carrots - vegetarian recipes

carrots vegetarian recipes

Quarantine Quesadillas and Stay-At-Home Menu Plan

yesterday 15:45 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Quarantine Quesadillas and Stay-At-Home Menu Plan I hope you’re prepared for cooking during quarantine.  I know I am.  But I owe my preparedness in the path of hurricanes for many years.  Hurricane preparedness was so much a part of our lives, that we actually wrote a book about it!  And now, that the same kind of preparedness is helpful during these strange days of self-isolation. Even though we’re allowed to venture out for groceries, I prefer to keep my interactions with the outside world to a minimum.  That’s why we made one trip to the store last week and shopped for enough food to last a month. The canned and dried beans and pasta was the easy part. I also stocked the freezer with an extra supply of frozen spinach, collards, broccoli, and other green veggies because I knew the fresh, more delicate produce would be the first things we needed to use up. I then loaded up the fridge with plant milk, tofu, and lots of fresh produce. I planned menus that used the most delicate product first, so now, over a week since shopping, we’re nearly out of fresh greens — I have enough lettuce for about three more salads. But we still have a lot of other hardy veggies like cabbage, carrots, celery, winter squash, and of course, white and sweet potatoes.  I bought a lot of fruit that I’m keeping refrigerated to last longer, pulling out only what we’ll use in a day each morning. Here is a list of what I plan to cook in the weeks ahead using what I have on hand: Stay-at-home Menu Plan - Chili Mac & salad - Tacos - Pizza & salad - Hakka noodle stir-fry - Lentil soup - Stuffed kabocha squash - Shepherds Pie - Ramen bowls - Vegetable fried rice - Tofu tetrazzini with green beans - Saag with tofu and basmati rice - Enchiladas - Pasta Fagiole - Tofu scramble - 15-bean soup - Seitan Pot Roast with Cabbage, Carrots & Potatoes - Artichoke Mac UnCheese - Three bean pasta salad - Veggie Dogs w/­­sauerkraut - Chickpea salad wraps - Singapore mei fun - Hoppin John If you have a copy of my book Cook the Pantry or Vegan Unplugged, you’ll find lots of useful tips and recipes using pantry ingredients.  I’ll be sharing some of those recipes in the weeks ahead.  For now, I’ll leave you with the recipe from Cook the Pantry for Spinach and White Bean Quesadillas or as they are now known, Quarantine Quesadillas.  Stay safe! Spinach and White Bean Quesadillas aka “Quarantine Quesadillas” Frozen spinach and canned white beans combine with garlic and spices to make a delectable filling for these hearty quesadillas.  No cheese needed.  Serve with your favorite salsa. - 1 tablespoon olive oil (or 2 tablespoons water to water-saute) - 2 or 3 garlic cloves, pressed or minced - 10 ounces frozen chopped spinach, thawed and squeezed dry - Salt and ground black pepper - 1 (15.5-ounce) can white beans, drained and rinsed - 1 tablespoon lemon juice - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground coriander - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cumin - Large flour tortillas Heat the oil in a saucepan over medium heat.  Add the garlic and cook until fragrant, 30 seconds.  Add the spinach and season with salt and pepper to taste.  Add the beans, lemon juice, coriander, and cumin.  Cook, stirring, until the spinach is cooked and the flavors are blended, about 5 minutes.  Mash the beans well while cooking. Set aside. Place a large tortillas on a flat work surface. Spread a thin layer of the spinach mixture evenly over half of the tortilla. Fold the remaining half of the tortilla over the half with the filling and press gently to enclose and spread the filling close to the edges. Heat a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Place the quesadilla in the hot skillet.  Flatten with a spatula and cook until lightly browned on the bottom, about 3 minutes. Flip the quesadillas and cook until the other side is golden brown.  Cut into wedges. Repeat with more tortillas and filling as desired. Serve hot with salsa. This recipe is from Cook the Pantry by Robin Robertson (C) 2015, published by Vegan Heritage Press. Photo by Annie Oliverio. The post Quarantine Quesadillas and Stay-At-Home Menu Plan appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Scalloped Potatoes (Spicy Baked Potatoes) in Creamy Sauce

March 25 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Scalloped Potatoes (Spicy Baked Potatoes) in Creamy Sauce (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Scalloped Potatoes (Spicy Baked Potatoes) in Creamy Sauce Scalloped Potatoes are a classic dish with layers of potatoes topped with a delicious creamy sauce! It is the perfect comfort food and side dish to any meal. A little background to the origin to this dish: When I first came to the United State, I was fortunate enough to meet a very kind elderly woman named Helen. She was so kind and helped me a lot when I first came to this country. She was the same age as my grandmother, but she wanted me to simply refer to her as Helen. We became so close that she eventually became another grandmother for my kids when I was away from my family and country. She truly was a blessing to our family. Scalloped potatoes was one of her favorite vegetarian favorite dishes to make for us. She would make this as a side dish for Easter and Thanksgiving. The ingredients are simple, and the dish is easy to make. I got inspired to make this dish while going through old photos. It has been 30 years since Helen passed away, but she will never be forgotten. I decided to add a variation to this recipe by adding some veggies and making it little spicy. This recipe will serve 4. Course Side Dish Cuisine American Keyword Baked Potatoes, Baked Vegetable, Cream Sauce, Creamy Butternut squash, easy cooking, Homemade, Main Meal, Side Dish, Spicy Baked Potatoes, Spinach Pasta, Vegetable Pasta, Vegetarian, Video Recipe, Zucchini pasta Servings 4 people Ingredients3 medium sized potatoes peeled and sliced about 1/­­8 inch thick 1/­­4 cup green peas 1/­­4 cup corn kernels 1/­­4 cup bell pepper chopped 1/­­4 cup carrots shredded 1 Tbsp green chilies finely chopped (this is optional) 2 Tbsp cilantro chopped For white sauce2 Tbsp olive oil 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour plain flour, maida 1/­­8 tsp black pepper 1/­­2 tsp red chili flakes adjust to taste 1/­­2 cup heavy cream 1 1/­­2 cup milk 1/­­2 tsp salt InstructionsSauceIn a small frying pan, heat the oil over low medium heat and add all-purpose flour, stir for a minute. Add black pepper, chili flakes, and salt, stir for another minute. Reduce heat to low. While stirring slowly add cream making sure there are no lumps. Add a small amount of milk at a time. The mixture will start becoming thick, continue adding a little milk at a time whisking until smooth. AssemblyPreheat oven to 350 degrees F (190 degrees C). I am using 5 x 7 Pyrex pan to make the Scalloped Potatoes. Grease the pan. layer the potatoes evenly in the pan. Pour cream sauce just covering the potatoes. Now spread the vegetables, bell pepper, carrots, green peas, corn, green chilies and cilantro. Layer the potato again over the vegetables. Pour the sauce making sure covering the potatoes evenly. Bake it for about 40-45 minutes, potatoes should be tender and should be brown from the top. Scalloped Potatoes are ready, nice color. Enjoy. NotesI prefer Yukon gold or Russet potatoes for this dish. You can use different vegetables of your choice, like broccoli, cauliflower, green beans, spinach. You might also like Vegetable Kathi Rolls, Mexican Bhel, Vegan Macaroni and Cheese The post Scalloped Potatoes (Spicy Baked Potatoes) in Creamy Sauce appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Indonesian-Style Vegetable Stew with Rice Noodles

March 15 2020 VegKitchen 

Indonesian-Style Vegetable Stew with Rice Noodles Characteristic of certain Indonesian vegetable dishes are colorful vegetables (in this case, broccoli, carrots, cauliflower, and bell pepper), this stew is enveloped in a rich, spicy peanut sauce and embellished with rice noodles. This has so much going for it that you need only a simple salad to complete the meal. Serves: The post Indonesian-Style Vegetable Stew with Rice Noodles appeared first on VegKitchen.

Boosting Your Immune System with Plant-Forward Eating

March 10 2020 Meatless Monday 

Boosting Your Immune System with Plant-Forward EatingThe recent COVID-19 outbreak has caused concern across the world, and many people are taking measures to make sure they do not fall sick. Besides washing your hands and staying home if youre sick, theres a lot you can do from a nutrition standpoint to boost your immune system  – eat more vegetables and fruits, legumes and whole grains .  Vegetables and fruits especially, have nutrients and special natural compounds called phytochemicals that serve as antioxidants to neutralize damage to cells and fight nasty pathogens like COVID-19, the flu and the common cold. Will they prevent you from getting sick? Maybe not. But a healthy diet can help strengthen your immune system to help fight the virus and recover quickly. Below are some nutrients found in plant-based foods that are vital for a strong and robust immune system: Vitamin C An antioxidant that increases production of white blood cells, is key to fighting infections. Citrus fruits, papaya, dark green and yellow vegetables, red bell pepper, strawberries, tomatoes and watermelons are great sources of Vitamin C. Try this recipe.  Vitamin E An antioxidant that protects your cells from free radical damages, enhances the immune system to fight off bacteria and viruses. Foods high in vitamin E are sunflower seeds, nuts and green vegetables. Try this recipe. Vitamin A Functions mainly by keeping the skin, vision, and tissues of the mouth, stomach, intestine, and respiratory system healthy. Its anti-inflammatory properties enhance the immune system. Good sources of vitamin A are sweet potatoes, spinach, pumpkins, carrots, peppers, cantaloupes. Try this recipe. Zinc An important mineral that helps in wound healing, functions in the development of immune cells, which is needed for the immune system to work properly. Food sources of zinc are legumes, whole grains, nuts and seeds. Try this recipe.  Dietary protein Plays a major role in the bodys immune response. They activate cells that help fight off infections in the body. Good plant sources of dietary protein are: legumes, beans, peas, soy, and nuts. Try this recipe.    Overall, if pondering about which vegetable or fruit to eat, think of colors – purple, blue, red, yellow and orange, because it usually means they are packed with antioxidants that are great for your health and immune system.     Resources: 1. Zinc in Human Health: Effect of Zinc on Immune Cells. https:/­­/­­www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/­­pmc/­­articles/­­PMC2277319/­­ . Accessed March 5, 2020 2. Health Professional Fact Sheet. NIH, Office of Dietary Supplement. https:/­­/­­ods.od.nih.gov/­­factsheets/­­VitaminA-HealthProfessional/­­ . Accessed March 5, 2020 3. Li P, Yin YL, Li D, Kim SW, Wu G. Amino Acid and Immune Function. Br J  Nutr, 2007 Aug:98(2):237-52.  4. Protect your Health with Immune-Boosting Nutrition. https:/­­/­­www.eatright.org/­­health/­­wellness/­­preventing-illness/­­protect-your-health-with-immune-boosting-nutrition . Accessed March 5, 2020 The post Boosting Your Immune System with Plant-Forward Eating appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Sweet Potato Peanut Stew

March 2 2020 Meatless Monday 

Sweet potato peanut stew, or groundnut stew, is called Mafe in West Africa. The stew uses a savory sauce made from peanut butter and tomatoes and is common throughout West and Central Africa. This recipe is based on one from Iba Thiam, chef and owner of Cazamance restaurant in Austin, Texas, and it is one of the recipes in Oldways A Taste of African Heritage cooking program. The sweet potato, a much-loved African heritage food, is a featured ingredient. Serves 4 - 2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil - 1 medium-size yellow onion, diced - 2 garlic cloves, minced - 1 large sweet potato, chopped into medium-size cubes - 2 large carrots, cut into thin rounds - 2 green zucchini, cut into thin half-rounds - 1 small can (15oz) of diced tomatoes, no salt added - 2 cups low sodium vegetable broth - 1 tablespoon curry power - 1/­­4 cup natural peanut butter - 3 sprigs of fresh thyme, minced, or 1 teaspoon dried thyme - Sea salt to taste   Heat the oil in one of the soup pots on medium heat and sauté the onion and garlic until translucent (3-4 minutes). While the onions and garlic cook, chop up the sweet potato, carrots, and zucchini. Add sweet potato and vegetables to the pot; saute for 3-4 minutes. Add the diced tomatoes, vegetable broth, and curry powder, and bring to a boil. Cover and simmer for 10 minutes. After 10 minutes, add the peanut butter and the thyme to the stew. Let it cook, covered, for another 3-5 minutes. Salt to taste, serve and enjoy!   Active time: 20 minutes Total time: 30 minutes The post Sweet Potato Peanut Stew appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Sesame Ginger Cabbage with Tofu and Shiitake

February 23 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Sesame Ginger Cabbage with Tofu and Shiitake Cabbage is a pretty underrated vegetable I think. It was a total staple growing up in Russia, making its appearance in everything from borscht to savory pies. I can’t say that I loved it back then, not unless it was framed by some kind of dough (like in pirozhki), but my whole view of cabbage has changed completely as an adult. I enjoy the fact that it’s super affordable and keeps in the fridge forever. I also love that it’s versatile and can be eaten both raw and cooked, and I think that we don’t cook it nearly enough. Cooked cabbage takes on a whole new life – it becomes sweet and silky soft, and gets the best caramelized bits when cooked long enough. This skillet with tofu and shiitake is a little tribute to the humble cabbage and all that it can do! It’s been on serious repeat in our kitchen lately. We quickly marinate tofu in a gingery sesame marinade and brown it in a pan, followed by leeks and shiitake. We then slowly sauté the cabbage and carrots until tender and caramelized, and flavor them with the remaining marinade. We serve the cabbage mixed with the leeks and mushrooms, studded with the golden tofu, and showered with toasted sesame seeds. This dish is surprisingly filling and can definitely be a main, but it can also make a nice side or a component of a multi-course meal. Have a great Sunday! Sesame Ginger Cabbage with Tofu and Shiitake   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 2-inch piece ginger - grated 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon tamari, plus more for the vegetables 1 tablespoon rice vinegar 2 teaspoons Sriracha or other hot sauce 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil 1 teaspoon maple syrup juice of 1 lime 14 oz extra-firm tofu, pressed and cut in cubes or triangles 1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons avocado oil or refined coconut oil - divided 1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil - divided 1-2 leeks - white and light green parts only, sliced 8 oz shiitake mushrooms - stemmed and sliced 1 small head green cabbage - sliced thinly 1 medium carrot - julienned, cut into sticks or grated sea salt freshly ground black pepper toasted sesame seeds - for garnish green onions and/­­or cilantro - for garnish Instructions Combine the ginger, tamari, vinegar, Sriracha, sesame oil, maple syrup, and lime juice in a shallow dish or large bowl. Add the tofu and toss gently to coat. Leave to marinate while slicing the leeks, mushrooms, cabbage, and carrot. Warm 1 tablespoon of each avocado/­­coconut and sesame oil in a large pan over medium heat. Add the tofu, leaving the marinade behind in the dish. Fry the tofu for 5-6 minutes, flipping every minute or two, until browned on most sides. Remove the tofu from the pan and set aside in a bowl. Wipe the pan if needed. Add 1 teaspoon of each avocado/­­coconut and sesame oil to the pan, followed by the leeks and shiitake. Add a generous splash of tamari and sauté for 10-12 minutes, until the leeks are soft. Remove from the pan to the same bowl as the tofu and set aside. Add the remaining 1 teaspoon each avocado/­­coconut and sesame oil to the pan, followed by the cabbage and carrot. Add a couple pinches of salt and freshly ground black pepper, stir to coat. Sauté for about 5 minutes, until the cabbage wilts down by about ⅓-1/­­2 in volume. Add 1 tablespoon of purified water, cover the pan, and reduce the heat to a medium-low. Cook, stirring periodically, for 10-15 minutes or longer, until the cabbage is soft and caramelized in parts. Add the remaining marinade, increase the heat to a medium and sauté until its absorbed, a minute or so. Add the reserved tofu and vegetables/­­mushrooms to the cabbage, toss gently to combine and let everything warm back through. Taste for salt and add another splash of tamari if needed. Serve sprinkled with sesame seeds and sliced green onions/­­cilantro. 3.5.3226 The post Sesame Ginger Cabbage with Tofu and Shiitake appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Mushroom Bourguignon

February 6 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Mushroom Bourguignon This Mushroom Bourguignon is one of my favorite things to cook on a winter weekend. It’s so fun to put together (makes you feel a little bit like Julia Child), it fills the house with the most incredible, cozy smells, and the result is a savory, earthy dream. My husband and I cooked this for Valentine’s Day last year, and I shared the whole process on our Instagram stories. The amount of recipe requests I got afterwards had me thinking that I should write it up for the blog. Finally sharing it a whole year later! Make this with your love or friend, or just for yourself on Valentine’s day or any other day when you’ve got some time to cozy up in the kitchen. I think you will really love it. I find that this recipe does well with some time and care – it’s not really a weeknight type of deal, and that’s truly the fun of it. For one, I highly suggest making your own mushroom, veggie and miso broth for this stew. You can use store-bought broth and your Bourguignon will still be really delicious, but the homemade broth will take it to that next, next level. This dish is all about layers of deep flavors, and the broth is a true backbone of that. Making your own broth is also not hard at all – it’s just a matter of throwing things in the pot and letting them do their own thing. When I made the Mushroom Bourguignon pictured here, I made the broth in the morning, and it was there waiting for me when I started cooking the stew later in the day. No big deal. I love that this dish is made mostly with very straightforward, common, pantry and crisper-friendly ingredients, but the flavor is so special and so much greater than the sum of its parts. These kinds of recipes are always my favorites. You can see how this Bourguignon comes together step-by-step on our Instagram stories later today. Enjoy! Mushroom Bourguignon   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the mushroom bourguignon olive oil or avocado oil 1 lb crimini or other mushrooms of choice - stemmed if necessary, sliced sea salt 20 Cipollini or pearl onions 1 yellow onion - diced 2 medium carrots - sliced 2 tablespoons fresh thyme leaves - chopped ½ teaspoon smoked paprika freshly ground black pepper 5 cloves garlic - minced 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1 cup red wine 3½ cups mushroom veggie broth (recipe below) or store-bought broth, plus more if needed 2 bay leaves 1½ tablespoon all-purpose flour mashed or smashed potatoes - for serving parsley - for garnish for the mushroom veggie broth 1 oz dried porcini 1 large carrot 2-3 celery ribs 1 yellow onion - skin on 1 leek - white and green parts 5 cloves of garlic - smashed handful fresh thyme 1-2 pitted dates - for deeper flavor (optional) sea salt 1 tablespoon white miso Instructions to make the mushroom bourguignon Heat a soup pot over medium heat. Add enough oil to coat the bottom of the pot, letting it heat up. Add the mushrooms and begin browning. Stir once to coat the mushrooms in the oil, then let sit completely undisturbed. Depending on the variety of mushrooms youre using, they will likely release lots of water. Wait for the water to cook off almost completely before stirring, about 10 minutes, that way the mushrooms will brown properly. Stir, add a generous pinch of salt, and let the mushrooms cook for a few more minutes. Transfer the mushrooms to a bowl and set aside until later. Wipe the bottom of the pan if necessary and add another generous pour of oil. Add the Cipollini/­­pearl onions, stir to coat in the oil and let shimmer for the undersides to brown, about 2-3 minutes. Stir to flip and let brown for another 2-3 minutes. Add the yellow onion, carrots, thyme, smoked paprika, a generous pinch of salt, and lots of of black pepper. Sauté until the vegetables are soft, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic and tomato paste, and sauté for 1 more minute. Add the cooked mushrooms back to the pot and stir to incorporate with the other ingredients. Add the wine to the pot, bring it up to a simmer and let simmer and reduce for 3-5 minutes. Add the broth, bay leaves, and another pinch of salt, making sure to add enough broth to achieve a chunky stew consistency. Bring the stew up to a simmer and simmer, covered, for 1 hour, adding more broth if necessary. Discard the bay leaves at the end. Put the flour in a small bowl. Take a small ladle-full of the broth from the stew and pour over the flour. Whisk together until smooth. Pour the slurry back into the stew, mix, and let simmer for another 5 minutes for the stew to thicken. Serve the Mushroom Bourguignon over mashed or smashed potatoes, garnished with parsley. to make the mushroom veggie broth Combine all the ingredients in a large pot with at least 10 cups of purified water. Salt well. Its not necessary to include all the vegetables listed, but the more you include, the more flavorful the broth. You can also include any other ingredients that you like in your veggie broth like peppercorns, bay leaf, etc. Bring up to a boil, reduce to a simmer and simmer, covered, for about 1 hour. Put the miso in a small bowl and pour a little bit of the broth over it. Whisk together until you have a smooth paste. Pour it back into the pot with the broth and mix well. You will have leftover broth after making the bourguignon. Its delicious to sip on its own or in any other stew or soup, and it freezes very well. Notes We used crimini and white beech mushrooms for the Mushroom Bourguignon pictured here. 3.5.3226 The post Mushroom Bourguignon appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways

January 26 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways Here’s something fun that you can make to set yourself up for endless future wins in the kitchen. This freezer bouillon is a great thing to have on hand for those times when you don’t have veggie stock or just don’t want to buy any. Add a few teaspoons to your soup or sauce, and you’ll end up with a rich flavor base with very minimal effort. Inspired by both curry paste and a brilliant ‘Souper Mix’ recipe from The River Cottage Preserves Handbook, this freezer bouillon is essentially just a combination of different, whole food aromatics that you’d typically find at the base of any soup or broth, plus salt. The beautiful thing about this recipe is that there are no strange preservatives or weird ingredients that you might find in store-bought bouillon – just good old veggies and a few other, non-sketchy flavor enhancers. Today we’ve got two variations on the theme: a ‘classic’ freezer bouillon, based on the mirepoix trio of onion, celery, and carrot, and a ‘fiery’ variation, kind of like curry paste but without all the spices, starring, ginger, shallots, garlic and more. To make both of the bouillon variations, you just pulse up veggies and salt into a fine, pesto-like paste in the food processor. Distribute the bouillon among containers, label, and keep in the freezer. Because of the fair amount of salt in the recipe, the paste doesn’t completely freeze in the freezer and is easily scoopable. The salt also helps it keep for a really long time – pretty much indefinitely in my experience. This is a concentrated product and a little is meant to go a long way, so if you taste it as is, it will taste very salty and strong. I like to use the ‘classic’ bouillon variation in all kinds of legume-based soups like lentil soup and minestrone, and in rich sauces like mushroom bolognese. The ‘fiery’ version is really lovely in all kinds of curries and healing soups, meant to help clear the sinuses. But really, there are no rules for how and where you can use this bouillon, it’s really fun to experiment with. Just the other day, I cooked up a pot of plain chickpeas (just chickpeas and salt) and wanted to make a quick, single serving of chickpea soup for lunch. I heated up some olive oil in a small pot, added about a teaspoon of the classic bouillon, and let it get fragrant for about a minute. I then added the chickpeas to the pot with about 2 cups of their cooking water, brought everything up to a simmer for a few minutes, and wilted in some spinach at the end. I ended up with the coziest bowl of soup and a very flavorful, warming broth in just a few minutes. Hope you’ll give this a try this year! Classic Freezer Bouillon   Print Serves: about 4½ cups Ingredients 1 yellow onion - peeled, roughly chopped 1 leek - white and light green part only, roughly chopped 2 medium carrots - roughly chopped 3 celery ribs - roughly chopped 1 head garlic - cloves peeled 1 bunch parsley - stems included, roughly chopped 1 tablespoon tomato paste (optional) 1 tablespoon olive oil ¼ cup sea salt Instructions Combine all the vegetables in a food processor in batches, roughly pulsing them and adding more as you go. Periodically scrape down the sides of the food processor to get everything nicely incorporated. Add the tomato paste, if using, oil, and salt, and finish processing into a pesto-like paste. Add another tablespoon of oil if your food processor is having a hard time getting going. Let the paste cool down to room temperature if it got warm while processing. Distribute the bouillon paste among sealable containers, leaving about 1 of space at the top (the paste will expand when frozen). Close and label the containers and place in the freezer. The bouillon should keep frozen indefinitely - it will not freeze solid because of the salt in the recipe. To use: use about 1 teaspoon of the bouillon per 1½ - 2 cups of water. Either add the paste directly to boiling water or sauté it up in oil for a few minutes before adding water. 3.5.3226 Fiery Freezer Bouillon   Print Serves: about 3 cups Ingredients 2 shallots - peeled, roughly chopped 6-8 total of ginger pieces - peeled if not organic, roughly chopped 1 head garlic - cloves peeled 2 medium carrots - roughly chopped 1 jalape?o or serrano pepper - seeded, roughly chopped (optional, include for more heat) 1 bunch cilantro - stems included, roughly chopped 1 tablespoon white miso (optional) 1 teaspoon turmeric powder (optional) 1 tablespoon avocado oil or olive oil ¼ cup sea salt Instructions Combine all the vegetables in a food processor in batches, roughly pulsing them and adding more as you go. Periodically scrape down the sides of the food processor to get everything nicely incorporated. Add the miso and turmeric, if using, oil, and salt, and finish processing into a pesto-like paste. Add another tablespoon of oil if your food processor is having a hard time getting going. Let the paste cool down to room temperature if it got warm while processing. Distribute the bouillon paste among sealable containers, leaving about 1 of space at the top (the paste will expand when frozen). Close and label the containers, and place in the freezer. The bouillon should keep frozen indefinitely - it will not freeze solid because of the salt in the recipe. To use: use about 1 teaspoon of the bouillon per 1½ - 2 cups of water. Either add the paste directly to boiling water or sauté it up in oil for a few minutes before adding water. 3.5.3226 The post Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Coconut Noodle Soup

January 2 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Coconut Noodle Soup Oh man is this the perfect recipe for getting back into the swing of things after the holidays! I think that we’re all ready for some deeply nourishing, veggie-heavy meals right about now. I recently made something similar to this noodle soup for dinner and shared it on IG Stories, and got so many inquiries about the recipe. So here it is but a little more intentional and less off the cuff (directly inspired by the Thai soup Tom Kha Gai). It’s seriously my favorite thing to eat right now – the balance of coziness from the noodles and coconut milk and the healthfulness from all the ginger, garlic, mushrooms, and veggies gets me every time. Don’t let the list of ingredients deter you, this soup is very easy to make. It’s all about building flavor in the broth, which starts with the power combo of onion, chili, garlic, and ginger. The broth gets finished off with a touch of coconut milk, which really rounds out its gingery and garlicky intensity and makes it perfectly creamy. It is SO GOOD – I could seriously drink it for every meal this January. We then cook some veggies and mushrooms directly in the broth and serve everything over noodles, garnished with tons of cilantro, scallions, squeezes of lime juice, and crushed nuts. We hope that you’ll give this a try, it’s a real winner! Coconut Noodle Soup   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 tablespoon coconut oil or avocado oil 1 yellow onion - diced 1 small chili pepper - sliced and seeded if preferred sea salt 2 piece of ginger - minced or grated 6 garlic cloves - minced 4-5 kaffir lime leaves (optional but highly recommended) zest from 2 limes 4 cups (1 quart) low-sodium vegetable broth + 1 cup purified water (or 5 cups broth) 1 medium sweet potato or winter squash, or 2 medium carrots - cut in medium chunks 3.5 oz shiitake mushrooms - stemmed and sliced 1 teaspoon coconut sugar 1 13.5 oz can full-fat coconut milk juice from 1 lime, plus more lime slices for garnishing 8 oz vermicelli rice noodles or other noodles of choice green onion - sliced, for serving cilantro - for serving crushed cashews or peanuts - for serving (optional) chili flakes - for serving (optional) Instructions Heat the oil in a soup pot over medium heat. Add the onion, chili, and a pinch of salt, sauté for 8-10 minutes, until soft. Add the ginger and garlic and stir until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the kaffir lime leaves, if using, lemon zest, vegetable broth, and water. Cover and bring to a boil. Add the sweet potato/­­squash/­­carrots and shiitake mushrooms, bring back up to a simmer and simmer, covered, for 10-15 minutes, until the sweet potato/­­squash/­­carrots are cooked through. Add the sugar and coconut milk. Bring back up to a boil and turn off the heat. Stir in the lime juice. Discard the kaffir lime leaves, if using. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Cook the noodles according to the instructions on the package. Distribute the noodles among bowls. Ladle the broth over the noodles, making sure to catch some vegetables and mushrooms when ladling. Garnish generously with green onion, cilantro, lime slices, crushed nuts and chili flakes, if using. Enjoy! Notes - If you are sensitive to spice, omit the chili pepper and flakes. - Kaffir lime leaves are a life-changingly delicious ingredient, and we really recommend seeking them out. Look for them at Asian/­­Indian markets - they are often sold frozen. You can also find them dried. - This recipe is highly customizable! You can add all kinds of veggies. Here are some ideas: -baby bok choy or spinach -zucchini -spiralized daikon radish -bell pepper -basil -other mushrooms like maitake or crimini, etc. 3.5.3226 Our New Ebook: Golubka Kitchen Sweets! Filled with our favorite, vegan and gluten-free dessert recipes in the world. The post Coconut Noodle Soup appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Sweet Cinnamon-Roasted Baby Carrots

December 20 2019 VegKitchen 

Sweet Cinnamon-Roasted Baby Carrots Heres an easy way to enjoy roasted carrots with no cutting or peeling involved: simply use a bag of baby carrots! This recipe for Sweet Cinnamon-Roasted Baby Carrots provides a veggie dish that stands a good chance of winning over young eaters, and a good side dish to make while another kid-friendly dish (like Tofu Nuggets) is in the oven. The post Sweet Cinnamon-Roasted Baby Carrots appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegetable Curry

December 12 2019 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Vegetable Curry If this cold weather makes you want to cozy up to a curry, but you dont have a lot of time to spend in the kitchen, this curry is for you. This fabulous looking curry is from a new book called Truly Healthy Vegan Cookbook by Dianne Wenz. As a vegan lifestyle coach, Dianne is adept at showing how to prepare well-balanced meals that taste great. The opening chapter of the book is loaded with great tools and tips for eating a healthy vegan diet.  Enticing recipes such as Carrot Cake Oatmeal, Cauliflower Banh Mi, Chickpea Pot Pie, and Key Lime Bars, insure that your menus will be as flavorful and fun to eat as they are good for you. Truly Healthy Vegan Cookbook is ideal for the new vegan trying to navigate their way through unfamiliar territory.  Its also great for anyone looking to fine-tune their eating habits by eliminating processed ingredients and getting back to basics - including eating more vegetables. This cookbook features easy to find ingredients that are used to make simple and delicious recipes such as this Vegetable Curry. About this recipe, Dianne says, Vegetable curries are a favorite warming meal on cold days. I tend to make them with whatever stray bits of vegetables I have on hand to clean out the produce drawer of the fridge, but this combination of cauliflower, green beans, and carrots is my personal favorite. This is a Thai-style curry that uses red curry paste, but it can also be made with the green variety. Vegetable Curry Serves 6 /­­ Prep time: 10 minutes /­­ Cook time: 20 minutes 1 teaspoon neutral-flavored oil (such as grapeseed or avocado), vegetable stock, or water 1 medium-sized yellow onion, diced 3 garlic cloves, minced 1 tablespoon grated or minced fresh ginger 1 (14-ounce) can light coconut milk 1 cup vegetable stock 3 tablespoons red curry paste 4 cups chopped cauliflower florets 1/­­2 pound green beans, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces 2 carrots, chopped 1 (15-ounce) can chickpeas, drained and rinsed 2 cups spinach Sea salt Black pepper Heat the oil in a large stockpot over medium-high heat. Add the onion, garlic, and ginger and cook until they begin to brown, about 5 minutes. Add the light coconut milk, vegetable stock, and red curry paste to the pot and stir to combine. Add the cauliflower, green beans, carrots, and chickpeas. Bring the mixture to a boil, and then reduce the heat to medium-low. Cover the pot and simmer for 15 minutes, or until the vegetables have softened. Uncover the pot and stir in the spinach, continuing to simmer, while stirring frequently until the spinach wilts. Season with sea salt and black pepper to taste. From Truly Healthy Vegan Cookbook, by Dianne Wenz, published by Rockridge Press. Copyright (C) 2019 by Callisto Media. All rights reserved. The post Vegetable Curry appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Vegan Cheese Sauce

December 4 2019 VegKitchen 

Vegan Cheese Sauce This classic cheese sauce is extremely simple to make, and can be refrigerated for up to 1 week. Save Print Vegan Cheese Sauce Serves: 1 cup   Ingredients 1 1/­­2 cup Yukon potatoes, peeled and quartered ⅓ cup carrots, diced ¼ cup nutritional yeast 2 tbsp olive oil 2 tbsp unsweetened almond milk 1 tsp lemon juice 1 clove garlic, minced ½ tsp vinegar ½ tsp salt ¼ tsp cumin Instructions Put the potatoes and carrots in a pot and cover with water. The post Vegan Cheese Sauce appeared first on VegKitchen.

A Vegetarian Thanksgiving Menu

November 25 2019 Oh My Veggies 

I hope you’ve enjoyed the week of vegetarian Thanksgiving posts that I put together with Rikki! I’ve gotten so used to working on my own as a blogger that it’s nice to collaborate with someone else once in a while and see my food through another photographer’s eyes (or camera lens). And Rikki isn’t just an amazing photographer, but she’s also a great friend and mentor who totally gets my food, so I can’t imagine working with anyone else. I’m totally thrilled with how all of her photos turned out in these vegetarian recipes for a vegetarian thanksgiving main course! Here’s our complete menu with vegetarian recipes for thanksgiving main course: Quinoa-Stuffed Acorn Squash Rings /­­/­­ Roasted acorn squash rings stuffed with quinoa, apples, cranberries, sage, and cheddar. A main dish for vegetarians that also works as a side dish for everyone else! Whipped Sweet Potatoes /­­/­­ Vanilla-scented sweet potatoes lightly sweetened with maple syrup and topped with candied pecans. The perfect alternative to the typical marshmallow-topped sweet potato casserole. Rosemary Roasted Carrots /­­/­­ Heirloom carrots make this simple Thanksgiving side dish a showstopper. Green Beans & Caramelized Shallots /­­/­­ Tender roasted green beans are topped with caramelized shallots. Wild Mushroom Gravy […]

New Vegetable Kathi Roll - Frankie

November 18 2019 Manjula's kitchen 

New Vegetable Kathi Roll - Frankie (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Vegetable Kathi roll Vegetable Kathi Rolls are a popular Mumbai street food. Vegetable Kathi rolls are the perfect meal for any time. These are also a great vegan treat. This recipe is super easy to put together and it makes for the perfect lunchbox or tiffin meal. Also, this is my version of Spring Roll. Course Appetizer Cuisine Indian Keyword Appetizers, Healthy, Homemade, Jain Food, Lunch Box Meal, No Garlic, No Onion, Picnic Food, Sattvik, Satvik, Snack, Spring Roll, Street Food, vegan, Vegetable Roll, Vegetarian Prep Time 15 minutes Cook Time 15 minutes Servings 2 people IngredientsFor Kathi roll2 uncooked tortilla 2 tsp oil to cook the tortillas About 20 spinach leaves cut into 2-3 pieces 1/­­2 cup red bell pepper thinly sliced and remove the seeds 1 cup cabbage thinly sliced 1/­­4 cup carrots shredded 1/­­2 cup cucumber thinly sliced 2 Tbsp cilantro leaves finely chopped Peanut Sauce 1/­­4 cup peanut butter 2 Tbsp soy sauce 1 Tbsp ginger juice 1 Tbsp sugar 2 Tbsp lime juice 1 Tbsp sesame oil optional 3 whole red chilies InstructionsSauceRemove the seeds from red chili and soak in 2 tablespoons of hot water for few minutes. Blend all the ingredients together except peanut butter, soy sauce, ginger juice, sugar, lime juice, and sesame oil. After spices are blended to paste add peanut butter and blend enough to mix t well. Note: dont over blend peanut butter will leave the oil. Check if the salt is needed, soy sauce is quite salty. Kathi RollHeat the skillet over medium high, lightly oil the skillet, place the tortilla over skillet for about half a minute, it will change in the color lightly and puff different places. Flip the tortilla over, and lightly brush the oil, flip it again and lightly brush the tortilla. tortilla should have light golden color on both sides. Remove the tortilla from the skillet, make both tortilla same way. And set it aside. You can cook the tortillas in advance. Assembling the FrankieTake one tortilla and put it over a flat surface. Spread about 2 tablespoons of peanut sauce over tortilla, leaving 1/­­2 inch around. Center of the tortilla spread the vegetables moderately, spinach, carrot, bell pepper, cucumber, cabbage, and cilantro. Roll them tightly like burrito. Use extra peanut sauce as a dip. NotesSuggestions Instead of tortilla you may use left over Roti, Paratha. Serve Peanut Sauce as a dipping sauce with vegetable salad, French fries or with variety of bread. You may also enjoy Idli Manchurian, Veggie Hash Browns The post New Vegetable Kathi Roll - Frankie appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Pineapple Carrot Muffins

March 2 2020 Meatless Monday 

These delectable muffins are naturally sweetened with pineapple and agave nectar. They’re freezer friendly too, so make a batch and munch on one every morning for the next two weeks. This recipe comes to us from Catherine of Weelicious. Serves 14 - 1 1/­­4 cup all purpose flour - 3/­­4 cup wheat flour - 2 teaspoons baking powder - 1/­­2 teaspoons baking soda - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1/­­2 cup butter, melted - 1/­­2 cup agave nectar* - 2 eggs - 1 teaspoon vanilla extract - 1/­­2 cup pineapple, chopped fine and drained well - or - 1 8 ounce can crushed pineapple, drained well - 1 cup carrot, shredded - 1/­­2 cup walnuts** * Agave (ah-Gah-vay) nectar is similar in taste & texture to honey but has a lower impact on blood sugar when compared other sweeteners. Agave can be found in the health food or specialty food aisle of most grocery stores. **optional Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Prepare muffin tins with paper muffin cups. In a large bowl combine the flours, baking powder, baking soda and salt. In a separate bowl combine the butter and agave using a whisk or an electric beater to combine. Add the eggs to the butter agave mixture and whisk to combine. Add the vanilla, pineapple, carrots and walnuts to the butter mixture and stir until incorporated. Stir the dry ingredients into the wet ingredients and mix until just combined, making sure not to over mix. Pour the batter into regular size, paper lined muffin cups. Bake for 22-25 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean. Cool for 10 minutes and enjoy! The post Pineapple Carrot Muffins appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Celebrate Healthy-Fat Tuesday by Adding These 8 Plant-Based Ingredients to Your Meatless Monday Menu

February 24 2020 Meatless Monday 

Celebrate Healthy-Fat Tuesday by Adding These 8 Plant-Based Ingredients to Your Meatless Monday MenuThis week, in honor of Mardi Gras, were celebrating Healthy-Fat Tuesday with a list of foods and ingredients rich in healthy fats. Fats are complex and often misunderstood nutrients. Despite their often-misleading name, fats play an important role in healthy balanced diets and their consumption doesnt necessarily lead to weight gain. Saturated and unsaturated are the two major categories of dietary fats. Saturated fats are typically solid at room temperature and are predominately found in red and processed meats, whole milk and whole-milk dairy products, cheese, and baked goods. Although fine in moderation, the USDA Dietary Guidelines recommend limiting saturated fat to under 10 percent of your daily caloric intake. Unsaturated fats come from vegetables, nuts, seeds, and fish, and are labeled as good fats because their consumption is associated with lower rates of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. Try incorporating these foods and ingredients into your weekly Meatless Monday menu. Avocado With 77 percent of calories from fat, this pretty green fruit is actually one of the fattiest plant foods on Earth. Avocado is rich in oleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid associated with reduced inflammation. Easily add some to your diet with this recipe for Garlicky White Bean Avocado Toast. Canola Oil Derived from the rapeseed, canola oil has a similar nutritional profile to olive oil but contains a slightly lower percentage of saturated fat. Its one of the most versatile cooking oils, which makes it excellent for frying and medium-heat cooking. It can also be used as the base for salad dressings, sauces, and marinades. Flaxseeds Flaxseeds are high in fiber and protein, but theyre also one of the richest sources of plant-based omega-3 fatty acids -- polyunsaturated fats that are associated with benefits for heart health. Hemp Seeds While technically categorized as a nut, the hemp seed is nutrient-dense and a terrific source of both omega-6 and omega-3 essential fatty acids. Try adding a scoop to smoothies, muffins, or chia pudding. Olive Oil Although it contains small levels of saturated fat, olive oil is predominately composed of a monounsaturated fat called oleic acid. Studies link oleic acid to lower levels of inflammation, but the health benefits of olive oil range from a reduced risk of stroke and heart disease to weight loss. Peanuts An easy and accessible snack, a little pouch of peanuts can instantly cure your hunger pangs. Peanuts are so satiating because of their high-fat content. Classified as an oilseed rather than a nut, the peanut is nearly 50 percent fat, most of which is mono- and polyunsaturated. Try adding some to this hot and spicy Peanut Noodle. Tahini Made from pulverized sesame seeds, tahini -- along with chickpeas -- is one of the main ingredients in hummus. Sesame seeds are made up of 80 percent mono- and polyunsaturated fats, which research shows can help lower cholesterol levels. Tahini makes the perfect dressing for roasted vegetables or this Curry Carrot Salad. Walnuts Like most nuts, walnuts contain good fats, but they are also an important vegetarian source of omega-3 fatty acids. Research shows that omega-3 plays a critical role in reducing oxidative stress in the brain and can even help with the development and function of the central nervous system. Eat them roasted or blend them up with lentils to make the perfect plant-based meatball.   Click here for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Celebrate Healthy-Fat Tuesday by Adding These 8 Plant-Based Ingredients to Your Meatless Monday Menu appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Hearty White Bean & Millet Soup

February 17 2020 Meatless Monday 

This warming soup features a host of veggies, a touch of flavorful white wine and Parmesan cheese, and millet, a whole grain that cooks up quickly and gives the soup a hearty consistency. This recipe comes to us from Maria Tadic, RD, who blogs at Bean A Foodie. Serves 4-6 - 2 tbsp olive oil - 2 carrots, diced - 1 medium onion, diced - 2 ribs celery, diced - 1 head roasted garlic, minced - 28 oz can crushed tomatoes - 1/­­3 cup dry white wine - 1 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1 tsp pepper - 15.5 oz can white beans, rinsed and drained - 3/­­4 cup millet - 1 bag baby spinach, roughly chopped - 6-7 cups vegetable broth (add more or less depending on your desired consistency) - 2 bay leaves - 1/­­2 cup grated Parmesan cheese (or vegan parmesan cheese) - 1/­­4 cup parsley, chopped Heat the olive oil in a large soup pot over medium high heat.  Add in the carrots, onion and celery and sauté for about 5-7 minutes or until the vegetables start to soften and brown slightly. Add in the roasted garlic and sauté for another 2-3 minutes.  Add white wine and scrape the bottom of the pot with a wooden spoon removing any browned bits.  Cook for 3-5 minutes or until wine has reduced by half. Add in the all the ingredients from crushed tomatoes to Parmesan cheese.  Bring soup to a boil.  Cover and reduce heat to low.  Simmer soup on low for 30-45 minutes. Before youre ready to serve, stir in the chopped parsley.  Serve hot soup with extra Parmesan cheese and parsley if desired. The post Hearty White Bean & Millet Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Tofu au Vin

January 27 2020 Meatless Monday 

This meatless take of the French classic Coq au Vin slowly simmers tofu with pearl onions, mushroom, red wine and vegetable broth. The veggie version cuts hours off the cooking time so you’ll be sitting down to dinner just a half hour after you’ve started cooking. This recipe comes to us from Donna of Apron Strings. Serves 6 - 3 tablespoons canola oil, divided - 2 cups frozen pearl onions, thawed - 3 medium carrots, peeled and diced - 3 cloves garlic, minced - 2 bay leaves - 3 cups red wine* - 3 cups low-sodium vegetable broth - 2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce - 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar - 1 14 ounce package extra firm tofu, cut into 1/­­2 inch cubes - 4 tablespoons corn starch, divided - 12 ounces mushrooms, chopped - salt and pepper, to taste - 1/­­2 cup Italian parsley, diced as a garnish *3 cups vegetable broth mixed with 3 tablespoons red wine vinegar can be substituted for the red wine. Heat 1 tablespoon of the canola oil in a large pan over medium high heat. Add the onions, carrots and garlic. Saute for 3-5 minutes, or until lightly browned. Add in bay leaves, wine, broth and soy sauce to the pan. Reduce heat so that liquid is slowly simmering. Simmer for about 20 minutes, stirring frequently, until carrots and onions are soft and liquid has reduced by half. Once sauce is reduced season with salt and pepper to taste. Add 2 tablespoons of the cornstarch into 1/­­2 cup of water and mix until combined. Stir in the cornstarch mixture to the pan to thicken the sauce. Toss tofu cubes in the remaining 2 tablespoons cornstarch and a little salt and pepper until they are all evenly coated. Heat the 2 remaining tablespoons of olive oil over medium-high heat. Sauté coated tofu cubes, turning them occasionally with a spatula, for about 3 to 5 minutes, or until they are crispy browned on all the sides. Remove and set aside in a serving bowl. Add mushrooms to pan and sauté them 5-7 minutes, or until mushrooms are browned and softened. Add red wine sauce and mushrooms to tofu in the serving bowl. Sprinkle with parsley and enjoy!     The post Tofu au Vin appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Tuscan White Bean Soup in the Instant Pot

January 25 2020 FatFree Vegan Kitchen  

Vegan Tuscan White Bean Soup in the Instant PotFarro, an ancient grain similar to barley, adds texture and creaminess to this vegan version of Tuscan white bean soup with carrots and kale. Use Alubia Blanca or any small white beans, such as navy beans. I’ve had a bag of Alubia Blanca white beans from Rancho Gordo sitting on my “bean shelf” for longer than I care to admit. I was overly optimistic a while back about turning myself from a canned bean user to a dried bean connoisseur and bought a bunch of Rancho Gordo beans, but as it turns out, old habits are hard to break. In order to cook with dried beans, you need to plan ahead to give them time to cook (and perhaps pre-soak), and I’m a last-minute kind of cook. The only times I plan ahead are holidays and (some) blog posts.(...) Read the rest of Vegan Tuscan White Bean Soup in the Instant Pot (1,064 words) (C) svoisin for FatFree Vegan Kitchen, 2020. | Permalink | 2 comments Post tags: Greens, Soy-free The post Vegan Tuscan White Bean Soup in the Instant Pot appeared first on FatFree Vegan Kitchen.

Is Your Winter Meal-Plan Menu Seasonal Produce Friendly?

December 23 2019 Meatless Monday 

Is Your Winter Meal-Plan Menu Seasonal Produce Friendly?Despite the frigid temperatures and seemingly barren landscapes all around, the winter months can be surprisingly abundant. In fact, much of our most popular produce is actually in-season during this chilly time of year. Thats right, apples, beets, broccoli, cabbage, broccoli rabe, Brussels sprouts, carrots, cauliflower, celery, citrus fruits, fennel, garlic, leeks, mushrooms, onions, parsnips, pears, pomegranates, sweet potatoes, turnips, rutabagas, and radishes all fair pretty well in colder temperatures. But we dont. Thats why weve compiled a list of our warmest, most comforting meatless recipes -- all of which use seasonal winter produce -- to help you and your family stay toasty through the frosty months. Make them this Monday for a cozy start to the week. Carrot Soup with Parsnip Chips   Cauliflower and Chickpea Curry   Cranberry Balsamic Brussels Sprouts   Creamy Vegetable Noodle Soup Meaty Mushroom Stew over Garlic Mashed Potatoes Red Onion Soup with Shiitake Broth Roasted Fennel with Tofu and Oranges Roasted Garlic Parsnip Spinach Shepherds Pie Vegetable Fritters with Green-Chile Coconut Chutney   Interested in adding more Meatless Monday recipes to your cooking repertoire? Click here to access our recipe archives full of easy-to-make meatless and plant-based dishes.   The post Is Your Winter Meal-Plan Menu Seasonal Produce Friendly? appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Fried Tofu Eggs

December 14 2019 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Fried Tofu Eggs Makes 24 eggs photo by Kate Lewis Sometimes an egg just completes the look. But jeez are chicken eggs a cruel business (don’t worry, I’m not gonna’ describe it, but google if you’re curious). And please don’t with “not all eggs…” Ok, speech is finished, now let’s get down to business and honor some chickens by leaving them alone and making delicious eggs out of tofu! These have been out in the world for awhile via my Instagram and it looks like youse love them as much as I do! They do take a little finesse and practice, so if yours look more like a hashtag Pinterest fail than a golden centered morsel of deliciousness, dont worry, it will still taste yummy, just keep practicing kids! The recipe was inspired by two things that I love to cook: my tofu omelet recipe and bánh x?o, the Vietnamese rice flour pancake. I have made it with and without the agar powder and it works both ways but the agar gives it a little more of the slickness you might be looking for in an egg. The yolk isnt runny, it has more of a medium cooked yolkiness to it. But it definitely sets itself apart from the rest of the egg in a convincing way. I hope you love it and put it on everything from avocado toast to ramen to pasta to a brekkie sandwich! And I have a pasta recipe coming up this week that is calling out for this egg so watch for it. Oh, also, there’s a video buried in my Instagram of my friend Abou (ok employee, I have no friends) making eggs. See if it helps you get the idea! Recipes Notes ~Please make the recipe as stated or if you want to experiment go off and do that and let us know the results! I cant tell you what will happen if you replace the tofu with carrots or whatever so youre on your own there, dont ask me. ~I think they taste best if you make all the eggs, then let them rest for 10 minutes or so. Gently reheat in the pan on low for a minute or so. You can make these a day ahead, if you like! ~You may need to thin the batter once its sitting. Dont add a lot of water, just a tablespoon at a time if needed to make it pourable. The more water you add the more fragile it becomes. Ingredients For the egg white: 2 14 oz package extra firm silken tofu (vacuum packed Mori Nu brand) 2 tablespoons melted refined coconut oil 1 cup rice flour 2 tablespoon cornstarch 1 teaspoon kala namak 1 cup cold water 1/­­8 teaspoon agar powder For the yolk: 1 cup of the egg white mix 1/­­4 cup nutritional yeast 1/­­2 teaspoon turmeric 1/­­4 teaspoon paprika 3/­­4 teaspoons kala namak 1 tablespoon melted refined coconut oil 2 teaspoons tomato paste Directions In a blender, combine all of the egg white ingredients and blend until smooth. Transfer to a mixing bowl using a rubber spatula to scrape the sides. Now on to the yolk. Take one cup of egg white mix and add it back to the blender. Add in nutritional yeast, turmeric, paprika, the additional kala namak, additional tablespoon of coconut oil and the tomato paste. Blend until smooth. Transfer mixture to a smaller mixing bowl. Preheat a well seasoned cast iron over medium heat. Spray with a little cooking spray (I like coconut). Do a tablespoon test of the egg white. It should cook in about 2 minutes and be matte on top, golden underneath. If it burns, lower the heat, if it takes too long, raise it a little. Ok now make the eggs. Spray the pan with cooking spray. Use a 1/­­4 cup measuring cup filled about 3/­­4 of the way and pour into the pan in a circle, leaving a hole in the middle. Fill the hole with about a tablespoon of yolk. Depending on the side of the pan you can do 3 to 5 eggs per round. Let it cook for 2 to 3 minutes, until matte on top. Spray with more cooking spray, use a thin metal spatula to flip and cook on the other side for 30 seconds to a minute. Transfer to parchment as you continue with the others.

Joy Bauer’s Tips for Getting Kids to Eat More Vegetables

December 9 2019 Meatless Monday 

Joy Bauer’s Tips for Getting Kids to Eat More VegetablesEvery parents predicament: How do I get my children to eat more vegetables? Although theres no secret sauce (sorry ketchup), there are tried and true methods to get your kids to eat more adventurously. But what are they? The team at Meatless Monday spoke with Joy Bauer, bestselling author and health and nutrition expert on The Today Show, about her new book, Yummy Yoga: Playful Poses and Tasty Treats , and her creative ways to encourage kids to eat healthier. Yummy Yoga pairs healthy, kid-friendly recipes with fun yoga positions, giving the whole family the opportunity to get in the kitchen and on the yoga mat. But what sets this book apart is the collection of adorable yoga sculptures made out of fruits and vegetables that accompany each recipe (warning: they definitely encourage playing with your food). To celebrate the launch of her book, Joy shared with us some easy-to-apply tips and tricks that will spark a passion for veggies in even the pickiest of eaters. This Monday, follow Joys words of wisdom and help your kids establish a loving relationship with plant-based foods. Tip # 1: Make Healthy Food Fun The key to encouraging kids to eat healthfully is to make food fun and exciting. Thats the whole point of Yummy Yoga. The pages are filled with tasty, kid-friendly recipes -- smoothies, fruit skewers, veggie pizzas, super food ice pops, etc. -- and playful yoga poses to entertain and excite little ones as they discover healthy, new habits.   Tip #2: Eat More Produce Yourself Kiddie see, kiddie do. If your little ones (and big ones) see you eating a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, theyre more likely to do it, too. A study from the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, found that preschool age kids were more likely to eat bell peppers (and prefer them in the future) after being shown a video of people eating the veggie compared to kids who didnt see the veggie video. Encourage your children to eat more fruit and vegetables by enjoying them yourself, and by pointing out other people (grandparents, siblings, cousins, friends, babysitters, and so on) who enjoy them, too!   Tip #3: Think Out of the Box If a picky spouse or child doesnt like steamed broccoli, dont give up. Instead, try another spin. Whip up a batch of Broccomole Dip (I mash steamed broccoli florets into guacamole), Roasted Broccoli , Creamy Broccoli Soup , Broccoli Tots , or top it with cheese sauce or marinara...you get the idea. Be creative and experiment until you find a recipe that your picky eater does like.   Tip #4: Give Them the Power of Choice Give picky eaters the power to choose--a fun recipe, a new fruit or a veggie to prepare as a side dish, or even the theme of the meal. Its a simple equation that will make mealtimes less fraught: more freedom = less fussing. When you involve picky eaters with planning and prep a few nights each week, youll find theyre less likely to argue about finishing their veggies. Good food, good mood...sounds appetizing, right?   Tip #5: When in Doubt, Hide it Sometimes, its easier to just slip veggies into their favorite foods. You can add a handful of kale or spinach into smoothies; add chopped broccoli, diced carrots or yellow bell peppers into mac and cheese (no brainer!); swap out standard noodles for veggie noodles, like spaghetti squash or zucchini linguini (aka zoodles); mix cauliflower rice with traditional rice; blend canned pumpkin puree into marinara sauce and taco meat -- the options are limitless!   Tip #6: Try it on a Monday Monday follows the weekend, which is when most people do their shopping and prep work-the veggies have been purchased, cleaned, peeled and chopped. Plus, its the perfect way to reset and reboot for a healthy and energizing new week ahead. Try Joy’s recipe for Heart-y Artichokes, Green Beans, and Leeks from the book and check out Yummy Yoga for more delicious recipes!   Want some more plant-based cooking tips for you and your picky eaters? Check out The Kids Cook Monday for more recipe inspiration and fun kitchen activities for you and your children to do together. The post Joy Bauer’s Tips for Getting Kids to Eat More Vegetables appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Mushroom Gravy, Savory Stuffing, Fudge Brownie Pie, and 8 Other Plant-Based Swaps for Your Thanksgiving Feast

November 25 2019 Meatless Monday 

Mushroom Gravy, Savory Stuffing, Fudge Brownie Pie, and 8 Other Plant-Based Swaps for Your Thanksgiving FeastThanksgiving is a time for family, giving, and gratitude. But its also the time for stuffing...and starches, and birds, briskets, casseroles, cranberry sauce, gravy, dressings, and desserts! But as we know from Thanksgivings past, the entire family doesnt always agree, especially when it comes to the food on the dining room table.  So, whether your guests prefer dark meat, white meat, or no meat, its important that your Thanksgiving spread accommodates everyone. Fortunately, the classic Thanksgiving fixings can be made completely plant-based without compromising tradition or taste. Weve compiled a collection of simple plant-based Thanksgiving swaps that allow everyone -- from the newly vegan to the traditional omnivore -- to enjoy the holiday feast, together. Mushroom Gravy from Trader Joes Sometimes your secret recipe is store bought. We wont tell. Trader Joes has an impressive Organic Savory Vegan Gravy made with onion, garlic, coconut milk, tamari, mushrooms, and a whole bunch of seasonings and zero work for you. Oh, its also gluten free. Roasted-Garlic Smashed Potatoes from Minimalist Baker The secret to incredibly light and fluffy dairy-free mashed potatoes isnt much of a secret. After boiling and mashing your potatoes (you can use a potato masher or hand mixer; if you use the latter, be careful not to overmix), fold in non-dairy butter and a whole head of roasted garlic to pump up the decadence.  Super Savory Vegan Stuffing from The Cheeky Chickpea A Thanksgiving spread is judged not on its turkey, but rather the quality of its stuffing. We scoured the internet to find the most satisfying stuffing recipe available. Chopped mushrooms, wild rice, bell peppers, vegetable bouillon, plant-based sausage, cubed up bread, and Thanksgiving seasonings -- fennel, garlic, parsley, fresh rosemary -- make this stuffing simply irresistible. Cinnamon Sugar Sweet Potato Casserole from Eat With Clarity Oh, sweet potato casserole; you sit innocently on the Thanksgiving table masquerading as a member of the main meal, but we all know youre our pre-dessert dessert...with your delightful topping of crushed pecans, coconut sugar, oats, and marshmallows. But the sweet and creamy nature of this indulgent side dish is a necessary counterbalance to all the punchy herbs and spices. This recipe adds another dimension to the traditional sweet potato casserole by using non-dairy milk, ground flax seeds, and melted coconut oil. Roasted Root Vegetables with a White Balsamic Glaze from Healthy World Cuisine No bacon necessary for these magical root vegetables. The recipe suggests fennel, carrots, and Cipollini onions, but you can add any of your favorite seasonal vegetables. Curried Green Bean Casserole from Omnivore’s Cookbook A spin on the classic, this curried green bean casserole adds a new dimension to the Thanksgiving table. Traditional green bean casseroles typically rely on a can of condensed cream of mushroom soup and a topping of bread crumbs and fried onion straws. This recipe is just as easy to make, but offers your taste buds so much more! No-Meat Loaf from Nora Cooks Turkey doesnt always have to be the star of the Thanksgiving spread. Meatloaf traditionally plays a supporting role, but this holiday season let it take center stage with this smoky, savory plant-based chickpea loaf. After its covered with a tangy ketchup glaze and baked in the oven, its look and texture become indistinguishable from its meaty counterpart. Cranberry Jam from Delish Theres something extraterrestrial-looking about the maroon cylinder of congealed cranberry sauce that you always find sitting menacingly next to the gravy boat. Its Thanksgiving, you deserve better. Treat your family (and yourself) with this simple-to-make four-ingredient cranberry jam. All you need is fresh cranberries, sugar, water, orange zest, and about twenty minutes. Your dinner rolls, stuffing, and other Thanksgiving starches will thank you. Chipotle Whole-Roasted Cauliflower with Caper Vinaigrette from Goya Need an alternative centerpiece for your Thanksgiving meal? Look no further than this elegant whole roasted cauliflower with a smoky chipotle finish. Top your cauliflower steaks with a tart and briny caper vinaigrette for a perfect alternative to the big bird. Chocolate Fudge Brownie Pie from Sweet Vegan Sara Some people eat to live, others eat to get to dessert. Your patience has paid off. This plant-based chocolate fudge brownie pie looks sinful, but it really isnt. The crust uses a combination of almond flour, rolled oats, date sugar, and flax eggs (coagulated flax seeds), while the filling is as healthy as hummus, using chickpeas, nondairy milk, date paste, cocoa powder, rolled oats, and vegan chocolate chips. Creamy Coconut Pumpkin Pie from Loving It Vegan What makes this pumpkin pie filling so much more luxurious than the rest? A rhinestone-studded crust? Nope, this pie gets its extra decadent flare from a can of full-fat coconut milk. Fold in some brown sugar, maple syrup, pumpkin pie spice, and a little bit of cornstarch, and youve got yourself the ultimate Thanksgiving dessert.   Invite your friends and family to try (and share) these plant-based Thanksgiving swaps. If youre looking for more meatless recipe inspiration, check out our recipe gallery. The post Mushroom Gravy, Savory Stuffing, Fudge Brownie Pie, and 8 Other Plant-Based Swaps for Your Thanksgiving Feast appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegetable Kathi Roll - Frankie

November 18 2019 Manjula's kitchen 

Vegetable Kathi Roll - Frankie (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Vegetable Kathi roll Vegetable Kathi Rolls are a popular Mumbai street food. Vegetable Kathi rolls are the perfect meal for any time. These are also a great vegan treat. This recipe is super easy to put together and it makes for the perfect lunchbox or tiffin meal. Also, this is my version of Spring Roll. Course Appetizer Cuisine Indian Keyword Appetizers, Healthy, Homemade, Jain Food, Lunch Box Meal, No Garlic, No Onion, Picnic Food, Sattvik, Satvik, Snack, Spring Roll, Street Food, vegan, Vegetable Roll, Vegetarian Prep Time 15 minutes Cook Time 15 minutes Servings 2 people IngredientsFor Kathi roll2 uncooked tortilla 2 tsp oil to cook the tortillas About 20 spinach leaves cut into 2-3 pieces 1/­­2 cup red bell pepper thinly sliced and remove the seeds 1 cup cabbage thinly sliced 1/­­4 cup carrots shredded 1/­­2 cup cucumber thinly sliced 2 Tbsp cilantro leaves finely chopped Peanut Sauce 1/­­4 cup peanut butter 2 Tbsp soy sauce 1 Tbsp ginger juice 1 Tbsp sugar 2 Tbsp lime juice 1 Tbsp sesame oil optional 3 whole red chilies InstructionsSauceRemove the seeds from red chili and soak in 2 tablespoons of hot water for few minutes. Blend all the ingredients together except peanut butter, soy sauce, ginger juice, sugar, lime juice, and sesame oil. After spices are blended to paste add peanut butter and blend enough to mix t well. Note: dont over blend peanut butter will leave the oil. Check if the salt is needed, soy sauce is quite salty. Kathi RollHeat the skillet over medium high, lightly oil the skillet, place the tortilla over skillet for about half a minute, it will change in the color lightly and puff different places. Flip the tortilla over, and lightly brush the oil, flip it again and lightly brush the tortilla. tortilla should have light golden color on both sides. Remove the tortilla from the skillet, make both tortilla same way. And set it aside. You can cook the tortillas in advance. Assembling the FrankieTake one tortilla and put it over a flat surface. Spread about 2 tablespoons of peanut sauce over tortilla, leaving 1/­­2 inch around. Center of the tortilla spread the vegetables moderately, spinach, carrot, bell pepper, cucumber, cabbage, and cilantro. Roll them tightly like burrito. Use extra peanut sauce as a dip. NotesSuggestions Instead of tortilla you may use left over Roti, Paratha. Serve Peanut Sauce as a dipping sauce with vegetable salad, French fries or with variety of bread. You may also enjoy Idli Manchurian, Veggie Hash Browns The post Vegetable Kathi Roll - Frankie appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Pumpkin Maple-Glazed Penne with Roasted Fall Vegetables

November 18 2019 Meatless Monday 

This pasta dish is fall in a bowl! While there is quite a bit of peeling and chopping involved, the final result is so worth it. You can find prechopped butternut squash in most stores these days, so feel free to take advantage of that time-saver if you wish. The subtle sweetness of the sauce pairs beautifully with the roasted vegetables. If you have picky eaters who wont eat some of these veggies, feel free to leave them out and double up on the ones they like. This recipe comes to us from The Meatless Monday Family Cookbook by Jenn Sebestyen. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 5 - For the Roasted Fall Vegetables: - 1 cup (140 g) peeled and chopped butternut squash - 1 cup (130 g) peeled and chopped carrots - 1 cup (110 g) peeled and chopped parsnips - 1 cup (88 g) halved Brussels sprouts - 1 tablespoon (15 ml) olive oil -  1/­­2 teaspoon dried thyme -  1/­­2 teaspoon salt -  1/­­8 teaspoon black pepper   - For the Pasta: - 16 ounces (455 g) penne pasta (gluten-free, if desired) -  1/­­2 cup (123 g) pure pumpkin purée (NOT pumpkin pie filling) - 1 cup (235 ml) lite coconut milk - 2 tablespoons (40 g) pure maple syrup -  3/­­4 teaspoon salt, or to taste - 1 tablespoon (15 ml) olive oil (optional)   For the Roasted Fall Vegetables: Preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C, or gas mark 6). Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and set aside. Toss the vegetables in a large bowl with the olive oil, thyme, salt, and pepper. Spread out onto the prepared baking sheet in an even layer. Roast for 15 minutes, stir, and roast for 10 to 15 more minutes until the vegetables are tender and browning on the sides.   For the Pasta: Meanwhile, cook the penne according to package directions. Be sure to salt your cooking water well. When your pasta and vegetables have about 10 minutes cooking time left, whisk all the sauce ingredients in a large skillet over medium heat. Bring to a boil and then reduce the heat to low to simmer for 5 to 10 minutes until thickened a bit.   Add the cooked pasta and roasted vegetables to the skillet with the sauce and toss well to coat. Add the olive oil, if using. Season with extra salt and pepper, if desired. The post Pumpkin Maple-Glazed Penne with Roasted Fall Vegetables appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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