carbohydrate - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Wheat dosa recipe | instant wheat flour dosa | godhuma dosa or godhi dose

Vegan Pumpkin Donuts with Cinnamon Sugar

Pumpkin Cinnamon Oatmeal

Chana pulao recipe | channa rice recipe | kabuli chana pulao










carbohydrate vegetarian recipes

sabudana khichdi recipe | sabudane ki khichdi | sago khichdi | sabakki khichdi

September 9 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

sabudana khichdi recipe | sabudane ki khichdi | sago khichdi | sabakki khichdisabudana khichdi recipe | sabudane ki khichdi | sago or sabakki khichdi with step by step photo and video recipe. the recipe is prepared by soaking the sabudana in water which later sautéed with bolied potatoes, groundnuts, green chillies and cumin. typically it is served mainly during fasting season as it is full of carbohydrates and is essential for fasting. but it can also be prepared for very similar to upma for breakfast. Continue reading sabudana khichdi recipe | sabudane ki khichdi | sago khichdi | sabakki khichdi at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso

September 6 2017 My New Roots 

Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso I have to start by saying how incredibly moved I was by the comments on the last post, and the emails I received from you guys - a deep, heartfelt thank you. I knew that opening myself up would spark a lot of conversation, but I never imagined the impact it would have, not only in regards to the incredible outpouring of support, but for sharing your own stories and struggles. Time and time again I am reminded of the power in vulnerability and open communication. I feel truly blessed to have a community of conscious and loving readers, and that we can all share our journey with one another. That is what makes us stronger, and certainly healthier human beings in every sense of the word. Before I dig deeper into what Ive been doing to eat for balancing my hormones, Id like to just follow-up with the topic of orthorexia. Many of you expressed surprise at my struggles, thinking that because I do what I do, I must have had it all together. The truth is I thought that I did have it all together for a very long time, and creating My New Roots has been the most powerful catalyst in my healing. For the last decade, Ive felt very grounded in my choices and excited to celebrate them with you. But like I mentioned in the last post, the experience of changing my diet has brought back many of the challenges, dark thoughts and feelings that I had convinced myself were gone forever. Putting new restrictions on myself made me to put food into good and bad categories. This probably doesnt sound so terrible, but like I said before, this is a slippery slope into full-blown disordered eating for me. I see now that there is an incredibly fine line between caring about what I eat and caring too much. I believe that my relationship to food is something that I may have to keep in check for the rest of my life, or at least as long as I choose to use it as a tool to become a healthier person (so, like, forever). In the last four months of tuning into what I need right now, and eating more consciously, Ive really experienced a positive difference in how I feel, which is the biggest reward anyone could ask for! But Ive also had bad days where I wasnt prepared, and suddenly being at a wedding or a birthday party, or out for dinner with friends without much to eat in the good category, wasnt so rad. My blood sugar would crash, Id feel desperate, totally out of control and the voices would come back. What Ive learned from these experiences is that I need to be as prepared as possible in these situations, but if I can’t, I simply have to let go. I cannot control everything and I cannot always be prepared, but that in order to move forward, I have to maintain flexibility, and stop being so darn hard on myself! I firmly believe that there is more strength in being fluid and forgiving, than rigid and judgmental. I am just a person, after all. Since many of you were curious about the connection between food and hormone balance, Id like to discuss it in more detail, and share what Ive been doing to keep these miraculous chemicals in check, and keep them working for me, not against me! Upping my fat and protein intake – but especially fat Fats are an essential part of a healthy, well-balanced diet, and they are especially important for hormone balance. Fats actually create the structural components of hormones, and cholesterol specifically is responsible for our reproductive hormones; estrogen, progesterone and testosterone. The type of fat you choose however, is critical to achieving a positive effect, as the ones you consume become the building blocks for your hormones. Saturated fats like coconut oil, butter and ghee, and monounsaturated fats like olive oil, nuts, eggs, and avocados are excellent choices and should be consumed responsibly every day. Cut back on or eliminate corn, canola, sunflower, safflower and soybean oils, and replace them with the aforementioned instead. Ive also increased my protein intake, and consciously replacing more high-carbohydrate foods with more protein-rich foods such as tempeh, hemp, sprouts, activated nuts, eggs, and quality protein powder has really made a difference in stabilizing my energy levels and appetite. Getting enough protein on a vegetarian diet is totally possible, but I find that if Im not really paying attention, I can dip below the ideal 45 grams a day. Loosely (not obsessively) keeping track of my daily intake of protein has helped me feel my best. Keeping my blood sugar stable It may seem totally unrelated, but blood sugar and hormones are in fact inextricably linked. One of the main functions of the endocrine system (the system that creates and transports hormones in your body) is delivering glucose to your brain, muscles, and heart. So if anything in that process isnt working properly, than mismanaged blood sugar is the inevitable result. But whats worse is that it creates a cascade effect whereby none of the other parts of your endocrine system will work either. Sheesh! Walking the line between high and low blood sugar is something that Ive really been focusing on lately, and its working well, but it is an ongoing process that takes some getting used to. Including more fat and protein in my diet has been a game-changer for me, since those macronutrients digest slower than carbohydrates - even the complex ones from things like sweet potatoes, quinoa, and chickpeas. I try to eat a large and protein-rich breakfast within an hour of waking up (after the lemon water, of course!). Lunch is where I get the majority of my calories since that is when I need the most energy. I like eating roasted vegetables, avocado, eggs, and sprouted pseudo-grains like quinoa and buckwheat. I snack in between meals when Im hungry, but instead of reaching for a slice of rye bread or a rice cake, Ill have veggies with a high-fat dip, or a handful of my Maple Cinnamon Grain-free Granola. Dinner is mostly grain-free these days and I stick to salads, soups and stews. I go to bed no longer than four hours after dinner so that Im not hungry right before I hit the pillow. Then I like to have a break of about 14 hours between dinner and breakfast the next day, as my digestion does well on the rhythm of intermittent fasting. Eating more vegetables (and less bread a.k.a. DUH) I almost always had a couple slices of rye bread at lunch. Not that there is anything wrong with doing so, but Ill admit to feeling pretty foggy-headed afterwards. And because it filled me up so much, I had less room for veggies. Now Im prepping raw and cooked vegetables ahead of time and keeping them on hand specifically for my big lunches. Some favourites to roast in the oven are cauliflower, sweet potato, pumpkin, red onion, zucchini, tomatoes, and broccoli. Ive also started cutting up a big plate of veggie sticks in the early afternoon, before I even get hungry, so that it is there and waiting for me - no excuses. Right before diving in I douse it in freshly squeezed lemon juice, Maldon salt and Aleppo pepper. Its honestly delicious. I dont have to tell you that vegetables are full of filling fiber, replenishing phytonutrients, and yes, protein. Especially dem green ones. Eat more plants. Habits + meal prep I think this was the other big hurdle for me when it came to changing things up with my eating habits. I knew that if I was going to start eating food differently, Id have to start preparing food differently too - and a lot more often. I already spend a lot of time in the kitchen (obvi) and I love it, but I am also a person who likes to spend her non-work hours away from the cutting board. Eating this way admittedly does take more time, and makes it more challenging to eat out, or just grab something on the go. Coming to terms with this was challenging, but Ive realized that I have to dedicate more time to my diet if I want to be successful. No matter how you slice it, meal preparation is a very big part of sticking to your goals, whatever they may be. Of course there are times when its just not possible to do, and divergent days are fine, but the majority of your food youre should fall into the category that helps you feel your best, however you define that. Instead of prepping one day a week, which I know a lot of people like to do, I actually prefer to pepper it throughout the week in a way that is a little more fluid for me. If the Life-Changing Loaf of Bread is in the oven for instance, Ill chop up a bunch of veggies, and put them in too. If Im washing greens for a salad, Ill do all of them so that theyre ready to chuck into a smoothie on a whim. Lee from Americas Fat Balls have also been a super snack these days. And like I mentioned before, having fresh veggies washed and sliced up for afternoon cravings is very helpful. I can prepare two or three days worth at a time and keep them in the fridge. Mindset Instead of looking at food in terms of good and bad which I think is a dangerously judgemental way to categorize what were eating, I like to say yes to certain things, and the others fall into the not-right-now basket. For instance, I love brown rice to the ends of the earth and back, but Im not eating it right now since it doesnt make me feel all that great. And just because Im not eating brown rice these days doesnt mean I’ll never eat it again! This leaves room for flexibility and creates a far more sustainable way to look at ones diet. Isn’t it relieving to know that if you are out for dinner and there’s only rice for example, that you could potentially eat it and not beat yourself up? Ahhhh…did you feel that?! What a relief, eh? Tomorrow you’ll get back on the horse, no big deal at all. Making changes should be fun, and keep those labels for tin cans! You’re a fluid being, ever-changing, so make space for that in your meal planning too. Self-care routine, stress-reduction, exercise, and sleep I used to see self-care as something that only people with time have. Well, after totally hitting the wall a while ago, I realized that it just has to be a priority, respected as a part of a holistic approach to health, and something to actually schedule in the calendar. Staying active, sleeping, and treating myself to some yummy stress-reducing activities like spending time in nature, bodywork, and cooking (go figure) keeps me feeling happy and relaxed. Squelching stress doesnt happen by accident: it is truly a daily practice and something to be mindful of. Listen to yourself. How can this moment be juicier and more relaxing? Its fun to love yourself! Keeping stress levels low means that your body will be relaxed and not producing hormones that should only be reserved for emergency situations. Cortisol is a stress hormone released by the adrenal glands. Every time we experience a stressful situation we secrete this hormone into the blood stream so that our bodies can deal with the stressor at hand. Although cortisol is our friend in acute situations, our systems arent designed to be pumping it out round the clock as we juggle and struggle with backlogged emails, fussy kids, and traffic jams. This is why chronic stress is so detrimental to our bodies: prolonged, elevated cortisol levels wreak all kinds of wrong inside of us, raising our blood pressure, causing unwanted weight gain, exhaustion, anxiety, impaired brain function, and weakening the immune response. All the more reason to take self-care seriously, and do the things you love more often. Its actually healthy. Sleeping 7-9 hours a night is another non-negotiable. Getting enough sleep helps us to control our cortisol production, balance our blood sugar, and put us back in line with our natural circadian rhythm. Turning screens off an hour before bedtime will help signal to your body that it is in fact, night time. Create a relaxed, cozy environment and spend the last hour before bed reading, stretching, or meditating. I still struggle with this one, as I love looking at Instagram right before turning out the light, but Im becoming more mindful and doing my best. Required Reading There are a few really amazing books out there that I recommend every woman reads, whether or not you’re seeking advice on a particular health issue. Understanding our bodies and cycles is the first step in helping ourselves become healthier, stronger, more connected women. Woman Code by Alisa Vitti has been hugely educational and supportive for me. Her book is a guide to figuring out what the heck is going on inside you, and how to correct it through diet and lifestyle. I appreciate her easy-to-understand language and humour in this book, because let’s face it: nothing is very funny when you’re hormones are raging! The Complete Natural Medicine Guide to Women’s Health by Dr. Sat Dharam Kaur has been and continues to be another excellent resource for me. This book is more of an all-round toolkit for lifelong health and healing, than specifically about hormone balance. I love the holistic approach to all conditions, and inspiring programs to get us back in touch with our natural cycles in connection to the earth. The third book I recommend is Hormone Balance by Carolyn Dean. Dean is a naturopathic doctor that utilizes both traditional and alternative solutions to help readers rebalance their hormone levels. Her writing is engaging and inspiring, and this book is full of ways for women to achieve greater overall health. Oh man, I havent even talked about the tacos yet! So. I got the idea for these this past summer when I was chopping up tempeh to replace ground beef with in a tomato sauce for pasta. It turned out so meaty, satisfying, and delish that I thought I could perhaps take that same idea, spice it up a little differently, and serve them in a taco. Woot! I knew that grilled veggies and red cabbage would help cut the richness, but that I would also need a boss sauce to put them over the top. During one of my retreats I made a raw queso in our cooking class and everyone went wild for it. It seemed like a natural fit! Topped with some lime, avo, pickled red onions, and cilantro these were the best tacos Ive ever had. Ever. Ever. And Ive had a lot of tacos. I know some of you are going to ask about the corn tortillas and probably remind me that corn is a “grain”. Yes, I am aware of that, and I’ll remind you that I am not grain-free, just cutting way back. I stick mostly to pseudo-grains and make sure they are soaked prior to cooking, and enjoy a treat like this once in a while. I only purchase tortillas made with sprouted corn, or from corn that has been nixtalmized (that topic is a whole other blog post!). I buy my corn tortillas from Hija de Sanchez here in Copenhagen. Their tortillas are made fresh daily using nixtamalized corn imported from Mexico, so they taste unbelievably good. Of course taco fillings are important to a good taco, but the tortilla quality should not be overlooked! It makes the dish. Go find the good ones.     Print recipe     Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso Serves 3-4 Tempeh Taco Meat 250g /­­ 8.8oz organic, non-GMO tempeh 1 medium red onion 4 cloves garlic 1 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee 1 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. chipotle or smoked hot paprika, to taste 2 Tbsp. tamari 2-5 Tbsp. water, as needed Grilled vegetables 1 medium zucchini 1 medium red onion 1 red bell pepper 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1 tsp. ground cumin a couple pinches of cayenne, if desired 12 small corn tortillas (try to find organic, non-GMO if possible) 1 batch Raw Cashew Queso, recipe below Optional add-ins: 1 ripe avocado 1 small bunch cilantro pickled red onion or thinly sliced red onion shredded red cabbage tossed with a little salt and lime juice limes for serving hot sauce Cooking and assembly: 1. Start by making the Raw Cashew Queso (see recipe below). 2. Heat your grill or barbecue to medium-high. If not using a grill, simply cook everything in a skillet on the stove. 3. Finely chop or crumble tempeh into whatever size appeals to you (mine were rather small to mimic ground beef). Set aside. Mince red onion and garlic. Set aside. 4. Soak wooden skewers in water while you prepare the vegetables, or longer if you remember. If using metal skewers, skip this step. 5. Wash and cut the zucchini and onion into rings, the peppers into chunks. Place in a large bowl and toss with the salt and spices. 6. Skewer the vegetables so that their largest surface will lay flat on the grill (see photo). Alternate veggies until youve used them all. Place on the grill and cook until stating to char on the underside, anywhere from 5-10 minutes, depending on your cooking method. Flip and cook on the other side. 7. While the vegetables are grilling, cook the tempeh. H eat your cooking oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the onion and a few pinches of salt. Cook until starting to brown, about 7-10 minutes. Add garlic and cook for another minute until fragrant. Add crumbled tempeh, cumin, chipotle, and stir well to incorporate. Pour in the tamari, followed by a couple tablespoons of water. Stir well and add water as needed - youre after a moist mixture. Taste and adjust seasoning as desired. Cook for a total of 10 minutes. The mixture should be golden brown, hot and delicious! 8. Warm the tortilla shells on the grill or in a pan over medium-high heat. 9. Spoon the desired amount of tempeh into each tortilla shell. Followed by the roasted veggies, avocado, cabbage, cilantro and pour on the Raw Cashew Queso. Enjoy! Raw Cashew Queso Makes about 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 150g cashews, soaked for 4-8 hours or overnight 1 red bell pepper 1/­­2 tsp. salt 2 Tbsp. nutritional yeast 2-3 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice, to taste 1/­­2 clove garlic 1 small piece fresh turmeric ground cayenne, to taste 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water Directions: 1. Drain and rinse the cashews. 2. Put all ingredients, except water, in a high-speed blender or food processor and blend, adding water one tablespoon at a time until the desired consistency is reached. If you want a thick cream, use less water, for a thinner sauce, use more. (You will not achieve a perfectly smooth sauce with a food processor, but it is still delicious!). Before I go I just want to reiterate how wonderful it felt to be met with such open arms after the last post. I wish I could write back to every single one of you who shared their story with me, and everyone else here, but I simply couldnt get to them all. I am moved beyond words that so many of you felt open and supported in this space too, and I will urge you to seek out help if you need it. And if you know someone who you think may struggle with disordered eating, reach out and help them in a loving, and non-judgmental way. We are all in this together. In love and light, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   *   * http:/­­/­­www.goldencircleretreats.com/­­portugal/­­index.html Dear friends! I am thrilled to share the location for my next wellness retreat in magical Comporta, Portugal, November 5-11, 2017. Join Mikkala Marilyn Kissi and I at Sublime Comporta for seven days of luxurious living, divinely delicious meals, inspiring cooking classes and nutrition seminars, yoga, Pilates, meditation, and breath work. Come press the reset button with me! Ride horses on the beach, dance under the stars, and cozy up by the fire. This will be a week to remember. I cant wait to see you there! Click here for more info and tickets. The post Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso appeared first on My New Roots.

Cinnamon Crunch Cereal and Hemp Milk

August 14 2017 My New Roots 

Cinnamon Crunch Cereal and Hemp Milk It is easier to change a man’s religion than to change his diet. – Margaret Mead Yup. Pretty much. This entire shift began when I had a particularly gnarly couple of months with manic mood swings that rivaled my adolescence, acne flare-ups, bloating, low energy, night sweats, and all-round malaise. Knowing what I know, I looked at my diet first to see what could be adjusted. Everything was organic, whole, plant-based and totally healthy by most peoples standards. But it just wasnt working anymore. I knew something had to give. Delving in deeper, a typical day for me was a whole-grain porridge in the morning, topped with all kinds of seasonal fruit, homemade granola etc. Lunch was a couple slices of organic sourdough rye bread from the local bakery, with homemade hummus, avocado, sprouts etc. Dinner was often a mixed bowl, the base of which was brown rice, quinoa, millet or buckwheat covered in a rainbow of vegetables, homemade pickles, superfood-loaded sauce, and fresh herbs. I wasnt eating sugar, drinking coffee, I was keeping up with my exercise and sleeping well. So what was the problem? In this case, I had a feeling it was a big ol grain overload. The idea of cutting back on my morning oats, bread, and grain bowls was literally devastating to me. I cried. On multiple occasions, just talking about giving up muffins made me weep, and I felt like there was just no way I could make even more changes, or think about my diet even more than I already did. I have had two serious experiences with orthorexia in my life. For those of you who dont know what orthorexia is, it is defined as an obsession with healthy eating. It is considered an eating disorder, and one that is becoming more prevalent in Western culture as healthy eating becomes increasingly trendy. The first bout happened the year I moved out of the house to study at university. While many of my friends were bingeing on junk food and beer, I swung in the opposite direction entirely and took advantage of the incredible meal program that was offered at school, and fueled myself with enormous salads, delicious sandwiches and wraps, veggie-heavy soups and stews, and protein-rich smoothies. I also signed up for the free fitness classes at the university gym, got hooked on kickboxing, step aerobics, boot camp drills, and the weight literally fell off me. I lost about 25 pounds that year, and for the first time in my life I felt like I was in control of the way I looked. The sudden attention from guys – which I had never had before – further stoked the fires for my desire to be even thinner, even though my initial motivation to eat this way stemmed from a desire to be healthy. As my attitude towards food morphed from friend to enemy, I flirted with a full-on eating disorder at this point, playing games with myself to see how long I could go without eating, how many exercise classes I could fit in between classes and study groups, how long I could make my bean salad from lunch last (too long!). Eventually my energy levels dropped to the point where I had a very hard time getting out of bed in the morning and I couldnt concentrate well in school. I realized that I had taken things too far and started eating in a more balanced way again. I put the experience behind me without giving it too much thought. The second time this resurfaced was, ironically, while studying holistic nutrition. While I was learning all about foods and how my body worked, I became almost afraid to eat, toxifying my body, or poisoning it with sugar, gluten, dairy and the rest. I became obsessed with detoxing and subsisted only on clean foods; mostly vegetables. I was stressed, my hair started falling out, my acne came back and my energy hit an all-time low. Despite my obvious physical misery, I somehow felt validated since I wasnt putting anything bad in my body. Eating as healthy as possible became obsessive for me and my classmates, and wed all proudly bring our lunches to school, subtly scrutinizing each others Tupperware contents. Again, food had lost its pleasure, its joy, and had become something that I saw as more of an enemy than a friend. And that really scared me. After graduating, I finally got a grip, and once again slowly re-established a healthy relationship to what I was eating. It is for these reasons that food is such a tender subject for me, and changing my diet dangerous territory. I spent so many years struggling to achieve a positive connection with food, and when I finally got there and it felt like such a relief. The prospect of having to go back to that place of thinking about food more than I already did felt unsafe for me, and slipping back into an obsessive place felt like an inevitability. Meanwhile, the negative self-talk voices were loud and overpowering, telling me how I was fat, flabby, weak, old - things that I KNEW werent true. But thats the sad thing about internal monologues, they dont need to make sense to play like broken records in our minds all day every day. Its enough to drive a person insane. The cruel voices coupled with my extreme fear of reverting back to my old thought patterns and eating habits absolutely terrified me. I felt like I had hit a wall of hopelessness. And all I wanted to do to feel better was to eat a piece of eff-ing bread. The reason I suspected the grain thing was because of the unique relationship that blood sugar has to our hormones. If were consuming carbohydrates at a faster rate than our bodies are utilizing them for energy, that extra glucose gets stored in the fat cells of the liver, which decreases its ability to breakdown excess estrogen, and allowing it to hang around in our systems longer than it should. This excess circulating estrogen causes a whole host of symptoms, including, you guessed it: mood swings, bloating, sluggish metabolism, tender breasts, fatigue, foggy thinking, PMS, and many more less-than-desirable issues. Now, these things can be exacerbated by stress (shocker), inadequate fat and protein intake, and environmental factors, all of which I was likely suffering from. I set out by making a plan, since I know how hard it is to make positive changes without preparation. Instead of focusing on the all the things I wanted to reduce or eliminate, I focused on the foods I could have, foods higher in fat and protein, since I knew that those things would naturally elbow out the things I would normally fall back on (Im looking at you, banana bread). I made a list that I could refer to when I was grocery shopping for ingredients. I cooked and froze things. I stocked the fridge and pantry. I was ready. Within the first few days I already noticed a difference: my energy was incredibly stable, my emotions were in check, the bloating in my stomach dissipated, and I just felt good. As the days rolled on my compulsive urges to down half a dozen muffins subsided, and it was like I could clearly see that what I had actually been battling was blood sugar issues - not just too many grains or carbohydrates. It became clear that I had been taking my bod on a wild rollercoaster of high and low blood sugar for years, which had in turn been tossing my hormones around like a pair of sneakers in a washing machine. Stabilizing blood sugar is the first step in managing your endocrines system ability to do its job properly. I realized that if I was going to eat grains (or any carbohydrate-heavy food), I had to eat them in smaller amounts, balance them out thoughtfully with enough fat and protein, and make sure that I was actually using that energy instead of letting it sit around in my body. So far, things have been going incredibly well, and I am so darn proud of myself for not only identifying the issue, but actually doing something about it. We are fluid beings with needs that evolve and change over time. Our diets need to reflect that, which is why its imperative to listen to our bodies and be advocates for our own health. No one knows your body better than you, and once you quiet all the noise out there telling you how to eat in black-and-white terms, youll be able to hear yourself, without judgement, and choose the way of eating that is just right for you, right now. It may be different tomorrow, and that is okay too. In sharing this all with you, I am trying to set an example, because you too have this intuition that is telling you just what you need to eat and do right now. Its actually fun to be connected to yourself, your unique rhythms and needs. Learning about how you operate and designing a plan that caters to your exceptional self means that you can celebrate, instead of berate your body the whole month through, and experience pleasure in every stage of our cycle. I promise. This is undoubtedly a huge topic, and one that I plan on chipping away at over the next few blog posts. Some things I want to reiterate here are, that I do not believe that grains or carbohydrates are bad. No natural food group should be vilified, just as no macronutrient should be either. If youre thinking about giving up carbs, Id advise you not to. Glucose, the sugar found in carbohydrates is your brains primary fuel source, and when consumed responsibly, carbs will help you on your wellness journey, not hinder you. I still stand behind each and every one of the recipes that I have created for this blog, the app, and both of my cookbooks, and I believe that they are appropriate for many people to enjoy. However at this stage of my life, some of the recipes do not serve my needs any longer, and Ive had to make small changes to them, or put them on the shelf for another time. Im okay with that. Whew! Now for some notes on the recipe. The base recipe for my Cinnamon Toast Crunch-inspired cereal is grain-free, but it does rely on almond flour, which can be expensive. If you can tolerate pseudo-grains, feel free to top up the base with buckwheat flour. This will bulk up the cereal considerably so youll have more for less money. This cereal is r-i-c-h. You really only need a small amount to fuel you in the morning - not like the bottomless bowls of that were used to consuming in the morning without every really feeling satisfied, ya know what I mean? And paired with a luscious liquid like my Super Creamy Hemp Milk will keep you full for even longer, help stabilize your blood sugar, not to mention flood your bod with the delicate nutrients and powerful enzymes that store-bought, plant-based milk is missing. This recipe is dead simple and pretty much like cream – I shouldnt even call it milk, since its so rich and thick. And since were thinking outside the cereal box here, dont stop at breakfast...this milk is amazing in coffee and tea, in raw treats and baked goods, soup, smoothies, ice cream and popsicles. Youre gonna love it! I made the cereal the first time with just almond flour and a full half-cup of applesauce. It was definitely delicious, but I loved it just as much when I cut this amount in half. If you dont want all the sweetness, use just 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml of applesauce instead of the full amount. If youre using buckwheat flour, you will need the full amount of the applesauces moisture to bind it all together. I havent tried a version without the coconut sugar, so if youre not into that stuff feel free to play with the recipe on your own.     Print recipe     Grain-free /­­ Gluten-free Cinnamon Crunch Cereal Makes 5-7 servings Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup ground flax seeds /­­ 50g 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 150g blanched almond flour 1 1/­­2 Tbsp. cinnamon 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­4 cup /­­ 35g coconut sugar 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml - 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml applesauce ( 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml if using buckwheat flour) 1 Tbsp. coconut oil, melted optional: 1/­­2 cup /­­ 85g buckwheat flour Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 325°F/­­160°C. 2. Combine the ground flax seeds, almond flour, cinnamon, salt, and sugar in a large mixing bowl. Stir well. Then add the desired amount of applesauce and coconut oil, and stir to fully incorporate (you made need to use your hands if it gets too dry). Gather dough into a rough ball. 3. Place dough ball on a sheet of baking paper with another sheet on top. Using a rolling pin, roll the dough as evenly as possible, about 2mm thickness (not quite paper thin). If youre using buckwheat flour, youll need to separate the dough into two batches to achieve this. Remove top sheet of baking paper, and using a paring knife, score the dough into small squares of your desired size (mine were about 1.5cm /­­ .5 square). 4. Place in the oven to bake for about approximately 25 minutes until turning golden around the edges, then turn the oven off and let the cereal sit in there until cool (this will help dry it out and make them extra crisp). 5. Once the cereal is completely cool, break up the pieces into squares and place in an airtight glass container. Store for up to one month at room temperature. Super Creamy Hemp Milk Makes 1 liter /­­ 1 quart Ingredients: scant 4 cups /­­ 1 liter water 3/­­4 cup hulled hemp seeds /­­ hemp hearts Totally optional add-ins: sweetener (stevia, dates, honey, maple syrup...) vanilla sea salt raw cacao powder Directions: 1. Place all ingredients in the blender and blend on high until smooth (this make take a couple minutes). 2. Pour directly into a sterilized bottle and store in the fridge for up to 5 days. Initially, I was really afraid to come out about any of this stuff - the changes my diet is undergoing, the orthorexia, the internal voices! But I know in my gut that if Im going through it, someone else out there is too. And the reason I wanted to start My New Roots in the first place was to create a safe space for everyone to share and support each other on our health journeys, so I have to be as transparent and honest as I feel I can be to set that example. I want to say a huge heartfelt thank-you to all of you who have stood by me all of these years and continue to do so. It feels pretty amazing to have you, and to be getting better all together. In light and gratitude, Sarah B.   ***** Also… There’s one spot left for the upcoming retreat in Ibiza, click here to join me for a week of total inspiration and rejuvenation! The post Cinnamon Crunch Cereal and Hemp Milk appeared first on My New Roots.

What are Carbohydrates and Why Do We Need Them?

May 2 2017 VegKitchen 

What are Carbohydrates and Why Do We Need Them? Excerpted from Questioning Meat by Robin Schaper, reprinted by permission. What are carbohydrates, and what are carbohydrate foods? Why do we need carbohydrates? And what is the difference between good and bad carbs? Well answer these questions, but first, a distinction: We all need plenty of good carbs. Meat and other animal-based food contains hardly any […] The post What are Carbohydrates and Why Do We Need Them? appeared first on VegKitchen.

Meatless Monday Sizes Up Superfoods

March 20 2017 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Sizes Up SuperfoodsMarch is National Nutrition Month. So each week this month, were highlighting how certain foods can help improve your health. This is the third article in the series. Please share with friends and family who may be interested. For many adults, being time-pressed has become the norm. Theyre driven to pack more into any given moment. With this mind, perhaps its no surprise that theres a recent surge of interest in superfoods - plant foods that pack in more nutrition than other food items. Sure, this food trend is hot right now, but does the reality actually live up to the hype? Turns out the answer is yes, as long as youre consuming the right foods for the right reasons. According to Diana K. Rice, a registered dietitian who works with Meatless Monday, Many plant-based foods pack in more fiber, minerals and fiber than other dietary choices, said Rice. So if youre looking to improve the quality of your diet, its a great idea to rely on these foods over choices like processed carbohydrates and animal products. But dont expect superfoods to deliver a miracle cure for your medical problems, cautions Rice. She explains, No single food is going to help you lose weight, give you clearer skin or achieve whatever other health goal youre after. The main reason to eat superfoods is that they are nutritious and convenient. One easy way to pack more superfoods into yoir diet is to adopt the practice of Meatless Monday. When you choose not to eat meat one day a week, theres a lot of room left in your diet to fill with nutrient-packed superfoods, Rice said. And when you try tasty new dishes containing plant-based superfoods on a Monday, youll be more likely to incorporate them into your diet over the rest of the week, too. To kick off your new Meatless Monday habit, Rice recommends these plant-based superfoods: Peanuts: Not only is this plant-based source of protein highly affordable, its adored by the masses for its appealing flavor. In addition to seven grams of protein per one ounce serving, peanuts are a terrific source of folate and resveratrol - yes, the red wine nutrient! Found in whole peanuts (as well as grape skins), resveratrol is an antioxidant thats linked to reduced rates of cardiovascular disease and cancer. Think outside the peanut butter sandwich with Peanut Noodles or Peanut Butter Chili.   Avocados: This fruit is a super substitute for animal products on Meatless Monday because its healthy fat content satisfies the same craving you might have for a juicy steak. But since the fats found in avocados are mostly heart-healthy monounsaturated fats, theyre doing your body a favor along with your tastebuds. Grill them and top with salsa for a new twist or try them with pasta in this Pea and Avocado Penne.   Kale: Sure, kale isnt as trendy as it once was. Nowadays, foods like collard greens and Brussels sprouts are stealing the spotlight. However, kale rose to popularity for good reason - it scores a perfect 1000 on the Aggregate Nutrient Density Index, meaning that it packs in more nutrition per calorie than most other foods. In particular, its a great source of vitamins A, K, C and fiber. Give it a spin in this Forbidden Rice Salad or try a new variation on your lasagna with this kale-packed version.   Mushrooms: Not many foods pack in a hefty dose of vitamin D, the sunshine vitamin. But one portabella mushroom can pack in 400 IU (international units) of vitamin D, which is more than half of the recommended daily intake level. Theyre an especially good choice for people who are averse to sun or live in northern climates, plus they offer the crave-able umami flavor found in meat. Try them in Mushroom Tikka Masala or Mushroom Hemp Tartlets.   Tomatoes: No, not the pale pink slice thats suspiciously topping your sandwich. Were talking deep, dark red tomatoes - especially canned tomatoes - that are an excellent source of lycopene, an antioxidant thats linked to heart health and reduced cancer risk. Pump up your lycopene intake with dishes like Shakshouka with Rainbow Chard and Tomato Parmesan Slow Cooker Soup. The post Meatless Monday Sizes Up Superfoods appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Men’s Health Month Hero: Kimatni D. Rawlins of Fit Fathers

June 13 2016 Meatless Monday 

Men’s Health Month Hero: Kimatni D. Rawlins of Fit FathersThis week Kimatni D. Rawlins takes our hero challenge to a new level--helping fathers become fit for their families. A former college athlete, Kimatni lost sight of his health goals in the early years of raising a young family, but later experienced a personal epiphany that inspired him to shed 50 pounds through a plant-based diet and daily workouts. The founder of the fitness and wellness website Fit Fathers, Kimatni today uses his knowledge as a certified fitness instructor and nutritionist to create programs that speak to men at all fitness levels. Learn more about his work and his enthusiasm for Meatless Monday in our recent interview below. You were a 250-pound running back in college. What stressors happened in those post-college years that turned you into a self-acclaimed couch potato? Work, partying, traveling, and entrepreneurship. After years of football at Georgia Tech I was a bit worn and didnt exert that same effort as I did on the field. Basically, I chose to let excuses run my life. Did you experience a specific wakeup call to get healthier? Was going meatless part of this change? At age 45 I actually wanted to relive my playing days at Tech, yet I lacked the energy and stamina needed to obtain the goal. I finally said, Enough is enough, and signed up for the Mens Health Urbanathlon in Chicago. I finished in the middle of the pack but was very exhausted after the 9-mile, 7-obstacle course. That moment I decided to study the body and how it metabolizes energy. It all led back to the foods we eat and those we choose to discard. Slowly I began eliminating chicken, fish, and dairy. Red meat and pork was never an option. Then, the icing on the cake was after my wife (also a vegan) and I watched the movies Forks Over Knives and Food, Inc. What are the positive changes youve experienced from being on a vegan diet? I have energy for days, my doctor says that my health numbers are that of an 18-year-old athlete, and I feel fluid and light on my feet after meals. I have since run a marathon and a few Urbanathlons, and every year I complete at least three half-marathons. I also train a few clients and lead group workout sessions for schools, non-profits, and work groups. Did getting into shape make you a better father? How? Yes, of course. Together my wife and I prepare well-balanced meals for the kids instead of relying on processed school lunches and fast foods. The girls (now 12 and 9) are little vegan chefs and also prepare plant-based meals for the family, especially when we have guests over. Additionally, I have the energy to expend with them after my workday is over. No longer do I let an excuse supersede our values, which are staying active, eating clean, and energizing our lives. What are the challenges men face that cause them to lose sight of their health? Do fathers in particular face special challenges in balancing home and work life? Far too often men continue to rely on the female of the household for shopping, cooking, and meal preparation. If she eats poorly, then most likely so will he. If she eats healthily but is often away, then dad is at a disadvantage if he doesnt know how to grocery shop or cook. Fit Fathers helps offset these behavioral patterns by providing recipes, nutrition tips, meal plans, etc. Today you are a physical trainer, active marathoner, and athlete. Can hard-core athletes really be successful without eating meat? Yes, thats me. Its amazing because I could barely run a mile when I was a meat-eating footballer. Keep in mind fruits, veggies, and grains are complex carbohydrates, which are humans main source of fuel, converted into glucose to be transported into every cell for energy. What repairs and accelerates the growth of cellular tissue is the macronutrient protein and its found in all foods. Beans, for example, provide needed protein, dietary fiber (which the majority of Americans lack), and various vitamins and minerals. Thus, veggies are also comprised of protein so a plant-based diet will never be devoid of any major food group. Moreover, we only need 5 to 10 per cent of our daily caloric intake to stem from proteins. Heard of Scott Jurek? He follows a pure vegan diet and is virtually unbeatable in 100-mile-plus ultra runs. Can you capsulize your health program in a few words? Yep! We have two key mantras. Lead by example so your child becomes the example and Eat Clean, Stay Active, and Energize Your Life. Why does Meatless Monday appeal to you? How do you incorporate it into your programs? We love Meatless Monday. It helps people let go of animal protein one step at a time while nourishing their bodies, reducing their carbon footprint, and ultimately giving animals another reason to breathe. Many of my close friends and followers have gone plant-based after starting their lifestyle change with a Meatless Monday. It works! Readers can follow the Fit Fathers movement at www.FitFathers.com and @FitFathers.    The post Men’s Health Month Hero: Kimatni D. Rawlins of Fit Fathers appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Fifty Shades of Greens

February 17 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Fifty Shades of Greens Many of our recipes are well talked through and planned between the two of us. We write shopping lists, buy enough groceries so we can test cook them properly a few times and make sure to take down notes during the process. I always use the laptop but Luise insists on scribbling on small pieces of paper that often end up in the hands of the kids and their crayons (can somebody please tell that woman to put her fancy new Macbook to use!). We always feel quite content after having published one of those type of recipes. But it actually seems like the recipes from simple fridge and freezer findings that are whipped together quickly without a moment of planning, seem to spark just as much interest, even though they are very basic. This quick pasta dish with fifty shades of greens started out like that, with two hungry kids, half a package of pasta (made from legumes) and some leftover green vegetables (the ones on the photo obviously look a little less sad than the first time we made it). It ticks all the right boxes for a February recipe. Simple. Comforting. Nutritious. Vegan. Tasty! It reminds me of a pasta dish I used to cook back when I was living in Rome. One of my favourite things to buy from the local farm stands were cute baby zucchinis (and they were so cheap!) that I sliced and fried with onion, garlic, thyme, capers, fresh herbs and spinach. Then I poured over a dash of cream and white wine before tossing in the cooked pasta. It was my go-to dinner for one, ready in 12 minutes. Here we have added even more greens. We are using frozen peas and one whole broccoli, shaving the stem thinly and breaking the rest into small florets. The vegetables are cooked in coconut cream which also adds a little sweetness. When making green vegetable dishes like this, remember not to cook it too long. You just want to soften the vegetables up, not kill them. If you are a quick chopper, you can have dinner ready in less than 20 minutes. And if you are cooking for kids and are afraid that they will dream horrible nightmares from being fed too many vegetables, Elsa’s recommendation is skipping the spinach and add more peas. Because cooked spinach is: “The most horrible thing I have ever tasted in my entire life”. Our pasta of choice here is a green pea fusilli pasta which is gluten free but also adds protein. Not to mention, it is green and bring yet another shade to this dish! More and more alternative pasta/­­noodle products made entirely from legumes (beans, lentils and peas) are popping up in stores. Not only health food stores but also many supermarkets. We like them because they are nutritious alternatives to regular refined wheat pasta. They are also rich in fiber, made from complex carbohydrates, naturally gluten free and they come in many colours and shapes, which make it more fun for the kids to eat. Pea, Spinach & Broccoli Pasta (aka fifty shades of greens) Serves 4 If you don’t have all the vegetables at home, no worries, just use what you’ve got. You can use frozen broccoli and spinach instead of fresh. If you’ve got some leftover white wine in the house, try adding a splash together with the garlic and onion. And if you don’t fancy coconut milk/­­cream, you can use ordinary cream, Greek yogurt or a vegan alternative. 2 tbsp olive oil or coconut oil 4 cloves of garlic 1 yellow onion 4 sprigs of fresh thyme 3 tbsp pickled capers (use the brine as well) 1/­­2 large zucchini or 1 small, sliced into thin half moons 1 small broccoli, broken into small florets and stem sliced thinly 2 handfuls whole spinach leaves, rinsed 1 small can coconut cream or the solid top layer of a coconut milk (more info here) 1 1/­­2 cup frozen peas 1-2 tbsp lemon juice and a little zest sea salt and pepper chopped fresh parsley, for serving Pasta for 4 servings, choose the sort you prefer (read about our pasta of choice above). Bring a saucepan filled with water to boil. Add pasta and let cook until ready (as instructed on the package), then drain and set aside. Heat oil in a large skillet on medium heat. Finely chop garlic and onion and add to the skillet. Let sauté until fragrant and then add thyme, capers (and white wine, if using) and cook for another minute. Add zucchini and broccoli and cook until almost tender. Now add peas, spinach, coconut cream, lemon, salt and pepper and cook until the spinach is just wilted. Taste and adjust the flavors to your liking. Add the cooked pasta to the skillet and mix to combine. Scatter over fresh parsley and serve. Non-vegans can of course add some grated cheese if they wish.

The Lowdown on FODMAPs

November 4 2015 Oh My Veggies 

Think you have gluten intolerance? You could be sensitive to FODMAPs, a group of carbohydrates that includes wheat, beans, alliums and other common foods.

Tempeh, Tofu, Seitan, and Jackfruit: What They’re Made of and How to Enjoy Them

September 14 2015 Meatless Monday 

Tempeh, Tofu, Seitan, and Jackfruit: What They’re Made of and How to Enjoy ThemChances are youve seen some delicious recipes that call for some interesting ingredients that might be a bit unusual. Foods like tempeh, tofu, seitan, and jackfruit, are rapidly taking the spotlight in dishes that are perfect for Meatless Monday meals. These foods add the texture and protein we often crave without using any meat at all - but what are they made of, and whats the difference between them? Tempeh Tempeh is growing in popularity in the US, and has begun showing up on restaurant menus and grocery store shelves. Originally from Indonesia, tempeh is made of soy that has been fermented with natural cultures. The fermentation process turns the raw soy into a fairly firm cake-like consistency. Tempeh is known for providing over 18 grams of protein per serving, and easily-digestible B12 vitamins. The food as an innate nutty flavor, but takes on the taste of spices an marinades well (just like its cousin, tofu). Bell Pepper Tempeh Fajitas, Meatless Monday Tofu Tofu is one of the most popular meat substitutes, and is an essential ingredients in East Asian and Southeast Asian cuisine. Tofu is made by coagulating fresh soy milk (made from raw or sprouted soy beans) until curds form, pressing the curds to release the remaining liquid, and cooling the resulting blocks of curd. Differences in how the tofu is pressed account for the differences in texture between silken/­­soft tofu and regular/­­firm tofu. Tofu is known for its ability to soak up flavors of spices and marinades, and is popular in healthy recipes as a robust source of protein and minerals that is entirely cholesterol free. Honey Glazed Tofu and Plum Summer Rolls, Robin Asbell Seitan Seitan (pronounced say-tan) is made of protein-rich wheat gluten, and boasts an impressively meat-like texture. Because of this texture and its ability to pick up flavors in cooking, seitan is frequently used in restaurants as meat substitutes like faux-duck. Seitan can be purchased seasoned and prepared, and is made by combining vital wheat gluten with water and any desired spices. Seitan is known for its texture, but it is also a prominent source of protein with up to 36 grams of protein per serving (more than tofu or tempeh) and has a high concentration of carbohydrates per serving. Seitan Cheeseburger Pizza, Upton’s Naturals Jackfruit Jackfruit is a tree fruit indigenous to tropical regions, and has recently been making waves in western meatless cooking. The flesh of the fruit is highly versatile and is perfectly healthy to consume raw or cooked in a recipe to mimic or replace meat. Jackfruits are high in protein and potassium, and are a rare example of fruits that are high in essential B-complex vitamins including B-6 (pyridoxine), niacin, riboflavin, and folic acid. BBQ Jackfruit Sandwiches with Avocado Slaw, Minimalist Baker To learn more about tasty ways to make Meatless Monday meals, join our Twitter chat with Upton’s Naturals tonight at 9pm. The post Tempeh, Tofu, Seitan, and Jackfruit: What They’re Made of and How to Enjoy Them appeared first on Meatless Monday.

The Best Vegan Milk (Non-Dairy) Alternatives

April 22 2015 VegKitchen 

The Best Vegan Milk (Non-Dairy) AlternativesAre you looking for some healthy vegan milk alternatives that can please your taste buds at the same time? Well, the market is flooded with dozens of non-dairy milk beverages and quite a few of them are worth trying. Sounds interesting? Read on below to learn more: Why Vegan Milk is a Good Choice for You? No matter whether you are a vegetarian or a non-vegetarian, picking non-dairy milk alternatives over the regular ones is always beneficial for you. Let us dig a bit deeper and find out why one should go for vegan milk choices: - Being free of lactose, it is non-allergenic. So, if you are allergic to cow milk, going vegan will help you a lot. - If you have lactose intolerance, the chances are big that you experience acid reflux, abdominal gas, bloating, etc. frequently. Dairy-free milk substitutes can eliminate these symptoms fast and easily. - Acne and regular milk always go hand in hand. The risk becomes even greater in case of skimmed milk. But when you replace your dairy consumption with the vegan alternatives, you get rid of it. - When the milk is produced from a cow non-organically, it gets contaminated by the antibiotics and hormones injected into the animals body. The unnatural production process of milk also causes mastitis to cows, which results into the presence of pus in milk. All these lead to hormonal imbalances and various other ailments in human beings. However, when you opt for non-dairy milk, you can always stay away from these worries. - Most of the vegan milk alternatives can be made easily, quickly and economically at home and you can even add lots of flavor to it. 8 Best Vegan Milk Alternatives You Should Try -  Soy Milk It is prepared by pounding and processing dried soybeans with water. You can find a variety of flavors including light, sweet, full-cream, vanilla, chocolate, etc. in the market. The density and creaminess of the milk may also vary greatly and it tastes even better than regular milk. Qualities: - The protein content is almost similar to cow milk (around 8 grams a cup). - High in dietary fiber, calcium, potassium, magnesium, vitamin B1, vitamin B2, vitamin D, plant-based omega-3 fatty acid, antioxidants, phytoestrogen, manganese, selenium, phosphorus, choline, folate, etc. - Very low in saturated fats and sugar - Lactose and cholesterol-free - Prevents prostate cancer, osteoporosis, cholesterol transportation, etc. - Strengthens blood vessels - Eases menopausal symptoms - Oat Milk This nutritious milk is made by pre-soaking the grains of oatmeal in water and straining the concotion carefully. It is sweet in taste and thick in consistency. A variety of flavor is available in the market and you are free to pick your favorite one. Qualities: - Fulfills almost 35% of our daily requirements of calcium - Works as a protein powerhouse - Fat and sugar content is very low. - Contains no cholesterol or saturated fats - Rich in soluble fibers, iron, vitamin A, vitamin D, folate, phytochemicals, etc. - Prevents a number of cancers - Improves cardiovascular health - Promotes digestion and prevents constipation - Increases good cholesterol level and reduces bad cholesterol level - Makes the immune system stronger - Keeps skin clean and acne-free -  Rice Milk This thin and naturally sweetened milk substitute is prepared from brown rice grains and is considered as extremely healthy. You can also avail its vanilla-flavored version from your local supermarket. Qualities: - Has perfect proportions of protein and carbohydrate - Great source of antioxidants, B-vitamins, vitamin D, calcium, etc. - Gluten-free milk - No saturated fat and cholesterol - Very inexpensive -  Almond Milk This wonderfully tasty vegan milk is made by pulverizing soaked almonds thoroughly. The sweet and nutty flavor and high nutrition make it highly popular among the lovers of dairy-free milk substitutes. Qualities: - Fulfills 30% of our daily requirements of calcium - Contains 25% of our daily requirements of vitamin D - Very low in calories (one servings offers only 30 calories) - Enriched with proteins, omega-6 fatty acids, antioxidants, dietary fibers, vitamin E, iron, zinc, magnesium, etc. - No saturated fats, cholesterol and lactose - Gives immunity a boost - Makes teeth and bones stronger - Helps in healthy digestion - Perks up the skin texture by offering anti-aging benefits - Encourages weight loss -  Coconut Milk It is another creamy, flavorful and nourishing alternative to regular milk, which is basically prepared by grating the meaty flesh of ripe coconuts as well as extracting the concoction. You can get both thick and thin coconut milk for using as cooking ingredients and both of them are super tasty. Qualities: - High in dietary fibers, vitamin B-12, vitamin D, iron, calcium, manganese, copper, phosphorus, selenium, etc. - Contains very less amount of sugar - No fructose - Helps in controlling blood sugar - Strengthens both bones and blood vessels - Prevents arthritis and osteoporosis - Gives a feeling of fullness, thereby helping in weight loss -  Cashew Milk Cashew milk has a natural vanilla flavor and it is made of a smooth, rich blend of water and cashew nuts. It is an amazingly tasty, absolutely creamy and highly satisfying milk beverage. Qualities: - Amazing source of proteins, B-vitamins, calcium, magnesium, copper, etc. - Very low fat content - Free of cholesterol - Increases the production of RBCs (Red Blood Corpuscles) - Promotes healthy metabolism - Helps in tissue and bone formations - Keeps cholesterol levels under control - Enhances cardiovascular health -  Hazelnut Milk Being derived from tasty and savory hazelnut, this milk tastes heavenly. It also has a nutty flavor, which is very much liked by people. Like all other vegan mil substitutes, it also has high nutrition value. Qualities: - High in healthy carbohydrates, vitamin B-12, vitamin D and calcium - No saturated fats, lactose and cholesterol - Takes care of bones and teeth - Keeps filled for a long time -  Hemp Milk It is prepared from the seeds of hemp tree and is regarded as one of the healthiest choices for dairy-free milk. It is widely known for its earthy taste and nutty flavor. Qualities: - Contains as much as 10 essential amino acids - Has a perfect omega-6 fatty acids to omega-3 fatty acids ratio - Loaded with soluble fibers, proteins, vitamin B1, vitamin B5, calcium, potassium, - Aids in muscle building - Provides immense energy 3 Simple and Easy Homemade Vegan Milk Recipes What if you need a good vegan milk alternative for cooking or drinking but do not wish to purchase commercial one? Just DIY! We are giving you 3 easy, simple and fast vegan milk recipes to try at home: (1) DIY: Homemade Almond Milk Recipe Ingredients: - Best-quality raw almonds - 1 cup (organic is even better) - Sea salt - 1 teaspoon - Distilled water - 2 to 4 cups (as per your preference) Method: - Take the almonds in a glass bowl and pour distilled water into it to soak them completely. Add sea salt to the water and cover the bowl with a lid. Keep it aside for nearly 12 hours. - Rinse the swelled up almonds well under running water to get rid of all sorts of enzyme inhibitors. - Now, put the almonds in a blender and pour rest of the distilled water into it. Blend thoroughly to mash all the nuts. - Strain it or not, your creamy almond milk is absolutely ready! (2) DIY: Homemade Oat Milk Recipe Ingredients: - Oats - 1 cup - Organic raw honey - 1 to 2 tablespoons (as required for sweetness) - Sea salt - (1/­­4) teaspoon - Distilled water - 3 cups Method: - Rinse the oats well and drain them perfectly before placing them in a bowl. - Add water to it and cover with a lid. Let the oats soak for 8 to 10 hours so that they get softer as well as easier to process. - Once again, rinse the oats well and remove the oat slime completely. - Shift them to a blender and pour distilled water into it. Blend for some time and sieve it. - Press the semi-pulverized oats with the backside of a spoon in order to take the maximum milk out of it. - Add honey and sea salt to the concoction and your homemade oat ilk is here! (3) DIY: Homemade Brown Rice Milk Recipe Ingredients: - Brown rice - (1/­­2) cup - Sea salt - 1 teaspoon - Distilled water - 2 cups Method: - Clean and wash brown rice properly and soak it in water for a couple of hours. - Cook it as usual. - Now, place the cooked brown rice inside a blender jar. Also, add sea salt and distilled water to it. - Blend until a smooth, thick milk is formed. - Voila! So, are you ready to switch to vegan milk alternatives? References http:/­­/­­vegetarian.about.com/­­od/­­vegetarianvegan101/­­f/­­MilkSubstitutes.htm http:/­­/­­www.peta2.com/­­lifestyle/­­vegan-milk-101/­­ http:/­­/­­www.beautyglimpse.com/­­almond-milk-vs-regular-milk-which-is-healthier/­­ Authors Bio Soni likes to share her knowledge with the world helping others to live a healthier life. She also loves to share her express her views and explore anything and everything that can feed her pen.

7 Top Protein Sources for Vegetarians

February 27 2015 Vegetarian Times 

7 Top Protein Sources for Vegetarians Worried that you--or someone you love--wont get enough protein without meat? Relax! According to a 2009 research review by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (formerly the American Dietetic Association), vegans and vegetarians typically meet and even exceed their protein requirements: the average adult woman needs just 46 grams of protein a day; the average adult man needs 56 grams. By eating a variety of healthful veg foods, you can easily cover your protein bases. Not sure where to start? We asked nutritionist Rachel Meltzer Warren, MS, RDN, author of The Smart Girls Guide to Going Vegetarian, to help us choose a few of the most convenient and affordable protein-packed staples. Tofu Consider this soybean block a blank canvas: itll soak up the flavors of whatever you add to it. Use silken varieties for blending into smoothies and puddings; save firmer tofu for baking or stir-frying into chewy pieces and tossing into salads, sandwiches, veggie bowls, and noodle dishes. In addition to protein, tofu delivers a dose of bone-building calcium if its made with calcium sulfate, notes Warren. Check for it in the ingredients list on the label. Tip: Short on time? Grab pre-seasoned baked tofu by brands such as Wildwood or Nasoya. Protein: 10 grams per 4-oz. serving firm tofu Beans A helping of beans makes any dish more filling, thanks to an abundance ?of protein and fiber. Being rich in both types of fiber--soluble and insoluble--beans also ?help lower cholesterol and promote healthy digestion, says Warren, who suggests eating ?a variety, such as chickpeas, black beans, and heirloom beans, for the widest range of ?nutrients. Cook a big batch of dried beans for use throughout the week, or stock up on ?cans with BPA-free linings and no added salt. Tip: Add a strip of kombu seaweed to beans as they cook to make them more easily digestible. Protein: 7 grams per 1/­­2-cup serving cooked black beans Greek Yogurt Swap out regular yogurt for this thicker, strained variety, which has up to twice as much protein. Warren forgoes non-fat yogurt in favor of 2% or even whole, which will leave you feeling fuller and more satisfied. Go organic, when possible: recent research shows that organic milk contains more heart-protective omega-3 fatty acids than its conventional cousin. Look for plain Greek yogurt, and sweeten it yourself using fruit or a natural sweetener such as agave or honey. Tip: Prefer savory to sweet? Add a few spoonfuls of Greek yogurt to blended soups and sautéed greens. Protein: 17 grams per 6-oz. serving 2% Greek yogurt Eggs Starting your day with an egg can help curb cravings later in the day--just dont skip the yolk. Its a great source of the nutrient choline, which is vital for cells to function properly, says Warren. Egg yolks are also rich in lutein and zeaxanthin, antioxidants that help maintain eye health. Note: the U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends ?consuming less than 300 milligrams cholesterol per day. ?One large egg clocks in at 186 milligrams. Tip: Check the Cornucopia Institutes Organic Egg Scorecard to see how different egg companies stack up. Protein: 6 grams per large egg Lentils These little legumes are packed with the about the same amount of hunger-quelling fiber as beans, but they require no soaking and cook up in just 20 to 30 minutes. Whats more, theyre an excellent source of folate--even more so than beans--which is important for your nervous system and heart health, says Warren. She suggests pairing iron-rich lentils with foods high in vitamin C, such as tomatoes and oranges, which help your body absorb the iron. Tip: Not a fan of mushy lentils? Choose French or Puy lentils, which hold their shape when cooked. Protein: 9 grams per 1/­­2-cup serving cooked lentils   Nuts and Nut Butters Just a handful of walnuts, almonds, cashews, or peanuts gives you a quick-and-easy protein boost. Nutty for nut butter? ?All types are good sources of monounsaturated fat, which can help lower bad LDL cholesterol levels, says Warren. She advises skipping low-fat varieties that remove much of this good fat, and opting for jars with just two ingredients: nuts and salt. Spread on toast, stir into stews, or whirl into morning smoothies. Tip: Try sunflower seed butter if youre allergic to nuts. Protein: 7 grams per 2-Tbs. serving peanut butter Tempeh Dont be intimidated by nutty, earthy tempeh. Like tofu, its made from soybeans, but with a twist: The beans are fermented, producing bacteria thats beneficial for your GI tract, says Warren. The fermentation process also breaks down the carbohydrates that some people have trouble digesting, making it an easier-to-tolerate option for people whose bellies dont do tofu. For a beginner-friendly ground meat alternative, crumble tempeh, pan-fry it, and stir into pasta sauces, taco fillings, and chili. Tip: Liven up salads and sandwiches with tempeh bacon, ?a smoky treat thats great for new vegetarians. Protein: 21 grams per 4-oz. serving tempeh Psst! You dont need to combine incomplete proteins such as beans and rice, ?which lack all nine essential amino acids, within one meal. If you eat ?a range of veg proteins throughout ?the day, youll most likely be in good ?shape. (When in doubt, you can load up on quinoa, one of the few plant-based complete proteins. It provides 4 grams of protein in a 1/­­2-cup serving.) Pack vegetarian protein using VT recipes that contain at least 18 grams of protein per serving: Blueberry-Spinach Smoothie Ultimate Vegan Chili Sweet-and-Sour Baked Tofu Sandwiches Lentil and Egg Bowl Cornbread and Pinto Bean Shepherds Pie Stir-Fried Tofu Bento Box with Sesame Soba Noodles and Ginger-Carrot Broccoli Spicy Tempeh Hash

5 Top Health Benefits of Almonds

February 24 2015 VegKitchen 

5 Top Health Benefits of AlmondsAlmonds are one of the worlds most nutritious and versatile nuts, perfect for snacking as well as in tasty recipes, renowned for their many health benefits and culinary uses. Here are just a few: Reduce Blood Sugar Levels: Eating almonds may be a great option for diabetics looking to maintain healthy blood glucose levels. Findings from a 2007 study published in the journal Metabolism found that consuming almonds alongside white bread regulates spikes in blood sugar and significantly lowers the glycemic index of the meal. Heart-Loving Antioxidant Powers: Almonds are one of the richest food sources of alpha-tocopherol, the form of vitamin E that is most easily absorbed by the body. Vitamin E is a potent antioxidant that protects cells against the damaging effects of free radicals, boosts the immune system, supports cardiovascular health, and helps your body create new red blood cells. A 2005 study published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association found that almond consumption helped meet the Recommended Dietary Allowance of 15 mg/­­day alpha-tocopherol and improved red blood cell concentration. Another study published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that almonds can reduce C-reactive protein, an indication of inflammation that affects the arteries. Weight Control: As part of a calorie-conscious eating regime, almonds, which are high in monounsaturated fats, can help obese adults lose weight easier than a diet high in complex carbohydrates, according to a study in the International Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders. Contrary to many worries of healthy eaters, consuming almonds actually lowers the risk of weight gain. A 28-month long study showed that individuals who ate almonds at least twice per week were 31% less likely to gain weight than nut-avoiding participants. So go ahead and go nuts! Lower Cholesterol: Almonds are the leading source of monounsaturated fat among commonly eaten nuts: over 60% of the total fat in almonds is monounsaturated. Numerous studies have demonstrated the cholesterol-lowering effects of consuming foods rich in monounsaturated fat. A 2005 study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that consuming almonds as part of a heart-healthy diet can be just as effective at lowering LDL bad cholesterol levels as first generation statin drugs. A good source of calcium and other nutrients: Weve already heard that almonds are a good source of Vitamin E, but they offer a modest but significant and absorbable form of calcium, which is good for the bones. Likewise, theyre a good source of phosphorous for strong bones and teeth. Almonds are a good source of magnesium and folic acid, as well. Excellent source of plant-based protein: Just one ounce of almonds contains about 12 percent of average daily protein needs. Enough said! Adapted from Nuts.com, with permission. Discover your favorite almond products at nuts.com from premium supreme-sized raw almonds to finely blanched almond flour and all natural almond butters for your snacking and recipe needs.

Beet, Apple, Quinoa & Sprout Salad

January 1 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Beet, Apple, Quinoa & Sprout SaladHey, happy new year everyone! Today we are excited to share this little project that we have been working on. It’s a whole bunch of new recipes including the delicious salad on the photo above. Before we tell you more about the recipes, let us just quickly share some thoughts behind them. Most people want to start the year by eating fresh, right. But getting a healthy start of the year doesnt mean that you have to go through a full detox. Sure, it can be great if you really feel like you need a complete cleanse, but we believe that it is even more important to focus on eating balanced throughout the year and then just increasing your intake of health boosting ingredients after the holiday season. When you live up in the northern parts of the world, the thought of restricting yourself to only drinking juices and eating raw meals during the coldest season of the year can seem quite difficult for most people. So we have created a recipe pack for our Green Kitchen app with 14 new and exclusive recipes that focuses on health and getting a fresh start of the year without having to feel like you are on a strict diet. We have worked with nourishing combinations of ingredients that are good for your body and taste delicious. Our recipes are not focused on being low fat or counting calories, we instead encourage healthy fats, complex carbohydrates and plant based proteins that your body needs. There are juices, smoothies, sides and salads in there, but also some warm meals and a soup. All recipes are gluten free and vegetarian and most of them are vegan or have vegan options. Here is a little preview of all the recipes. We have put a lot of love, time and effort into developing and testing these recipes, so we decided to sell them inside the app. If you have the app, there should be a new box with more info at the top of the grid. The price is $1.99 but we are giving it away for only 99 cents now during the first 24 hours of the new year. We always get the question about creating an Android version and the answer is that we are planning on doing it, but it’s just a different world to Apple nerds like us. So we keep pushing it forward. We are so sorry that it’s taking such time. We have however come up with a temporary solution for those of you that don’t have an ipad or iphone but still would like to try these particular recipes. We have gathered them in a mini recipe e-book that is available to purchase here in our temporary e-store.  To give you a preview, we are also sharing one of the recipes here today. It’s a beet, apple & quinoa salad that we have made perhaps a quadrillion times throughout the years, but for some strange reason it hasn’t made its appearance here until now. Beets and apples are shredded raw and they add both flavour, texture and sweetness to the quinoa. The beets also give the quinoa a beautiful red purple colour. It’s quick, simple and very easy to vary. You could add some tofu, tempeh or roasted vegetables to the salad if you want it even more nourishing. Have a happy, healthy and delicious 2015! Beet, Apple, Quinoa & Sprout Salad Serves 4 1 cup /­­ 190 g /­­ 250 ml uncooked quinoa (preferably soaked) 2 cups /­­ 500 ml water 4 raw beetroots 2 apples 1 handful lettuce, rinsed 2 tbsp olive oil 2 tbsp lemon juice salt black pepper Serve with 1 handful mixed sprouts a few dollops labneh or Cashew “Cheese” (both recipes are included in the bundle) 1 small handful almonds or sunflower seeds, coarsely chopped Cooking the quinoa: Place rinsed quinoa, water and a pinch of salt in a medium-size saucepan. Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a bare simmer and let gently cook for about 15 minutes, or until you see small tails on the quinoa seeds. Set aside to cool in a large mixing bowl. Making the salad: Peel and grate the beetroots and the apples on the coarse side of a box grater. Combine lettuce, quinoa, beetroots and apples in a bowl. Drizzle with olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper and give it a good toss with your hands. Serve in bowls with sprouts and a dollop of labneh or cashew cheese.

5 Reasons Why You Should Drink Ginger Lemon Tea

November 13 2014 VegKitchen 

5 Reasons Why You Should Drink Ginger Lemon TeaAre you searching for a way to give your immune system a boost? How about a drink that can relieve stress? Well, if you’re holding a cup of ginger lemon tea in your hand, then you’re on the right track! Sweet, spicy and one of the best drinks to have during the winter, ginger lemon tea is power-packed with some incredible health and body care benefits too! Let’s see how: - It Boosts Your Immune System: On top of the list of benefits of ginger lemon tea is its ability to strengthen your immunity. This is due to the presence of high levels of anti-oxidants in ginger. Lemons are an excellent source of vitamin C which can heal wounds and preserve the strength of bones and teeth. In the onset of cold and flu, the ginger lemon tea can act as an effective anti-biotic. The bioflavonoids that lemons contain help to prevent cancer cells from growing and spreading. The anti-oxidants in the lemons help in reducing inflammation and arthritis symptoms. The powerful anti-oxidants can reduce free radicals in the body. Ginger also increases blood circulation in the body that is vital for optimum health. - It Brings Instant Relief From Nausea and Indigestion: Vomiting and nausea usually occur as symptoms of a body disorder. Ginger lemon tea provides the best relief mechanism. Moreover, if you have a motion sickness tendency, you can drink a cup of ginger lemon tea prior to travel to prevent nausea. It can also help cure the vomiting related to chemotherapy and pregnancy, which is a relief during that period. It eases the pain and uneasiness of an upset stomach. The ginger and lemon in the tea lowers the chances of heartburn and indigestion. It causes the food to be better absorbed by the body and prevents belching and bloating after eating too much. It improves your appetite as well. - It Lowers The Effects Of Diabetes: New research has thrown light upon the fact that drinking ginger lemon tea on a daily basis can reduce kidney damage that occurs due to the effects of diabetes. The high levels of zinc found in ginger play a prime role in the production and secretion of insulin. It is the insulin that controls the blood sugar levels and keeps diabetes in check. Other harmful effects of diabetes like blood pressure, heart problems and so on can be countered by the anti-oxidants present in the drink. - It Is Your One-Stop-Drink To Perfect Skin And Great Hair: As mentioned above, ginger lemon tea is rich in anti-oxidants and vitamins which are beneficial for perfect skin, hair and health. The beverage helps in improving your digestion and guides you towards smooth and flawless skin. The antibacterial and antiseptic properties protect your skin from infections. For strong and beautiful hair, ginger lemon tea provides you a natural aid. Vitamin A and C are recommended in plenty for those with hair issues, as they combat the production of DHT in the scalp that in turn triggers hair growth. A vitamin and anti-oxidant rich drink like ginger lemon tea will help you overcome hair problems in an absolute natural and simple way. - It Is The Apt Drink For Weight Loss: High blood sugar levels trigger cravings for carbohydrates and fatty foods. Ginger helps to normalize these sugar levels which otherwise can affect your ability to lose weight or eat healthy food. Ginger also improves fat absorption and prevents it from accumulating in the body. Both ginger and lemon have anti-inflammatory properties that prevent inflammations and enhance the activity of the liver that helps in shedding those extra pounds. The smell of lemons reduces stress causing an increase in metabolism and proper organ function that can help in weight loss. How do we prepare ginger lemon tea? Using green tea as a base, finely chop the ginger root and infuse it boiling water for twenty minutes. This helps in transferring the active ingredients into the liquid. Adding two tablespoons of lemon juice and honey or stevia into the mix helps in both sweetening the tea as well as countering the spicy effects of the ginger. It can be served either hot or cold as the revitalizing effects are the same. Ginger lemon tea can be very refreshing to drink with its medicine like qualities. Moreover, a few recent studies suggest that it can help to stop blood clotting and lower cholesterol levels. This can prevent cardio-vascular diseases and strokes from taking place. If you feel tensed or worn out, the drink can also be an effective stress reliever. The strong aroma, spicy and refreshing taste and calming effects provide you relief and relaxation of your body and mind. Try it out today and feel healthy and energetic! Vineetha Reddy is very passionate about nutrition, fitness, health & wellness. She strongly believes that the ingredients you find in your pantry are the best medicines that you can get. Follow her on  Facebook and  Twitter. References: - http:/­­/­­www.dailymail.co.uk/­­femail/­­food/­­article-2205998/­­Stress-Ginger-tea-answer.html - http:/­­/­­www.momjunction.com/­­articles/­­unexpected-benefits-of-eating-ginger-during-pregnancy_­0082719/­­ - http:/­­/­­www.wikihow.com/­­Make-Honey-Lemon-Ginger-Tea - http:/­­/­­nutritionfacts.org/­­video/­­better-than-green-tea/­­

Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus

April 7 2017 My New Roots 

Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus The first job I landed after moving to Copenhagen, was working as a chef in a little cafe. After a few weeks of consistently not burning lasagna and under seasoning everything, I was asked if I was interested in cooking on a few episodes on a local, public TV station. The producers suggested I choose a few dishes that I love, and filmed me in a friends kitchen, since mine was too small. My husband gently warned me beforehand that Danes dont respond well to overly-enthusiastic, hyperbolic Americans, so I faked it and was awkwardly not myself as I spoke lukewarmly about whole grains and beans, fermented things and dark leafy greens. The first recipe I made on the show was sprouted hummus, and although the recipe turned out well, I felt like a fraud. Because above all things, sprouts were, and still are, my true love. The show was on at 2 or 3 in the morning, and because I didnt have a television, I never actually saw it on air. Instead, I watched it on my computer on a borrowed CD, long after it had been on TV. Much to my dismay, the producers titled the show Cooking with Sareh, which still baffles me considering the fact that my name is spelled the exact same way in Danish. The program was poorly edited, badly lit, awkward in every sense, and in my attempts to come off as cool and nonchalant, I seemed utterly bored as I fondled chickpea sprouts - something that otherwise would get me pretty riled up. On the whole, this experience was totally mortifying, except for one small, redeeming factor. I was suddenly being recognized at work in the café, and on the bike paths of Christiania: hey sprout girl! theyd call at me. Its you! I didnt make your hummus, but your show is great, sprout girl, theyd say. If there was any consolation, this was it. I was Sprout Girl. So in case you missed my break out performance on Cooking with Sareh, and my reined-in, lackluster pitch about sprouts, here it is again. Because I am Sprout Girl forever and always. Sprouting is like any other kitchen endeavour: it seems pretty daunting until you actually do it, then youre left wondering what took you so long to try – a real facepalm moment. With simple equipment that you most likely have in your cupboard, and seeds that you already have in your pantry, its a fun and empowering practice that brings you one step closer to your food. Sprouts are so nutritious because they are life potential, ignited. When we soak a seed, we end its dormancy, and awaken the nutrition inside it needed to grow a plant which will in turn make more seeds and more plants. When we eat a sprout, we eat this potential! Pound for pound, sprouts have the largest amount of nutrients of any food. Did you get that? This is a big deal! And its all because sprouting increases vitamin content significantly, especially vitamin A, Bs, C and E, along with boosting calcium, iron, selenium, and zinc. The quality of protein and carbohydrates improves, as the sprouting process begins to break down the complex proteins and starches into amino acids, peptides, and simple carbohydrates needed by the seed to grow. At the same time, anti-nutrients such as phytic acid, protease and amylase inhibitors are neutralized. This makes a sprout very easy to digest with highly absorbable nutrients. Who is responsible for this influx of awesomeness? Its enzymes! Enzymes are compounds found in raw plants that are needed for nearly every biochemical process that takes place in our body, and something many of our modern diets are lacking. Sprouts are virtually loaded with them. There are up to 100 times more enzymes in sprouts than uncooked fruits and veggies! Enzymes are also what sets living food apart from raw food. Yes, raw foods still offer us enzymes, but eating a food that is alive guantees more enzymes, and in fact more nutrients altogether. As soon as a food is picked, it begins losing its nutrients. Imagine how much vitamin C is left in that orange, which has traveled hundreds, if not thousands of kilometers to get to your plate, and spent weeks, if not months in a storage facility before being dropped off at your local grocer. Sprouts are the remedy to this, pulsating with life and life-giving nutrients, and pretty much the freshest food you can eat outside of a garden. Sprouts are also incredibly low in calories, yet deliciously filling due to their high fiber and water content. A fantastic food to binge on, especially if youre trying to elbow out some of the other stuff from your diet. I love the versatility of sprouts, not only are there so many varieties, but they can be used in so many ways. Like this hummus for example! You can also go classic and top your sandwiches with sprouts, or fold them into grain salads, puree them into soups and even smoothies. I also love freshening up cooked dishes, like stir-fries, curries and pizzas with sprouts. Their crunch and earthy brightness are a welcoming balance to heavier, richer meals. If youre on a budget, sprouts are a sweet deal. Because the amount of food you sprout triples or quadruples in size, youll end up with way more to eat than you started with for the same price. Its kind of magical. Whats more, is that properly stored sprouts can last over a month, and some varieties up to 70 days. If youre prone to tossing away spoiled produce, sprouts will save you money, big time. Sprouting can take place anywhere you have access to fresh, clean water twice a day. Ive sprouted on road trips, beach holidays, visiting the in-laws...all over the place! And the groovy thing about taking your show on the road is that you can convince other people to get sprouting too. And sprouts are not just great for our health, but also the planet. Consider the fact that youre growing a garden right in your kitchen, using your own energy to make the magic happen. Its hyper-local food at its best! No chemicals or pesticides during the growing process, or fossil fuels for transportation. Could sprouts be the perfect food?! The answer is yes. But I may be a little biased. I am the Sprout Girl, after all. If you are concerned about mold or bacteria contamination, please understand that commercially-grown sprouts are propagated in an ideal environment for pathogens to proliferate. Just one more reason to grow your own sprouts at home where you can be sure of proper hygiene and care. Make sure that your jar or sprouting container is thoroughly clean, that youre rinsing your sprouts with cool water twice daily, and that your sprouts have plenty of airflow. After I drain my sprouts, I make sure that the seeds /­­ sprouts arent blocking the entire opening of the jar (see photo). If you follow these tips, you shouldnt have any problems. Scoring Seeds You can sprout just about anything, but the cheapest and easiest things are found in the bulk bin of your health food store! Lentils, beans, chickpeas, rice, buckwheat, wheat are all widely available and inexpensive. Its imperative that you choose organically-grown ingredients, as conventionally grown seeds are often irradiated, making them difficult, or even impossible to germinate. You can also purchase seeds online, especially the more specialty ones, like alfalfa, radish, onion, broccoli etc. Finding Equipment There are plenty of sprouting apparatuses that you can buy, but if youre just starting out, use a jar! I bet you already have one. – 1 sterilized, large-mouth, quart-sized glass jar with an airtight lid – small piece of cheesecloth – rubber band – a bowl or dish rack How to Sprout There are countless resources on this topic online, and even whole books written about sprouting, so I am presenting you with a very simple, yet rather foolproof technique. If you want to learn more (which I encourage you to do!) here’s a great place to learn about different methods, applications, as well as help and advice: Sprout People     Print recipe     Simple Sprouting Day 1 1. Prep (night) Take a quick glance at the seeds as you put them into the sterilized soaking container. Remove any stones, cracked /­­ damaged seeds, and rinse well. 2. Soak (night) A general rule is covering the seeds with 2-3 times the amount of water (e.g. 1 cup seeds : 2-3 cups water). Use pure, filtered, unchlorinated water. Skim off any seeds that are floating. Let sit for 8-12 hours. Day 2 1. Drain (morning) Put a piece of cheesecloth over the mouth of the jar and secure it with a rubber band. Drain the seeds letting all the water run out. 2. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 3. Rinse + drain again (night) Day 3 1. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 2. Rinse + drain again (night) Day 4 1. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 2. Rinse + drain again (night) 3. Enjoy (night) Your sprouts are ready! The tail should be at least the length of the seed itself (if it is not quite there yet, continue with the rinsing and draining process until it is. Some seeds take a couple more days). If youre not going to eat all the sprouts right away, make sure you let the sprouts drain for at least 8 hours after their last rinse before you put them in the fridge. Never store wet sprouts, as they will spoil quickly. Store sprouts in the sprouting jar with an airtight lid for one month, or more.     Print recipe     Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus Makes 4 cups Ingredients: 2 cloves garlic 1/­­3 cup /­­ 85ml tahini 1/­­2 tsp. fine salt, to taste 2 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­4 tsp. smoked paprika (optional) zest of 1 lemon 4 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 4 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 4 cups /­­ 500g sprouted chickpeas (start with 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 300g dried chickpeas) Directions: 1. Pulse the garlic in the food processor until minced. Add all other ingredients, except for the sprouted chickpea and blend until you have a paste. Add the chickpeas and blend on high until as smooth as possible. Season to taste and adjust more salt /­­ spice if desired. To achieve an even smoother consistency, scoop hummus into a high-speed blender and blend on high for an additional 10-15 seconds. Serve immediately and store leftovers in an airtight container for up to five days. I hope that this process seems simple enough for you to try. I promise that once you start sprouting, you won’t be able to stop! It’s so easy, fun, and connecting – not to mention delicious. Good luck and happy sprouting, dear friends! xo, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   * Hey Copenhagen! I am thrilled to announce my first two cookbook events in CPH this Spring. The first will be an intimate talk and demonstration at SLOW Copenhagen, and the second will be a magical, celebratory dinner in collaboration with the local, organic grocer and kitchen, Kost. Click on the images for more info and tickets! Can’t wait to see you there.    The post It’s Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus appeared first on My New Roots.

The Scientific Secret to Happiness: More Fresh Fruits and Veggies

March 13 2017 Meatless Monday 

The Scientific Secret to Happiness: More Fresh Fruits and VeggiesMarch is National Nutrition Month. So each week this month, were highlighting how certain foods can help improve specific health conditions. This is the second article in the series. Please share with friends and family who may be interested. Its long been known that a diet rich in fresh fruits and vegetables is good for your physical health. Lower blood pressure and less risk of heart disease are among the many benefits. But did you know fruits and veggies can also be good for your mental health? Absolutely true. According to a recent study, higher consumption of fruit and vegetables may increase feelings of well-being, happiness and life satisfaction. In addition, the study participants who ate more fruits and vegetables tended to be more curious and more creative than those who didnt. There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that dietary patterns emphasizing fruits and vegetables may be linked to better psychological health.[i] A recent study found that higher fruit and vegetable consumption may increase well-being, curiosity and creativity, possibly related to micronutrients and carbohydrate composition.[ii] This is probably related to the fact you are giving your body and brain more healthy vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals and fiber, said Rebecca Ramsing, sr. program officer, Food Communities & Public Health Program at Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future. This conclusion is supported by a separate study that found growing evidence that suggests that eating more fruits and vegetables is linked to better psychological health. So which foods help you feel happier, more creative and brimming with curiosity? Well, for starters, try roasted carrots and other root vegetables, such as sweet potatoes, yams and squash. Also, fresh berries are highly recommended to lift your spirits - blueberries, raspberries, blackberries, take your pick! And to jump-start your good mood, weve got a special recipe thats sure to make you smile. Root Vegetable Samosas   References: [i]Rooney C, McKinley MC, Woodside JV. The potential role of fruit and vegetables in aspects of psychological well-being: A review of the literature and future directions. TheProceedings of the Nutrition Society. 2013; 72: 420-432. doi:10.1017/­­S0029665113003388 [ii] Conner TS, Brookie KL, Richardson AC, Polak MA. On carrots and curiosity: eating fruits and vegetables is associated with greater flourishing in daily life. Br J Health Psychol. 2015; 20(2):413-27. The post The Scientific Secret to Happiness: More Fresh Fruits and Veggies appeared first on Meatless Monday.

The Colossal Healthy Chocolate Bar

March 30 2016 My New Roots 

The Colossal Healthy Chocolate Bar Being a recipe developer means grocery shopping almost every day. On my way out the door I always ask my husband if he would like anything from the store, and more often than not he says: a treat, please. Now, he doesnt mean a lovely bag of blood oranges or a pint of juicy strawberries - he means a chocolate bar. Not a healthy chocolate bar. A low-vibe, sugar-laden, not-real-food chocolate bar. But I do not judge him. I just buy the thing and pick my battles (toilet cleaning and garbage disposal rank higher on my list). Recently, standing near the cash register and cruising the candy bars like a very reluctant weirdo, I actually experienced a pang for one myself. That rich and total over-the-top decadence is not something I am often drawn to, but for whatever reason the Snickers and the Twix bar spoke to me like long lost friends. And that was the exact moment I decided that I was going to makeover my two favourites with the best whole food ingredients I could find, that would deliver both total satisfaction and nutrients. A healthy chocolate bar to end all healthy chocolate bars. Could such a dream be realized? Oh yes, the universe loves us and wants us to be happy. The Colossal Healthy Candy Bar is three tasty parts. First, the bottom biscuit layer inspired by Twix, is a mildly sweet, vegan and grain-free cookie made with coconut flour. It is crisp when it comes out of the oven, but goes pretty cake-y once it is combined with the other ingredients. Delicious nonetheless, and a pretty important counter-point to all the richness of the other layers. Second, the caramel-and-nut layer inspired by Snickers, but with a twist: instead of just using dates in the caramel, I balanced out the sweetness by adding a healthy dose of hazelnut butter. Wowzers. This was a very delicious decision. The caramel became far more complex, rich-tasting, and it is essential to note that this would make a fantastic spread or topping all on its own. If you do not have hazelnut butter, I recommend almond or cashew in its place (click here for instructions on how to make your own nut butter). Instead of using peanuts, I used roasted hazelnuts to sink into the top of the caramel for awesome texture and crunch - almonds could also be used here. Lastly, each bar is enrobed in luscious, raw, dark chocolate. I usually use coconut oil in my raw chocolate recipes, but after reading the (incredible!) new cookbook Clean Cakes by Henrietta Inman I was convinced that using solely raw cacao butter was the way to go. It delivers a crisper finish and creamier texture. If you want to make things simpler and faster, feel free to use a ready-made bar of chocolate in this recipe instead of making your own. Raw chocolate is of course the healthier choice, but if youre pressed for time or ingredients, this is a good shortcut to take. Coconut Flour Power! With so many diets and lifestyles focusing on gluten-free and grain-free eating, coconut flour is wonderful option for many people. Made entirely from dried coconut flesh that is pulverized into a soft, fine powder, coconut flour is a nutrient-dense alternative that is increasingly available at health food stores and even supermarkets. Score! There are several benefits of coconut flour, my favourite being that it is remarkably high in protein and fiber. Translation: super filling and satisfying! It is low in sugar and digestible carbohydrates, and scores low on the glycemic index, so it a perfect choice for paleo eaters and diabetics. Its also nut-free and non-allergenic. The flavour of coconut flour is slightly coconut-y, but not overwhelmingly so. I like it in things like these chocolate bars where there are many other strong tastes going on that overshadow the taste of the flour. If you want to compliment and enhance the flavour of the flour, use coconut milk as the liquid portion of a baked good. Seriously yummy. Whats the catch I can hear you asking. Well, there are a few downsides to using coconut flour, mainly due to its density, dryness, and lack of elasticity. Its certainly not a flour to experiment with if youre looking to replace wheat flour for instance, as the two behave completely differently (that goes for using coconut flour in place of almost any other flour, whether grain, seed, or nut-based). Coconut flour is also crazy-absorbent and needs quite a large proportion of liquid to solid to avoid crumbly results (I’ve read the comments below and it seems like a lot of you are struggling with this factor!) Most recipes Ive found online remedy this by using a lot of eggs, but I used applesauce and flax seeds instead with good results. Once you get the correct ratio down its pretty easy to work with, but Ive learned the hard way that its best to use tried and true recipes with this finicky ingredient! Back to the candy bars. Which are insane. These truly colossal creations have everything you could ever want: tasty cookie, ooey gooey chewy caramel, crunchy roasted nuts, divinely rich chocolate, and tiny salt kisses. I am so darn proud of this recipe, and I cant believe that such a decadent thing can exist without making me feel lousy after eating it. In fact, Ill go so far as to say that I feel colossally healthy after eating one. Or two. Stop looking at me like that.     Print recipe     The Colossal Healthy Candy Bar Makes 16 bars Coconut flour cookie bottom 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 175g coconut flour 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml unsweetened applesauce 2 Tbsp. ground flax seeds 1/­­3 cup /­­ 85ml coconut oil, melted 2-3 Tbsp. maple syrup, as needed Date and nut caramel 1 1/­­4 cup /­­ 325g pitted soft dates 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80 ml nut butter (I used hazelnut) seeds of 1 vanilla bean 1/­­2 tsp. sea salt Roasted nuts 3/­­4 cup /­­115g raw hazelnuts or almonds Raw chocolate coating 8.8 oz. /­­ 250g cacao butter (not coconut butter or coconut oil) 1 1/­­2 cup /­­ 150g raw cacao powder 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml maple syrup pinch of sea salt Note: raw chocolate can be substituted with two 3 1/­­2 oz. /­­ 100g bars of dark chocolate (minimum 70% cacao). Directions: 1. Start by making the cookie bottom. In a small bowl stir the applesauce and the ground flax together. Set aside and let gel for 15 minutes. Preheat the oven to 350°F /­­ 175°C. In a large bowl sift together the coconut flour and sea salt. Stir in the melted coconut oil, two tablespoons of maple syrup, the applesauce-flax mixture and blend until the mixture holds together when pressed. If not, add the remaining tablespoon of maple syrup and stir to combine. 2. Line a brownie pan with baking paper and firmly press the mixture into the pan, especially around the edges. Place in the oven and bake for 12-15 minutes until the edges are beginning to turn golden. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool at room temperature. 3. Lower the oven temperature to 300°F/­­150°C. Spread the nuts out in a single layer on baking sheet and roast for 20-30 minutes until fragrant and slightly darker in colour (a good way to check is to cut one in half and check the colour in the center. Instead of cream, it should be golden). Remove from oven and let cool completely. If you are using hazelnuts, rub them together to remove as much of their skins as possible. Roughly chop and set aside. 4. Make the nut caramel. Add the pitted dates to a food processor and blend until creamy. Add the nut butter, vanilla bean, and sea salt. Taste and adjust according to your tastes. 5. Spread the nut caramel in an even layer over the cooled cookie bottom. Cover the caramel with the chopped toasted nuts, and press them down so that they are slightly sunken, reserving a few for garnish. Place the pan in the freezer to firm up for at least 4 hours (frozen bars are easier to cut and coat with chocolate). 6. Prepare the chocolate. Melt the cacao butter in a double boiler over barely simmering water. Remove from heat, stir in the maple syrup and salt, then sift in the cacao powder. Whisk together until smooth. 7. Remove the brownie pan from the freezer and pull up the edges of the baking paper to remove the filling. Place on a cutting board and slice into 16 equal bars. 8. Roll each bar in the melted chocolate, then pick up using a fork, allowing most of the excess chocolate to drip off. Set on a wrack and let harden. Take remaining chocolate and drizzle across the width of the bar to create a design (this step is optional, but it makes the bars look really beautiful). While the chocolate is still wet, sprinkle with remaining hazelnuts and let set. Place all bars in the freezer to firm up. Store in an airtight container in the freezer, and remove 10-15 minutes before serving. (Note: these are okay outside of the freezer, but if you’re using raw chocolate they will be relatively soft if left at room temperature). I hope you guys find as much satisfaction in this recipe as I have. Its pretty rad to have a stockpile of candy bars in your freezer for when the urge strikes, and to keep you out of the chocolate aisle on your next trip to the store! For the record, if you see me there, Im buying treats for my husband...since Im really bad at sharing. Show me your candy bars on Instagram: #MNRchocolatebars The post The Colossal Healthy Chocolate Bar appeared first on My New Roots.

How to Eat Healthy for Your Gut and Feel Better

January 11 2016 Vegetarian Times 

How to Eat Healthy for Your Gut and Feel BetterWe asked healthy cooking expert and “Skinny Chef” Jennifer Iserloh for tips on feeling our best in the new year. Jennifer is the author of numerous best selling health books including, 50 Shades of Kale, Secrets of a Skinny Chef, and Healthy Cheats. She’s also the instructor for our easy-to-follow online course, Gentle Cleanse, which features recipes and guidelines for gently detoxing with healthy recipes and making lifelong dietary changes to feel your best. Sign up for exclusive free tips and discounts for the Gentle Cleanse course! If youre lacking energy after the holidays, it may not only be stress or lack of sleep thats slowing you down. Getting more energy could be as simple getting good eats for your gut! Thats right, there are foods and meals that are especially healing for the colony of bacteria that live in your large intestines, called the microbiome. When your bacteria are unbalance (more bad than good) it could mean lack of energy, poor digestion, weakened immune system and brain fog.  Eating good things for your gut start by noshing on a plant based diet! Fiber and Prebiotic Foods Fiber isnt just important for weight loss and digestion, its crucial for our gut flora since thats what they eat.  And we cant be our healthiest without them - since these good bacteria are responsible for manufacturing B vitamins, vitamin K,  as well as strengthening our immunity, and breaking down complex carbohydrates.  So how do you make sure they get what they need?  Its easy –  add plenty of prebiotics foods like carrots, asparagus, and artichokes. They are rich in a particular fiber called inulin, that the good bugs love. Limit Gluten Not everyone has gluten sensitivities but giving gluten a rest for a few days when youre feeling slow, limiting gluten when you feel the drag is a good idea since gluten has been show to activate allergies, and can be tough to digest for those with sensitive stomachs.  Dont go for the package gluten free products since they can be loaded with sugar, unhealthy fats and salt.  Enjoy naturally gluten free grains instead like millet, quinoa, and brown rice.  If you want to learn the 101 on these grains while you go gluten free follow my 3 day mini cleanse.

White Lentil Risotto with Mushrooms

October 18 2015 My New Roots 

White Lentil Risotto with Mushrooms Eating out is a grand seduction. From the moment I step into a restaurant, I am totally open and utterly surrendered to the experience. The first thing I notice when I enter is the smell - I actually like it to hit me with an assertive thwack - like someone proudly shouting a rainbow of aromas to my face that something amazing is happening in the kitchen. I love sitting down at the table, gently touching the cutlery, unfolding the napkin and placing it in my lap, the first exchange with the server, opening the menu. Its all very weighty, very important, very ritualistic for me. While I was on my cookbook tour, you can imagine that I ate out a lot. Mostly out of the necessity of not having a kitchen, but also because going to restaurants is a rare privilege for me and Ill take any excuse. During my few harried days in New York City I went to dine at a new, hip joint in the west village that came highly recommended (although I’ll refrain from naming names). The place was packed with an intimidating blend of gorgeous locals and well-dressed, in-the-know tourists. The menu looked incredibly promising with Sarah B. favourites and buzz ingredients like chia seeds, cashew cheese, baby kale, and turmeric oil. I was explosive with anticipation. I immediately committed myself to the ivory lentil risotto with peas. Id seen ivory lentils at the market before but never bought them, and had never had the revelation to try making risotto with them. I could feel my expectations soar and the desire pulsing between us. Hold me back! The dish arrived, its scent wafting up from the pristine white bowl and pools of amber oil intermingling with green globes of seasonal spring perfection. I looked at my friends with great eagerness, dipped my spoon in and took the first bite. The lentils were raw. No, not al dente. Raw. Crunchy. Hard. Uncooked. I rarely, rarely send something back to the kitchen, but because I was so seduced by the idea of this dish and it completely fell flat, I just had to. The lentils had obviously been cooked, but so far from properly cooked that it baffled me - what kind of chef would send a dish out like this unless by mistake? It must have been a mistake. I could feel myself loosing trust in this impeccably designed, obviously happening restaurant, but how could all of these hipsters be wrong? The waiter returned and said that there was nothing wrong with the dish. The chef meant it to be that way. He placed the plate of cold food back on the table in front of me, smiled, turned, and left. I was crushed. After all wed been through. Although it has been months since this experience, I cant shake it - the lunch bag letdown of a genius concept failing to meet its true potential, the fact that I was served undercooked legumes, and that I paid $30 for them. In order to right all of these wrongs, I headed to my local Indian grocer, bought some white lentils and made a date with my stove. What manifested was not just a better meal, but a new favourite one. Its pretty clear that Im into making risotto out of anything besides rice, such as the Miraculous Riceless Risotto and the Inspirational Sunflower Seed Risotto, but Im digging this new recipe for a lot of reasons. First, its grain-free and in my rice-loving life its nice to have an alternative. Its very high in protein, something that Im always mindful of as it is so important to balanced health. It cooks quickly so its perfect for a weeknight, and its endlessly customizable to the season simply by changing up the veggies on top. Its divinely creamy, rich and velvety and so much like risotto (by far the closest Ive come so far!). If you are looking for me this fall, you can find me tucked into a big bowl of this stuff. Its like eating hugs. Yum, Yum, Molybdenum Chances are you havent heard of molybdenum, but I will wager that you had to sound it out a couple times (let me help you: muh-LIB-duh-num). Moylbdenum is an essential trace mineral and happens to be wildly abundant in our pal, the lentil. It is found first in the soil where we grow our food and water, so healthy soil and groundwater is essential for healthy plants that contain good amounts of this stuff. In our bodies it is stored in the liver, kidneys, adrenal glands bones, and skin, but it is present in some amount in all of our tissues. Molybdenum is important because it is part of several enzyme systems, the most notable being that of xanthine oxidase. Xanthine oxidase (XO) helps the liver mobilize iron for use in the body and aid uric acid metabolism. Molybdenum also helps us digest and assimilate carbohydrates and detoxify the body from exposure to sulfites. Besides lentils, other sources of molybdenum include dried peas and beans, oats, tomatoes, romaine lettuce, cucumber, celery and eggs. A few notes on the recipe. First, white lentils are available at Indian grocery stores, but Ive also seen them at Middle Eastern markets and online. If you cant find white lentils, its good to know that they are also called urad daal or urid daal. To confuse you a little, the unhulled lentils themselves are called black lentils or black gram since their skins are completely black. It should be obvious, but Ill advise against buying the unhulled kind or you will have a very different result - a black one to be precise. Because someone will inevitably ask if they can make this with any other colour of lentil, I will say a half-hearted yes, but I wouldnt recommend anything other than red lentils due to their properties. Second, you can definitely make this a vegan recipe by leaving out the cheese rind, but good golly, it really makes for some delicious eating. I also like a grate a bunch of pecorino over the top right before serving, but Im pretty wild like that. Oh baby. Third, I got pretty fancy and bought (not foraged - the shame!) wild mushrooms for this because I just love them so, but when I originally tested the recipe I used good ol brown button mushrooms and portobellos. Whatever mushrooms you choose the biggest secret to cooking them is not moving them too much. Like pancakes, grilled cheese, and I would imagine, a steak, dont stir them for crying out loud. Get the pan pretty screeching hot, melt some ghee (or coconut oil), throw in the mushrooms, toss to coat, then just back away. Sure, you can watch them sizzle, talk to them, Instagram them, but do not touch them. The secret to really great mushrooms is a caramelized crust and that only happens with high heat and no mucking about. You are allowed to check the bottom of one (one!) after 3-4 minutes, but if there is no colour yet, flip it back until you have some serious golden going on. Also, dont crowd the pan too much - this causes the mushrooms to steam instead of fry - an important distinction.     Print recipe     White Lentil Risotto Serves 4 Ingredients: 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 325g white lentils, soaked for 8-12 hours if possible 2 Tbsp. ghee or coconut oil 2 medium /­­ 200g onions, finely diced 1/­­2 tsp. fine grain sea salt 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 rind Pecorino Romano, optional but delicious (a parmesan rind also works) a generous grating of Pecorino Romano to garnish (optional but delicious) 4-5 cups /­­ 1-1 1/­­4 liters vegetable broth 1 lb. /­­ 500g mixed mushrooms, cleaned of all dirt and debris, and roughly chopped (I chose golden and trumpet chanterelles, and oyster mushrooms, but any type work) a few sprigs fresh thyme, leaves removed, plus a few for garnish 2-3 Tbsp. ghee, butter, or coconut oil a couple pinches sea salt freshly ground black pepper 2 cloves garlic 2 tsp. balsamic vinegar, optional Directions: 1. Wash lentils well, drain and rinse until water runs clear. Set aside. 2. Melt ghee in a large stock pot. Add onions, salt and stir to coat. Cook over medium heat for about 10 minutes until the onions are softened and just starting to caramelize - dont brown them too much or they will colour the dish! Add garlic, the lentils, 3 cups /­­ 700ml vegetable broth and the cheese rind, if using. Stir well and make sure that the broth is covering the lentils by at least a few centimeters /­­ half an inch. If not, add more. Bring to a simmer, stir and cover. 3. Over the next 30 minutes or so (cook time depends on whether or not you soaked the lentils), stir the pot every few minutes (this helps release the starch and add creaminess) and check the broth level, adding more as needed to just cover the lentils. 4. After about 20 minutes, start to prepare the mushrooms. Melt the ghee in a large skillet and add the mushrooms. Stir to coat and let them cook over high heat without touching them (!!!) for at least three or four minutes. Flip and repeat until golden on all sides. Add a touch more ghee, garlic, thyme leaves and to the pan. Cook for 1-2 minutes until fragrant, season with salt and pepper and a splash of balsamic vinegar, if desired. 5. The lentils are done when they are tender but not mushy. The consistency of the dish should be very much like a classic risotto: more solid than a soup, but thinner than a stew, so make sure that there is enough stock in the pot. Remove cheese rind. Divide between plates, garnish with cheese and black pepper, place mushrooms on top and garnish with a sprig of thyme and more black pepper.   Show me your risotto on Instagram! #MNRwhitelentilrisotto *   *   *   *   * Hey Danes! I’m doing three events this month and I would love to see you there. First, I will be the guest chef at the organic and hyper-local food restaurant Mad Mad Mad Bodega cooking and serving a total pumpkin orgy, giving a talk and signing books as well. Click the flyer for a link to learn more. Secondly, I am giving two lectures on Nutrition Fundamentals (way more rad than it sounds!) with a Q&A at Books & Company. You can come to one of the talks or both. Click the flyer for a link to learn more.

Inspirational Sunflower Seed Risotto

June 10 2015 My New Roots 

Inspirational Sunflower Seed Risotto Inspiration is a perplexing creature. As someone who relies on a constant stream of ideas to do what I do, having an endless supply is rather essential. Of all the questions I am asked, the most common of them all is where my inspiration comes from. The funny thing about this is, I cant really give a straight answer because I get ideas from everywhere. Literally. Yes of course there are the obvious places like cookbooks, the farmers market, my vegetable garden, but Ive had ideas strike me like lightening while listening to music, smelling a certain scent wafting on the breeze, the colours in a particular vintage dress. My main motivation for writing a cookbook actually came from a postcard I found randomly, which pictured a faceless girl picking wildflowers. Nothing to do with food. At this point Ive learned that the most important thing for me is to put myself in the way of beauty as often as possible, keep an open mind, and not do discount any sources or ideas as weird, because the best things most often come out of the seemingly strange. I will say that one thing that consistently brings me a lot of inspiration, is just talking to other people who really love food. Sometimes getting out of my head and into someone elses, or at least hearing about their experience with a particular dish or special ingredient can help jumpstart a flood of ideas. For instance, the last time I was in Amsterdam teaching cooking classes, one of the attendees came up to me at the end of the day and told me about a very exciting meal she had eaten in Copenhagen, of all places. It was a risotto made out of sunflower seeds. Sunflower seeds! At first this sounded totally bizarre, but then again, I havent been able to stop thinking about this seriously inspiring idea ever since. I knew that sunflower seeds were about the same size and shape as grains of rice. They were nearly the same colour. But how would they taste? How would they become creamy? What is it like to boil them? When I googled it, all the recipes called for a pressure cooker, which makes sense for those that arent familiar with the awesome power and health benefits of soaking. I knew that that spending the day in a warm bath would make the sunflower seeds totally relaxed and willing to tenderize in a sultry spa of caramelized alliums for dinner that evening. Also, I dont own a pressure cooker. So setting out to make this, I anticipated a weeks worth of trial-and-errors, a pile of dirty dishes and a lot of semi-edible sunflower seeds. But I treated the seeds very much like I would treat rice in a risotto and after one (one!) attempt, it was pretty darn near perfect. And pretty darn inspiring. To say that this recipe is totally surprising is an understatement. The sunflower seeds are tender and chewy, with just the slightest bit of tooth still left - not unlike the real deal. Its remarkably simple to make with just a few common ingredients, truly delicious and deeply satisfying. You can make it suit any season as the seeds create a foundation to build upon no matter what time of year youre enjoying. Since we are finally getting some lovely fresh spring produce here in Denmark, I chose to go that route. I found some beautiful young rainbow carrots, peas in their pods, white and green asparagus and some super fresh watercress. This would be equally lovely with sautéed mushrooms, roasted root vegetables, pumpkin or squash. I am sure youre wondering how the seeds get creamy from cooking, and the truth is they dont – youll need to help them out a little. When cooking a rice-based risotto, starch emerges from the grains as they cook, and magically melds with the broth to create a velvety texture. To mimic this I simply blended some of the soaked seeds with equal parts water and added it back into the mix at the end of cooking, the results astounding. This makes the risotto rich and creamy without any starches or carbohydrates. But what shocks me most of all is how darn flavourful the dish is with such minimal ingredients. The caramelized onions and garlic are really all you need (in this dish, as well as life, I wager) although herbs would be a welcome addition; dried ones during cooking or fresh ones stirred in at the end. My version uses watercress as a finishing touch and is totally lovely with its peppery bite, but I will leave the brilliant blank canvas for you project your own inspiration on to. Everyone Loves the Sunflowers Easy-to-find, inexpensive, and nutrient-rich, sunflower seeds are one of my favourite additions to a number of dishes that I make, from breakfast to dinner and snacks in between. They are delicious toasted or soaked, blended up into seed butter or even milk! Sunflower seeds are one of natures highest sources of vitamin E, the bodys primary fat-soluble antioxidant. Vitamin E is important for overall health, as it functions as a free-radical neutralizer and prevents damage to fat-containing structures and molecules, such as brain cells, cholesterol, and cell membranes. When the fats in cell membranes become damaged, the function of the cell itself can be compromised. This is why researchers have studied whether diets low in Vitamin E are associated with many diseases associated with aging. Sunflower seeds are so high in vitamin E, that just one serving of this risotto contains over 100% of your daily recommended intake! Because sunflower seeds have such a high (and healthy!) fat content, it is best to store them in a tightly sealed glass container in the refrigerator. Keeping them cool will help preserve their delicate, nourishing oils, which can then in turn nourish you! They will also last much longer stored this way. If you purchase shelled sunflower seeds in bulk make sure to sniff the bin first: it should smell fresh and nutty, without any traces of sourness, which can indicate that the fats have become rancid. And always have a good look at the seeds to ensure that they are not discoloured or damaged.     Print recipe     Celebration Sunflower Seed Risotto Serves 4 Ingredients: 2 1/­­2 cups /­­ 350 g shelled, raw, unsalted sunflower seeds 1 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee 2 medium onions, finely diced 5 cloves garlic, minced a generous pinch of sea salt 2-3 cups /­­ 500 – 750ml vegetable broth Spring vegetables for four people + cooking times: 8 spears white asparagus - 10 min 140 g. /­­ 8 young carrots - 4 min 16 spears green asparagus - 3 min 1 cup /­­ 150g shelled green peas - 2 min handful per person watercress - stirred in right before serving Directions: 1. Soak sunflower seeds overnight or all day in pure water with 2 tablespoons of sea salt. 2. Drain and rinse sunflower seeds. Remove about 1 cup /­­ 135g of the soaked seeds and place in a blender with 1 cup /­­ 250ml water. Blend on high until completely smooth. Set aside. 3. Melt coconut oil in a large stockpot. Add onions and sea salt, stir to coat and cook over medium-high heat until translucent, about 5-7 minutes. Add garlic and cook 2 minutes, then add sunflower seeds and about 2 cups of the broth. Bring to a simmer and cook covered for 20-30 minutes, depending on the size of your seeds, adding more broth as needed. When cooked the seeds should be al dente: tender with only the slightest crunch still left in them. If there seems to be a lot of liquid left in the pot, let it simmer uncovered for about 5 minutes to evaporate the excess. Add the sunflower cream from the blender and stir to combine, and heat gently. Season to taste. Remove from heat and fold in a few generous handfuls of watercress. 4. Blanch the vegetables in the same pot of salted water for approximately the time indicated, testing as you go. Do not overcook! 5. To serve, place about a quarter of the risotto on each plate, then top with the vegetables. Drizzle with olive oil, lemon juice and a sprinkling of flaky sea salt. Top with extra watercress and enjoy warm. Where do you get your inspiration from? How does it come to you? What have you been inspired by lately? Tell me! Especially if it’s about food… Wishing you an inspired day! Love always, Sarah B

Dean Ornish Weighs in on the Myth of High-Protein Diets

March 30 2015 Meatless Monday 

Dean Ornish Weighs in on the Myth of High-Protein Diets  Over the next few months Americans are encouraged to comment on the recommendations of the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (see our recent article.) Dean Ornish, physician, author, and founder of the nonprofit Preventive Medicine Research Institute, let his thoughts be known in a recent op-ed piece published by the New York Times. Many people have been making the case that Americans have grown fat because they eat too much starch and sugar, and not enough meat, fat and eggs, wrote Dr. Ornish. Recently, the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee lifted recommendations that consumption of dietary cholesterol should be restricted, citing research that dietary cholesterol does not have a major effect on blood cholesterol levels. Not only does Dr. Ornish dread the predictable headlines telling Americans they can return to eggs & bacon, hes also concerned that the debate is not as simple as low-fat versus low-carb, but is much more about the amount of animal protein in ones diet. Research shows that animal protein may significantly increase the risk of premature mortality from all causes, among them cardiovascular disease, cancer and Type 2 diabetes. Heavy consumption of saturated fat and trans fats may double the risk of developing Alzheimers disease. He cites several more studies implicating animal protein and also attacks the idea that not addressing fats, but simply cutting out carbs, is the best way to lose weight. When fat calories were carefully controlled, patients lost 67 percent more body fat than when carbohydrates were controlled, he states. The Ornish diet was evaluated in the Best Diets of 2015 US News & World Report, and was rated #1 in Best Heart-Healthy Diets and #3 in Best Diabetes Diet & Best Plant-Based Diet. He summarized his approach in the Times op-ed. An optimal diet for preventing disease is a whole-foods, plant-based diet that is naturally low in animal protein, harmful fats and refined carbohydrates. What that means in practice is little or no red meat; mostly vegetables, fruits, whole grains, legumes and soy products in their natural forms; very few simple and refined carbohydrates such as sugar and white flour; and sufficient good fats such as fish oil or flax oil, seeds and nuts. A healthful diet should be low in bad fats, meaning trans fats, saturated fats and hydrogenated fats. Finally, we need more quality and less quantity. As part of his diet he also stresses exercise and stress management through a daily practice utilizing things like deep breathing, meditation, and yoga. combining deep breathing, meditation, and yoga. One of the cons U.S. News brought up about his diet is that staying the course can be tough. However, Meatless Monday is always a good first step. He also brought up the additional benefits of skipping meat that are familiar to fans of Meatless Monday. Whats good for you is good for our planet. Livestock production causes more disruption of the climate than all forms of transportation combined. And because it takes as much as 10 times more grain to produce the same amount of calories through livestock as through direct grain consumption, eating a plant-based diet could free up resources for the hungry. What you gain is so much more than what you give up.         The post Dean Ornish Weighs in on the Myth of High-Protein Diets appeared first on Meatless Monday.

6 Top Health Benefits of Almonds

February 24 2015 VegKitchen 

6 Top Health Benefits of AlmondsAlmonds are one of the worlds most nutritious and versatile nuts, perfect for snacking as well as in tasty recipes, renowned for their many health benefits and culinary uses. Here are just a few: Reduce Blood Sugar Levels: Eating almonds may be a great option for diabetics looking to maintain healthy blood glucose levels. Findings from a 2007 study published in the journal Metabolism found that consuming almonds alongside white bread regulates spikes in blood sugar and significantly lowers the glycemic index of the meal. Heart-Loving Antioxidant Powers: Almonds are one of the richest food sources of alpha-tocopherol, the form of vitamin E that is most easily absorbed by the body. Vitamin E is a potent antioxidant that protects cells against the damaging effects of free radicals, boosts the immune system, supports cardiovascular health, and helps your body create new red blood cells. A 2005 study published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association found that almond consumption helped meet the Recommended Dietary Allowance of 15 mg/­­day alpha-tocopherol and improved red blood cell concentration. Another study published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that almonds can reduce C-reactive protein, an indication of inflammation that affects the arteries. Weight Control: As part of a calorie-conscious eating regime, almonds, which are high in monounsaturated fats, can help obese adults lose weight easier than a diet high in complex carbohydrates, according to a study in the International Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders. Contrary to many worries of healthy eaters, consuming almonds actually lowers the risk of weight gain. A 28-month long study showed that individuals who ate almonds at least twice per week were 31% less likely to gain weight than nut-avoiding participants. So go ahead and go nuts! Lower Cholesterol: Almonds are the leading source of monounsaturated fat among commonly eaten nuts: over 60% of the total fat in almonds is monounsaturated. Numerous studies have demonstrated the cholesterol-lowering effects of consuming foods rich in monounsaturated fat. A 2005 study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that consuming almonds as part of a heart-healthy diet can be just as effective at lowering LDL bad cholesterol levels as first generation statin drugs. A good source of calcium and other nutrients: Weve already heard that almonds are a good source of Vitamin E, but they offer a modest but significant and absorbable form of calcium, which is good for the bones. Likewise, theyre a good source of phosphorous for strong bones and teeth. Almonds are a good source of magnesium and folic acid, as well. Excellent source of plant-based protein: Just one ounce of almonds contains about 12 percent of average daily protein needs. Enough said! Adapted from Nuts.com, with permission. Discover your favorite almond products at nuts.com from premium supreme-sized raw almonds to finely blanched almond flour and all natural almond butters for your snacking and recipe needs.

Seriously Super Cereal

January 22 2015 My New Roots 

Seriously Super Cereal If you were to nominate one meal a day for a facelift, would it be breakfast? I thought so. Breakfast can be a challenge for many people, including myself. I get into super groovin streaks with morning meals for weeks on end at times, feeling like Im sooo on top of everything in my life. Then something happens, breakfast becomes less of a priority and I end up making the same smoothie or sourdough smeared with almond butter over and over again. Okay, now that I am writing this down, it really doesnt sound all that dreadful, but for me, starting the day in not only a conscious, but enthusiastic way sets me up for the rest of my waking hours. It fuels me in ways that go beyond calories: its self-love, ceremony, and celebration. Ironically, I make a very complete and healthy breakfast for my 14-month old every single day without even thinking about it. Before I go to bed at night, I soak whole grains, nuts and seeds, rinse them in the morning and cook them with fresh fruit, spices and superfoods. So, um, what about mum? Funny how it wasnt until recently that I thought about myself and how I would like the break the fast. I guess thats just being a parent sometimes, but I am now committed to making a change. It is a New Year after all. Serious Cereal and a Plea for Carbohydrates When someone says that they eat cereal for breakfast, what do you picture? A bowl of steaming hot whole grains, or sugary flakes in milk? I tend to imagine the latter, and I suppose its because that was my breakfast growing up. We had a few kinds of packaged cereal, and not total junk food, but I do recall the odd time we could convince my mom to buy some rainbow-hued concoction in a moment of weakness. I get it: boxed cereal is mindlessly easy, requires no cooking, soaking, stirring or waiting. But this. This is serious cereal. Real cereal. The kind that stands behind its name, and not the kind that has led us so far astray from what cereal actually is that weve mostly forgotten its meaning. Its unprocessed, unrefined, completely whole and natural, and the real way we are meant to eat grains. And while were on the subject, I would like to make a case for carbs. When yet another friend of mine felt the need to accuse all carbohydrates of being evil, I wonder how weve become prejudice against macronutrients?! Its like the diet dark ages. Carbohydrates are not the devil. Many modern eating plans out there vilify them for various reasons, but we need to remember that the majority of grains and grain-related products that people in developed counties consume are highly processed, refined, and stripped of nearly all their nutrients. This was originally done to prolong shelf life, but continues as weve developed a taste for them! It turns out we prefer sweeter food that is faster to cook and easier to chew (go figure). From a biological standpoint, this makes perfect sense, so its rather difficult trying to convince people to spend more money on food that spoils faster, takes longer to cook and eat! Argh. I can only promise you it is worth it. And once you start replacing refined grains with whole grains you will feel why. Eating them in balance with both fats and proteins is a much healthier and quite simply, a more sustainable way of living. My point here is this: lets stop looking at food in its respective parts (carbs, fats, proteins), and get back to the whole picture, the whole food. Choosing a balanced way of eating, as close to nature as possible is the most realistic plan for eating long term. Going to extremes (low-carb! no-carb! fat-free! high-protein!) is not a sustainable way of eating or living. What I propose instead is a sensible, flexible dietary strategy that we can incorporate successfully over a lifetime. McKel Hill wrote a couple stellar articles about carbohydrates over on her site, Nutrition Stripped. Check them out - very clear and thorough reads for those of you who want to know more! I made this cereal blend with a few things in mind. For one, I wanted the mix to be gluten-free so that we can all enjoy it. I wanted something that could keep outside of the fridge, as rolled grains spoil relatively quickly if left at room temperature (how long have those quick oats been sittin in your cupboard, yall?) so I chose only whole grains that are relatively shelf stable. And of course, I also wanted the cereal to actually taste good, which it does. The texture is also very pleasing, not mushy or glue-y like some of the other porridges Ive tried. The sunflower seeds add a wonderful tooth and the grain size differences make for a satisfying mouthfeel (yes, I just used that word). Although I highly recommend soaking the cereal overnight, you can of course cook it from raw the morning you are eating it. In both cases however, rinse the cereal under cool running water before cooking. I use a very fine mesh sieve for this, as the chia and amaranth seeds will fall through large holes. Once cooked, add whatever you like to the porridge. I love a little nut milk poured over the top for creaminess, plus a drizzle of maple syrup or honey, which makes everything delish. I made up a couple seasonal bowls in hopes of inspiring you: one with pear, roasted hazelnuts, and pomegranate seeds; the other with persimmon, toasted coconut flakes and bee pollen. Warming spices like cinnamon and cardamom are tasty stirred in, as are dried fruit, like apricots, raisins, goji berries, mulberries, or figs. Basically, this breakfast is infinitely customizable for every palate and season. Find your groove and just enjoy filling yourself with nourishing goodness from mornings first light. The below batch recipe is a good starting amount, and will make 18-19 portions if you go with 1/­­4 cup /­­ 50g servings. I find this amount is perfect for me once I add in fruit, some nuts or seeds and superfoods, but if your calories needs are higher, go for 1/­­3 or 1/­­2 cup servings. If you want to double, triple or quadruple the batch amount, feel free to do so. I just recommend making this amount first and testing it to make sure you really like it, then you can make it your go-to cereal.     Print recipe     Seriously Super Cereal Makes 18-19,  1/­­4 cup /­­ 50g portions Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 170g buckwheat 1 cup /­­ 200g millet 1 cup quinoa /­­ 170g 1 cup amaranth /­­ 190g 1/­­2 cup /­­ 70g sunflower seeds 1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g chia seeds For soaked cereal: 1/­­4 cup Seriously Super Cereal blend 1 tsp. acidic medium (apple cider vinegar or lemon juice are good choices) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water Directions: 1. Rinse cereal blend well in a very fine mesh sieve. 2. Place in a small saucepan with your acidic medium and cover with water, preferably from a recently boiled kettle. 3. In the morning, drain and rinse grains well. Place back in the saucepan, add 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to simmer and cook 10 minutes, until the grains are tender. 4. Enjoy warm with milk and sweetener of your choice, fresh fruit, spices, and superfoods. For un-soaked cereal: 1/­­4 cup /­­ 50g  Seriously Super Cereal blend 1 cup /­­ 250ml water cook 20 minutes Directions: 1. Rinse porridge mix well in a very fine mesh sieve. 2. Place in a small saucepan with 1 cup /­­ 250ml water, bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer, covered, for about 20 minutes, until the grains are tender. 3. Enjoy warm with milk and sweetener of your choice, fresh fruit, spices, and superfoods. *   *   *   *   *   * For those of you that follow me on Instagram will know that I received the first hard copy of my cookbook this week! Eek! I just wanted to take this opportunity to thank you all SO MUCH for the incredible love and enthusiasm. I couldn’t write this post and not tell you how much I appreciate your words. Sheesh! I am bursting with gratitude. I have to mention again that the book is only available for preorder at this time, here. The book drops in North America March 31, UK and Australia April 9, Denmark May 21, Netherlands in June and Germany this summer. Thanks everyone!! with a full heart, Sarah B Show me your Seriously Super Cereal on Instagram: #seriouslysupercereal

Green & Clean 2015

January 1 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green & Clean 2015 Hey, happy new year everyone! Today we are excited to share this little project that we have been working on. It’s a whole bunch of new recipes including the delicious salad on the photo above. Before we tell you more about the recipes, let us just quickly share some thoughts behind them. Most people want to start the year by eating fresh, right. But getting a healthy start of the year doesnt mean that you have to go through a full body detox. Sure, it can be great if you really feel like you need a complete cleanse, but we believe that it is even more important to focus on eating balanced throughout the year and then just increasing your intake of health boosting ingredients after the holiday season. When you live up in the northern parts of the world, the thought of restricting yourself to only drinking juices and eating raw meals during the coldest season of the year can seem quite difficult. So we have created a recipe pack for our Green Kitchen app with 14 new and exclusive recipes that focuses on health and getting a fresh start of the year without having to feel like you are on a strict diet. We have worked with nourishing combinations of ingredients that are good for your body and taste delicious. Our recipes are not focused on being low fat or counting calories, we instead encourage healthy fats, complex carbohydrates and plant based proteins that your body needs. There are juices, smoothies, sides and salads in there, but also some warm meals and a soup. All recipes are gluten free and vegetarian and most of them are vegan or have vegan options. Here is a little preview of all the recipes. We have put a lot of love, time and effort into developing and testing these recipes, so we decided to sell them inside the app. If you have the app, there should be a new box with more info at the top of the grid. The price is $1.99 but we are giving it away for only 99 cents now during the first 24 hours of the new year. We always get the question about creating an Android version and the answer is that we are planning on doing it, but it’s just a different world to Apple nerds like us us. So we keep pushing it forward. We are so sorry that it’s taking such time. We have however come up with a temporary solution for those of you that don’t have an ipad or iphone but still would like to try these particular recipes. We have gathered them in a mini recipe e-book that is available to purchase here in our temporary e-store.  To give you a preview, we are also sharing one of the recipes here today. It’s a beet, apple & quinoa salad that we have made perhaps a quadrillion times throughout the years, but for some strange reason it hasn’t made its appearance here until now. Beets and apples are shredded raw and they add both flavour, texture and sweetness to the quinoa. The beets also give the quinoa a beautiful red purple colour. It’s quick, simple and very easy to vary. You could add some tofu or roasted vegetables to the salad if you want it even more nourishing. Have a happy, healthy and delicious 2015! Beet, Apple, Quinoa & Sprout Salad Serves 4 1 cup /­­ 190 g /­­ 250 ml uncooked quinoa (preferably soaked) 2 cups /­­ 500 ml water 4 raw beetroots 2 apples 1 handful lettuce, rinsed 2 tbsp olive oil 2 tbsp lemon juice salt black pepper Serve with 1 handful mixed sprouts a few dollops labneh or Cashew “Cheese” (both recipes are included in the bundle) 1 small handful almonds or sunflower seeds, coarsely chopped Cooking the quinoa: Place rinsed quinoa, water and a pinch of salt in a medium-size saucepan. Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a bare simmer and let gently cook for about 15 minutes, or until you see small tails on the quinoa seeds. Set aside to cool in a large mixing bowl. Making the salad: Peel and grate the beetroots and the apples on the coarse side of a box grater. Combine lettuce, quinoa, beetroots and apples in a bowl. Drizzle with olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper and give it a good toss with your hands. Serve in bowls with sprouts and a dollop of labneh or cashew cheese.

Veggie Oat Taco Mince

October 19 2014 VegKitchen 

Veggie Oat Taco MinceSteel-cut oats mimic the mouthfeel of vegan crumbles while being completely free of processed ingredients. They also add heartiness to the veggie and bean mixture. This is the perfect way to sneak in some veggies for the picky eaters in your house. This is gluten-free, soy-free, oil-free. From OATrageous Oatmeals by Kathy Hester; photos by Kate Lewis. Reprinted with permission of Page Street Publishing, (C) 2014. Makes enough for 8 tacos - 1 cup water - 1/­­4 cup steel-cut oats - 1/­­4 cup minced carrots - 1 tablespoon olive oil (*or use water to make no oil added) - 1/­­2 small onion, minced (about 1/­­4 cup) - 1/­­4 cup minced green pepper - 2 cloves garlic, minced - 1 teaspoon chili powder - 1 teaspoon dried oregano - 1 teaspoon cumin - 14-ounce can kidney beans, drained and rinsed - 1 tablespoon chopped green chilies - 1 cup minced kale (or other green) - Juice of 1/­­2 lime - 2 to 4 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro, to taste - Salt to taste In a saucepan, bring the water, oats and carrots to a boil, then turn the heat to low. Cook for 15 to 20 minutes or until the steel-cut oats are cooked through but still chewy. While the oats are cooking, heat the olive oil in a large saute pan over medium heat. Add the onion and saut é until translucent, then add the green pepper, garlic and spices and cook for another 2 minutes. Once the oat mixture is cooked, add it to the saute pan and mix the oats in with the veggies. You want to keep cooking until the oats dry out some and begin to separate. Keep cooking until it starts to look like crumbles. Mix in the kidney beans, green chilies and kale. Cook until the kidney beans are thoroughly heated. Right before serving, add the lime juice, cilantro and salt. Serve in hard or soft taco shells, or in burritos. This is also amazing on top of nachos. Nutrition information: Per serving (1/­­8 of recipe): Calories: 87.8; Total fat: 2.2g; protein 4.0 g, carbohydrates 14.6 g, sodium 108.8 mg, fiber 4.3 g Variations: Feel free to leave out the beans and replace the chili powder and cumin with basil and thyme. You can also leave out the green chilies and green pepper and replace with either sliced mushrooms or sun-dried tomatoes. *This post contains affiliate links. If the product is purchased by linking through this review, VegKitchen receives a modest commission, which helps maintain our site and helps it to continue growing!


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