat. Dollop the yogurt into four bowls. Use the back of a spoon to smooth it out. Arrange the salad on one side of the yogurt and the spiced warm chickpea on the other side. Drizzle a little extra oil on top. Enjoy immediately while the chickpeas are still warm. ********* LONDON + BATH In all my excitement over a simple bowl of yogurt, I almost forgot to mention that we are coming to London and Bath next week for a couple of book events. We’re very excited and can’t wait to meet some of you! We’re having a supper club at Grace Belgravia on Monday 5 June, 7-10 pm. More info here. We’ll do talk and Q&A at Whole Foods Market in Kensington on Wednesday 7 June, 6.30 pm. More info and tickets here. We’ll also do a talk and cooking demo at Topping & Company Booksellers in Bath on Friday 9 June, 7.30 pm. More info and tickets here. Finally, we’re having a hands on cooking class at Bertinet Kitchen in Bath on Saturday 10 June, 10 am. Tickets here (only one left). Big love!

Peanut Carrot White Bean Burgers

March 31 2017 Vegan Richa 

Peanut Carrot White Bean BurgersWhite Bean Burgers with Carrots, Peanuts and thai flavors. Topped with sweet and sour Butternut squash. Asian Peanut Bean Burgers. Serve as Burgers or make a bowl with greens, and roasted butternut or sweet potato. Vegan Gluten free Option.  Are we all ready for Summer already? I am quite tired of the rain in PNW. Who am I kidding, Spring isnt going to be fun. Thankfully now I know I am not the only person who has a barometer in her sinuses.  Anywho, lets get to this easy and delicious Peanut and White Bean Burger topped with roasted squash or sweet potato that is tossed in sweet and sour sauce and sriracha. As with most veggie burgers, these can easily be made into wraps or served in a bowl with greens and more of the sweet sour sriracha dressing. These Asian flavored burger patties with Peanuts, carrots, celery are crunchy, peanutty and fun. Use other nuts or toasted sunflower seeds or pepitas to make nut-free. A dressing of sweet sour or a bbq sauce take these to another level.  Make these patties and let me know on Instagram or here how you served them!Continue reading: Peanut Carrot White Bean BurgersThe post Peanut Carrot White Bean Burgers appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Peanut Noodles

February 20 2017 Meatless Monday 

This flavorful peanut noodle dish is not only packed with plant protein, but veggies and enticing aromatic herbs, too. This recipe comes to us from our friends at Pondicheri and is featured as a Meatless Monday special in the restaurant’s New York and Houston locations. Serves 4 - 4 cups /­­ 225 g Chinese thin rice noodles - 3 Tbsp sesame oil - 3-4 cloves garlic, chopped - 2 small carrots, julienned - 1 red bell pepper, thinly sliced - 1 stalk celery, thinly sliced on the bias - 1 small red onion, thinly sliced - 2 in /­­ 5 cm piece ginger, julienned - 2 tsp black pepper - 2 tsp salt - 4 Tbsp Shaoxing cooking wine or rice wine vinegar - Zest & juice from 1 orange - 2 Tbsp ketchup manis [Indonesian soy sauce] - 1 tsp Sichuan peppercorns, ground - 2 Tbsp sambhal olek [Indonesian chili sauce] - 2 Tbsp peanut butter - 2 cups /­­ 135 g spinach leaves, sliced - 1 cup /­­ 340 g purple cabbage, sliced - 2 Tbsp chopped cilantro - 2 Tbsp toasted & chopped peanuts Pour boiling water over the noodles & let them soak for 3-4 minutes. Drain & set aside. In a large wok or sauté pan, heat up the sesame oil & add the garlic. Almost immediately, add the julienned carrots & cook for 4-5 minutes, frequently stirring. Add the red bell peppers & cook for another minute. Turn up the heat & cook, stirring on high for 2-3 minutes. Add the celery, red onions, ginger, black pepper & salt. Cook for just under another minute & add the cooking wine, orange juice with zest, ketchup manis, peppercorns, sambhal olek & peanut butter. Continue cooking at high heat for 2-3 or until the sauce around the vegetables is bubbly. Add the noodles, spinach, cabbage, cilantro & peanuts. Toss to mix, turn the heat off & serve immediately. The post Peanut Noodles appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Chef David Burke Serves Up the New Year

January 9 2017 Meatless Monday 

Chef David Burke Serves Up the New Year There are points in your career where you start to cook the way you want to eat; thats where I am now. – Chef David Burke David Burke is world-renowned as a chef, artist, entrepreneur, cookbook author, innovator and inventor. In 2009, he won the James Beard Award for Whos Who of Food & Beverage in America and was twice nominated earlier for Best Chefs in America. A graduate of the Culinary Institute of America and a student at the École Lenôtre Pastry School in Plaisir, France, his 30-year career includes opening over a dozen celebrated restaurants.  David is often recognized from his TV appearances on Bravos Top Chef Masters, NBCs TODAY Show and as a featured guest on Rachael Rays Every Day Show. In 2015, David joined ESquared Hospitality as a Culinary Partner to open new restaurants nationwide including his latest restaurant, Tavern62 by David Burke which opened in October 2016 on New York Citys Upper East Side. For our first interview of the New Year, we sat down with David to ask whats currently on his plate.   Its the beginning of a New Year, a time when many are making a fresh start and making resolutions about diet and nutrition. What are some easy ideas to incorporate more vegetables and fruits into a daily diet? Have pre-cut fruit and vegetables ready in your refrigerator and make olive oil-based dipping sauces for them. Winter is a good time to make vegetable soups and stews. I would also recommend buying an Indian cookbook (lay off spices if you dont like heat) to get inspiration for vegetarian dishes. Are there any professional secrets or tips you can share on your favorite ways to prepare vegetables? I like to slowly sauté my vegetables. Cut them smaller and add olive oil, onion, and garlic, then let them caramelize. That works for home fries, a vegetable hash, a filling for a pasta, a purée, or the base of a soup. When youre cooking at home or for friends, what are some of your favorite meatless dishes? Pasta. Cous Cous. Eggplant Parmesan. Stuffed Zucchini Boats. Couch potatoes, which we serve at BLT Prime by David Burke. Cabbage is also really underrated. Chef David Burke’s Couch Potatoes   At your new restaurant Tavern62 by David Burke, what winter vegetables are you looking forward to using and where do you source them from? Salsify, parsnips, parsley root, celery root, butternut squash, kale, and cabbage. We source produce from the Hunts Point Produce Market. Sustainable foods are a topic of discussion these days. What are your thoughts on the subject and why is this important? With any good business comes responsibility. Responsibility of keeping a sustainable supply is important for the future. Your restaurants are typically meat heavy or meat-centric. Why are you interested in supporting and participating in Meatless Monday? My restaurants are designed for great business that highlight hospitality and give our customers what they want. My personal choice and vision for the future is to start segueing into more vegetarian-centric and healthy eating options because no matter what other food trends come and go, customers being more aware of what goes into their food is a trend that will only continue to grow. I think we go through cycles. There are points in your career where you start to cook the way you want to eat; thats where I am now.   The post Chef David Burke Serves Up the New Year appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower

December 11 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower Since winter in the northern hemisphere is most definitely in full swing, we thought it was time for another quick, creamy winter soup recipe that’s nourishing and warming to the core. This one’s got a balance of grounding winter roots like celeriac and parsnip with some brighter, crisper veggies like spinach and fennel, finished off with a kiss of lemon. The roasted cauliflower pieces that stud each bowl are cooked in a special, sweet and spicy dressing that helps create those caramelized edges we are all so fond of. Eating this soup during this time of year just feels right – it’s incredibly cozy and feeds both body and soul. This soup is stunning enough in looks to serve as a starter to a festive meal, so we encourage you to get radical and serve green soup at your holiday party :) There are some weekend links after the jump, have a cozy Sunday. Natalie Weinberger interviewed on Sight Unseen – one of our favorite ceramicists Botanica – a soon to be, vegetable forward restaurant in LA + a lovely online journal with some amazing recipes like Spiced Spaghetti Squash Pancakes, Whole Roasted Cauliflower, Banana Buckwheat Poppyseed Bread The Founders of CAP Beauty interviewed by Ashley Neese – and if you haven’t heard of CAP Beauty, check it out, it’s an amazingly well-curated one stop shop for natural beauty products Pirelli Calendar 2017 Goes Makeup-Free McKel Hill of Nutrition Stripped interviewed on Chris Ducker’s podcast Pulp Pantry – a snack company that utilizes pulp from making juice, which normally gets discarded, to make granola, veggie crisps and more – such a smart idea! GIFs by NASA Gourmet Print Shop – Sarah Britton of My New Roots is now selling some of her beautiful food photographs for making prints Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the cauliflower 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil - melted ½ tablespoon Dijon mustard ½ tablespoon maple syrup ½ tablespoon tamari ½ teaspoon sriracha 1 medium cauliflower head - cut into florets for the soup 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 2 teaspoons whole coriander seeds or 1 teaspoon ground coriander 1 large yellow onion - chopped sea salt - to taste 2 small or 1 medium to large celery root - peeled and roughly chopped 1 medium parsnip - peeled and roughly chopped 1 medium to large fennel bulb - roughly chopped, green fronds reserved 3½ - 4 cups purified water 2-3 bay leaves (optional) few large handfuls arugula or spinach leaves freshly ground black pepper - to taste ½ lemon - juice Instructions to roast the cauliflower Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Combine coconut oil, mustard, maple syrup, tamari and sriracha in a medium bowl and whisk until smooth. Place cauliflower florets onto a parchment paper-covered baking tray, drizzle with the dressing and toss to coat evenly. Roast for 30 minutes or until soft and caramelized at the edges, stirring at halftime. to make soup While the cauliflower is roasting, warm coconut oil in a medium soup pot over medium heat. Add coriander and toast for 1-2 minutes, until fragrant. Add onion and a pinch of salt and let onion sweat for a few minutes. Lower the heat to medium low and sauté for 20-30 minutes, stirring frequently, until onion is soft and caramelized. Add celery root, parsnip, fennel, water, bay leaves, if using, and a few generous pinches of salt to the pot, bring to a boil over medium high heat. Adjust the heat to establish a strong simmer and cook, partially covered, for about 20 minutes, or until vegetables are soft throughout. Remove and discard bay leaves. Combine soup with half of the roasted cauliflower, arugula/­­spinach, fennel fronds (reserve a few for garnish) and black pepper in an upright blender and blend until smooth. You may need to do this in batches, depending on the size of your blender. Use caution when blending hot liquids. Transfer the pureed soup back into the pot, squeeze the lemon juice and mix it in. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Distribute between bowls and serve warm, garnished with the rest of the roasted cauliflower florets and fennel fronds. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Taco Collard Green Rolls Barley Tomato Salad Summer Greek Salad Yerba Mate Infused Sunchoke Soup .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.


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