carrots - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Butternut Miso Soup with Arame and Wasabi

Our Favorite Gua Sha Routine – Video

Yellow Split Pea Coconut Breakfast Porridge

Weekday Cauliflower Dal










carrots vegetarian recipes

Japanese Vegetable Curry

November 13 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Japanese Vegetable CurryMilder and thicker than other curries and slightly sweet, Japanese curries are typically thickened with a roux. This Japanese Vegetable Curry from One-Dish Vegan cuts the fat and adds flavor by pureeing some of the vegetables in the curry to thicken it. This is also good made with fresh or frozen shelled edamame instead of the tofu and snow peas instead of the green peas. S&B brand curry powder works best in this dish. Japanese Vegetable Curry Milder and thicker than other curries and slightly sweet, Japanese curries are typically thickened with a roux. This version cuts the fat and adds flavor by pureeing some of the vegetables in the curry to thicken it. This is also good made with fresh or frozen shelled edamame instead of the tofu and snow peas instead of the green peas. S&B brand curry powder works best in this dish. - 2 teaspoons olive oil or 1/­­4 cup (60 ml) water - 1 large yellow onion, chopped - 2 carrots, peeled and cut into 1/­­4 -inch (6 mm) thick slices - 1 1/­­2 to 2 tablespoons (9 to 13 g) yellow curry powder - 1 1/­­2 tablespoons (24 g) tomato paste - 1 tablespoon (15 ml) wheat-free tamari - 1 to 2 teaspoons agave nectar -  1/­­4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, optional - 1/­­3 cup (82 g) applesauce - 3 cups (700 ml) vegetable broth - 1 large rurusset potato, peeled and cut into 1-inch (2.5 cm) dice - Salt and freshly ground black pepper - 1 tablespoon (16 g) mellow miso paste - 8 ounces (225 g) extra-firm tofu, well drained, blotted dry, and diced -  3/­­4 cup (113 g) fresh or (98 g) thawed frozen peas - Heat the olive oil or water in a large pot over medium heat. Add the onion and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the carrots and then stir in the curry powder, tomato paste, tamari, agave, cayenne (if using), applesauce, and broth and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and add the potato and salt and pepper to taste. Simmer until the vegetables are tender, about 30 minutes. - Transfer about 2 cups (455 g) of the mixture to a high-speed blender or food processor. Add the miso paste and puree until smooth. Stir the vegetable puree back into the curry along with the tofu and peas and simmer for 5 minutes longer. Taste and adjust the seasonings if needed. - Serve hot. From One-Dish Vegan by Robin Robertson (C) 2018 Quarto Publishing Group USA Inc. Used with permission.   The post Japanese Vegetable Curry appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Yellow Split Pea Coconut Breakfast Porridge

November 12 2018 Meatless Monday 

Pulses are eaten for breakfast in many cultures around the world, but its rare to see peas on a breakfast menu in the U.S. This recipe will change that! Savory split yellow peas are paired with rich coconut milk for a satisfying porridge that makes for a great way to start your day. This recipe comes to us from our friends at USA Pulses. Serves 5 - 1 teaspoon mustard seeds (optional) - 1 white or yellow onion, diced - 2 large or 4 small carrots, peeled and diced - 2 teaspoons grated or minced ginger (or 1/­­2 teaspoon ground ginger) - 1 teaspoon turmeric - 1/­­2 teaspoon cumin - 1/­­2 teaspoon coriander - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1/­­4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper - 1 1/­­2 cups yellow split peas - 4 cups water - 1/­­2 cup coconut milk (canned, not boxed) - 1 tablespoon lime juice   Heat the coconut oil in a Dutch oven or a medium sized pot over medium high heat. Add the mustard seeds, if using, and allow them to cook until they start to pop. Stir in the onion and carrots. Saute the vegetables for 8-10 minutes, or until they’re very soft and the onions are clear, adding a tablespoon or two of water if the vegetables start to stick. Stir in the ginger, turmeric, cumin, coriander, salt, and pepper. Add the split peas and water and bring the mixture to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cover. Cook for 35-40 minutes, or until the split peas are tender. Check the split peas a few times to stir them and make sure they’re not sticking to the bottom of the pot; if they’re very thick, stir in a half cup of water. Once the split peas are very tender, stir in the coconut milk and lime juice. Check seasoning and adjust salt, pepper, lime juice, and turmeric to taste. Serve with rice and toppings of choice. Leftover porridge will keep for up to 6 days in an airtight container in the fridge. The post Yellow Split Pea Coconut Breakfast Porridge appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Thai-Style Tofu or Tempeh with Pineapple and Vegetables

November 2 2018 VegKitchen 

Thai-Style Tofu or Tempeh with Pineapple and Vegetables Despite the fairly long ingredient list, this Thai-style tofu dish is a quick, easy preparation with lots of  healthy components. You need only some noodles or grains and a simple salad to make a satisfying meal. This is a nice change of pace from more common soy sauce flavored stir-fries, but its every bit as delectable. Serves: 4 to 6 14- to 16-ounce tub extra-firm tofu or two 8-ounce packages tempeh, any variety 2 tablespoons safflower oil 1 tablespoon reduced-sodium soy sauce 1 medium onion, quartered and thinly sliced 8 baby carrots, halved lengthwise 2 cups small broccoli florets 2 cups fresh pineapple chunks, or one 15- to 16-ounce can pineapple chunks, drained (reserve juice for a different use) One 15-ounce can baby corn, drained 1 cup diced ripe tomatoes 1 cup reduced-fat coconut milk 2 teaspoons good quality curry powder, more or less to taste 1/­­2 to 1 teaspoon red or green curry paste, or Sriracha sauce, optional 2 tablespoons arrowroot or cornstarch 1/­­4 cup minced fresh cilantro, or more, to taste Salt to taste Hot cooked grains (rice, quinoa, or couscous) or noodles If using tofu, cut it into 6 slabs crosswise. Blot well on paper towels or […] The article Thai-Style Tofu or Tempeh with Pineapple and Vegetables appeared first on VegKitchen.

Tawa Pulao Mumbai Style (Pav Bhaji Pulao)

October 27 2018 Manjula's kitchen 

Tawa Pulao Mumbai Style (Pav Bhaji Pulao) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Tawa Pulao Mumbai Style, Pav Bhaji Pulao Tawa Pulao is a popular street dish of Mumbai that is very similar in style to Pav Bhaji. The secret behind this flavorful Tawa Pulao is that its mixture of spices that creates the perfect balance of flavors. The recipe incorporates vegetables that are still crunchy and not mushy like Pav Bhaji. This is a one dish meal and also a good lunch box meal. - 3 cup plain rice (cooked) - 2 cup tomatoes (chopped) - 1 cup potatoes (cubed into small pieces) - 1 cup cauliflower floret (in small pieces) - 1/­­2 cup green peas (I am using frozen peas) - 1/­­4 cup carrots (cubed into small pieces) - 1 Tbsp ginger (thinly sliced) - 1 Tbsp green chili (cut into small pieces) - 3 Tbsp oil - 1 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 1/­­2 tsp red chili powder - 1/­­4 tsp turmeric (haldi) - 1-1/­­2 tsp salt - 1-1/­­2 Tbsp fennel seed powder (saunf) - 2 tsp garam masala - 1 Tbsp lemon juice - 1/­­4 cup cilantro (chopped, hara dhania) -  Boil the vegetables, potatoes, cauliflower, carrot, green peas in 2 cups of waters till they are tender not mushy. Drain the water and set aside. - Heat the oil in a wide flat frying pan, on medium heat, oil should be moderately hot add cumin seeds, as cumin seeds crack add tomatoes, and cook till they are very soft and tender. - Add all the spices except garam masala, add turmeric, red chili powder, and fennel seeds, ginger, green chili, and salt mix it well. - Add the vegetables mix it and let it cook for few minutes. - Add the cooked rice mix it well, if it looks dry add little water and mix it very gently and let it cook for few minutes, keep stirring. - Turn of the heat add garam masala, cilantro and lemon juice, stir gently making sure rice and vegetables are coated with spices evenly.  Notes: I said I am making Pav Bhaji Pulao, then where is Pav Bhaji masala, fennel seed powder and garam masala together makes a Pav Bhaji Masala. Most of the time I add garam masala in the end, I dont like to add the garam masala in beginning and cook with. When you add garam masala in the end it gives batter taste and aroma.  I like to serve Tawa Pulao with yogurt. This recipe is so convenient that you can even use left over rice to make it. The post Tawa Pulao Mumbai Style (Pav Bhaji Pulao) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Vegetables and Barley Soup

October 17 2018 VegKitchen 

Vegetables and Barley Soup What better way to start the week than a good soup full of seasonal vegetables? I learned to love soups in Italy, because there they make their soups with legumes and cereals, which makes them even more delicious. The preparation of the dish is fast, no need to stay close to monitor the cooking. The soup can be kept for two days in the fridge or may be frozen. You can add vegetables to the soup, depending on the season, or legumes, such as lentils. For a gluten-free version, replace barley with buckwheat or millet. Adapt the cooking times according to the cereals used. Preparation time: 15 minutes Cooking time: 40 minutes Serving: 4 Ingredients 1 can of tomato 4 cups of vegetable broth 200 g of pearl barley 1 celery stalk 2 potatoes 3 carrots 1 onion 1 clove of garlic 1 bay leaf Salt and pepper to taste Olive oil Preparation Wash the celery branch, carrots, and potatoes. Cut the vegetables into cubes. Peel and cut the onion and garlic clove. Pour the barley, all the vegetables, the onion, and the garlic into a sauce pan. Drizzle in olive oil, salt, and pepper to taste. Add the bay […] The post Vegetables and Barley Soup appeared first on VegKitchen.

Full of Veggies Minestrone Soup

October 13 2018 VegKitchen 

Full of Veggies Minestrone Soup Time to gather round the table with some minestrone! I love to cook this Italian soup with seasonal vegetables--you can cook it winter or summer. For me, it often marks the end of the summer with all the fresh vegetables that are available. Its a thick soup with seasonal vegetables and pasta, but--if you prefer--you can replace the pasta with rice. This minestrone soup is also a great way to make your children eat their vegetables. I always add frozen edamame to give it more protein, but replacing the edamame with legumes is another great option. Servings: 6  Ingredients 1 big zucchini 1 yellow squash 2 carrots 2 potatoes 1/­­2 cup frozen peas 1 cup edamame 1 can of diced tomatoes 1 onion 1 clove of garlic 1/­­4 cup fresh basil leaves 1 bay leaf salt and pepper olive oil 7 cups of vegetable broth 100 g pasta (broken fehttuchini or vermicelli) Preparation Peel and dice the zucchini, squash, carrots, & potato. Chop the onion and the garlic. In a large saucepan, sweat the chopped onion and chopped garlic in a drizzle of olive oil for a few minutes. Add the diced tomatoes and cook for about 5 minutes. Add […] The post Full of Veggies Minestrone Soup appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegetable Tagine

October 6 2018 VegKitchen 

Vegetable Tagine Tagine is a dish typical of Maghreb cuisine. A dish with a thousand versions, tagine is prepared with ingredients and spices that differ from one region to another. Everyone can adapt it as they please. But don’t worry that it will be complicated and take a long time to prepare; its a simple dish that anyone can make. The recipe is perfect for using all the leftover vegetables you have at home. I love these simmered dishes that take a little bit of everything. Traditionally, tagine is eaten directly from the dish--which sits in the center of the table--with a piece of bread. You will love the fragrant juice and tender vegetables of this tagine.   Save Print Vegetable Tagine Prep time:  15 mins Cook time:  40 mins Total time:  55 mins   Servings: 2-3 Ingredients 2 potatoes 2 carrots 2 tomato 1 yellow pepper 1/­­2 cup spinach (fresh or frozen) 1 can chickpeas 1 onion 1 clove of garlic 3 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon of paprika 1 teaspoon coriander 1 teaspoon Turmeric Salt Pepper 1½ cups of water Instructions o Heat the oil in a pot. Peel the garlic and onion, slice, and pour into the pot. o […] The post Vegetable Tagine appeared first on VegKitchen.

Harvest Vegetable Tart

September 17 2018 Meatless Monday 

This tart takes advantage of the exquisite red/­­orange palate of fall by using colorful root vegetables cut into small leaf shapes using cookie cutters to create an Autumn motif. It happens to be savory and delicious too! This recipe comes to us from Joyce of Goodmotherdiet. Serves 6 - 1 single pie crust - 1 butternut squash - 1-2 purple carrots - 1-2 parsnips - 1 large sweet potato - 4 tablespoons olive oil, divided - 3 medium shallots, minced - 4 cloves garlic, minced - 1 cup vegetable broth - 2 tsp flour - 1 can full fat coconut milk - 1/­­2+ cup shredded parmesan (optional) - 1/­­2 tsp dried thyme - salt and pepper to taste Pre heat oven to 375. Peel and slice squash neck into 1/­­4 inch rings. Using a cookie cutter, press firmly into squash. I recommend using a potholder to make pressing down easier on your hands. Peel and slice remaining root vegetables, using various leaf shapes. Reserve veggie scraps. Line one or two baking sheets with parchment paper or foil. Arrange the leaves on the baking sheets. If your cookie cutters have large and small shapes, separate them as they may have different cooking times. Spray or brush with olive oil and sprinkle lightly with salt. Prebake the leaves until they are tender enough to pierce with a knife tip, but not so tender that they fall apart, about 15 minutes. Larger leaves may need another 5 minutes. Let cool. Saute shallots until lightly browned in 2 tablespoons olive oil. Add garlic. Gather the veggie scraps and dice. You should have about 6 cups of veggies. Dont include purple carrot scraps as they will turn everything pink. Add to the shallots along with vegetable broth. Simmer 10 minutes with the lid off. Add more broth if necessary but liquid should mostly evaporate. Veggies should be soft but still somewhat firm. They will cook again in the tart pan. Stir in 2 tsp of flour and then add coconut milk, herbs and parmesan (if using). Roll out pastry dough and place it in a tart pan, pressing gently into the bottom. Roll the pin over the top to cut the dough to fit the pan. Pour vegetable filling into pie crust and spread evenly with a spoon. Arrange the leaf shapes onto the top of the filling, covering any gaps until entire tart is covered. Spray or brush with olive oil. Sprinkle with parmesan, if desired. Bake tart for 35-45 minutes. Let cool slightly before cutting. Serve with a crisp green salad. Enjoy! The post Harvest Vegetable Tart appeared first on Meatless Monday.

10 Cooling Vegan Recipes for August

August 14 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

10 Cooling Vegan Recipes for AugustThe hot humid weather is back in full force and so is my desire for quick and easy meal solutions. On hot days like the ones weve been having lately, I prefer to do any cooking that needs to be done early in the morning to save me from heating up the kitchen later in the day. Today, I’ve put together a list of some of my favorite vegan recipes for the blisteringly hot days of August. 10 Cooling Vegan Recipes August Cucumber and White Bean Ceviche - Traditionally made with raw fish or scallops, I like to make this lime-marinated salad from Peru with cucumbers and white beans for a nice contrast of refreshingly crisp and creamy. Fire and Ice Sesame Noodles - The evocative name refers to the heat from the sriracha and the cold since I usually serve this dish chilled. You can serve it at room temperature, if you prefer, but fire and room temperature just doesnt have the same ring to it. Indonesian Gado Gado - Gado-Gado is an Indonesian main-dish salad of raw and cooked vegetables tossed with a spicy peanut sauce. The flavor improves with time, so plan on making this crunchy salad the day before you need it. Bánh M? Tostadas - East meets West in this tasty fusion combo. Tostada means toasted in Spanish and is the name of a Mexican dish in which a toasted tortilla is the base for other ingredients that top it. Bánh m? is a popular Vietnamese sandwich that features crisp pickled vegetables, fragrant cilantro, chiles, and zesty hoisin and sriracha sauces. Soba Slaw - Plus - The Soba Slaw in Quick-Fix Vegan, with its chewy noodles and crunchy cabbage and carrots, is a nice refreshing salad on its own. To make it a heartier meal, however, I usually add some cooked shelled edamame or some diced baked tofu, and a little sriracha sauce to give it some heat. Chilled Glass Noodles with Snow Peas and Baked Tofu - This light but satisfying salad should be prepared at least 30 minutes ahead of time for the best flavor. Made from mung bean flour, glass noodles are also called cellophane noodles, bean thread noodles, and harusame. English Garden Salad- Little gem lettuce has spoiled me for other types of lettuce--its everything we love about butter and romaine lettuce, all in one compact little head-- and its perfect for this English Garden Salad. Chickpeas Nicoise - One of my favorite flavor combos is the one found in a Nicoise Salad:  the melding of creamy potatoes, fresh green beans, sweet tomatoes, and piquant olives hits all the right flavor notes. Watermelon Paletas- These watermelon popsicles make a refreshing end to a spicy meal or a cooling snack on a hot day. Pina Colada Squares -  These no-bake treats arent too sweet if you use unsweetened coconut. The post 10 Cooling Vegan Recipes for August appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Spring Picnic Bread

April 16 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Spring Picnic Bread Picnic season is finally upon us and we have been kicking it off with two new favorite things. The first one is a bike and the other is a bread. We have been dreaming of a Danish cargo bike for years and years, and last month we finally splurged on this one. It’s the perfect vehicle for us because we can fit all three kids in it with seatbelts and all. It’s ideal to bring home heavy grocery bags with. And it’s environmentally friendly. All practicalities aside, it is also so much fun to ride around with and we are roaming from playground to picnic spots without a hitch. Just packing a few blankets, a big smoothie, a rhubarb compote and this beauty of a bread. We created this recipe for all type of picnic situations. We wanted something spring-y and savory that tasted awesome and could manage a bumpy bike ride. It’s basically like a savory muffin that we bake in a sheet pan. It serves many, is easy to make, super moist and flavorful and you can make lots of variations on it (although I love the look of thinly shaved asparagus on top). Needless to say, this is also ideal for a brunch or or other weekend gatherings. Just like a foccacia, the bread acts as a base and you can play around with all kind of toppings. Here are a few variations: o Swap some of the potatoes in the bread with grated carrots, parsnip or swede. o A teaspoon of mustard in the batter adds some complexity to the flavor. o Any fresh herbs can be mixed into the batter. o Olives or capers could be good on top. Spinach could also be used instead of asparagus. o You can use a dairy free yogurt instead of buttermilk and leave out the feta cheese if you prefer it dairy free. o We havent tried a vegan version but replacing the eggs with chia eggs (1 egg = 1 tablespoons chia seed + 3 tablespoons water) has worked for us on similar recipes. Asparagus & Potato Picnic Bread Serves 12 Dry Ingredients 100 g /­­ 1 cup oat flour (or the same amount rolled oats, blitzed into flour in a food processor) 100 g /­­ 3/­­4 cup rice flour (or buckwheat flour or spelt flour) 1 1/­­2 tsp baking powder 1 tsp sea salt flakes Wet Ingredients 3 free-range eggs 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup olive oil or coconut oil, at room temperature 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup cultured buttermilk (or yogurt or plant-based yogurt) 1-2 spring onions 3-4 potatoes (2 cups /­­ 250 g grated) 1 handful fresh parsley, finely chopped 100 g feta cheese Topping 3 raw asparagus 1/­­3 cup pumpkin seeds 2 tsp quality olive oil 2 tsp honey a handful chive Preheat the oven to 180°C /­­ 350°F bake mode and grease a 30 x 22 cm /­­ 12 x 9 inch tray or line it with parchment paper. Add all the dry ingredients to a large mixing bowl and stir until combined. Make a well in the centre and set aside while preparing the wet ingredients. Whisk eggs in a separate bowl, then add oil and buttermilk. Finely chop the onion. Peel the potatoes, grate them coarsely and add them to the wet mixture along with the onion and parsley. Crumble in half of the feta cheese. Give it a good stir and then pour the wet mixture into the bowl with the flours. Use a wooden spoon or spatula to combine the batter and then pour it onto the tray. Use a peeler to shave the asparagus into thin ribbons and spread them out over the batter. Crumble the remaining feta cheese on top. Combine pumpkin seeds, oil and honey and sprinkle them on top as well, along with the chive. Bake for approximately 40 minutes or until golden and a skewer inserted in the centre of the cake comes out clean. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool slightly in the tin before transferring to a wire wrack to cool completely. Store the cake at room temperature in an airtight container and it will keep for a few days. Great to bring on a picnic and serve with a tangy rhubarb compote or chutney. Enjoy!

Roasted Veggie Grain Platter

March 27 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Roasted Veggie Grain Platter Hi, David here. I’ll get to the recipe soon but first I just wanted to share a little scene from last night. Isac was watching a baking program for kids and as I was tucking him in, he thoroughly explained the whole process of making croissants to me. You have so much butter in croissants, dad. Like, a lot. You put it on the dough and fold it over the butter like this. And you hit it with the rolling pin like this, bam bam bam. When it comes to numbers and letters, he can be a little clueless, but the fact that our three year-old had memorized all the details in croissant baking from just watching it once on tv, made me all happy and proud. I’m not saying that mastering a croissant is more important than math, but teaching our kids how to cook has been one of the things I’ve really looked forward to as a dad. And he is really into it. The little kids stove has long been his favorite toy both at home and in kindergarten an he often serves imaginary pancakes to all his friends. I’ve promised him that we will make croissants together tonight so I’m off to prep a dough right after this (making the rye croissants from Green Kitchen Travels). I’ll report back with how it goes. Today’s recipe doesn’t have anything to do with croissants but Isac does play a little part as kitchen helper in the video below. So, the recipe. There is one obvious reason why grain bowls have become so popular in the last couple of years. Their looks. If you don’t know what a grain bowl is, it’s basically a mix of roasted and raw vegetables on a bed of grains and herbs arranged in a bowl. The mix of vegetables often make these bowls super colorful and therefore also very popular on instagram. Grain bowls are however more then just pretty. They are hearty and provide a variety of textures and flavors. They are also very easy to adapt to what you have at home and what’s in season. We often make grain bowls for lunch, with any cooked grain, millet or quinoa as the bed, adding leftover vegetables from the fridge on top. In this recipe, we have taken the grain bowl concept and turned it into a platter. It’s topped with roasted and fresh spring vegetables, feta cheese, egg halves and hazelnuts. It’s a beautiful dish and a great one to make for Easter dinner. If you want to take the Easter concept even further, you could add roasted asparagus as well. We use an organic five-grain mix (emmer wheat, barley, gamut, brown rice and oat groats) from Zeta as the grain base but if you can’t find something similar, go with your favorite grain. Grains thrive with flavor friends, so we have paired these with a quick salsa made from marinated bell peppers, olives, capers, herbs and lemon. And stirred in a bit of feta cheese and toasted hazelnuts as well. It’s all there, flavours, looks and textures. Roasted Veggie Grain Platter with Bell Pepper Salsa Serves 4 To make this vegan, you can simply skip the eggs and feta cheese. 1 x 250 g bag Zeta 5-grain mix (or grains of choice) Roasted vegetables: 1 bunch carrots 3 purple spring onions or 2 red onions 2 small zucchini 1 tbsp olive oil sea salt Bell pepper & olive salsa: 100 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup grilled marinated bell pepper 100 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup Lecchino olives 3 tbsp capers 5-6 stalks fresh parsley and mint 1/­­2 lemon, juice 4 tbsp olive oil Topping: 2-3 medium soft boiled eggs 150 g feta cheese 100 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup hazelnuts, toasted and chopped 2 handfuls mache lettuce 6 heirloom cherry tomatoes, halved 1 bunch radishes Preheat the oven at 200°C /­­ 400°F and cover a baking tray with baking paper. Peal or clean the carrots and trim off the outer layer of the onion. Cut the onion lengthwise and the zucchini in bite-size pieces. Place the vegetables on the tray. Drizzle with oil and salt and roast for 15-20 minutes. Cook the grains in a large bowl of salted water according to the instructions on the package and drain in a sieve once they are ready. Make the salsa by chopping all the ingredients finely. Place in a bowl, squeeze over lemon juice and drizzle with oil. Fold the salsa into the grains, reserving some of it for serving. Crumble 2/­­3 of the feta cheese into the grains and half of the hazelnuts. Toss so everything is mixed. Pour the grains onto a platter, top with the roasted vegetables, lettuce, tomatoes, radishes, egg halves, feta cheese and hazelnuts. Drizzle with olive oil and serve with the remaining salsa and some sourdough bread on the side. Disclosure: We were compensated by Zeta for creating this recipe and video using some of their products. All words are our own. 

Peanut Butter Cauliflower Bowl with Roasted Carrots

January 9 2018 Vegan Richa 

Peanut Butter Cauliflower Bowl with Roasted CarrotsPeanut Butter Cauliflower Bowl with Roasted Carrots. Cauliflower tossed in peanut butter sauce and roasted, carrots tossed in hot sauce and roasted. Vegan Recipe, Gluten-free option.   You know whats better than a peanut sauce veggie stir fry or peanut sauce drizzled on a bowl? Peanut Sauce baked on Cauliflower! The PB sauce gets Concentrated on baking and you get all the amazing flavor and then more. Add the cauliflower or other veggies to a bowl with greens and roasted carrots and some more peanut sauce to dress. Damn. So good. Try it! This bowl comes together very quickly. Blend up the peanut butter sauce (use sunbutter for nut-free), add a tbsp or so flour to thicken, dip cauliflower in the sauce and bake. Add to salad bowl, wraps, or serve as a side with grains or spiced chickpeas. Easy, Delicious, Satisfying, and fun.Continue reading: Peanut Butter Cauliflower Bowl with Roasted CarrotsThe post Peanut Butter Cauliflower Bowl with Roasted Carrots appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Favorite New Year Reset Recipes

January 4 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Favorite New Year Reset Recipes Happy New Year, friends! We wanted to stop by with a round-up of 18 vegan and gluten-free New Year reset-friendly recipes that are vegetable-forward and deeply nourishing, but also satisfying and delicious. We’ve got you covered on healing soups and stews, vibrant mains, energy-boosting breakfasts and snacks, a powerful cold remedy drink, and even a minimally sweetened dessert that still very much tastes like a treat. Wishing you all the health and happiness in 2018 :) No-Recipe Healing Soup (v, gf) One of our most popular recipes of 2017. This is a highly customizable soup, built on a powerful broth made with immunity-friendly ingredients. It’s delicious and warming, but especially helpful to those under the weather or low on energy. Make sure to seek out 100% buckwheat soba noodles to make this recipe gluten-free. Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices (v, gf) A deeply nourishing and simple stew recipe, heavily influenced by South Indian cuisine, with a high potential for customization. Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew (v, gf) The ultimate, cozy stew from our Fall Meal Plan, loaded with so many star ingredients of fall/­­winter fare: mushrooms, carrots, garlic and onion, as well as jarred tomatoes, brussels sprouts and lentils. Check out the whole meal plan, too – it has all kinds of other great ideas for a new year reset menu for a whole week. Bright & Grounding Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale Soup (v, gf) A soup that’s both creamy and chunky, full of grounding, winter-appropriate ingredients. Mango Curry with Fennel and Parsnip (v, gf) Mango season is coming soon, and this curry is the perfect way to celebrate the sunny fruit’s arrival. Besides the mango, it’s loaded with all kinds of other nutritious, health-promoting produce like broccoli and fennel. Make sure to seek out 100% buckwheat soba noodles to make this recipe gluten-free. Mung Bean Falafel (v, gf) Mung beans make for a great alternative falafel base. They are incredibly nutritious and affordable, and their cooking time is a lot shorter than that of chickpeas. This falafel is very simple to prepare, and it makes for a perfect component to complete a bright and flavorful veggie bowl. Creamy Millet Polenta with Rainbow Chard and Chickpeas (v, gf) An incredibly savory, alternative polenta recipe made with millet instead of corn. Simple in looks, but surprisingly complex in flavor. Taco Collard Green Rolls (v, gf) All the flavors of a great veggie taco, contained in a collard green roll. A crowd-pleaser through and through. Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans (v, gf) If you happen to have access to good zucchini this time of year, try out this light, plant-powered dish. One of my favorites to prepare when I’m feeling sluggish and non-vibrant. Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango (v, gf) Another great recipe for ushering in mango season. Cucumber noodles are a life-changing discovery, and the glazed tofu technique is our absolute favorite way to prepare tofu. Quick Marinated Beans (v, gf) A great thing to make on the weekend, to have in the fridge throughout the week. These marinated beans are able to transform any salad or bowl into a complete, satisfying meal. Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut (v, gf) Incorporating more fermented foods into your diet is always a great idea, especially during a new year reset. Gut health is everything! If you are up for a home fermentation project, consider making this colorful sauerkraut. Omit the blueberries if you can’t find any this time of year. Sweet Potato Toast, Two Ways (v, gf) Taking a break from grains or bread? Sweet potato toast might be the perfect thing to curb any toast cravings or withdrawals you may be having. It’s also just a really delicious dish in its own right. Immunity-Boosting Beet and Camu Camu Breakfast Bowl (v, gf) Raw beet, avocado, cranberries, camu camu: these are just some of the ingredients in this powerful, immunity-boosting bowl. Makes for a perfectly vibrant breakfast. Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways (v, gf) These are truly healthy pancakes, made with nutritious, protein-rich, gluten-free grains, and vibrant veggies. The blender technique makes them very easy to put together, too. Sweet and Savory Energy Bites (What to Do with Leftover Nut Milk Pulp) (v, gf) Having healthy snacks on hand is the key to success, in our opinion. These energy bites are one of our favorite things to make with leftover nut milk pulp, and they make healthy snacking easy and delicious. Almost Savory Raw Chocolate (v, gf) We know that a lot of people take a break from sugar after all that holiday indulgence. This chocolate recipe is a life-saver for any true chocoholics having a hard time with that idea (aka us). You can make it with zero sugar, but still feel like you’ve had your chocolate fix after having a square or two of this stuff. It’s gold! Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy (v, gf) If you or anyone around you is thinking of getting sick, MAKE THIS! It’s helped us and countless friends of ours fight off colds in their beginning stages. It’s also an invigorating and firey tonic, perfect for any bitter winter day. You might also like... Mango Curry with Fennel and Parsnip Simple Spicy Strawberry Gazpacho Garlic Onion Veggie Dip from Food Loves Writing Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Favorite New Year Reset Recipes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

One Pan Brussels Sprout and Red Lentil Pie with a Root Vegetable Crust

December 27 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. Since this is our last recipe of 2017, we wanted to make sure that it’s a special one. It needed to check all the boxes we usually try to check with our recipes: nourishing, delicious, seasonal, beautiful, convenient, and a little bit unexpected. This veggie and lentil-centered one pan pie is all of those things. It’s very cozy and fun to prepare, too. If I had a choice, most of my savory dishes would be one-pan dishes :) Convenience is hard to beat. That little bit of initial effort you put into assembling all the ingredients for a single-pan dish pays off incredibly well when you end up with a big meal, plus a ton of leftovers for the week, having only used one pan or pot in the process. This one-pan dish is something like a vegetable pot pie, but the crust is made up of thinly mandolined winter roots – potatoes, sweet potatoes, and celery root. The filling is shredded Brussels sprouts, mushrooms, and red lentils (you can add barley, too, for a grain component) that cooks in a mixture of healing spices and coconut milk. The whole thing is packed with a great variety of plants. It’s perfect for those looking to up their intake of vegetables after the holidays, but still wanting to keep their cooking hearty and cozy. The ingredient that takes this dish into the complete meal category are the red lentils. Vegetable dishes are great on their own, but adding any kind of pulses (lentils, beans, chickpeas, dry peas) to your plant-centric meals will up their nutrition and ability to satisfy quite a bit. Pulses are incredibly nutrient-dense, like superfoods, but they are also very affordable, unlike most other superfoods, so it’s a win-win all around. Try adding about a half a cup of pulses to your meals a few times a week – your cooking will greatly benefit from them, and you’ll be on your way to discovering a whole new world of deliciousness (of you haven’t already, of course). Head here for more of our recipes using pulses, and be sure to check out Half Cup Habit. Happy New Year! Thank you so much for visiting GK, trying out our recipes, and reading up on the self-care series. It all means so much to us .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post One Pan Brussels Sprout and Red Lentil Pie with a Root Vegetable Crust appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Baked Vegetable Idli

October 21 2018 Manjula's kitchen 

Baked Vegetable Idli (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Baked Vegetable Idli Baked vegetable Idli makes for a healthy and delicious appetizer or side dish. They are very eye-catching and great to present at a gathering for guests to pop into their mouth. They are the perfect addition to any menu because they are so easy to make. Idlies have a unique texture because they are soft but also slightly crisp on the bottom. Baked vegetable idli are best served with coconut chutney if served as an appetizer or with sambar if served with the main meal. - 1 cup coarse sooji (semolina) - 1/­­2 cup yogurt (dahi, curd) - 1/­­2 cup bell pepper (finely chopped, capsicum, I am using green and yellow for color) - 1 green chili (finely chopped) - 1 piece ginger (finely grated) - 2 Tbsp cilantro (chopped, hara dhania) - 1 cup water (as needed) - 1 tsp ENO (fruit salt) - 1 tsp salt For Seasoning - 1 Tbsp oil - 1/­­4 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 1/­­4 tsp mustard seeds (rai) -  Preheat the oven at 350 degrees (F). - Seasoning: heat the oil moderately in a saucepan. Add mustard and cumin seeds, as the seeds crack turn off the heat and set aside. - I am using mini cupcake tray, will make 24 idli, oil it and set aside. - Mix sooji, salt, yogurt, and water (as needed) to make a pancake-like batter. Set aside for at least 30 minutes. - Add the vegetables bell pepper, carrots, ginger, green chili, and cilantro. Add the seasoning and mix. The batter thickens as the semolina absorbs the water. At this point, add a little more water if it is too thick. - Add Eno Fruit Salt to the batter and mix well. The mixture will begin foaming. Immediately begin pouring into the cupcake tray. Place the tray in oven. - Bake the idlies for five minutes, then lay over the aluminum foil. Bake it again for 15 minutes. Idlies should be lightly brown from the sides. - Cool for few minutes before removing each individual idli. They should come out easily and not stick to the tray. The idlis should be spongy, and light golden color from the sides and bottom. Notes:  First, I baked the idlies without covering, then after 5 minutes I covered the Idlies, if you dont cover Idlies, they will be dry and will lose the softness and texture. you can prepare Idlies 2-3 days in advance, after they cool of refrigerate them in air tight container. Before serving heat the Idlies in microwave for about two minutes. Idlies will be soft. Baked vegetable idli are best served with coconut chutney if served as an appetizer or with sambar if served with the main meal. The post Baked Vegetable Idli appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Couscous Salad with Tangy Dressing

October 15 2018 Meatless Monday 

This plant-based recipe is low in sodium and helps keep blood pressure control in check, providing less stress on the kidneys. It is also low in saturated and total fat, helping blood vessels supply necessary oxygen and nutrients to the heart and kidneys. This recipe comes to us from the National Kidney Foundation. Serves 7 - 1  tablespoon minced  Garlic - 1  tsp, leaves  Oregano – Dried - 1  teaspoon  Allspice - 2  lemon yields  Lemon Juice – Fresh - 1  cup, whole  Raw Snow Peas, Sugar Snap Peas - 1/­­2  cup  Frozen Corn - 1/­­2  cup chopped  Carrots - 1/­­2  cup, chopped  Yellow Bell Pepper, Raw - 1/­­2  cup, chopped  Red Bell Pepper, Raw - 3  large  Cucumber – Peeled - 1  cup  Couscous – Dry   1. In a large bowl, mix together chilled couscous, cucumbers, red pepper, yellow pepper, carrots, snow peas, and corn. 2. In a small bowl, whisk together lemon juice, All spices, dried oregano, minced garlic, and olive oil. The post Couscous Salad with Tangy Dressing appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Tofu and Vegetable Stew

October 10 2018 VegKitchen 

Tofu and Vegetable Stew My kitchen is a laboratory of vegetarian meals. These days, I’m still experimenting with new ingredients, new meal ideas, and revisiting classic dishes to make vegetarian versions. Last week, I wanted a comforting hot meal, and nothing is better than a good stew to get better! This stew is so consistent and comforting that it has even been gobbled up by my family members who aren’t vegetarian. The taste is amazing, the texture is interesting, and it has great nutritional value. Because of the tofu in the recipe, this stew provides plant-based protein to the body. Tofu is the traditional meat substitute that comes to mind when considering vegetarianism or a meatless diet. Despite its neutral taste and soy composition, the tofu quickly absorbs the flavor of the food with which it is prepared! Preparation time: 15 minutes Cooking time: 30 minutes Servings: 4 to 6 Ingredients 400 gr firm Tofu 3 Potatoes 3 Carrots 3 celery 1/­­2 cup puree of tomatoes 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 onion 1 clove garlic 1 teaspoon of dry oregano and basil 3 tablespoons of fresh coriander Salt pepper Instructions Over medium eat brown cook the onion and garlic in a little olive oil for 3 […] The post Tofu and Vegetable Stew appeared first on VegKitchen.

Best Vegan Restaurants – Dallas

September 18 2018 VegKitchen 

Best Vegan Restaurants – Dallas Where do you find the best plant-based meal in Dallas, Texas? The prospect of eating out while vegan may seem daunting at first. Dallasites are well-known for their love of BBQ, and steak features in many of the local specialties. But Dallas is a diverse and evolving city, with a wide selection of vegan eateries. Dont forget to check out the food trucks, which can rival the citys best vegan restaurants. Dallas also offers various upscale, all-vegan cafés. 12 of the Best Vegan Restaurants in Dallas, TX If youre new in D-Town or you dont have much experience with the vegan food scene, it can be hard to know where to start. Here is a list that will help you discover some of the most delicious vegan dishes out there. 1. Spiral Diner & Bakery If youre on the hunt for vegan comfort food, consider Spiral Diner on North Beckley Avenue. Spiral has a proud tradition of serving plant-based versions of your favorite childhood dishes. Founded in 2002, Spiral is now one of the pillars of the Dallas vegan scene. You may want to start with their Blue Plate Special with vegan chickn, potatoes, peas, carrots, and green beans. Then […] The post Best Vegan Restaurants – Dallas appeared first on VegKitchen.

ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

August 29 2018 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on KickstarterThe Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA just launched on Kickstarter! watch the video: PRE-ORDER the ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2NrnNXl This year I traveled to Ethiopia in the weeks before Easter - one of several special times of fasting, when the majority of the country eats entirely vegan! I explored the central cities, traveled overland to the north, went trekking in the highlands and stayed with families in remote villages. As with all my travels and culinary research, I am extremely grateful for the privilege to learn, share & exchange, and be guided & supported by many families and professional cooks who invited me in their kitchens and shared amazing meals with me. Since returning to Berlin, I’ve been cooking Ethiopian and Eritrean food practically non-stop, recreating recipes and dishes, constantly inviting friends and guests to my cooking studio for lunch and dinner parties. Abebech showing me traditional village cooking in the Ethiopian Highlands. Making Injera for the first time in Ethiopia The Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA is my newest cookbook with original recipes, artwork, photography and stories inspired by these latest culinary adventures. It includes over 70 recipes based on the mouth-watering meals in bustling cities & towns, at road-stop eateries, and in rural highland villages. As with my previous 5 cookbooks, I have written, illustrated, cooked, photographed, and designed this book myself. The Lotus and the Artichoke is the ultimate combination of my passions: art, travel, vegan cooking, and photography. The ETHIOPIA Cookbook at a glance: - My 6th cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide - 140 pages with 70+ recipes and over 60 full-page color photos - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by my travels and culinary adventures in East Africa - Also based on experiences with international communities of Europe (London, Paris, and Berlin) and North America (Philadelphia, New York, and Washington D.C.) and over 25 years of vegan cooking - Ethiopian & Eritrean classics, familiar restaurant & family favourites, delicious delights, wonders & surprises, and creative culinary experiments - Discover new flavors, tasty spices, and cooking skills - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients (Cook everything, anywhere!) - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Doro Wat – spicy seitan stew Spinach Dinach Butecha – Chickpea “Egg” Salad Minchet Abish – spicy soy mince & walnuts Duba Wot – pumpkin stew Shimbra Asa – chickpea “fish” Asa (Jackfruit) Tibs Fosolia – green beans & carrots Pizza Lalibela Ingudai Tibs – spicy mushrooms Shepherd’s Pie – lentil filling & mashed potato topping Ambasha – sweet bread Recipes in The Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA - Traditional Berbere spice mix (simple + advanced) - Nitir Qibe – spiced butter/­­oil - Mitmita – extra hot spice mix - Yewot Qimen – black pepper spice mix - Shiro – chickpea/­­bean spice mix - Data (Yekarya Delleh) – roasted chili, garlic, onion & herb sauce - Traditional Injera – Ethiopian sourdough crepe - Quick Injera - Ambasha - sweet raisin bread - Doro Dabo – baked stuffed bread - Difo Dabo - spiced bread - Pizza Lalibela - with tomato sauce & roasted potato topping - Sambosa – savory pastry with lentil filling - Senig Karia – roasted spicy stuffed chilies - Injera Firfir – traditional flatbread with spicy tomato sauce - Yesuf Fitfit – chopped injera & lemon sunflower seed dressing - Kita (Injekita) – sweet breakfast flatbread & jam - Chornake /­­ Pasty – fried bread - Genfo – roasted wheat & barley porridge - Selata - super simple salad - Selata Delux - with mango, dates, avocado mixed greens & lentils - Butecha - chickpea “egg” salad - Selata Timtim - tomato salad - Selata Dinich - potato salad - Selata Bekarot - carrot salad - Telba - roasted flax dressing - Shiro Wot - chickpea puree - Misir Wot – red lentils - Doro Wot – spicy seitan - Soy Tibs - spicy soymeat strips - Ingudai Wot - spicy mushrooms - Bamia - spicy okra - Minchet Abish - spicy soy mince & walnuts - Shimbra Asa – spicy chickpea “fish” - Kik Alicha – yellow lentils - Atakilt Alicha – cabbage, carrots & potatoes - Keysir - beet root - Duba Alicha - pumpkin stew - Tikr Gomen - greens with garlic - Spinach Dinich - spinach & roasted potatoes - Fosolia – green beans & carrots - Asa Tibs – lemon pepper jackfruit fritters - Tofu Alicha - batter fried tofu in mild garlic & onion sauce - Ingudai Alicha – mushrooms w/­­ creamy cashew, lemon, pepper, thyme, parsley - Peppers & Potatoes - garlic ginger stir-fry - Inkulal Firfir – spicy tofu scramble & tomatoes - Ful – fava beans - Ayib – cottage cheese - Bedergan – roasted eggplant - Vegetable Lentil Soup - Vegetable Pasta – spaghetti with mixed chopped vegetables - Macaroni Firfir – noodles with garlic onion tomato sauce on injera - Shepherd’s Pie – lentil filling & mashed potato topping - Ethiopian Mashed Potatoes - Traditional Coffee Ceremony - Spiced Black Tea - Roiboos tea with lemon, ginger &cardamon - Mango Moringa Banana Smoothie - Injera w/­­ dates - Banana Bread - Fasting Muffins - Rooibos Tea Ice Cream Video: Justin P. Moore Music: Nils Kercher Nanfulle from Ancient Intimations (live) (C)2016 Ancient Pulse Music PRE-ORDER the ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2NrnNXl The post ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Caramelized Onion White Lentil Hummus

June 14 2018 My New Roots 

Caramelized Onion White Lentil Hummus If there is one trick Ive learned in all of my years cooking, both at home and in restaurants, it is this: caramelized onions can make almost anything taste amazing. Theyre the ridiculously simple, yet magical ingredient that turns an ordinary dish into something so rich-tasting and satisfying that people go ...oh hi excuse me, this is incredible. I think the simple reason that caramelized onions taste so good, is because they are a labour of love. Not like an all-day stirring the pot kinda deal, but most definitely a food that you cant just leave on the stove and dive into an Instagram vortex. No. Caramelized onions take care and attention, at least for the better part of half an hour, and the results are so worth it I bet youll catch yourself multi-tasking at the stove tonight just to have some on hand to gussy up your omelet this weekend (boss move there, by the way). The more accurate reason that caramelized onions taste so good however, isnt technically caramelization - its called the Maillard reaction. The Maillard reaction is a browning reaction similar to caramelization, but with one distinct difference: caramelization is a chemical reaction between reducing sugars, while Maillard is a chemical reaction between reducing sugars and amino acids (proteins). And yes, there is enough protein in an onion to elicit this response - how thrilling for us! Although the Maillard reaction is very complex and complicated, what we do know is that it requires heat to transform and rearrange sugars and amino acids to create new and fantastic flavour molecules in and on your food, making it even more delicious. If youve ever eaten a golden slice of toast, enjoyed a rich cup of coffee, or nibbled on a grilled vegetable, youve experienced the pure pleasure that all of this this chemical commotion is responsible for. Science! Harnessing the power of the Maillard reaction can make you a better cook, because things that are browned properly taste more intensely, more complex, and well, better. Without even being aware of it, its the reason youll reach for the roasted veggies with the crispiest edges, or the reason that you prefer a fried egg over a boiled one (no judgement!). There are a couple ways of making this spectacular series of chemical reactions work for you, and the first is high heat. Maillard will not occur at very low temperatures, especially in situations where the food is not in direct contact with the heat, like it is on a skillet or grill for instance. When youre roasting veggies, make sure the oven is at least 400°F /­­ 200°C. When youre making pizza, you can crank it up even higher, to get those beautifully blistered crust edges that make your mouth water. The second way is to keep the food youre cooking on the dry side. For instance, have you ever noticed how if you wash mushrooms (which you should actually never do), theyll never really get brown and crusty? Too much moisture! Instead, brush those fungi gently to remove any dirt or debris, then put them in a screeching hot pan with some ghee and dont stir them. I talk more about this technique here. This is the same reason you need a large pan for these caramelized onions, since theyll need the space to allow the water to evaporate around them. If the onions are too close together, theyll only steam each other. Eew. If you’re oven roasting vegetables for dinner, cut them in the morning and leave them out all day uncovered so that the surface water will evaporate, and the veggies will brown more easily. Yes, this seems like a bit of a hassle, but the culinary nerd in me admits that its cool because it works. So, where does the hummus come into this story? Well, hummus is pretty much a food group in my world. Ive made so many variations with so many kinds of legumes, spices, alt seed butters, toppings, and stir-ins, that I could hardly believe I had never tried it with the ingredient that could single-handedly save humanity: caramelized onions. I knew that deep richness of the onions would meld perfectly with the creamy dip, and make the flavour even better. I wasnt wrong! The only thing that I wanted to improve upon, was the protein content - not because Im obsessed with protein, but simply because I thought it could be higher. To do that I simply swapped out the traditional chickpeas for white lentils, or urad dal. We not only get more protein from this change-up, but almost double the fiber, with less sodium, less fat, and less sugar. Sweet. This dip is the perfect, rich compliment to all the crisp and light, early summer veggies popping up. I went to my friends farm and picked some seriously beautiful radishes and young carrots, which paired so well with the caramelized onion flavour. I also had some Life-Changing Crackers on hand, which always make dipping more delicious. One thing I changed from the first version to the third, was the onions on top. Instead of blending all of them into the dip, I used about a third of them on top, which allows you to scoop a few tender morsels up with each bite. This delivers even more caramelized onion flavour and texture, which, let us be reminded, is the whole point of this exercise. Even though this hummus keeps well for at least five days in the fridge (you can even freeze it!), it is best eaten freshly made at room temperature, since the flavour is at its peak then. And because you’re wondering, you can find white or ivory lentils at Indian grocers, Middle Eastern markets, or some natural food stores. They are the skinned and split version of urad dal, which is black, so make sure you buy the huskless version! If you cant find them at all, simply use chickpeas - it will be just as delicious.     Print recipe     Caramelized Onion and White Lentil Hummus Makes about 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup raw white lentils (huskless split black mapte beans /­­ urad dal dhuli), soaked if possible 1 small clove garlic 3 Tbsp. tahini 3 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tsp. balsamic vinegar 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­4 tsp. ground cumin heaping 1/­­4 tsp. freshly cracked black pepper 1 batch caramelized onions (from the recipe below) cold-pressed olive oil, for garnish Directions: 1. Start by cooking the lentils. If youve soaked them beforehand (even an hour helps!) drain and rinse them very well. If youre starting from raw, place the lentils in the cooking pot, cover with plenty of water and vigorously swish them around with your hands. When the water becomes murky, drain and repeat until the water is clear, or mostly clear (this can take 3-4 rounds). Place lentils in the cooking pot and cover generously with water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to simmer and cook partially covered for about 20-30 minutes, depending on whether or not you soaked them. The lentils should be cooked until mushy. If the pot becomes dry during cooking, simply add more water. Once cooked, drain the lentils if there is any remaining water. Set aside to cool. 2. In a food processor pulse the garlic until finely minced. Add the tahini, lemon juice, balsamic, salt, cumin and pepper, then blend until combined. Add the cooked lentils and blend on high until smooth. Lastly, add about two-thirds of the caramelized onions, and pulse to incorporate them into the dip. Taste and adjust seasoning if desired. 3. To serve, spoon the hummus into a serving bowl. Make a small divot in the center of the dip and spoon in the remaining caramelized onions. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with your toppings of choice (I used toasted black sesame and chive flowers for a splash of colour, but this is totally optional). Serve with crispy fresh veggies and crackers or toasted flatbreads. Enjoy. Caramelized Onions Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. neutral-tasting coconut oil or ghee 1 lb. /­­ 500g yellow onions 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt Directions: 1. Peel the onions and slice them as evenly as possible into half-rounds. 2. Melt coconut oil or ghee over medium heat in the largest skillet you have. Add the onions, then salt, and stir well to coat. Once the onions are coated, turn the heat down to a medium-low, stirring occasionally - more often towards the end - until theyve fully caramelized, about 25-30 minutes. If the pot becomes too dry during cooking, reduce the heat a tad, or add a teeny bit of water adn stir well. In the end, youre looking for soft, silky, and golden brown goodness! Store leftovers in the fridge for up to four days, or freeze for 3 months. If it’s your first time caramelizing onions and you’re feeling intimidated, here is a stellar step-by-step tutorial from Bon Appétit. It varies ever so slightly from my method, but you’ll get the picture! Big love and happy hummus, Sarah B. Show me your hummus on Instagram: #mnrcaramelizedonionhummus  *   *   *   *   * Hello dear friends! There are only a few spots left for our January 2019 Wild Heart High Spirit retreat and we’d love to see you in Bali!  Join us along with 15 other women to unwind, reconnect, and find the inspiration to ignite you on your health journey. Our thoughtfully-designed program will awaken and nourish your entire being – body, mind, and spirit! This is a true celebration of life, and we get to do it together in paradise! Come see what all the magic is about.  Much love, Sarah B, Mikkala and the Golden Circle Retreats team The post Caramelized Onion White Lentil Hummus appeared first on My New Roots.

One Soup - Three Ways

April 6 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

One Soup - Three Ways I feel extra enthusiastic about this post partly because I think we are on to something good here. But also because this headline speaks so much to my magazine-publishing-heart (my previous career). This is a dinner concept that we have played around with lately and it works particularly well for families with sensitive eaters or allergies. The idea is built around cooking one recipe base and then making some last minute add-ins to suit various preferences. Or to turn the leftovers of one dish into a new one the next day. The base can be anything from a salad, a basic stew, a cooked grain, a good sauce or, as here, a soup. In this recipe we are taking a simple tomato broth soup in three different directions. The kids love this with tortellini (or any other pasta) dropped into it. They actually prefer it to tomato sauce. Luise and I like to let a chunk of mozzarella (or burrata cheese) melt in the soup and serve it with some leftover cooked quinoa to make it more filling. Another favorite of ours is to stir chopped kale, chickpeas and a little chili paste into the broth and topping it with avocado for a chunkier vegan version. The way it usually works is that we cook one big batch of broth and then pour the kids version in a smaller sauce pan, drop in the ravioli and let it cook for another minute or two until soft. While we stir in or other add-ins to our version. It’s an excellent way to add some heat and more herbs to your own soup while keeping your kids or partners soup milder. You can of course keep it simple and just do one of these. Or mix them up, adding chickpeas to the ravioli or mozzarella to the kale. Or combine them all! Think of it as good base to build from and use the last minute add-ins to suit your personal preference. If you like this concept we might be back with the same ideas applied on other meals in a later post. Simple Tomato Broth Soup Serves 4 2 tbsp olive oil 1 onion, peeled and finely chopped 1 clove garlic, peeled and finely chopped 2 tbsp tomato puree 1 tsp ground paprika powder 3 carrots 3 celery stalks 1 x 400 g /­­ 14 oz can crushed tomatoes 4 cups /­­ 1 liter vegetable stock sea salt Fresh thyme Fresh basil Heat oil in a large thick-bottomed sauce pan on medium heat. Add tomato puree, onion, garlic and ground paprika and let sauté for 5 minutes. Peel and clean the carrots and celery and chop into bite-sized dices. Add to the pan and let sauté for a few more minutes. Then add chopped tomatoes and vegetable stock and let simmer under a lid for 15-20 minutes. Taste and adjust the flavoring, adding some fresh thyme or basil towards the end. You can also add more stock, if needed. Choose your favorite way of serving this soup, see recipe ideas below. Vegan Cavolo Nero & Chickpea Soup Serves 4 1 batch Simple Tomato Broth Soup (see recipe above) 5 leaves cavolo nero or kale, coarsely chopped 1/­­2 can cooked chickpeas (approx 100 g) 1 tsp harissa or another chili paste (optional) 1 avocado, to serve lemon zest, to serve olive oil Stir in chopped cavolo nero, chickpeas and harissa to the soup during the last minutes of cooking. Laddle the soup into serving bowls and top with avocado slices, lemon zest and a splash of olive oil. Tortellini Drop Soup 1 batch Simple Tomato Broth Soup (see recipe above) 1 bag good quality fresh tortellini micro greens or sprouts, to serve grated vegetarian parmesan cheese, to serve Simply drop the tortellini straight into the soup as its cooking on the stove. After about two minutes (check the pasta package for exakt time), its ready to serve. Divide into soup bowls, grate over parmesan cheese and top with micro greens and drizzle with olive oil. Quinoa & Mozzarella Melt Soup 1 batch Simple Tomato Broth Soup (see recipe above) 2 cups cooked quinoa 200 g buffalo mozzarella or burrata cheese Laddle the soup into serving bowls and add a couple of spoonfuls cooked quinoa to each bowl. Break the cheese into smaller pieces and let it melt in the hot soup. Top with a drizzle of olive oil, black pepper and fresh thyme.

Kichadi: The Realistic Reset

January 16 2018 My New Roots 

Kichadi: The Realistic Reset Happy 2018 dear friends! I hope that you all had a restful and relaxing holiday, and that youre ready to take on the new year. As most of you know, the past few months have been all-over-the-place (literally) for my family and I, so Ive been giving myself plenty of freedom when it comes to what Im eating and how often Im exercising. With my regular routines out the window, Ive felt an immense sense of liberation - its great to let go once in a while! - but now its gotten to the point where my body is really craving some stability and grounding, especially after the holidays. Sometimes I like to go drastic and embark on a 10-day juice fast or something like it, but my body and my mind arent feeling a hard-core anything at the moment, so Im turning to kichadi to gently ease my way back into eating with more balance. Kichadi, sometimes called and spelled khichdi, kitchari, kitcheree or khichri, is the famous one-pot wonder Indian dish that combines rice and lentils or quick-cooking pulses or legumes, such as mung beans. Its best known in Ayurvedic tradition as a cleansing and complete protein meal, very easy to digest, and a cinch to make! It is delicious, super comfort food, and even if youre not down with eating the exact same thing for every meal for several days in a row, youll be thrilled to learn its also the perfect thing to tuck into on a cold winter night. Because of its simplicity and ease, many people find that doing a kichadi “mono-diet” is very pleasant and far less of an ordeal than a juice fast for example (although I need to be clear that a juice fast is far deeper and more effective). Taking three to seven days to eat this dish exclusively gives the digestive organs a serious break since kichadi is very easy to break down and assimilate. And because digestion is at the core of human health, putting a practice in place that supports this essential process makes room for the miracle of self-healing: something the body is constantly striving for, but often distracted from by poor dietary and lifestyle choices. When we forgo processed foods, alcohol, caffeine, and common allergens for a few days, we give our bodies the space it needs to do what it naturally does anyway: clean itself up! I like to eat a kichadi diet in the colder months when the weather is unfriendly and I need some reassuring, grounding, warm food - and juicing sounds about as fun as a hole in the head. Its also a wonderful way to glide yourself into the process of cleansing if youve never tried it before. Since it doesnt involve abstaining from food, most first-timers find it totally do-able, and dare I say it, enjoyable! Ive just completed three days of eating kichadi for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and Im feeling sooo much more balanced, clear-headed, and energized - the ways I would like to feel at the beginning of a brand new year! I hope that this simple and realistic reset is up your alley, and that you give it a go. First things first, youre going to need to do a bit of planning for the kichadi diet. Set a realistic goal for yourself - ideally youll be eating this dish for at least three days, up to seven, but if one is all you can handle, that is okay too. Since youre eating throughout this practice, going about your regular life is usually fine, but if you want to go the extra mile and give yourself a real treat, do the kichadi diet over a long weekend or break from work so that you can focus on some other cleanse-enriching experiences, such as a massage, a sauna visit, daytime napping, reading an actual book, and maybe even going offline completely. Gasp! I started my kichadi diet on a Monday and carried out my normal routine with work and family life, and just made sure to give myself lots of juicy personal time in the evenings (essential oil bath, yin yoga sesh, early lights out etc.). Aside from a cleanse-classic mood swing on the last day, no one around me even noticed what I was doing. Since they were too busy eating pizza.    Before you begin youll want to start by cutting back on alcohol, caffeine, sugar, meat, dairy, processed foods, and anything else you know is throwing you off balance. If you abstain from these things for at least a couple of days before you begin, your experience will be much smoother, as you won’t be distracted by gnarly withdrawal symptoms while you’re trying to chill. You can also add any bad habits you have to your hit list, and reduce or eliminate the daily practices that arent making your life extra groovy. Whatever day you are starting the kichadi on, soak the rice and pulses /­­ legumes together the night before. This step is important for improving the digestive qualities of kichadi, but if you are really pressed for time or you forgot, get them in water as soon as you can. Remember that even soaking for an hour is better than nothing! Cook the kichadi daily if possible, since the fresher the food is, the more energy, or prana it contains. My recipe makes about six servings for my appetite (eight for people who eat less) and I can easily stretch one batch over two days if no one else in my family wants it. Regardless, youll have to make at least two batches if youre going for three days, and I would not recommend keeping kichadi around for longer than that. Freezing is an option, but freeze it in the portion size youd want to eat so that youre not heating more than you need at one sitting.        Daily routine The night before: soak the rice and pulses together in plenty of filtered water overnight. Morning: upon rising, drink a large glass of warm water with freshly squeezed lemon juice, followed by another glass of pure water. Make your first batch of kichadi, and enjoy it for breakfast. Store leftovers in the fridge. Midday: Drink a couple large glasses of water at least 30 minutes before eating. Heat your desired amount of kichadi and enjoy it for lunch. Evening: Drink a couple large glasses of water at least 30 minutes before eating. Heat your desired amount of kichadi and enjoy it for dinner. Night time: Drink a cup of herbal detox tea if desired, enjoy something that nourishes you (bath, meditation, stretching) and go to bed early. Repeat for three to seven days. Kichadi Reset tips 1. Eat when youre hungry. This may seem like an obvious one, but many people eat according to the clock, instead of listening to their bodies. Take these days to really tune in and see when your body actually desires food, and how much you need to eat to feel satisfied. When you feel real hunger, your body is giving you the signal that it is actually ready to receive. 2. Cook mindfully. Remember that cooking is something to be grateful for. If you normally approach cooking from a lets get this over with standpoint, use this opportunity to make your meal prep a ceremony, and see it as a gift to yourself. Take your time washing and cutting vegetables, delight in the sound of the spices popping, the scent that wafts up while youre peeling ginger. The attention and intention you put into your food will come back to you, and nourish you in ways that you never thought possible. 3. Keep things interesting, by adding a squeeze of lime instead of lemon to your kichadi. You can use parsley instead of cilantro, and adjust the spices to suit your personal taste. If you really need some variety, top the kichadi with some of your favourite sprouts, grated raw carrot, or fold in some spinach while its still hot. 4. Cravings are normal, especially when youre knowingly depriving yourself! If you feel a craving coming on, first identify what the craving is. Be curious...maybe it has nothing to do with the food, but more your emotional or mental state. If you really cant shake the feeling, drink water first, then try a piece of fruit, or some raw veggie sticks. 5. Drink a lot of water. The body functions optimally when properly hydrated. It is especially important when were resetting, since were letting go of things that need to be flushed out. Water is essential to this process, but it will also prevent cravings, combat fatigue and brain fog, and keep the bowels moving. Remember to drink water away from mealtimes for optimal digestion (30 minutes before eating, 2-3 hours after unless youre very thirsty). Other beverages, even if they are mostly water like coffee and tea, are not water. Only water is water. After the Kichadi diet Although it is extremely tempting to celebrate and indulge after denying oneself certain things, this is not the best time to do so. Even though this process keeps your digestive system humming along, your body is still in a sensitive place. Introduce new foods slowly, and keep combinations small and uncomplicated (i.e. dont have a meal with 20 different foods together). Limit meat, dairy, sugar, and processed foods for as long as possible. That congratulatory slice of cake should wait until youre pretty much back to normal, or maybe even find an alternative ; )     Print recipe     Simple and Cleansing Kichadi Serves 6-8 Ingredients: 1 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee 1/­­2 Tbsp. cumin seeds 1/­­2 Tbsp. mustard seeds 1/­­2 Tbsp. coriander seeds 1/­­2 tsp. ground turmeric 1 cinnamon stick 1-2 Tbsp. minced ginger (to taste) 1 large tomato, chopped (optional) 2 medium yellow onion, diced 2 medium carrots, chopped 1 small /­­ 250g sweet potato (or other seasonal root veggie), chopped 1 cup /­­ 200g brown rice 1/­­2 cup /­­ 110g mung beans or brown lentils 1 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1 cup /­­ 140g green peas, frozen or fresh 4 cups /­­ 1L water (or more, as needed) a couple handfuls finely chopped cilantro lemon to garnish Directions: 1. If possible, soak the rice and pulses together overnight, or for 8-12 hours. Drain and rinse very well. 2. Melt the oil in a large stockpot. Add the cumin and mustard seed and fry just until the mustard seeds start to pop. Add the remaining spices, stir and then add the tomato and ginger (if youre opting out of the tomato, simply use a few splashes of water). Fry for a couple minutes until fragrant. 3. Add the onion, carrots, sweet potato, brown rice, mung beans, salt, and water. Bring to a boil, reduce to simmer and cook for about 45 minutes, until the rice and beans are soft. About five minutes before serving, add the peas whether fresh or frozen, and cook until they are warm. Add more water for a stew-y consistency, or if the pot becomes dry while cooking. 4. Serve kichadi hot, garnished with cilantro and a squeeze of fresh lemon juice. Give thanks and enjoy. I hope that many of you try the kichadi diet out, and rejoice in the fact that there is no need to do something radical and overly deprivational during the winter. This is a time for closing in, for being quiet and gentle, and nourishing oneself in a tender way. And remember, you can enjoy this delicious kichadi even for a day, and any season of the year when you need to find your equilibrium once again. Its a tasty way to come back to center, every time, anytime. In health, vibrancy, and abundance for the year ahead, Sarah B. Show me your kichadi on Instagram: #mnrkichadi The post Kichadi: The Realistic Reset appeared first on My New Roots.

Proof that Not All Vegan Food Has To Be Healthy

January 8 2018 Happy Cow veggie blog 

If youre under the impression that vegan food is boring and that all we eat all day are carrots and kale, Vegan Junk Food Bar in Amsterdam is the perfect place to go to get your stereotypes absolutely rocked. Full of punk styling and off the wall flavors, Vegan Junk Food Bar offers the perfect place to go when you need to get your fix of burgers and fries, among many other classic fast food favorites. Theyve got two locations in Amsterdam, so theres always one close by when the craving for a double double with a shake on the side hits. I had the chance to speak with the manager of their newly opened Marie Heinekenplein location, which is hard to miss because the interior is neon pink and bubblegum blue, and he excitedly told me that their new location is doing great and theyre thrilled to be able to offer even more vegan options to an already vegan-hungry crowd of tourists and Amsterdam locals. While there, I got to try the Notorious Sumo Burger, a double patty with melty cheese and all the fixins as well as theyre Amsterdam Bitterballs and Flashy Loaded sweet potato fries. Everything was […] The post Proof that Not All Vegan Food Has To Be Healthy appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

carrot soup recipe | gajar ka soup recipe | cream of carrot soup

December 29 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

carrot soup recipe | gajar ka soup recipe | cream of carrot soupcarrot soup recipe | gajar ka soup recipe | cream of carrot soup with step by step photo and video recipe. the recipe for carrot soup is extremely simple and can be prepared within minutes. yet it is one of the healthy soup recipes as it is prepared with fresh carrots and other choice of veggies. moreover it can be easily extended by adding other vegetables to have a mix and match flavoured soup. Continue reading carrot soup recipe | gajar ka soup recipe | cream of carrot soup at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Bright & Grounding Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale Soup

December 13 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Bright & Grounding Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale Soup This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. Here’s a simple, nourishing soup that will help ground you through any holiday craziness or, really, any kind of stress you might be experiencing. Pureed soups offer such an easy way to get lots of veggies into your diet, and the possibilities for pureed soup recipes are endless. Think of them as warm, savory smoothies, and you’ll see that almost anything goes. I love a smooth soup, but sometimes I crave a little more texture within that creamy format. Enter this Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale soup, which has it all in terms of texture: a smooth and silky base, with satisfying chunks of chickpeas and kale throughout. Root vegetables are the perfect thing to be eating right now, when our bodies require more high-quality fuel to keep warm. They gather all their energy underground, where they grow to become nutrient and calorie-dense. Roots are grounding in the most literal sense. Parsnips, carrots, sweet potatoes, celeriac, beets, rutabaga, and any other root veggies you can think of, will make for a great addition to your winter meals. This soup highlights parsnips, the roots that look like albino carrots and have the loveliest sweet and earthy flavor. They are pureed together with warming spices like turmeric and coriander, as well as home-cooked chickpeas, which make this soup even more hearty, and satisfying enough to be eaten as a light lunch. Whole chickpeas and ribboned kale are then warmed in the pureed mixture, to make for the perfect balance of creamy and chunky. Have you tried adding half a cup of pulses, like the chickpeas in this soup (along with beans, lentils and dry peas) to your meals throughout the week yet? We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: they are the perfect, nutrient-dense and affordable building blocks for healthy, hearty and sustainable meals. Head here for more of our recipes using pulses, and be sure to check out Half Cup Habit. Bright & Grounding Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale Soup   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients 1 cup dried chickpeas - soaked overnight in purified water with a pinch of acv 2 bay leaves (optional) 2-inch piece of kombu seaweed (optional) sea salt 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 1 onion - chopped 1 tsp fennel seeds 1 tsp ground coriander 1 teaspoon ground turmeric pinch of red pepper flakes 3 garlic cloves - sliced 1 lb parsnips - peeled and roughly chopped black pepper - to taste 5 cups chickpea broth + more if needed (recipe below) 1 bunch kale - finely chopped zaatar, herbs/­­sprouts and nuts/­­seeds - for serving Instructions Drain and rinse the chickpeas. Combine them with 8 cups of purified water, bay leaves and kombu, if using, in a medium pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to a simmer, and cook, partially covered for about 30 minutes, or until the chickpeas are completely cooked. Add salt at the end. Discard the bay leaves and kobmu, then strain, reserving the chickpea broth. Warm the coconut oil in a medium soup pot over medium heat. Add the onion, fennel, coriander, turmeric, red pepper flakes, and a pinch of salt, and sauté for 7 minutes, until the onion is translucent. Add the garlic and sauté for 1 more minute, until fragrant. Add the parsnips, 1 cup of the cooked chickpeas, more salt and black pepper, and 5 cups of the chickpea broth to the same pot. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to a simmer, and cook, partially covered, for about 15 minutes, or until the parsnips are completely cooked and soft throughout. Puree all the contents of the pot in batches in an upright blender. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Return the pureed mixture to the same pot. Add the kale to the pot and stir it in. If the soup is too thick at this point, add a little more of the reserved chickpea broth to achieve the desired soup consistency. Bring the soup to a gentle boil once more, and simmer, stirring often, for 10 minutes. Add the remaining cooked chickpeas and stir to warm them through. Serve the soup warm, sprinkled with zaatar and any herbs/­­sprouts or nuts/­­seeds of choice. 3.5.3226 You might also like... No-Recipe Healing Soup Sweet and Savory Energy Bites, What to Do with Leftover Nut Milk Pulp Spring Vegetables with Smoky Chickpea Croutons and Avocado Aioli Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Bright & Grounding Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale Soup appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.


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