capers - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Vegan Lentil Mushroom Stew with Mashed Sweet Potatoes – Instant Pot or Stovetop

Palak chutney recipe | spinach chutney | palakura pachadi

Butternut Miso Soup with Arame and Wasabi

Yellow Split Pea Coconut Breakfast Porridge










capers vegetarian recipes

Sourdough Sandwich with Mushroom, Kale and Lentils

November 6 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Sourdough Sandwich with Mushroom, Kale and Lentils More than just a sandwich, this is better described as a warm and wintery mushroom and kale salad on top of a slice of freshly baked sourdough bread and it is every ounce as heavenly as it sounds. But before we talk more, let’s watch a movie. We have been taking an involuntary break from making our youtube videos as we have been finishing up our next book, but we are back with a bunch of new videos now. We are starting off with this sandwich this week and have a few more in the upcoming weeks. If you’ve been following my stories on instagram, you might have noticed that we’ve been picking up a new (but old) love for baking rye sourdough bread. It’s been years since we baked bread more regularly and I remember giving up the last time after having killed our third starter. Apparently (luckily), we are better at keeping children alive than sourdough starters and plants. Anyway, I felt a streak of boldness and got back on it again a few weeks back. Instead of making our own starter, we asked if we could buy a rye starter from a sourdough bakery close to us. They handed us a paper cup with a wobbly and bubbly starter and we went home and started baking. It’s been alive for a month now and whenever we are not baking, we simply let it sleep in the fridge. Many sourdough breads are complicated stories involving a checklist with tasks. This is a simpler method where we bake the bread in a crockpot to help it develop a thick crust and soft centre. Its a version of the classic No-Knead Bread but with sourdough bread and the addition of rye flour to give it more tang. The dough is more moist than traditional bread doughs and needs longer proofing time so it develops its tangy sourdough flavor. We use 30/­­70 per cent rye/­­wheat ratio. We have been experimenting with various ratios but find that this is optimal for a bread that can rise well and still provide a lot of rye character. We have been using the bread for lunch sandwiches and this mushroom sandwich is our very favorite at the moment. It’s very very simple, you just fry mushrooms in a pan with a bit of garlic, fold down kale and cooked lentils and add a little vinegar to balance the flavors. We serve it with a herby vegan spread between the bread and the topping that we make from Zeta BreOliv, capers and parsley. BreOliv is a spreadable olive oil that can be used instead of butter. It is made from just olive oil, shea oil, water and salt. This recipe is sponsored by Zeta and you can find the recipe in Swedish on their site. And the English version below. Sourdough Sandwich with Mushroom, Kale & Lentils Makes 4 slices BreOliv Herb Spread 4 tbsp Zeta BreOliv 1 tbsp capers 1 small bunch parsley Mushroom Topping 2 tbsp Olive Oil 300 g /­­ 11 ounces (3 cups) mixed mushrooms 1 clove garlic 1 tbsp white wine vinegar 2 large kale leaves, stalk discarded 1 cup /­­ 100 g cooked lentils salt & black pepper To serve 4 slices sourdough bread (see recipe below) - Make the herb spread by chopping capers and parsley and stirring it together with Zeta BreOliv In a bowl. - Clean and divide the mushrooms into large bits. Peel and crush the garlic. - Heat a large skillet with olive oil. - Add mushroom and garlic and let sizzle for a few minutes. Then add white wine vinegar. - Chop the kale and rinse the lentils and stir them into the pan. Let saute until the kale has softened. - Taste and season with salt and pepper. - Cut a few slices bread and add a layer of the herb spread. Top with the mushroom and kale mixture and a grind of black pepper. Rye Sourdough Makes 1 loaf Before we make this bread we feed the starter a few hours ahead so it’s alive and kicking. 100 ml (1/­­3 cup) rye sourdough starter 400 ml (1 1/­­2 cup) water 1 1 /­­2 tsp salt 330 g (2 1/­­3 cups) organic all purpose flour 170 g (1 1/­­2 cup)  organic rye flour 6-8 green olives - Stir together sourdough, water and salt in a large bowl, and the two flours in a separate bowl. - Chop the olives coarsely. - Fold the olives and the flour mixture into the sourdough liquid and use a wooden spoon to stir it into a sticky dough. Sprinkle over more flour if needed. You can also dip your hands in flour and use them if you prefer. The dough is ready when it can be shaped to a ball that is smooth on the outside and sticky on the inside. - Cover the bowl with plastic and leave in room temperature for 12 hours (can be more or less depending on how warm your room is. - It should have expanded at this point and be very sticky and bubbly. Fold it out on a floured table. Sprinkle extra flour on top and pull and fold the dough around itself a few times. It will be pretty sticky. - Flour a proofing basket or bowl and transfer the dough to it with the folds and ends facing upwards and the smoother (dont worry if its not super smooth) facing down. - Leave to proof for two more hours. - Set the oven to 250°C/­­500°F and place a Dutch oven with lid in the oven. - Use oven mittens to remove the hot Dutch oven. Sprinkle the bottom with flour and carefully flip out the dough into it. - Put the lid back on, place in the oven and let back for 30 minutes. Remove the lid, lower the temp to 230°C/­­450°F and let bake for 20 more minutes. - The bread is ready when it has a neice crust and a hollow sound when tapped on. - Let cool wrapped in a cloth before you slice it and it will stay moister. This post is sponsored by Zeta. All words and opinions are our own.

Vegan Aubergine Polpette - Three Ways

October 12 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Vegan Aubergine Polpette - Three Ways Our first thought was to do a classic Lady and the Tramp Spaghetti and Meatball dish with this polpette recipe, but then we decided that it was too expected. So here is instead another spin on our one makes three-series. Where we use one staple food in three different recipes. We really love this series because it reflects so much how we actually eat. It’s not always an entirely new meal every day but more of a flow where the same components are repeated with new pairings. These polpette or vegan meatballs are perfect for this. They are good on their own - tender and very flavorful. And they are also insanely versatile, rolled into a wrap, tangled into pasta, paired with a spicy tomato sauce and hummus or tossed in a crunchy vegan take on a caesar salad. Vegan Aubergine Polpette Makes around 40 balls 2 medium sized aubergines 2 red onions 4 tbsp olive oil 100 g /­­ 1 cup almond flour 120 g /­­ 1 cup cooked lentils 4 tbsp pickled capers, drained and finely chopped 2 tbsp raisins zest from 1 lemon 15 leaves basil leaves salt Preheat the oven to 200°C  /­­ 400°F. Peel and chop the onion finely and chop the aubergine into small dices. Stir fry both in a large skillet with the oil for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally, until very soft. When soft, add to a food processor with the rest of the ingredients. Pulse a few times to mix everything together. You want a very chunky sticky texture but dont pulse too much or youll end up with a mushy mixture. Remove the knife blades and shape 30-40 small balls with your hands. Place them on a baking tray covered with baking paper and bake for 25 minutes. Store in the fridge or freeze them. Scroll down for three ways to serve them. Hummus with spicy tomato sauce, polpette and cucumber salad 1 batch vegan aubergine polpette (see recipe above) 1 batch Hummus, see this recipe or store-bought hummus Spicy tomato sauce Serves 4 1 tbsp olive oil 1 red onion 1 garlic clove 1 tsp cumin 1 tsp harissa paste (or 1 red chili) 2 x 400 g tins tomatoes 1/­­2 tsp sea salt, to taste Heat the oil in a large sauce pan on medium heat. Peel and finely chop the onion and garlic and add them to the sauce pan  together with the spices. Let sauté for a few minutes until soft not browned and then add  the tomatoes and salt. Let cook for at least 20 minutes, until rich and fragrant. It will become sweeter and rounder in flavour the longer you leave it on. Store the sauce you are not using tonight in glass bottles in the fridge. Cucumber salad 1/­­2 cucumber 2 tsp olive oil 1/­­2 lemon, juice + zest 1 pinch sea salt 1 small handful fresh dill Finely dice the cucumber and place in a bowl. Add olive oil, lemon juice and zest, salt and dill and toss to combine. Arrange the hummus in shallow bowls and make a well in the middle. Place a couple of spoonfuls tomato sauce in the well, add a few aubergine polpette and a few spoonfuls cucumber sallad. Vegan Wrap with Polpette, Ajvar and Krauts Serves 4 4 wrap breads /­­ tortilla breads, gluten free or whole grain 4 lettuce leaves 4 cavalo nero or kale, stems removed 1 cup cooked white quinoa 4 tbsp ajvar dressing 1/­­2 cucumber, cut into sticks 4 tbsp sauerkraut (see recipe here) 1 batch aubergine polpette (see recipe above) Place one lettuce leave and one kale leave on each tortilla bread, then place 2-3 tbsp quinoa in the middle, a dollop ajvar, cucumber slices, sauerkraut and top with a couple of aubergine polpette. Fold the top and bottom edges over the filling. Roll the whole tortilla from left to right to wrap in the filling. Roll some parchment paper around them and tie with a string to hold them together. Vegan Ceasar Salad with Polpette Serves 4 1 head Cosmopolitan lettuce 1 batch aubergine polpette (see recipe above) 2 avocados, stone/­­peel removed and sliced 2 small apples, cored and sliced 2 tbsp sunflower seeds, toasted Dressing 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml cold pressed neutral oil (organic rapeseed) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml soy milk, unsweetened 2-3 tsp lemon juice 1 tsp dijon mustard 1 tbsp pickled capers, drained 1 large pinch salt Add all dressing ingredients to a tall glas or blender cup. Mix with a stick blender on high speed for about 15 seconds or until you have a creamy white dressing. Taste and adjust the flavours to your preference. Add more oil and blend again if you like it thicker. Tear the lettuce into bite size pieces and place in a mixing bowl. Add 2 tbsp vegan mayo dressing and toss to cover. Then transfer to a serving platter and arrange avocado slices, apple slices and aubergine polpette and last, scatter over toasted sunflower seeds.

Smörg?st?rta - Savory Rye Sandwich Cake

June 23 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Smörg?st?rta - Savory Rye Sandwich Cake Hey friends and happy midsummer! We spent midsummer eve at a friends house, dancing like frogs around a flower covered midsummer pole. It’s one of many weird traditions that we do in Sweden on this longest day of the year. Today we are off to Noma (as in one of the coolest restaurants on earth) to test their new plant focused menu that is launching next week. We’re very excited - obviously for Noma, but also for eating a fancy dinner together with zero kids around. Before we are leaving, I wanted to post this little recipe that we uploaded to our youtube a few days ago. Just like frog dance, this savory layered sandwich cake is also a very Swedish thing. It is called smörg?st?rta and is traditionally made by layering white bread with mayonnaise, creme cheese, whipped cream, dill, chives, shrimps, salmon and a bunch of other stuff. It’s basically like a sandwich gone wild. Even if we are not completely sold on the very heavy traditional version, there is something intriguing about the concept of a sandwich cake. So we made our own version, using rye bread and three colorful and fresh (but still quite rich) spreads in between. One green spread with avocado, dill and peas. One white spread with egg, sauerkraut and creme fraiche. And one purple spread with beans, beetroot and sunflower seeds. We cover it with cream cheese with a sting of horseradish and lots of finely sliced veggies and flowers. It looks great, is fun to make and really delicious. Sandwich cake FTW! Check out this recipe video to see how we make it. This is the perfect savory dish to make for a party, brunch or gathering with friends. You can easily half the recipe or make it vegan by skipping the egg layer and replacing the cream cheese with coconut cream. If you want to try a gluten-free version of this cake you could either simply use a gluten free bread, or bake 4 trays of our vegetable flatbreads (this option is a little time consuming but would probably taste amazing). Smörg?st?rta (Savory Rye Sandwich Cake) Serves 12-16 Green Spread 300 g /­­ 2 cups cup green peas 1 small lemon, juice 1 bunch dill, chopped 2 avocados, flesh scooped out 2 tbsp olive oil 1 large pinch salt White Spread 6 hard-boiled eggs 250 g /­­ 1 cup creme fraice or sour cream 2 tbsp capers 4 tbsp sauerkraut a pinch black pepper Purple Spread 1 cup sunflower seeds, soaked for an hour in water 1 x 400 g tin white beans, drained and rinsed 2 cooked beetroots, roughly chopped 1 small lemon, juice 4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil salt and pepper Assembling 36 slices of sourdough rye bread (or bread of choice), thinly sliced 500 g cream cheese 1 tbsp grated horseradish Decoration 1 avocado, sliced or shaped into a rose 1/­­2 cucumber, sliced thinly 1 small bunch of asparagus, thinly shaved 1 lemon, halved and thinly sliced mache lettuce chives, finely chopped Start by making the spreads. Add all the ingredients for the green spread to a food processor and mix until smooth (or use a bowl and a hand blender). Taste and adjust the flavour to your liking. Transfer to a bowl and clean the food processor. For the white spread, peel and roughly chop the eggs, place in a bowl and gently stir through cr?me fraiche, capers, sauerkraut and a little black pepper. Set aside. Drain and rinse the sunflower seeds for the purple spreads and add them to the food processor (or use bowl and hand blender) along with beans, beetroot, lemon juice, olive oil and a good grind of salt and pepper. Pulse a couple of times until combined but still a little chunky. To assemble: Trim any hard ends off the bread and line up the rye slices so you have a rectangle, 3 slices wide and 3 slices long. Spread the green spread evenly on top and then place another layer of bread. Now layer they white spread evenly on top. Place another layer of bread, followed by the purple spread. Place the final 9 slices of rye on top. Add cream cheese to a mixing bowl and grate in the horseradish. Whisk to make sure it’s incorporated, taste and add more if desired. Use a palette style knife to cover the cake with a layer of cream cheese. Decorate with an avocado rose, ribbons of cucumber, shaved asparagus, machet lettuce, slices of lemons, chives and flowers. Or whatever you think looks good. Tip: You can make this cake 12-24 hours ahead and store in the fridge to let the spreads soak into the bread and soften it up a bit. Then add the cream cheese and decorations right before serving.

Spring Picnic Bread

April 16 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Spring Picnic Bread Picnic season is finally upon us and we have been kicking it off with two new favorite things. The first one is a bike and the other is a bread. We have been dreaming of a Danish cargo bike for years and years, and last month we finally splurged on this one. It’s the perfect vehicle for us because we can fit all three kids in it with seatbelts and all. It’s ideal to bring home heavy grocery bags with. And it’s environmentally friendly. All practicalities aside, it is also so much fun to ride around with and we are roaming from playground to picnic spots without a hitch. Just packing a few blankets, a big smoothie, a rhubarb compote and this beauty of a bread. We created this recipe for all type of picnic situations. We wanted something spring-y and savory that tasted awesome and could manage a bumpy bike ride. It’s basically like a savory muffin that we bake in a sheet pan. It serves many, is easy to make, super moist and flavorful and you can make lots of variations on it (although I love the look of thinly shaved asparagus on top). Needless to say, this is also ideal for a brunch or or other weekend gatherings. Just like a foccacia, the bread acts as a base and you can play around with all kind of toppings. Here are a few variations: o Swap some of the potatoes in the bread with grated carrots, parsnip or swede. o A teaspoon of mustard in the batter adds some complexity to the flavor. o Any fresh herbs can be mixed into the batter. o Olives or capers could be good on top. Spinach could also be used instead of asparagus. o You can use a dairy free yogurt instead of buttermilk and leave out the feta cheese if you prefer it dairy free. o We havent tried a vegan version but replacing the eggs with chia eggs (1 egg = 1 tablespoons chia seed + 3 tablespoons water) has worked for us on similar recipes. Asparagus & Potato Picnic Bread Serves 12 Dry Ingredients 100 g /­­ 1 cup oat flour (or the same amount rolled oats, blitzed into flour in a food processor) 100 g /­­ 3/­­4 cup rice flour (or buckwheat flour or spelt flour) 1 1/­­2 tsp baking powder 1 tsp sea salt flakes Wet Ingredients 3 free-range eggs 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup olive oil or coconut oil, at room temperature 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup cultured buttermilk (or yogurt or plant-based yogurt) 1-2 spring onions 3-4 potatoes (2 cups /­­ 250 g grated) 1 handful fresh parsley, finely chopped 100 g feta cheese Topping 3 raw asparagus 1/­­3 cup pumpkin seeds 2 tsp quality olive oil 2 tsp honey a handful chive Preheat the oven to 180°C /­­ 350°F bake mode and grease a 30 x 22 cm /­­ 12 x 9 inch tray or line it with parchment paper. Add all the dry ingredients to a large mixing bowl and stir until combined. Make a well in the centre and set aside while preparing the wet ingredients. Whisk eggs in a separate bowl, then add oil and buttermilk. Finely chop the onion. Peel the potatoes, grate them coarsely and add them to the wet mixture along with the onion and parsley. Crumble in half of the feta cheese. Give it a good stir and then pour the wet mixture into the bowl with the flours. Use a wooden spoon or spatula to combine the batter and then pour it onto the tray. Use a peeler to shave the asparagus into thin ribbons and spread them out over the batter. Crumble the remaining feta cheese on top. Combine pumpkin seeds, oil and honey and sprinkle them on top as well, along with the chive. Bake for approximately 40 minutes or until golden and a skewer inserted in the centre of the cake comes out clean. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool slightly in the tin before transferring to a wire wrack to cool completely. Store the cake at room temperature in an airtight container and it will keep for a few days. Great to bring on a picnic and serve with a tangy rhubarb compote or chutney. Enjoy!

Beet Tartare with Sesame Labneh + Amsterdam

August 19 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Beet Tartare with Sesame Labneh + Amsterdam Earlier this year we were in New York to launch Green Kitchen at Home. We had a blast doing a live cooking session at Food52, teaching a cooking class and had a book signing in a tiny but packed little store in Greenwich Village. But what I really wanted to talk about today was our night off. When we tucked baby Noah (formerly known as Gabriel) to sleep in his stroller and headed to ABCV for dinner. Side note: You should know that for being a food writing couple, Luise and I very rarely go out and eat at proper restaurants. With kids, it’s just easier to do takeaway or pick places where it’s okay that they climb, run and crash. Also, fancy restaurants make me feel awkward. But we had an epic evening at ABCV. We tried the tasting menu of which I can’t even remember half of the dishes. But I know that there were simple crudités with lots of spreads, some kind of soft beet carpaccio/­­tartare with a little bit of sting to it, a whole roasted cauliflower with turmeric tahini dressing(!), avocado lettuce cups, roasted shiitake and a couple of desserts. And what made the evening even better was that Noah slept through almost the entire dinner (thank you jetlag!). We have been talking about that beet carpaccio (and the cauliflower with tahini turmeric dressing) a few times since we got back. And when Luise recently spotted a recipe for roasted beets and sesame labneh in the latest issue of Jamie Magazine, we started talking about it again. Looking through our recipe archive, it is pretty obvious that we’ve got a love for beets. They are sweet and mildly earthy, have an awesome color, can grow in our harsh Swedish climate and are cheap! What’s not to love? So a couple of days ago, we picked up a few bunches of beets, started cooking and here we are. With some kind of beetroot tartare (mixed minced beets), dollops of sesame labneh and a few suggestions on what can be used to scoop it into your mouth, apart from crackers. And as a last minute contribution, we are also offering a less fancy way of serving this, inside a rye waffle toast (yup, you might want to scroll down to it right away). This recipe is great as a starter, at a buffet table or a party. It’s pretty and impressive, creamy and delicious with plenty of flavor from fresh dill and mint and a little sting from horseradish. Since we love yogurt just as much as we love beetroots, we invited labneh (yogurt’s fancy cousin) to the party. We totally stole the idea to mix tahini into labneh from that Jamie Mag article. You should too. You need at least two hours to let the yogurt drain into labneh cheese but I’m still going to claim that this is an easy recipe - only a few ingredients and apart from draining the yogurt, it’s all pretty quick.  I imagine that a quick cheat version could be accomplished by simply using thick yogurt without draining it and buying pre-cooked beetroots. I can’t promise that it will be as good, but it’ll at least be quick and effortless. http:/­­/­­www.greenkitchenstories.com/­­wp-content/­­uploads/­­2017/­­08/­­Labneh_­drip.mp4 Okay, I can hear Isac trying to teach baby Noah how to roar like a lion with the only result that little brother cries like a baby. So I better post this now before major chaos is breaking out. No proofreading needed because yolo. Enjoy the recipe and check out info below re Amsterdam. Ciao! Beet Tartar & Sesame Labneh Serves 4 Recipe is inspired by a recipe from Jamie Magazine, Aug 2017 and a dinner we had a ABCV NYC. Sesame labneh 2 cups /­­ 500 g Greek or Turkish Yogurt 1/­­2 tsp salt 2 tbsp tahini 1 tbsp olive oil Beet Tartare  1/­­2 kg /­­ 1 lb  beetroots 2 tbsp capers juice from 1/­­2 lemon 1 tsp horseradish (or mustard) 1 handful fresh dill 1 handful fresh mint leaves salt & pepper Topping 1 handful pistachio nuts, finely chopped fresh dill, chopped fresh mint leaves, chopped 2 tbsp capers, halved lemon slices olive oil Serve with rye bread crisps, tender gem lettuce or cucumber slices Start by making the labneh. Add salt to the yogurt and stir until smooth. Wrap the yogurt in a cheese cloth or other clean thin cloth and tie it over a bowl for about 2 hours or more to allow liquid to be drained (meanwhile, cook the beetroots). You can leave it for 24-36 hours if you prefer a thicker labneh but 2 hours and a gentle squeeze (to get rid of some extra liquid) works fine. Stir in tahini, transfer to a serving bowl and top with a little bit of olive oil. Peel the beetroots, divide them in quarters and cook in salted water for approx 20 mins min or until tender. When ready, let cool and then transfer them to a food processor along with capers, lemon juice, horseradish, fresh dill, mint and seasoning. Pulse a few times until the beetroot has the consistency of course grits. Not too much though or you will end up with a sauce. You can also dice them finely. Arrange the beet tartare on a large serving plate. Fold in large dollops of sesame labneh and top with pistachio, fresh herbs, capers and lemon slices. Add a drizzle of olive oil and serve with crackers or thin rye bread crisps (thin rye bread pieces toasted in a pan or the oven for a couple of minutes), tender gem lettuce or cucumber slices to scoop with. Beet & Labneh Rye Waffle Toast We made this Waffled rye bread toast with the leftovers.  It’s a family favorite and we’ve got another recipe and the whole story behind this method in our latest book. Here are some quick instructions: Simply smudge labneh on two pieces of dark rye bread, add some spinach, fresh dill and mint and a thick layer of beet tartar. Brush a hot waffle iron with butter or coconut oil, combine the two slices and place inside the waffle iron, pressing together lightly. When you’re bread has got a nice and brown waffle pattern, the toast is ready. Cut the waffle toast in half and eat it while it’s hot. **************************** AMSTERDAM & ANTWERP - 7-9 September Green Kitchen at Home is being released in Dutch next week and to kick things off, we are coming to Amsterdam and Antwerp for a couple of press events, signings, dinners and talks. We will have a little talk, signing and dinner at the bookstore ‘t Stad Leest in Antwerp at 19.30 pm on 7 September. Tickets can be booked here. We are having a little talk + Q&A and a book signing at Limon in Amsterdam on 9 September between 10.30-11-30. There will be nibbles from the book served and we will end with a book signing. There will also be a lunch afterwards (between 12.00-14.00) and we will try to move around so we get the chance to chat with all of you. You can either buy tickets for both the talk and lunch, just the talk or just the lunch. Follow this link to read more about it in Dutch: Greenkitchenbooks.nl  

Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 1

July 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 1 A few months ago, we asked if you would be interested in seeing semi-regular, seasonal meal plans here and heard a resounding yes. We love coming up with whimsical and creative, plant-based recipes to share here, but we also want this site to be a friendly space for busy people looking to eat more plants. You know, for those of you who might not have the time or brain space for making, say, an experimental aquafaba meringue, like we do. Meal planning is a great practice for saving money on groceries (and impulse takeout orders!), eating homemade meals (which inevitably equal healthier meals), and minimizing those situations of staring blankly into your refrigerator, wondering what to eat for dinner. Do I plan my meals? Sometimes. Ironically, I think that if cooking wasn’t my job, I would plan our family meals much more. But because I’m in the business of dreaming up recipes for this blog and for other publications, I often end up with random, non-coordinated dishes in my fridge, which then become our breakfast, lunch and dinner. For now, we are thinking of publishing one meal plan a season, while maintaining regular, single-recipe post programming the rest of the time. Not changing anything about the blog! Just adding to what’s already here. This is our meal plan for the Summer of 2017. I tried hard to make it comprehensive, practical, and budget-friendly, but also not boring and really delicious. It all starts out with cooking a big pot of chickpeas and making a batch of almond milk, and most of the recipes stem from there. We are splitting this plan into two parts. This first part will focus on the shopping list, prep, breakfast and lunch recipes. The second part is here, and it’s all about dinner and dessert. Here we go! Menu (for dinner and dessert recipes, see Part 2) Breakfast Almond Pulp Lime Ginger Granola Overnight Berry Chia Oats Lunch Loaded Veggie Chickpea Salad Basil Zucchini Chowder Dinner Cauliflower Chickpea Fajitas Zucchini Kimchi Tacos Dessert Peach and Blackberry Crisp *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free and will make enough for a week, for 2-3 people Shopping List (print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, it’s got all the ingredients you’ll need for the recipes in this meal plan. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Produce Vegetables - 1 cauliflower head - 1 small broccoli head - 5-7 small to medium zucchini - 3 corn ears or 1 corn ear and 2 1/­­2 cups frozen corn - 1 of each green and red (or yellow, or orange) bell peppers - 1 poblano or jalapeno pepper - 2 portobello mushrooms - 2 medium carrots - 1 large and 1 small red onion - 2 yellow onions - 1-2 garlic heads (6-7 cloves) - 1-inch piece ginger - 2 avocados - 3-4 radishes (optional) Fruits - 3-4 limes - 3-4 lemons - berries: 1 pint fresh blueberries or 8 oz frozen, 1 pint fresh raspberries or 8 oz frozen, 1 pint strawberries – fresh (optional) - 1 cup blackberries – fresh or frozen - 3 ripe peaches or nectarines Herbs - 1 bunch (about 2 cups) basil - 1 bunch dill - 1 bunch cilantro - parsley (optional) Bulk - 1 1/­­2 cups dried chickpeas - 2 1/­­2 cups raw almonds or 2 cups almonds and 1/­­2 cup walnuts/­­other nuts of choice - 3/­­4 cup pumpkin or sunflower seeds - 3/­­4 cup chia seeds - 3 cups gluten-free old fashioned rolled oats - 1/­­4 – 1/­­2 cup unsweetened shredded coconut Other - 1 13.5 oz can light unsweetened Thai coconut milk - 1 can green or black olives - about 1 cup kimchi - tortillas of choice (corn for gf) - sun-dried tomatoes packed in olive oil (optional) - vanilla ice cream to serve with the fruit crisp (optional) Pantry /­­ Refrigerator Staples - white miso paste - sunflower butter /­­ tahini /­­ almond butter - Dijon mustard - Sriracha or chili sauce of choice - neutral coconut oil - maple syrup - coconut sugar - arrowroot powder (optional) - vanilla extract (optional) - kombu (optional) - capers (optional) Spices - whole cumin seeds - whole coriander seeds - red pepper flakes - smoked paprika - chili powder - garlic powder - cayenne pepper - black peppercorns - bay leaves (optional) Day by Day Prep List Saturday Night (Night Before Main Prep Day): These are just quick tasks that need to be done the day before your main prep day. Soaking nuts and beans helps rid them of phytic acid, which makes them easier to digest. It also kickstarts the germination process, making the nuts and beans more nutritious. - Soak 1 cup of almonds overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. You may need to repeat it later in a week to make more almond milk if needed more for granola. - Soak 1 1/­­2 cups dried chickpeas overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. Sunday (Main Prep Day): This is your main prep day, which you can also split into multiple days, depending on your schedule. You will find all the recipes for this prep day in this post, which includes two breakfast options and two lunch options for the whole week, as well as some simple prep for the dinners during the week. - Make almond milk for the overnight oats and granola, reserve the leftover almond pulp for the granola and fruit crumble. - Make the Almond Pulp Ginger Lime Granola - Cook the chickpeas to be used in the soup, fajitas, tacos and salad, reserve the cooking liquid for the soup. - Make the Overnight Berry Chia Oats - Make the Creamy Salad Dressing and the Loaded Veggie Chickpea Salad - Make the Zucchini and Basil Corn Chowder - Mix the Fajita Spice - Prep the veggies for the Fajitas Monday Night: Make the fajitas to have for dinner on Monday, Tuesday, and possibly Wednesday nights. This will be fairly quick, since you already prepped the vegetables and spice blend during prep day. Bake the crumble for dessert on Monday or Tuesday night, it’s quick and you will have enough for dessert for the rest of the week. The recipes for the fajitas and the crumble are in Part 2. - Make the Fajitas - Bake the Crumble (+ second batch of almond milk if you didn’t make it on prep day) Wednesday/­­Thursday night: Once you’ve finished eating the fajitas, prepare the Kimchi Zucchini Tacos for dinner starting Wednesday or Thursday night and until the end of the week. They are a very quick, weeknight friendly dish. These tacos would also work well as a lunch, if you need a break from the soup and salad. The recipe for the tacos is in Part 2. - Make the Tacos Recipes 1. Once you try making almond milk at home, it will be hard to go back to the store-bought kind, since it’s infinitely more delicious and affordable. In this meal plan, we also show you how to utilize the almond pulp that is left over from making almond milk in an addictive granola recipe. You will likely need to make two batches of almond milk throughout the week. You can make the first batch (to use for the granola and overnight oats) during the prep day, and the second batch on the day that you make the crisp, which will give you more milk to serve with the granola. You can also make both batches during the prep day. Almond Milk   Print Serves: about 4½ cups Ingredients 1 cup almond - soaked overnight, drained and rinsed 4 cups purified water Instructions Combine the almonds with the water in an upright blender, blend until smooth. Strain the milk through a nut milk bag into a jar or bottle. Squeeze the pulp dry as much as possible and reserve the almond pulp to use for the granola and crumble. Store the milk in the refrigerator. 3.5.3226 2. This Ginger-Lime Granola is made with the pulp, leftover from making almond milk. Besides being zero waste, this recipe is also incredibly delicious, with bright flavors from ginger and lime, rich notes from shredded coconut, and crunch from pumpkin and chia seeds. It tastes great served with almond milk and fresh berries. Almond Pulp Ginger-Lime Granola   Print Ingredients reserved almond pulp from making almond milk ¼ - ½ cup unsweetened shredded coconut ½ cup pumpkin or sunflower seeds ¼ cup chia seeds 2 tablespoons melted neutral coconut oil ¼ cup maple syrup 1 tablespoon grated ginger zest of 1 lime juice ½ lime pinch of sea salt Instructions Preheat oven to 325° F (160° C). Combine the almond pulp, shredded coconut, pumpkin/­­sunflower seeds, chia seeds, coconut oil, maple syrup, ginger, lime zest and juice, and a pinch of sea salt in a large bowl. Mix thoroughly. Spread the granola mixture on a parchment paper-covered baking sheet in a somewhat even layer and toast for 20 minutes. Remove from the oven and stir, breaking apart any large clumps. Place the sheet back in the oven and turn off the heat. Leave to dry in the oven for 1 hour. If granola is not completely dry by that time, turn the oven back on the lowest temperature and let dry for another 30 minutes or until completely dry and crispy. If you have convection oven, that setting is really useful here. Keep the granola in an airtight glass container at room temperature. Serve with almond milk and berries. 3.5.3226 3. Cooking a big pot of beans on a Sunday is always a good idea, since you will then have a solid base for all kinds of meals throughout the week. In this meal plan, the chickpeas are utilized in every savory recipe, making the dishes more nourishing and satisfying. Pot of Chickpeas   Print Ingredients 1½ cups dried chickpeas - soaked overnight, drained and rinsed 3-4 garlic cloves - crushed with a knife half a yellow onion 1-2 bay leaves (optional) 2-inch piece kombu (optional) sea salt Instructions While the granola is baking, combine the chickpeas with plenty of purified water in a soup pot. Add the garlic, onion, bay leaves and kombu, if using. The water level should be about 4 inches above the beans. Bring the chickpeas to a boil over high heat, lower the heat to a simmer and cook for 30 minutes. Check for doneness. If the chickpeas are soft, salt the water generously and cook for another 10 minutes, until the chickpeas are tender but still intact. Simmer longer, before adding salt, if chickpeas are not yet soft. Drain the chickpeas, reserving the cooking liquid. Youll need 1 cup of it for this meal plan, for the chowder. Optionally, freeze the rest of the liquid for future use in place of vegetable broth in any dish. 3.5.3226 4. These overnight oats are a breeze to put together and make for a satisfying, summery breakfast. We like our overnight oats to be chia-heavy, so this is something between a chia pudding and overnight oats, layered with juicy summer berries. Overnight Berry Chia Oats   Print Ingredients 2 cups rolled oats ½ cup chia seeds 2¾ cups homemade almond milk - from above ⅓ cup maple syrup splash of vanilla extract (optional) about 2 cups mix of fresh or frozen blueberries and raspberries, or any other berries of choice Instructions While the granola is baking and the chickpeas are simmering, combine the rolled oats and chia seeds in a large bowl. Add the almond milk, maple syrup and vanilla extract, if using, and stir to combine thoroughly. Spoon the oats between 2-3 clean jars in layers, alternating them with fresh or frozen blueberries, raspberries or any other berries of choice. Cover the jars with their lids and place in the refrigerator overnight. Enjoy for breakfast. 3.5.3226 5. I make this simple, creamy dressing all the time. It’s perfect in salads, as well as a sauce or dip for so many veggie dishes. Universal Creamy Salad Dressing   Print Ingredients 2 tablespoons white miso paste 2 tablespoons sunflower butter, tahini or almond butter 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon sriracha or other chili sauce of choice juice of 2 large lemons, plus more if needed Instructions Combine all the ingredients, with the exception of the lemon juice, in a glass jar or a bowl. Mix until smooth. Add the lemon juice and stir until well combined. Store refrigerated in an airtight glass container. 3.5.3226 6. This rainbow salad is loaded with nourishing summer vegetables, chickpeas, olives, herbs and seeds. At the base of the salad is garlicky, sautéed broccoli, which keeps much better than greens and makes for a really sturdy bed for the veggies. When slathered in the creamy dressing (above), this salad is completely irresistible. Loaded Veggie Chickpea Salad   Print Ingredients ½ cauliflower head - chopped 1 cup cooked chickpeas - from above ¼ cup toasted sunflower or pumpkin seeds 1 small to medium carrot - shaved into ribbons with a vegetable peeler kernels from 1 corn ear ½ cup olives - halved or quartered ⅛ red onion - chopped ¼ cup chopped dill ¼ cup chopped parsley (optional) handful basil leaves - torn (optional) 3-4 radishes - sliced (optional) about 2 tablespoons chopped sun dried tomatoes (optional) 1 tablespoon capers (optional) 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 head broccoli - cut into florets sea salt 3 garlic cloves - sliced freshly ground black pepper about 6 tablespoons Universal Creamy Salad Dressing, plus more for serving - from above Instructions Place the cauliflower into a food processor and pulse a few times into rice-sized pieces. Combine the cauliflower rice, chickpeas, sunflower or pumpkin seeds, carrots, corn, olives, onion, dill, parsley and basil, as well as the radishes, sun-dried tomatoes and capers, if using, in a large bowl. Warm the coconut oil in a sauté pan over medium heat. Add the broccoli and salt and sauté until bright green, for about 5-7 minutes. Add the garlic and stir it around for 30 seconds, until fragrant. Add the garlicky broccoli to the bowl with the salad. Season the salad with freshly ground black pepper and add about 6 tablespoons of the Creamy Salad Dressing. Toss to combine well. Store the salad refrigerated in an airtight container. Serve with more dressing. 3.5.3226 7. One of our favorite, easy summer soups, with delicate flavors of zucchini and basil, sweetness from corn, and creaminess from coconut milk. It makes for the perfect, light warm weather lunch. Zucchini and Basil Corn Chowder   Print Ingredients 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 teaspoon cumin seeds 1 teaspoon ground coriander (optional) pinch of red pepper flakes 1 yellow onion - chopped sea salt freshly ground black pepper 2½ cups fresh or frozen corn kernels 3-4 small zucchini - cubed 3 garlic cloves - sliced juice of ½ lemon 1 can unsweetened light Thai coconut milk 1 cup reserved chickpea broth - from above 1 cup cooked chickpeas - from above 1 packed cup basil leaves, plus more for serving Instructions Warm the coconut oil in a medium soup pot over medium heat. Add the spices, onion, a pinch of salt and black pepper, and sauté for 5 minutes, until onion is translucent. Add the corn and another pinch of salt and sauté for another 5 minutes. Add the zucchini and garlic, and stir around for 1-2 minutes, until the garlic is fragrant. Add the lemon juice and let it absorb for about 1 minute. Add the coconut milk, chickpea broth and chickpeas and bring to a boil. Remove from heat. Measure 1½ cups of the soup into an upright blender, add the basil, and blend into a chunky puree. Return the pureed soup back to the pot and mix it in. Serve the soup garnished with more basil. Store refrigerated in an airtight container. 3.5.3226 8. Use this spice mix for the Cauliflower Chickpea Fajitas, as well as in any other dishes, where a piquant savoriness would be welcome. Fajita Spice   Print Ingredients 2 tablespoons chili powder ½ tablespoon sea salt ½ tablespoon smoked paprika ½ tablespoon ground cumin, preferably freshly ground ½ tablespoon coconut sugar ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper 1 teaspoon garlic powder (optional) a few grinds of black pepper Instructions Combine all the ingredients in a small jar with a tight fitting lid. Close the jar and shake until well-combined. 3.5.3226 9. Prep the vegetables for the Cauliflower Chickpea Fajitas ahead of time, in order to simplify your weeknight dinner. Fajita Vegetable Prep   Print Ingredients ½ cauliflower - cut into florets 2 portobello mushrooms - sliced 1 large red onion - chopped 1 red, yellow or orange bell pepper - seeded and sliced 1 green bell pepper - seeded and sliced 1 poblano or jalapeno pepper - seeded and sliced Instructions Prep all the vegetables as specified in the ingredients list. Store the chopped cauliflower and mushrooms in separate containers. Store the chopped onion and all sliced peppers in one container. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Whipped Chocolate Chia Pudding Summer Greek Salad Pink Soup with Roasted Onions and Broccoli Lemongrass Mango Curry with Toasted Pumpkin Seeds .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 1 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Summery White Bean ‘Tuna’ Sandwich

June 21 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Summery White Bean ‘Tuna’ Sandwich This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. Everything tastes better on the beach. The sun and saltwater create a special kind of exhaustion that will make even the blandest piece of food taste mind-blowing. When I was a kid, we were usually handed fresh peaches after a long, tiring swim. The peach juice would inevitably end up all over our faces and running down our arms, but no one cared because the way they tasted made the whole world go quiet. Those same peaches never seemed quite as delicious at home, and one year I even made a point of only eating them when at the seaside. Today’s sandwich can be eaten anywhere and anytime, but it will also make for one very special beach snack. The main component of the sandwich is a white bean ‘tuna’ that has all of the best flavor components of tuna salad, with a little summer flare from fresh cucumber and basil. When mixed with red onion, pickles, olives, sunflower seeds, herbs and a mayo-like sauce, white beans taste remarkably close to tuna salad, especially sandwiched between some bread. Once you have all your ingredients at the ready, the ‘tuna’ comes together easily, and the batch will last you for close to a week’s worth of sandwiches. It’s sturdy and portable, and as a bonus has none of that characteristic scent that follows a tuna sandwich lunch. It’s satisfying and nutritious too, since white beans (as well as all pulses, aka chickpeas/­­beans/­­lentils/­­dry peas) are protein and fiber-packed little superfoods. This year we are partnering with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada on sharing some tasty, simple recipes centered around pulses, as part of their Half-Cup Habit program. The goal is to kindly inspire you to include at least 1/­­2 cup of cooked pulses in your cooking a few days a week, for sustainable, nourishing and tasty meals. This sandwich is a good start :) Summery White Bean Tuna Sandwich   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients for the white bean tuna salad juice of half a lemon ¼ medium red onion - chopped ½ cup dried white beans (such as cannellini, navy, baby lima, etc.) - soaked overnight in purified water and cooked ½ cup chopped English cucumber ⅓ cup chopped pickles ⅓ cup chopped olives ⅓ cup toasted sunflower seeds ⅓ cup chopped dill and/­­or parsley 1 tablespoon capers 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast freshly ground black pepper handful basil leaves (optional) ½ teaspoon garlic powder (optional) ¼ cup mayo, or more to taste - recipe follows sea salt - if needed for the mayo 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon sweet miso paste 1 tablespoon sunflower butter or any nut/­­seed butter 1 teaspoon sriracha juice of 1 lemon or more if needed sandwich add-ins shredded red cabbage tomato slices more whole basil leaves sprouts or microgreens Instructions to make the white bean tuna salad Pour the lemon juice over the chopped red onion in a small bowl and let it sit while preparing the rest of the ingredients. Combine the onions in lemon juice with the rest of the ingredients in a food processor. Pulse a few times, taking care not to over process; the mixture should be slightly chunky. Taste for salt and pepper, adjust if needed. Keep refrigerated in an air-tight container. Serve on good sandwich bread, with red cabbage, tomato, more basil, sprouts/­­microgreens, or any other favorite sandwich add-ins. to make the mayo Combine all the ingredients, except the lemon juice, in a small bowl and mix until smooth. Add the lemon juice and combine thoroughly. Add more of the lemon juice, if needed to achieve a creamy, slightly runny consistency. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Kohlrabi Avocado Salad Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes and Black Rice Lemon Tarts from Laura at The First Mess Ethiopian Injera with Mustard Lentils and Braised Cabbage .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Summery White Bean ‘Tuna’ Sandwich appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Grilled Mushroom Caesar Salad

May 30 2017 Vegan Dad 

Grilled Mushroom Caesar Salad This is a recipe I developed over two years ago that never saw the light of day. With BBQ season now upon us I thought would dust it off. There is perhaps nothing I love more that a marinated, grilled oyster mushroom. And certainly e veryone will think youre a fun guy when you make this traditional side salad as the main meal--all done on the barbecue! INGREDIENTS Dressing: ?      1/­­2 cup (125 mL) soy milk (more as needed) ?      1/­­2 cup (125 mL) vegan mayonnaise ?      2 tsp (10 mL) freshly squeezed lemon juice ?      2 small cloves garlic, minced ?      1 tbsp minced capers ?      1/­­2 tsp each light soy sauce, brown sugar ?      1/­­4 tsp each apple cider vinegar, mustard powder, onion powder ?      1 tsp miso ?      pinch ground ginger ?      salt and pepper to taste Salad: ?      2 small hearts of romaine lettuce ?      1/­­4 cup (60 mL) freshly squeezed lemon juice ?      2 tbsp (30 mL) olive oil ?      seasoned salt ?      16 large shitake mushrooms, stems removed ?      3/­­4 lb (375 g) oyster mushrooms, stems on ?      1/­­2 cup (125 mL) croutons METHOD Oil grill and preheat barbecue to med-high  Dressing:  1. In a medium bowl, whisk together dressing ingredients. Season to taste with salt and pepper and thin with more soy milk to get desired consistency.  Salad:  1. Slice romaine in half lengthwise, leaving core intact.  2. In a medium bowl, whisk together lemon juice, oil, salt and cayenne. Lightly brush over cut side of romaine. Set romaine aside on a tray.  3. Place mushrooms (cut oyster mushrooms into smaller pieces if needed) in remaining lemon juice mixture in a baking tray. Toss to coat. Season with seasoned salt. Let marinate for 15 mins  4. Place romaine cut-side down on grill. Place mushrooms on grill. Barbecue romaine for about 3 mins on the oiled side, and mushrooms, about 3-5 mins per side.  5. Set each romaine half on a plate. Divide shitake mushrooms evenly among the plates. Remove stems from oyster mushrooms and divide among the plates. Scatter with croutons. Drizzle with dressing. Serve.

Gemista – A Rainbow of Stuffed Veggies

September 20 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Gemista – A Rainbow of Stuffed Veggies With less than a month left before the baby is due to arrive, a riot of feelings are bombarding me as I am trying to get mentally and physically prepared. The excitement that our small family (or perhaps not so small anymore) soon get to meet the tiny person that has been kicking my ribs out for the past months. The nervousness how this baby will affect our family’s dynamic. And the fear that we won’t have time to hug all our children and each other enough as we will be drowning under all the duties of everyday life. I don’t think I can be entirely mentally prepared for all the changes that are coming. But I am at least trying to solve a few practicalities. I have just started filling the freezer with soups, bread and vegetable patties. I have also picked up a small selection of new clothes for the baby and brought down the ones we saved from Isac from the attic. Isac has been sleeping in our room until now but will soon move in together with Elsa. Things are starting to fall into place, piece by piece. One bump in the preparations is that David actually is traveling to Turkey tomorrow and will be there for a few days for a mission with WFP, meeting Syrian refugees and documenting their stories (he will tell you more about it here on the blog soon). Even if I am not thrilled about the timing, we both felt like this was something we wanted to be involved in. I’m just crossing my fingers that the baby isn’t too eager to come out early (and that he will stay safe down there)! Lately, I have been making variations of the Greek dish Gemista (a.k.a stuffed vegetables). The kids are loving it and have been shoving there faces full with the stuffing even before it’s baked. The traditional way of preparing the rice is to let it cook together with the rest of the stuffing ingredients but since we are using red or black rice, we cook it separately and then add it, otherwise it stains the entire filling and it just doesn’t look pleasant. In Greece they usually also add some potato slices in between the vegetables on the tray and then pour a thin layer of tomato passata to cover the bottom of the tray. This slightly cleaner approach work well in our family as the kids love to hold the stuffed vegetables with their hands without getting messy. But feel free to add potatoes and tomato sauce for a more traditional take. We used a mix of green, yellow and red tomatoes and peppers and it came out so beautiful. If you only have red tomatoes, that of course works as well. It is easily made vegan by swapping the feta cheese with tofu. Gemista – Rice Stuffed Vegetables  Serves 4 200 g/­­ 1 cup red rice, rinsed 500 ml /­­ 2 cups water 1 tsp sea salt 1 kg /­­ 2 lb mixed tomatoes and/­­or bell peppers (approx 15 vegetables, less if they are large) 1-2 tbsp olive oil or coconut oil 1 red onion, peeled and finely chopped 1 clove garlic, peeled and finely chopped 20 wrinkly black olives, pitted 2 tbsp pickled capers, drained 2 tbsp finely chopped fresh mint 2 tbsp finely chopped fresh parsley 1 handfull almonds, chopped 2 tbsp lemon juice 4 tbsp raisins or finely chopped dates 150 g /­­1 cup feta cheese (optional) Yogurt sauce 1 cup natural yogurt 1 tbsp olive oil 2 tbsp lemon juice 2 tbsp finely chopped mint leaves 1 small clove garlic, peeled and finely chopped salt and black pepper Preheat the oven to 175°C /­­ 350°F. Place rice and water in a saucepan, bring to a boil, lower the heat immediately and let simmer on low heat for as long as instructed on the packet (meanwhile prepare the other ingredients). Drain if needed and transfer the cooked rice to a large mixing bowl. Trim off the top of each tomato. Use a small spoon to scrape out the seeds and flesh from the tomatoes and into a bowl. Slice each bell pepper lengthwise and discard the seeds, alternatively trim off each top and discard the seeds (depending on the shape of the pepper). Heat oil in a skillet, add onion, olives and capers. Finely chop the tomato flesh and add it together with the seeds and liquid. Sauté for about 15 minutes until soft and fragrant, then transfer to the mixing bowl. Add the rest of the ingredients and stir to combine. Fill upp the tomatoes and bell peppers with the stuffing, pressing down very gently as you go. Place the caps back on top of the tomatoes and bell peppers. Place the vegetables in a greased ovenproof dish and bake in the oven for 30-35 minutes or until the tomatoes and bell peppers are soft, golden and have slightly burnt edges. Whisk together the ingredients for the yogurt sauce in a small bowl while the vegetables are in the oven. Serve the stuffed vegetables with a drizzle of yogurt sauce and a simple side salad of choice. ************************ PS! We are having a supper club at Urban Deli in Stockholm next Monday, 26th September at 17.00. We have created a dinner menu together with them and it includes a few smoothies from our new book, warm dishes from our other books and a dessert. We will be there all evening to talk about our books, food philosophy, answer questions and also try to sit down and chat with all of you. Hopefully we will all have a nice and cosy Monday evening. Tickets can be purchased here! We have also released a few new products together with Urban Deli - a curry, a salad, a smoothie and a delicious overnight oats - that are sold as take-away boxes on all their locations.

Vegan Caesar Salad with Tempeh Croutons, Roasted Peaches and Corn

August 3 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegan Caesar Salad with Tempeh Croutons, Roasted Peaches and Corn A bit on the state of things around here - The kitchen renovations have been put off until October, and all I can say is that I’m very relieved. I knew that gutting the kitchen right after submitting the cookbook manuscript would be chaotic, but when it actually came down to it, I felt even more unprepared and exhausted than I ever expected. Not to mention, I still have a list of recipes to perfect for the book, which requires a fully working kitchen. Thankfully, our contractor – the only good one we could find after months of meetings and unreturned calls (because sometimes people in Florida are too chill) – is booked up two months in advance. A blessing in disguise, if I ever saw one. Among other things, I’m finding it painfully difficult to choose tile for the kitchen floor (Moroccan? Spanish? Mosaic? Forget the tile and do hard-wood?) and I’m really welcoming this extra time for making a decision. I am still working on the staircase leading up to the kitchen, and if you follow us on snapchat (golubkakitchen), you’ve likely seen some snaps of that whole process. The stairs were covered in bad carpet by previous owners, and finally stripping off that dust magnet of a surface felt great. Re-finishing the wooden stairs underneath, however was a huge pain, and re-awakened my carpal tunnel, which started when I was working in the dental field. But at least the stairs are looking great. Paloma goes back to school mid-August and turns eight around the same time too. We’re looking for a Beatles-related present (girl has serious Beatlemania), and the birthday cake will be an ice cream cake, which I will hopefully share here one of the coming Sundays. I recently promised to do more salad posts, and since we are getting into the hottest part of the summer, salads are the key item at any given meal around these parts. And this Caesar, you guys! I’ve already made it several times since coming up with the entirely vegan Caesar dressing. The dressing is everything you want your salad leaves drenched in (and you will want to drench with this one, not just drizzle) – it’s garlicky, creamy and incredibly savory. I aimed for a salad that can be eaten as a main course, and besides the addition of protein-rich beans in the dressing, there are crispy, golden tempeh ‘croutons’ that will fill you up nicely. Grilled peaches and corn contribute perfect little pockets of juice and sweetness here, and Laura’s pine nut parm is optional but very addictive. This Caesar is also easily adaptable to other seasons – instead of the peaches and corn, include roasted squash in the fall/­­winter, asparagus/­­peas in the spring, etc., etc. It’s August! Take it easy and enjoy this last stretch of summer, perhaps even with some hearty Caesar in tow ;) Vegan Caesar Salad with Tempeh Croutons, Roasted Peaches and Corn   Print Serves: 6 Ingredients for the Caesar dressing 1 cup cooked white beans, plus cooking liquid/­­liquid from can to achieve desired dressing consistency 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice ½ tablespoon Dijon mustard ½ tablespoon vegan Worcestershire sauce 1 teaspoon capers ½ teaspoon maple syrup ¼ teaspoon sriracha 1 garlic clove sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste 2 tablespoons olive oil for the salad 4-6 corn ears 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil - divided freshly ground black pepper - to taste 3-6 ripe, sweet peaches - cut in half 1 package tempeh - cubed 1 medium bunch kale - stems removed, leaves cut into bite-sized pieces ½ tablespoon olive oil sea salt - to taste 1 small head Romaine lettuce - torn into bite-size pieces pine nut Parmesan - optional Instructions to make the dressing Combine all the ingredients, with the exception of the cooking liquid and olive oil in an upright blender. Blend until smooth, adding in cooking liquid as needed to achieve the desired creamy salad dressing consistency. Add olive oil with the motor still running. to make the salad Rub corn ears with 1 tablespon coconut oil, salt and black pepper and grill on an outdoor grill or under the broiler, watching and rotating the corn, until charred in places. Let cool slightly and cut kernels off the ears, set aside. Grill peaches on an outdoor grill or under the broiler until charred. Let cool and slice into wedges. Set aside. Warm the remaining 1 tablespoon of coconut oil in a medium pan. Add tempeh cubes, sprinkle with salt and fry until golden and crispy. Set aside. Place kale in a large mixing bowl, drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with sea salt, and massage until wilted. Add in torn Romaine lettuce. Pour the dressing over the greens and toss to coat. Distribute between bowls or plates, top with corn kernels, peach slices, tempeh croutons and sprinkle with pine nut Parmesan, if using. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Smoky Summer Vegetable Tangle Roasted Pepper Lasagna Baby Spinach and Strawberry Salad with Pink Dressing No Noodle Pad Thai .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Vegan Caesar Salad with Tempeh Croutons, Roasted Peaches and Corn appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Fifty Shades of Greens

February 17 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Fifty Shades of Greens Many of our recipes are well talked through and planned between the two of us. We write shopping lists, buy enough groceries so we can test cook them properly a few times and make sure to take down notes during the process. I always use the laptop but Luise insists on scribbling on small pieces of paper that often end up in the hands of the kids and their crayons (can somebody please tell that woman to put her fancy new Macbook to use!). We always feel quite content after having published one of those type of recipes. But it actually seems like the recipes from simple fridge and freezer findings that are whipped together quickly without a moment of planning, seem to spark just as much interest, even though they are very basic. This quick pasta dish with fifty shades of greens started out like that, with two hungry kids, half a package of pasta (made from legumes) and some leftover green vegetables (the ones on the photo obviously look a little less sad than the first time we made it). It ticks all the right boxes for a February recipe. Simple. Comforting. Nutritious. Vegan. Tasty! It reminds me of a pasta dish I used to cook back when I was living in Rome. One of my favourite things to buy from the local farm stands were cute baby zucchinis (and they were so cheap!) that I sliced and fried with onion, garlic, thyme, capers, fresh herbs and spinach. Then I poured over a dash of cream and white wine before tossing in the cooked pasta. It was my go-to dinner for one, ready in 12 minutes. Here we have added even more greens. We are using frozen peas and one whole broccoli, shaving the stem thinly and breaking the rest into small florets. The vegetables are cooked in coconut cream which also adds a little sweetness. When making green vegetable dishes like this, remember not to cook it too long. You just want to soften the vegetables up, not kill them. If you are a quick chopper, you can have dinner ready in less than 20 minutes. And if you are cooking for kids and are afraid that they will dream horrible nightmares from being fed too many vegetables, Elsa’s recommendation is skipping the spinach and add more peas. Because cooked spinach is: “The most horrible thing I have ever tasted in my entire life”. Our pasta of choice here is a green pea fusilli pasta which is gluten free but also adds protein. Not to mention, it is green and bring yet another shade to this dish! More and more alternative pasta/­­noodle products made entirely from legumes (beans, lentils and peas) are popping up in stores. Not only health food stores but also many supermarkets. We like them because they are nutritious alternatives to regular refined wheat pasta. They are also rich in fiber, made from complex carbohydrates, naturally gluten free and they come in many colours and shapes, which make it more fun for the kids to eat. Pea, Spinach & Broccoli Pasta (aka fifty shades of greens) Serves 4 If you don’t have all the vegetables at home, no worries, just use what you’ve got. You can use frozen broccoli and spinach instead of fresh. If you’ve got some leftover white wine in the house, try adding a splash together with the garlic and onion. And if you don’t fancy coconut milk/­­cream, you can use ordinary cream, Greek yogurt or a vegan alternative. 2 tbsp olive oil or coconut oil 4 cloves of garlic 1 yellow onion 4 sprigs of fresh thyme 3 tbsp pickled capers (use the brine as well) 1/­­2 large zucchini or 1 small, sliced into thin half moons 1 small broccoli, broken into small florets and stem sliced thinly 2 handfuls whole spinach leaves, rinsed 1 small can coconut cream or the solid top layer of a coconut milk (more info here) 1 1/­­2 cup frozen peas 1-2 tbsp lemon juice and a little zest sea salt and pepper chopped fresh parsley, for serving Pasta for 4 servings, choose the sort you prefer (read about our pasta of choice above). Bring a saucepan filled with water to boil. Add pasta and let cook until ready (as instructed on the package), then drain and set aside. Heat oil in a large skillet on medium heat. Finely chop garlic and onion and add to the skillet. Let sauté until fragrant and then add thyme, capers (and white wine, if using) and cook for another minute. Add zucchini and broccoli and cook until almost tender. Now add peas, spinach, coconut cream, lemon, salt and pepper and cook until the spinach is just wilted. Taste and adjust the flavors to your liking. Add the cooked pasta to the skillet and mix to combine. Scatter over fresh parsley and serve. Non-vegans can of course add some grated cheese if they wish.

Herby Picnic Potato Salad

September 1 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Herby Picnic Potato Salad A couple of weeks ago we had a little picnic for our baby boy with family and a few close friends. It was kind of a combined (very delayed) Welcome-to-the-World-Isac and Happy-First-Birthday celebration and it turned out to be a real gem of a day. It has basically been raining in Sweden all summer, but this day was filled with sunshine, good food, laughter and lots of chubby babies. Despite having written two cookbooks, we actually rarely cook for our friends. Instead we prefer going the picnic route, having everyone bringing something to share. It just makes it a lot easier to plan these kind of things instead of having to do everything yourself. It also makes for a more fun and spontaneous event. We did actually end up cooking quite a lot anyway for this picnic. We made a few picnic pies, two monster versions of our Blueberry Cake (not shattered this time) and an adapted version of the potato salad from Sara Fortes latest book Bowl+Spoon. We got to read her book manuscript before it was published as we were asked to write a little quote for the back. Here is what we wrote: We love that Saras recipes are always focused on real ingredients, simple to prepare, and undoubtedly delicious. The bowl theme is brilliant and exactly how we prefer to eat our everyday meals. Apart from a few other favourites in the book, we have been making different versions of Saras potato salad at least five times this summer. Its incredibly flavourful with lots of fresh herbs and capers, and also has a tangy zing from white wine vinegar. The original recipe calls for hard-boiled eggs and its an excellent combo, but we have also been playing with other (vegan) sources of protein. One time we tried beluga lentils and here we are using chickpeas. We added kale and apple to make it less of a side dish and more of a complete meal. As the name implies, this is great to pack on a picnic but it is also a good indoor meal. And when your kids are tired of having potato salad for the fifth time, you can fry the leftovers in a pan into a quick and flavourful hash. Herby Picnic Potato Salad with Kale, Apple & Chickpeas Serves 6 Recipe adapted from Bowl+Spoon by Sara & Hugh Forte. We usually make an extra large (almost double) batch of the vinaigrette because it’s so good. If your white wine vinegar is very sweet, you can add some lemon juice for extra zing. 2 pounds/­­1 kg small new potatoes Coarse Herb Vinaigrette 3 tbsp pickled capers 2 spring onions or green onions 2 cups loosely packed herbs (a mix of chives, parsley, basil and top greens from the celery) 2 tbsp white wine vinegar or apple cider vinegar 1/­­3 cup cold pressed oil sea salt and black pepper, to taste 2 apples, diced 3 celery stalks (save the top greens for the vinaigrette), finely diced 2 leaves kale, chard or spinach, chopped 1 can (14 oz/­­400 g) cooked chickpeas, rinsed Put the potatoes in a large pot, cover them with water and bring the water to a boil. Boil for 12-15 minutes until they are cooked through but not falling apart - just until you can easily pierce a sharp knife through the center. Drain and set aside to cool. In a food processor, blitz capers and their brine, onions, basil, parsley, chives, celery greens, vinegar, lemon juice, oil, salt and pepper until you get a coarse vinaigrette. Quarter the potatoes and collect them in a larger mixing bowl. Pour the vinaigrette over the just-cooled potatoes and gently toss to coat. It will look like a lot of dressing, but the potatoes soak it up as they sit. Stir celery, apples, kale and chickpeas into the potatoes. Taste for salt and pepper. Serve at room temperature.

Summer Pasta with Smashed Tomatoes, Peaches & Mozzarella

July 23 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Summer Pasta with Smashed Tomatoes, Peaches & Mozzarella We have been cooking this quick little dinner recipe rather frequently during the summer. At a first glance, it might seem like it’s just a classic/­­boring fresh tomato pasta. But when you consider the context: hot summer days, family time, ripe tomatoes in season, everyone is hungry but no one feels like cooking … you’ll realise that it’s exactly the kind of simple dinner that we all need more of. We have of course given this dish our own schwung. Instead of just serving tomatoes fresh, we squeeze/­­punch/­­smash them up a bit so they get softer and release some of that lovely juice that gets mixed with olive oil, a splash of the hot pasta water, fresh basil, garlic and pickled capers. Already there, you got yourself a pretty great flavor combo. But then we throw in a handful of peach slices for extra sweetness, delicious toasted pine nuts and some large chunks of creamy buffel mozzarella, which makes it Italian-grandmother-kind-of-awesome. You can serve this with any type of pasta. In our home we usually use various sorts of gluten free (buckwheat is a favourite) or whole grain pasta or spiralized/­­shredded zucchini (also known as zoodles), but here we are using bean linguine, made entirely from dried beans and therefore naturally vegan, gluten free and high in protein. This pasta has a delicious flavour and a nice chewy texture. We have seen various sorts of bean pastas starting to pop up in supermarkets and health food stores - soybean pasta, chickpea pasta and black bean pasta - so keep an eye out for those next time you are out shopping for pasta. In this dish the quality of the ingredients is everything. Use only fresh, ripe tomatoes and peaches and make sure to choose your favourite olive oil. If you want a creamier sauce, you can sub the mozzarella for ricotta cheese + some lemon juice, which also is really awesome. You can of course also add parmesan cheese if you prefer. For a vegan option, I think it’d be interesting to work with a softer type tofu instead of the cheese. Perhaps pre-marinate it for a while in olive oil and fresh Italian herbs. Pasta with smashed raw tomatoes, peach & mozzarella Serves 4 1 clove garlic 2 tbsp pickled capers 500 g /­­ 1 lb ripe tomatoes 3-4 sprigs fresh basil, leaves picked and chopped, save some for garnish a few glugs of cold-pressed olive oil a pinch sea salt and black pepper 200 g  /­­ 7 oz bean pasta or other gluten free pasta alternative or zucchini noodles 1 handful pine nuts 2 peaches or nectarines 200 g /­­ 7 oz mozzarella cheese 1 handful rucola/­­aragula/­­rocket salad Mince the garlic very finely. Mash the capers with the back of a knife. Divide the tomatoes in half. Chop the basil. Place everything in a large serving bowl and add a few glugs of olive oil, salt and pepper. With your hands, squeeze or punch the tomatoes until soft and juicy. Cook the pasta in lightly salted boiling water according to the instructions on package. Meanwhile, lightly toast the pine nuts in a skillet on medium heat. Slice the nectarines and tear the mozzarella in smaller pieces. When that pasta is done, reserve about 1/­­2 cup /­­ 100 ml of cooking water and drain the rest. Add the pasta immediately to the serving bowl while it’s still hot, toss with the tomato ‘sauce’ and rucola until well mixed, add some of the cooking water if you want to make it a little juicier. Decorate with peaces, mozzarella cheese, pine nuts, arugula, a few whole basil leaves and an extra drizzle of olive oil. Ready to serve.

Polenta Pizza Crust

May 23 2015 VegKitchen 

Polenta Pizza CrustWhile I love homemade pizza, I look for shortcuts to replace a dough-based crust-- like this polenta crust. Though it’s gluten-free, you need not follow a GF diet to enjoy this change-of-pace pizza crust. Recipe from from Plant-Powered Families: Over 100 Kid-Tested, Whole-Foods Vegan Recipes by Dreena Burton, BenBella Books (C) 2015, reprinted by permission. Photos by Nicole Axeworthy. Makes: One 12-inch crust - 1 tube (18-ounce) prepared organic polenta, broken in pieces - 1 cup cooked and cooled brown rice -  1/­­2 cup chickpea flour (or use 1/­­2  cup plus 2 tablespoons millet flour) -  1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder -  1/­­4 scant teaspoon salt - 1 tablespoon cornmeal Preheat oven to 425°F. If you have a pizza stone, place it in the oven. If you dont, have a pizza pan or other large baking pan at hand (but it doesnt need to preheat). In a food processor, add the polenta, rice, chickpea flour, garlic powder, and sea salt and pulse first to combine, then process just until the mixture comes together in a ball on the blade. Remove the dough ball and place it on a large sheet of parchment paper. Cover with another piece of parchment. Roll out the dough with a rolling pin between the parchment sheets to about 12″ diameter or more, and 1/­­2″ thick. Remove the top sheet of parchment from the dough. Using a pizza peel or a very large tray/­­plate, transfer the pizza crust to the pizza stone (with the single layer of parchment still underneath the dough). Bake for 25 minutes, until it is golden around the edges and firm in the center. Remove the pizza stone to let the crust cool slightly for few minutes while preparing the toppings. When ready to bake, increase oven temperature to 450°F. Using a large plate or your pizza peel, remove the crust from the pizza stone/­­ pan and invert to remove the parchment. Sprinkle the cornmeal over stone/­­pan, and place on pizza. Add toppings (see suggestions), and bake for 13-15 minutes, until heated through, and longer if desired for crispier edges/­­crust. Remove, let sit for 3-5 minutes, then serve. Suggested Toppings: Toppings that are not too moist are best. You can always preroast veggies to reduce moisture. Topping Ideas: Sliced bell peppers, roasted zucchini or eggplant, olives, sun-dried tomatoes, thinly sliced red onion, artichoke hearts, capers. Visit Dreena Burton at Plant-Powered Kitchen. - Here are more recipes for Easy Pizzas.

Roasted Veggie Grain Platter

March 27 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Roasted Veggie Grain Platter Hi, David here. I’ll get to the recipe soon but first I just wanted to share a little scene from last night. Isac was watching a baking program for kids and as I was tucking him in, he thoroughly explained the whole process of making croissants to me. You have so much butter in croissants, dad. Like, a lot. You put it on the dough and fold it over the butter like this. And you hit it with the rolling pin like this, bam bam bam. When it comes to numbers and letters, he can be a little clueless, but the fact that our three year-old had memorized all the details in croissant baking from just watching it once on tv, made me all happy and proud. I’m not saying that mastering a croissant is more important than math, but teaching our kids how to cook has been one of the things I’ve really looked forward to as a dad. And he is really into it. The little kids stove has long been his favorite toy both at home and in kindergarten an he often serves imaginary pancakes to all his friends. I’ve promised him that we will make croissants together tonight so I’m off to prep a dough right after this (making the rye croissants from Green Kitchen Travels). I’ll report back with how it goes. Today’s recipe doesn’t have anything to do with croissants but Isac does play a little part as kitchen helper in the video below. So, the recipe. There is one obvious reason why grain bowls have become so popular in the last couple of years. Their looks. If you don’t know what a grain bowl is, it’s basically a mix of roasted and raw vegetables on a bed of grains and herbs arranged in a bowl. The mix of vegetables often make these bowls super colorful and therefore also very popular on instagram. Grain bowls are however more then just pretty. They are hearty and provide a variety of textures and flavors. They are also very easy to adapt to what you have at home and what’s in season. We often make grain bowls for lunch, with any cooked grain, millet or quinoa as the bed, adding leftover vegetables from the fridge on top. In this recipe, we have taken the grain bowl concept and turned it into a platter. It’s topped with roasted and fresh spring vegetables, feta cheese, egg halves and hazelnuts. It’s a beautiful dish and a great one to make for Easter dinner. If you want to take the Easter concept even further, you could add roasted asparagus as well. We use an organic five-grain mix (emmer wheat, barley, gamut, brown rice and oat groats) from Zeta as the grain base but if you can’t find something similar, go with your favorite grain. Grains thrive with flavor friends, so we have paired these with a quick salsa made from marinated bell peppers, olives, capers, herbs and lemon. And stirred in a bit of feta cheese and toasted hazelnuts as well. It’s all there, flavours, looks and textures. Roasted Veggie Grain Platter with Bell Pepper Salsa Serves 4 To make this vegan, you can simply skip the eggs and feta cheese. 1 x 250 g bag Zeta 5-grain mix (or grains of choice) Roasted vegetables: 1 bunch carrots 3 purple spring onions or 2 red onions 2 small zucchini 1 tbsp olive oil sea salt Bell pepper & olive salsa: 100 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup grilled marinated bell pepper 100 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup Lecchino olives 3 tbsp capers 5-6 stalks fresh parsley and mint 1/­­2 lemon, juice 4 tbsp olive oil Topping: 2-3 medium soft boiled eggs 150 g feta cheese 100 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup hazelnuts, toasted and chopped 2 handfuls mache lettuce 6 heirloom cherry tomatoes, halved 1 bunch radishes Preheat the oven at 200°C /­­ 400°F and cover a baking tray with baking paper. Peal or clean the carrots and trim off the outer layer of the onion. Cut the onion lengthwise and the zucchini in bite-size pieces. Place the vegetables on the tray. Drizzle with oil and salt and roast for 15-20 minutes. Cook the grains in a large bowl of salted water according to the instructions on the package and drain in a sieve once they are ready. Make the salsa by chopping all the ingredients finely. Place in a bowl, squeeze over lemon juice and drizzle with oil. Fold the salsa into the grains, reserving some of it for serving. Crumble 2/­­3 of the feta cheese into the grains and half of the hazelnuts. Toss so everything is mixed. Pour the grains onto a platter, top with the roasted vegetables, lettuce, tomatoes, radishes, egg halves, feta cheese and hazelnuts. Drizzle with olive oil and serve with the remaining salsa and some sourdough bread on the side. Disclosure: We were compensated by Zeta for creating this recipe and video using some of their products. All words are our own. 

Watermelon & Halloumi Salad with Magic Sauce

August 9 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Watermelon & Halloumi Salad with Magic Sauce Hello! This is David & Luise. Remember us? During our almost eight years of blogging we have never left it silent for two months before. We’re going to do what we always do in these situations and blame the kids. Wether we miss a dentist appointment, forget to answer a text message, get a parking ticket or are two months late with a blog post, it’s always our kid’s fault. In this case however it’s actually somewhat true. We simply underestimated how much time and attention three kids on summer holiday takes. They have sooo much energy. I (David) have been thinking of ways to connect them (and with them I mean Isac) to the power grid so that they (he) could replace a nuclear power plant or two. And I could perhaps cash in a Nobel price for saving the world. Anyway, after a couple of weeks of feeling bad about not having a single second over to blog new recipes, we instead decided to give ourselves a summer break from it all. So we have been trying to keep up with our children’s pace (obviously impossible) and play on their rules (also impossible because they ignore rules) this summer. It’s been fun and much needed. But we are here now with plenty of new recipe ideas and projects. Lots of other things have happened during the summer. We almost bought ourselves a tiny smoothie bar in a park, we burnt pancakes from Green Kitchen at Home inside a jam-packed little book store in Bath and we have planned the release of the European languages next month, but we’ll find time to talk more about all that. For now, let’s just talk food. Before the summer and watermelon season is all over. This recipe has been going on repeat all summer. It’s actually a combination of two recipes which we recently realized work brilliantly together. A simple watermelon and halloumi salad and our Magic Green Sauce. We first got the idea to combine watermelon with halloumi from a recipe photo in a supermarket pamflett and from that combo, we’ve added some chickpeas, cherry toms and pumpkin seeds to make it less of a side and more of a meal. It’s a really nice combination. Rich and chewy halloumi, sweet and fresh watermelon, crunchy pumpkin seeds and a tangy, flavorful and slightly spicy sauce. If I wasn’t such a humble guy, I would say that it’s probably one of the best watermelon salads you’ll try this summer. Luckily, I’m super humble and will just say that it’s pretty good. A simple vegan option would be to replace the halloumi with marinated tofu. Just make sure to squeeze out the liquid before marinating it, so it soaks up all the flavor. Quinoa, black lentils or rice could also be a great addition if you want to make this salad more substantial. Here is a little salad assembling action by Luise. Technically, the Magic Green Sauce is just our take on Chimichuri with a more hippie name. We use lime juice instead of vinegar and have added a little avocado to give it the right balance between creamy and chunky and also a few drips maple syrup to round off the sharpness from the other flavors. The magic lies in its ability to transfer any simple dish into something flavorful. Apart from this salad, we also use it on scrambled eggs, as a dip for raw crudités, inside rye sandwiches and on top of shakshuka. We have made it with a number of different herb combinations and found that anything goes (but parsley, cilantro/­­coriander and mint is still a fav). Watermelon & Halloumi Salad with Magic Green Sauce Serves 4 Watermelon & Halloumi Salad 1 kg /­­ 2 lb watermelon 200 g /­­ 7 oz halloumi 150 g /­­ 1 cup good quality cherry tomatoes  1 can /­­ 200 g /­­ 1 cup cooked chickpeas  60 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup pumpkin seeds /­­ pepitas 2 large handfuls Mâche lettuce (or any tender lettuce) 2 tbsp olive oil 1 lime Salt Magic Green Sauce 1 large handful (30 g /­­ 1 tightly packed cup) mixed fresh herbs (we used parsley, cilantro and mint) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 120 ml olive oil Juice from 1 lime 1 tbsp capers 1 tsp maple syrup 1 clove garlic 1 small chili 1/­­2 avocado 1/­­2 tsp sea salt flakes Start by preparing the sauce. Add all sauce ingredients to a food processor and pulse a few times until coarsely mixed, check the flavor and consistency and add more salt, herbs or oil if needed. If you don’t have a food processor, finely chops herbs, capers, garlic and chili, mash the avocado and mix everything in a bowl together with olive oil, lime juice and maple syrup. Add salt to taste. Then set aside. Dice the watermelon and halloumi, quarter the tomatoes and rinse the chickpeas. Toast the pumpkin seeds on medium heat in a dry pan with a little salt until they begin to pop, then transfer them to a chopping board and chop coarsely. Add a little oil to the pan and fry the halloumi for a couple of minutes until golden on all sides. Arrange the lettuce in a bowl or on a serving platter. Add chickpeas, tomatoes, watermelon and halloumi. Squeeze over a little lime juice and drizzle with oil and toss until mixed. Top with pumpkin seeds and Magic Green Sauce, with extra in the side. Enjoy! ***************** PS! We are off to Rome now to celebrate that it was 10 years ago that my drunk feet tried to seduce dance Luise on a club by the Tiber while simultaneously using ALL my Italian pick up lines on her (took me approx 1 hour before I realized that she was Danish and not Italian!). We’re bringing all the kids this time and we’d really appreciate a comment if you know any good places to eat, fun playgrounds, outdoor pools or your favorite gelato bars. Grazie!

Roasted Cauliflower Piccata

July 18 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Roasted Cauliflower Piccata When you cut a head of cauliflower like you would a loaf of bread, the resulting slabs can be roasted and served as delicious steaks. My favorite way to season them is with a luscious lemony piccata sauce and mushrooms atop a serving of creamy mashers. Roasted Cauliflower Piccata - 1 head cauliflower, cored - Olive oil, for cooking - 1 cup sliced mushrooms - 2 scallions, minced - 1/­­3 cup dry white wine or vegetable broth - 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice - 1 1/­­2 tablespoons capers, drained - 1/­­4 cup minced fresh parsley - 2 teaspoons vegan butter, chilled - Your favorite mashed potatoes, to serve - Preheat the oven to 425°F. Lightly oil two large rimmed baking sheets or line them with parchment paper. - Place the cauliflower on a cutting board, cored-side down, and use a long serrated knife to cut it into 1/­­2 -inch-thick slices, as if you were cutting a loaf of bread. Arrange the cauliflower slices in a single layer on the prepared baking sheets and brush with a little olive oil or spray with cooking spray and season with salt and pepper to taste. Roast the cauliflower until tender and nicely browned, 25 to 30 minutes, turning once with a large metal spatula about halfway through. - While the cauliflower is roasting, make the sauce. Heat 2 teaspoons oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add the mushrooms and scallions and sauté for about 3 minutes, or until softened. Add the wine, lemon juice, and capers and cook, stirring, until the liquid reduces slightly. Just before serving, add the parsley, then stir in the butter to melt it into the sauce. - To serve, spoon a serving of the mashed potatoes onto each plate and top with a cauliflower steak. Spoon the sauce on top. Text excerpted from VEGANIZE IT! (C) 2017 by Robin Robertson. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. Photo by William and Susan Brinson.   The post Roasted Cauliflower Piccata appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Hearts of Palm Ceviche

June 20 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Hearts of Palm Ceviche Hearts of palm stand in for raw fish in this plant-powered version of the classic South American dish. There are many versions of this salad throughout central and South America, so lets add this plant-based pantry version to the list. If you like heat, add the jalapeno - if not, leave it out. The avocado is an optional but delicious inclusion. Hearts of Palm Ceviche makes a great salad served over lettuce or a fun appetizer spooned onto tortilla chips, crackers, or slices of toasted baguette.   Hearts of Palm Ceviche - 1/­­4 cup fresh lime juice - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 1 jalape?o, seeded and minced (optional) - 1/­­2 teaspoon sugar - 2 tablespoons minced scallion ((green onion)) - 1 teaspoon small capers - Salt and ground black pepper - 1/­­2 English cucumber, peeled and thinly sliced - 1 (14-ounce) jar hearts of palm, cut into 1/­­4-inch rounds - 1 medium tomato, finely chopped or 1 (4-ounce) jar chopped pimientos - 2 tablespoons kalamata olives or green olives, pitted and halved - 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro or parsley - 1 ripe avocado, peeled, pitted and chopped (optional) - Tortilla chips, to serve -  In a small bowl, combine the lime juice, oil, jalapeno, if using, sugar, scallions, capers, and salt and pepper to taste. Mix well. - In a large shallow bowl arrange the cucumber slices in a layer. Top with a layer of the hearts of palm slices. Sprinkle the tomato and olives, then drizzle with the reserved dressing. Set aside to marinate at room temperature for 15 minutes or refrigerate for up to 3 hours before serving. - When ready to serve, taste and adjust the seasonings if needed and sprinkle with the cilantro and avocado if using. Serve with tortilla chips. Recipe from Cook the Pantry (C) 2015 by Robin Robertson. Photo by Annie Oliverio. Used by permission Vegan Heritage Press LLC. The post Hearts of Palm Ceviche appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Sourdough Salad Pizza

October 14 2016 My New Roots 

Sourdough Salad Pizza Along with ice cream, chocolate, and burgers, pizza was definitely on my hit list when I started eating healthier. But like every single one of those foods, I have come up with a way of making them not only not bad for me, but actually good for me. If you live in the pizza is junk food world, this is the post for you, as I will single-handedly convince you that this universally loved indulgence can in fact, be nutritious. It starts with the crust. The pizza youll get at your local restaurant, in the freezer section of your grocery store, or out of the backseat of a teenage kids delivery car, is typically made with white flour. It also likely contains commercial yeast, the magical ingredient that makes dough rise quickly and predictably. There are of course other ways of making dough or crust, but these ingredients and methods can be more expensive and take more time. Most places stick to the quick and cheap, which almost always compromises our health. How do we make a healthier crust? The answer is fermentation! Sourdough: whats the big deal? Sourdough is essentially fermented flour. And if youre familiar with fermented foods, youll know that they are easier to digest, and contain far more nutrients than the original ingredients themselves. Sourdough bread is made by combining flour and water together with the natural yeasts that live on everything - our hands, our food, swirling around in the air - and after letting it hang out for a few days, youll have whats called a starter.  This starter is added to a basic combination of more flour, water and salt, essentially inoculating it with all of the good bacteria and friendly yeasts. These organisms create lactic acid, which neutralize phytates, making nutrients more easily absorbed by the body. Lactic acid slows down the entrance of glucose into the blood stream, preventing the infamous glycemic index roller coaster. But my favourite of all, is that lactic acid helps break down the complex structure of gluten, making it far easier to digest. That means that people who have a sensitivity to gluten (except celiacs) can potentially eat sourdough bread without digestive upset, as the protein has been changed into a simpler arrangement that is easier to break down in the body. Three cheers for that, eh? Down below Ive included the recipe for both sourdough starter and making pizza from that starter. I think sourdough pizza is a great place to begin because it is far easier to pull off than bread, in my experience. No matter if your dough gets a solid rise or not, youll still end up with a gloriously crisp, chewy crust that will your body will also thank you for. Toppings: not just a pretty face The toppings on a pizza will make or break the overall flavour, but also the potential health benefits. It doesnt take a rocket scientist to know that gobs of cheese and pepperoni are not the most health-supportive choices. So, see topping your pie as an opportunity to get creative, while sneaking in all of those veggies! The best advice I can give you on this front, is to remember to prepare the toppings – meaning that they should be in the state that you’d enjoy eating them before putting them on the pizza. Since this style of pizza is cooked very quickly, things like garlic, onions, mushrooms, and greens are not going to change all that much in the oven. If you wouldnt mow down on a bunch of raw Swiss chard, take those leaves on a tour of a hot skillet first. Mushrooms should be marinated or cooked beforehand (unless you like them raw), and onions, in my opinion should be caramelized. Things like olives, zucchini, tomatoes, capers, and bell peppers can be added raw since they are delicious eaten that way. Sauce is optional, especially if youre going to use juicy toppings, but if you are using it, keep it sparse and dont let it sit on the dough too long, otherwise it will get soggy and sad. Pesto is a great alternative to traditional sauce, as is tapenade, roast veggie puree, romesco, chimichurri, and harissa. And while were on the subject of health, did you know that pizza is THE perfect vehicle for salad? I discovered this a couple years ago when trying to make my healthy pizza even healthier. Instead of putting salad on the side, I thought, why not pile it on top? This delivers a fantastic textural contrast, while delivering that much-needed hit of freshness and bright acidity to cut the richness of the pizza. How is this not a thing?  I posted a shot on Instagram some time ago and it received a lot of positive feedback, so it seems like many of you are down with the salad pizza idea. It’s two of the world’s best foods combined, and that equals true tummy happiness. Every summer I go to my friends cottage, just down the river from my own in the Thousand Islands. They are enthusiastic foodies and love to cook and eat good food as much as I do. They are also passionate about a plant-based diet, fermentation, pickling, and sourdough - all things healthy and delicious! Needless to say, this weekend has become the culinary highlight of my summer. The only difference between this year and previous ones, is that this time I was able to talk myself into snapping a few pics during this process and waiting to eat! Not an easy feat for me, you must know, but well worth it if it inspires any of you to try this recipe. Creating the sourdough starter Although it may seem daunting, creating a sourdough starter, culture, or mother is far easier than you may think, and only requires three simple ingredients: water, flour, and a little patience. A starter takes about five days to develop, but perhaps more or less depending on temperature, humidity, and the type of flour youre using. Nevertheless, its NOT complicated, and a very gratifying way to connect more to your food. Heres what you need: 4oz. /­­ 115ml filtered water (un-chlorinated) 4oz. /­­ 115g flour (choose whichever kind of grain-based flour youd like – 100% rye and spelt are great choices) a medium-sized glass container Method: 1. Stir the flour and water together for about 30 seconds until it is a consistent batter. Cover the container with a tea towel, secure with a rubber band and set in a warm place. 2. After 24 hours, feed the starter with the same amount of flour and water. Stir to combine. 3. After another 24 hours, repeat with the feeding. By this time, you should see bubbles forming and smell something slightly sour. This is a good sign, and means that the wild yeasts are active. If there are no bubbles or sour aroma, keep feeding the starter and looking for signs of life. 4. After 24 hours, repeat with the feeding. By this time, you should see many bubbles of varying sizes and the aroma should be pleasantly strong. 5. Around day five, the starter should have doubled in size from day four, and is ready to use. If the starter has not risen, continue with the feeding program until it has. This process can take a few extra days if youre in a colder environment. Dont give up! Storing your Sourdough Starter If you would like to use the starter daily, then I recommend feeding it daily. Keep it at room temperature on your counter top so that youll remember to do so, and remove half of the starter each time so that there is always room for the fresh flour and water. If you would however like to store your sourdough for occasional use, keep it in the fridge where the fermentation process will slow down and will only require a feeding once a week. To use again, simply remove the starter from the fridge about 12 hours prior to baking. Feed the starter to wake it up from hibernation. After about 12 hours from the last feeding, and once the starter is bubbly and smelling sour, its ready to go again! Resources and Troubleshooting There are so many resources for sourdough making out there, Ill leave you with a few that I really like in case you run into any issues. Cultures for Health Nourished Kitchen The Kitchn     Print recipe     Sourdough Salad Pizza Makes 4 individual pizzas Dough: 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 350ml sourdough starter 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 350ml wholegrain flour, I like spelt or light spelt for making pizza (plus more for dusting) 1 Tbsp. coconut oil, melted 1 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1. Combine all ingredients in a large mixing bowl. Stir with a large wooden spoon until incorporated. Then turn out dough onto a clean, floured surface and knead for 5-10 minutes, until it is no longer sticky (add additional flour, as needed, or add water if the dough is too dry). 2. Split the dough into four balls and put them on a floured baking sheet. Cover with a moist kitchen towel or plastic wrap put them in the fridge for 12-24 hours. 3. Take the dough of the fridge out about 30 minutes before you plan to make the pizzas. Toppings: Tomato sauce Local, seasonal veggies (our favourites include zucchini, eggplant, caramelized onions, fresh tomatoes, sweet and /­­ or spicy peppers, mushrooms, olives, sundried tomatoes, crushed chili flakes Greens such as beet tops, kale, Swiss chard, spinach Cheese such as Pecorino Romano, ch?vre, feta, goat or sheeps milk mozzarella Fresh herbs Salad greens such as arugula, baby spinach, leaf lettuce, tossed in lemon, olive oil, and salt Directions: 1. Preheat your oven to 500°F /­­ 260°C. If you have a pizza stone, place it in the oven while it preheats, or use a baking sheet. 2. Flour your work surface well and roll out the dough to desired size (tip: rolling out onto baking paper makes transferring the pizza much easier). 3. Spread a thin layer of sauce over the dough, followed by desired toppings (except for salad greens). Work quickly - you dont want the sauce sinking into the dough, as it will become soggy. 4. Slide the pizza (on the baking paper or not) onto the pizza stone or baking sheet. Let bake for 7-10 minutes until the crust is golden and the toppings are bubbly. 5. While the pizza is cooking, dress your greens with a little lemon juice, olive oil and salt. Toss to coat and set aside. (This step is optional, but delicious!) 6. Remove the pizza from the oven, let cool for five minutes, then top with greens, slice and enjoy!   I hope that this post puts you in touch with your inner baker, and that you commit to starting your sourdough culture TODAY. Through this miraculous process, you’ll be joining centuries of tradition, ritual, and connection. Not to mention that your pizza will suddenly be good for you. And that is the most important thing of all, amiright? Happy fermenting, friends! xo, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   * In other THRILLING news, I’m co-hosting a retreat in Bali this coming January! Wild Heart, High Spirit is a 7-day revitalizing retreat for women, aimed to restore balance, cultivate inner peace, and nourish the body from inside out. Learn to take care of yourself on a deep level, and feel empowered moving forward in your life beyond our week together. Join Mikkala Marilyn Kissi of Living Yolates and I for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity on the enchanted island of Bali to connect with your wild heart and your high spirit! Click here to find out more.  The post Sourdough Salad Pizza appeared first on My New Roots.

Penne Pomodoro with Vegan “Tuna”

August 3 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Penne Pomodoro with Vegan “Tuna” I have crawled up in a rusty canopy swing with the computer in my lap, spiderweb from the canopy tangled up in my hair, Mr Bojangles on repeat (I always write with a single song on repeat in my ears) and Elsa balancing on my legs. We are spending a few days at my dad’s summerhouse and while Luise is drawing with Isac, I wanted to tell you about this pasta dish that we cooked and photographed the other day. I’m trying to formulate my thoughts into words. How soaked sunflower seeds almost magically get the texture of canned tuna when mixed in a food processor. But it’s not easy. Elsa is using every muscle in her body to steal my attention from the computer screen. Her mouth is forming words (that I can’t hear because of the earplugs), her head is jumping from side to side while her eyes are actively seeking mine. She is smacking her hands together right in front of my face and she grins when I finally look up from the computer and pull out the earplugs. - Do you know what this means on sign language? She asks me with giggle in her voice while she keeps smacking her hands together and then pointing at herself. - No, tell me. - I want a saaaaandwich! - Are you hungry? - No, I’m just teaching you sign language. - Ok, nice. But I’m working right now. Maybe you can teach me more later? - Ok. Just one more. Do you know what this is? [Taps her forehead with her hand and pulls it away in a half circle.] - Ehm, maybe a unicorn? - Nooo stupid, it means thank you. Actually, I think I want a sandwich. - Maybe you can ask mom to help you? - Okaaaaaaay. She jumps down and runs into the house. Earplugs back in. I’m guessing that I have approx 5 mins to write this. Here we go. It’s not often that we create dishes that mimics meat. In fact, we often do the opposite by letting the vegetables shine in all their glory. I don’t remember eating tuna a lot before I became a vegetarian, but after having seen a few vegan sunflower seed “tuna” recipes on the web (especially this beautiful Tuna Tartine from Faring-Well) I suddenly got this weird craving for it. So we decided to give fake-tuna a try. By pulsing soaked sunflower seeds in a food processor together with salty capers, shallots, oil, apple cider vinegar, lemon and nori sheet, you actually get something that looks weirdly similar to canned tuna with a crumbly, moist texture and a flavour that reminds me of salty seas and umami. Most recipes we’ve seen use this sunflower seed tuna as a spread or as a tuna salad (often with the addition of celery and herbs) but we instead added it to a tomato sauce and served it with penne, creating a classic Italian poor mans dish. The vegan “tuna” adds a nice texture to the sauce and it improves the flavour as well. The kids loved it! It is a simple recipe if you are on a budget and it is a tad more special than your basic pasta pomodoro. So go put your sunflower seeds in water and pretend they are a fish. I can see Elsa eyeballing me from the window now so I better round this up. I have got a class in imaginative sign language up ahead with my favourite teacher. Penne Comodoro with Vegan “Tuna” Serves 4 It’s important to soak the sunflower seeds to achieve the right texture so don’t skip that step. If you’ve got some white wine opened in the fridge, you can add a glug of that for extra depth and flavour. Vegan Tuna 1 cup raw sunflower seeds, soaked in water for 6 hours or overnight 1 small shallot or red onion, minced 3 tbsp capers + brine 1 tbsp lemon juice 1 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil (coconut oil, ghee or butter) 1 tsp apple cider vinegar 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 1/­­2 sheet of nori (the seaweed you use for sushi), cut into tiny pieces (optional) Pomodoro Sauce 1 onion 2 cloves of garlic 2 tbsp olive oil 3 x 400 g /­­ 14 oz cans of chopped tomatoes 1 handful fresh basil or 2 tsp dried sea salt freshly ground black pepper Serve with Pasta of choice (we use wholegrain penne or a gluten free version made from dried beans) 1/­­2 cup large capers fresh parsley, finely chopped ruccola To prepare the “tuna”, simply add all ingredients to a food processor. Pulse a few times until it you have a coarsely textured mixture. Taste and add more salt, lemon juice or vinegar. Pulse again and scoop the mixture into a bowl. Peel and finely chop the onion and garlic. Place a large sauce pan on medium heat and add olive oil. Sauté the onion and garlic for a few minutes until fragrant. Add tomatoes, basil, salt and pepper. Bring to the boil, reduce the heat and simmer for about 30 minutes. Taste and adjust the flavours throughout. Add a splash of water or white wine if it starts looking dry. Meanwhile, cook the pasta according to the instructions on the package. When the tomato sauce is ready, stir in 2/­­3 of the “tuna”, saving the rest for serving. Divide the pasta in 4 bowls, top with tomato sauce, capers, fresh parsley and a drizzle of olive oil.

Sanity-Saving One Pot Pasta

May 26 2016 My New Roots 

Sanity-Saving One Pot Pasta Life is beautifully full these days. Between caring for an energetic toddler and running my own business while attempting to carve out some time to cook, have a social life, exercise, pursue creative things and do laundry? Its full-on. And wonderful. And then there are days when I feel that I may just lose it. We were sitting down to dinner the other night, to a very simple meal that I had thrown together in a mad dash. My husband took a few bites, looked up and said: This is really, really good. Really? I asked in disbelief. I actually cooked the whole thing in 10 minutes and in the same pot (a triumph for me - Im a bit of a tornado in the kitchen). This is the kind of thing you should blog, Sarah. People like simple things. Not that I had forgotten this fact, but I also feel the need to like, blow your minds most of the time. Or at least attempt to, ya know? This was not a blow-your-mind kind of dinner. It was made on a busy weeknight from stuff we had in the fridge and pantry, while a hangry 2-year-old clung to my bare legs since he had already pulled my pants off. If this situation sounds familiar, this dinner will be your new go-to. It’s simple, fast, easy, and most importantly, very delicious. Just because you’re going insane doesn’t mean that you’ve lost all sense of taste. In fact, saving one’s sanity often hinges on proximity to good food, as evidenced by post break-up ice cream binges, and bad-day-at-work pizza parties. I get it. Legume-based pastas have been popping up in regular grocery stores all over Copenhagen lately, and I am loving them! They are made from just legumes (red lentils, green peas, adzuki beans etc.), they cook in about 6 minutes and contain unbelievably high amounts of protein and fiber, thanks to the only ingredient being, well, legumes. Although I have some rules in my diet which exclude most things that I couldnt recreate in my own kitchen, these pastas are a serious life-saver when I dont have a ton of time to make dinner, and a seriously great alternative to wheat pasta. I will compromise a little when my sanity is on the line, won’t you? The brilliance of this dish, besides the fact that it is so fast to make, is that its cooked in just one pot! Although it differs from the one-pot pastas Ive seen online where everything is cooked together from the beginning, my version requires a little bit of timing on your part, adding the asparagus and peas about three minutes before the pasta is cooked. Theoretically, you could toss everything together in the same pot from the get-go, but this produces overcooked veggies, and no one really digs that. You can use any legume-based pasta you like this, in any shape that appeals to you. And, you can really pick any seasonal veggies that cook in the same amount of time or slightly less than the pasta. Its great with broccoli, sweet potato, green beans, zucchini or snap peas. I even enjoy this dish cold - so its the perfect make-and-take meal for a picnic dinner. If you are not vegan, this is delicious with some grated Pecorino Romano grated in, or crumbled feta.     Print recipe     Sanity-Saving One Pot Pasta Serves 4-6 Ingredients: 200g legume-based pasta (I used mung bean fettucini) 1 lb. /­­ 500g asparagus 2 cups /­­ 300g fresh or frozen shelled green peas sea salt for cooking water and garnish 4 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil zest of 1 organic lemon 3 Tbsp. capers (about 1 small 60g jar) A large handful fresh mint, leaves only Directions: 1. Put a large pot of water on the stove and heat over a high flame. 2. While the water is heating up, wash, trim, and chop the asparagus. Shell the peas (or take them out of the fridge /­­ freezer). Wash and roughly chop the mint. Once the cooking water is boiling, salt it generously (it should taste salty). 3. Add the pasta and set a timer for about 3 before the suggested cooking time. Three minutes before the pasta is done, add the asparagus and peas. Cook for three minutes. Drain well and place back in the pot. Add the olive oil, lemon zest, drained capers and a few pinches of sea salt. Season to taste. Fold in the fresh mint and serve. Show me your pasta on Instagram: #MNRsanitypasta The post Sanity-Saving One Pot Pasta appeared first on My New Roots.

The New Vegetarian’s Guide to a Happy Thanksgiving

November 23 2015 Vegetarian Times 

The New Vegetarian’s Guide to a Happy Thanksgiving How to keep the peace between the omnivores and vegetarians at your holiday table Heading home for Thanksgiving as a newbie vegetarian? No need to fear the meat-eaters. Here, seasoned vegetarians offer dos and donts, answers for the silly (and serious) questions you may get from family and friends, tips for veg makeovers of traditional family dishes, and suggestions for main dishes even omnivores will love. Gene Baur Farm Sanctuary president and co-founder Gene Baur, a vegan, marks 1986 as his most memorable Thanksgiving, because that was the year he started celebrating the holiday by saving turkeys from slaughter. It was a way to turn a violent tradition into a more compassionate one, says Baur. One of the highlights that first year was an iconic picture taken as Clyde, our rescued turkey, poked his head into the oven as we were pulling out the main course, a stuffed squash. Q: What are your favorite Thanksgiving dishes? A: I love many of the plant-based side dishes commonly served at Thanksgiving, including potatoes, cornbread, stuffing, beets, veggies, corn, beans, and squash. My new book, Living the Farm Sanctuary Life, includes some Thanksgiving table-worthy recipes, like roasted-root salad and roasted asparagus with preserved lemon and crispy capers. Q: Do you have traditional dishes that you have remade veg? A: Yes, I have actually created a new dish by combining scrambled tofu with stuffing. The spices and veggies of each dish are complementary, and the heavier tofu and lighter stuffing balance each other out nicely. Q: What question are you most often asked about your diet and how do you respond? A: Where do you get your protein? It might seem silly to long-time veggies who have found getting protein to be very easy, but to people who have been bombarded by marketing campaigns touting animal protein, its often a serious concern, and I address it as such. I explain that the average American actually gets too much protein, and that protein is present in most plant foods. Vegan foods especially high in protein include beans, greens, tofu, tempeh, quinoa, nuts, and seeds. ESSENTIAL DO: Be friendly and supportive of others who may be curious about exploring a more compassionate holiday. ESSENTIAL DONT: Dont allow the holiday carnage to get the best of you. Focus on the positive. Julieanna Hever Julieanna Hever, RD, The Plant-Based Dietitian, cooking show host, and author of The Vegiterranean Diet, says that Thanksgiving is her favorite holiday: The focus is on gratitude, a priority that is often overlooked with the bustle of daily living. Q: What are your favorite Thanksgiving dishes? A: I love all the colorful squashes, fruits, and root vegetables, and I find myself cooking more frequently during this time of year. My favorite dishes include anything with pumpkin or butternut squash, and roasted Brussels sprouts. I have a stuffed acorn squash and herbed tempeh recipe that are my go-to Thanksgiving entrées. Q: Do you have traditional family dishes that you have remade veg? A: Yes, Ive revamped a chocolate-chip pumpkin bread that has become a family favorite; I swap in vegetable broth in any soups we traditionally made; and I use either prepared tempeh, tofu, or faux meats instead of turkey. Q: Do you have other non-food-related Thanksgiving traditions? A: We all go around the table and say what we are most grateful for and what we hope for in the upcoming year. ESSENTIAL DO: Enjoy an indulgence. When you focus on eating healthfully throughout the year, it is a good thing to enjoy a treat on holidays. ESSENTIAL DONT: Dont be defensive when someone tries to pressure you into just one bite of something not in alignment with your beliefs. One of the easiest responses is, Thank you for offering, but Im enjoying whats on my plate. Lisa Bloom NBC legal analyst, trial lawyer, and owner of The Bloom Firm, Lisa Bloom, a vegan, hosted her most unforgettable Thanksgiving in 2013, the first year that her omnivore guests embraced a full-fledged veg feast. How did she win them over? It helped that the [faux turkey], mushroom gravy, stuffing, sweet potatoes, almond string beans, and the boatload of pies were insanely tasty. The final verdict: Afterward everyone realized how nice it was not to be catatonic after the meal; full, but no one went into cardiac arrest. And no animals were harmed in our celebration of gratitude, which is what Thanksgiving is all about for me. Q: What question are you most often asked about your diet and how do you respond? A: My philosophy is that I dont actively proselytize, but if asked a direct question, I will give an honest answer. So, I often have this conversation: New Friend: Oh, youre vegan. Why? Me: Because I love animals, so I dont want to financially support their cruelty and deaths. NF: How does it affect your health? Me: Well, Im 53. I run marathons, climb mountains, take long cycling trips. I almost never get sick. I take no medication. My cardiologist says I have the heart of a 20-year-old. For all that I thank my whole-food vegan diet and daily exercise regimen. Q: What are your favorite Thanksgiving dishes? A: One Veg Worlds [faux] turkey with a crispy skin, my Moroccan-spiced carrot dip, and my chocolate pecan pie. ESSENTIAL DO: Offer to bring a few dishes. This is key to family happiness. Make sure they are amazing and delicious. ESSENTIAL DONT: Dont apologize for being a compassionate soul, caring about your health, wanting to reverse climate change, or whatever your reason for going veg is.

Eggplant Three Ways

August 17 2015 Meatless Monday 

Looking for a new way to try eggplant this summer? Take your pick from this terrific trio of recipes from Executive Chef Jason Weiner who features prix fixe Meatless Monday menus each week at his terrific trio of restaurants: Almond NYC, Almond Bridgehampton and Almond Tribeca! Each recipe yields 6 servings. Eggplant Fritters with Goat Cheese Ingredients - 1 Large Italian Eggplant (peeled and small dice) -  1/­­2 medium yellow onion (small dice) - 1 clove garlic (minced) - 2 Tbs. olive oil -  1/­­4 cup grated Parmesan cheese - 2 Tbs chopped flat parsley - 2 Tbs + 1 cup of Panko breadcrumbs - Salt and Pepper to taste - 1 cup all purpose flour - 4 beaten eggs - 1 qt. canola oil for frying -  1/­­4 cup soft goat cheese   Preparation In a heavy bottomed sauté pan, sauté the eggplant, onions, garlic in the olive oil until the vegetables take on a golden color. Allow to cool and fold in the parsley, cheese, 2 tbs of Panko, salt and pepper Prepare the flour, eggs and remaining Panko in three separate bowls. Form the eggplant mix into patties and bread them by tossing them first in the flour, then eggs, and finally the bread crumbs. In a deep heavy bottomed sauce pot,  bring your frying oil to about 325 degrees. Fry the fritters in batches until they are golden brown and blot them on paper towels. Anoint with a dollop or schmear of goat cheese and serve piping hot. Caponata Ingredients - 5 tablespoons olive oil - 1 1/­­2 pound eggplant (unpeeled, cut into 1/­­2-inch cubes) - 1 medium red onion (cubed) - 2 ribs celery (large dice) - 4 large garlic cloves (chopped) - 14 1/­­2 ounce can diced tomatoes with Italian seasonings in juice - 2 tablespoons sugar - 3 tablespoons red wine vinegar - 2 tablespoons drained capers - 1/­­3 cup chopped fresh basil   Preparation Heat oil in heavy large pot over medium heat. Add eggplant, onion, celery and garlic cloves. sauté until eggplant is soft and brown, about 15 minutes. Add diced tomatoes with juice, then red wine vinegar, sugar and drained capers. Cover and simmer until eggplant and onion are very tender, stirring occasionally, about 12 minutes. Season caponata to taste with salt and pepper. Mix in fresh basil. Transfer caponata to serving bowl. Serve  at room temperature on grilled bread. (Caponata can be made 2 days ahead. Cover and chill.) Baba Ghanoush Ingredients - 1 ?large eggplant -  1/­­4 ?cup mayonnaise, plus more as needed - 3 ?garlic cloves (minced) -  1/­­4  cup fresh lemon juice, plus more as needed - 1 ?pinch ground cumin - ?salt, to taste - 1 ?tablespoon extra virgin olive oil -  1/­­2 teaspoon smoked paprika   Preparation  Prepare a medium-hot fire in a charcoal grill. Preheat an oven to 375°F. Prick the eggplant with a fork in several places and place on the grill rack 4 to 5 inches from the fire. Grill, turning frequently, until the skin blackens and blisters and the flesh just begins to feel soft, 10 to 15 minutes. Transfer the eggplant to a baking sheet and bake until very soft, 15 to 20 minutes. Remove from the oven, let cool slightly, and peel off and discard the skin. Place the eggplant flesh in a bowl. Using a fork, mash the eggplant to a paste. Add the 1/­­4 cup tahini, the garlic, the 1/­­4 cup lemon juice and the cumin and mix well. Season with salt, then taste and add more tahini and/­­or lemon juice, if needed. Transfer the mixture to a serving bowl and spread with the back of a spoon to form a shallow well. Drizzle the olive oil over the top and sprinkle with the smoked paprika. Serve at room temperature on a warm crouton or cracker. The post Eggplant Three Ways appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Summer Pasta with Smashed Tomatoes, Peaches & Mozzarella

July 23 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Summer Pasta with Smashed Tomatoes, Peaches & Mozzarella We have been cooking this quick little dinner recipe rather frequently during the summer. At a first glance, it might seem like it’s just a classic/­­boring fresh tomato pasta. But when you consider the context: hot summer days, family time, ripe tomatoes in season, everyone is hungry but no one feels like cooking … you’ll realise that it’s exactly the kind of simple dinner that we all need more of. We have of course given this dish our own schwung. Instead of just serving tomatoes fresh, we squeeze/­­punch/­­smash them up a bit so they get softer and release some of that lovely juice that gets mixed with olive oil, a splash of the hot pasta water, fresh basil, garlic and pickled capers. Already there, you got yourself a pretty great flavor combo. But then we throw in a handful of peach slices for extra sweetness, delicious toasted pine nuts and some large chunks of creamy buffel mozzarella, which makes it Italian-grandmother-kind-of-awesome. You can serve this with any type of pasta. In our home we usually use various sorts of gluten free (buckwheat is a favourite) or whole grain pasta or spiralized/­­shredded zucchini (also known as zoodles), but here we are using bean linguine, made entirely from dried beans and therefore naturally vegan, gluten free and high in protein. This pasta has a delicious flavour and a nice chewy texture. We have seen various sorts of bean pastas starting to pop up in supermarkets and health food stores - soybean pasta, chickpea pasta and black bean pasta - so keep an eye out for those next time you are out shopping for pasta. In this dish the quality of the ingredients is everything. Use only fresh, ripe tomatoes and peaches and make sure to choose your favourite olive oil. If you want a creamier sauce, you can sub the mozzarella for ricotta cheese + some lemon juice, which also is really awesome. You can of course also add parmesan cheese if you prefer. For a vegan option, I think it’d be interesting to work with a softer type tofu instead of the cheese. Perhaps pre-marinate it for a while in olive oil and fresh Italian herbs. Pasta with smashed raw tomatoes, peach & mozzarella Serves 4 1 clove garlic 2 tbsp pickled capers 500 g /­­ 1 lb ripe tomatoes 3-4 sprigs fresh basil, leaves picked and chopped, save some for garnish a few glugs of cold-pressed olive oil a pinch sea salt and black pepper 200 g  /­­ 7 oz bean pasta or other gluten free pasta alternative or zucchini noodles 1 handful pine nuts 2 peaches or nectarines 200 g /­­ 7 oz mozzarella cheese 1 handful rucola/­­aragula/­­rocket salad Mince the garlic very finely. Mash the capers with the back of a knife. Divide the tomatoes in half. Chop the basil. Place everything in a large serving bowl and add a few glugs of olive oil, salt and pepper. With your hands, squeeze or punch the tomatoes until soft and juicy. Cook the pasta in lightly salted boiling water according to the instructions on package. Meanwhile, lightly toast the pine nuts in a skillet on medium heat. Slice the nectarines and tear the mozzarella in smaller pieces. When that pasta is done, reserve about 1/­­2 cup /­­ 100 ml of cooking water and drain the rest. Add the pasta immediately to the serving bowl while it’s still hot, toss with the tomato ‘sauce’ and rucola until well mixed, add some of the cooking water if you want to make it a little juicier. Decorate with peaces, mozzarella cheese, pine nuts, arugula, a few whole basil leaves and an extra drizzle of olive oil. Ready to serve.

Winter Rainbow Panzanella

March 16 2015 My New Roots 

Winter Rainbow Panzanella Dear colour. I miss you. Please come back soon. Your pal, Sarah B Ive joked before about the oh-so dark, single-toned, and super grey city Copenhagen becomes in the winter. After months upon months of this, I feel as if my eyes have turned into little slits, and only capable of seeing in black and white. Needing some kind of sign that I wasnt turning into a subterranean mammal, I cycled down to the central market of Copenhagen last week to find some inspiration in the form of light and colour. I was pretty shocked when I arrived to see a plethora of vibrant veggies, all lined up and waiting for me take them home. I guess Id gotten into such a routine with my shopping that I had failed to remember that winter does in fact offer a lot of brightly hued food, and that I am, undoubtedly, a human. Excited and hungry, I hurried home with a whack-load of produce and a plan brewing in my brain. Oh the colours! Oh the possibilities! Oh what a nerd I am! With some stale sourdough rye sitting on the counter and a knob of ginger in the fridge, a hearty, satisfying salad began to take shape in my mind, a rainbow swathe of vegetables stretched out before me like a beacon in an stubborn steel grey sky. Super Cool Kohlrabi Kohlrabi is a mysterious and intimidating vegetable, dont you agree? Ive gotten a lot of questions about this prehistoric looking creature, as many of you out there seem to be quite scared of even taking it home! Well fear not. Kohlrabi is not going to take off a finger or worse if you approach it with a knife. It is a rather gentle and yielding brassica, a cross between a cabbage and a turnip that can be enjoyed cooked or raw. Its pleasantly crisp texture is perfect julienned in salads, but its also a tender treat roasted in the oven in slices or batons. The flavour is somewhere near to broccoli but a tad milder and sweeter. I really like it in soups as well, blended up with white beans or chickpeas. The leaves are also edible and very delicious in salad or stir-fried with garlic like collards or Swiss chard. Key nutrients in kohlrabi include vitamin C, for fighting infection, vitamin E for preventing arterial plaque build-up, and a range of B-vitamins for combating stress. The potassium in kohlrabi helps the body maintain proper fluid balance, while the calcium manages the acid/­­alkaline balance of our blood. Other minerals in kohlrabi include iron, magnesium and zinc. When buying kohlrabi, look for bulbs that are firm, smooth and free of holes or cracks. Typically this part of the vegetable is pale green, but you can also find purple varieties like the one pictured above. The younger ones can be eaten with the skin on, but as their season (late fall to early spring) stretches, youll find peeling the more mature bulbs is a tastier choice. The leaves should be taut and unblemished. To prolong the kohlrabis shelf life, remove the leaves and wrap them in a damp towel, place them in a plastic bag in the fridge for up four days. The root bulb can be stored separately in the crisper as well, and will keep well for couple weeks. To the panzanella! Traditionally, this is a salad made with stale white bread and tomatoes, a popular dish in Tuscany. My version is a far, Nordic cry from the classic, but its a meal in itself and a very satisfying one at that, since there is just so. much. going. on. The key to building this dish, or any dish for that matter is layers and balance; flavours, textures and of course, colours. Taking into consideration that the base of this dish would be hearty winter greens I knew that I needed something creamy and yielding, like roast veggies, and something dense and crusty, like the Garlic Sourdough Rye Bread Croutons to contrast and compliment. From a flavour perspective, especially in salads, balancing tastes is very important for success. Because the roast vegetables are so sweet, its important to have an acidic hit to add brightness. I made some very tasty Ginger-Pickled Carrots in advance, but capers would also be a nice touch if you are pressed for time. The point is to step back and look at your dish as a whole, then adjust all the levels of salt, sugar, and acid as needed tipping the scales until everything is just right. And just a special note about these croutons, because they are so darn delish. I first came up with these in the good ol days when I was cooking at a very small café here in Copenhagen, inventing new dishes every day and being creative with what I had available. The odd time we had any leftover rye bread, I would make these garlic croutons, few of which actually made it onto any finished dishes because I would typically eat them all up before service with my kitchen mates. They are addictive. The kind of thing you wouldnt necessarily think of as a terrific little snack, but wow, are they ever hard to stop eating! There is a high amount of garlic-to-bread ratio, but because Danish rye is so rich and flavourful, youll need that amount of garlic to be heard. If youre using a lighter bread, a spelt loaf for instance, you can scale back just a touch unless you really love your garlic and/­­or not planning on making out with anyone for a couple days. This dish may seem component-heavy, but most of these elements can be made in advance so the whole thing comes together when youre ready. The only thing you need to do before serving in fact, is massaging the kale and kohlrabi leaves. Now excuse me as I dive face first into this bowl of rainbow ecstasy! Okay, good-byyyyyyeeee!     Print recipe     Winter Rainbow Panzanella Serves 4 Ingredients: 4 cups /­­ 100g shredded kale and kohlrabi leaves (or any hearty winter green) 1 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 1 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice a couple pinches sea salt A variety of winter vegetables suitable for roasting. I chose: – sweet potato – golden & red beets – kohlrabi – parsnip – Brussels sprouts Other suggestions: – celeriac – butternut squash – purple potatoes – Jerusalem artichoke – cauliflower – broccoli – leeks Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F/­­200°C. 2. Scrub veggies well, chop into similar sized pieces (no need to peel!) and place on a baking sheet with a few knobs of coconut oil or ghee. Place in the oven and when the oil has melted, remove pan from oven, toss to coat veggies and return to the middle rack. Bake for 25-35 minutes, depending on the size of your veggies. Remove from oven, season with salt and pepper, and a drizzle of olive oil. 3. While the veggies are roasting, prepare the kale and /­­or other greens. Wash and dry then well and chop into small pieces. Place in a large bowl and dress with olive oil, lemon juice and sea salt. Vigorously massage the oil and juice into the greens for two whole minutes until they are tender and dark green. Season to taste. 4. To assemble salad, Top the greens with the roasted veggies, add as many pickled carrots as you like, drizzle the dressing over and toss. Top with garlic croutons and serve. Overnight Ginger-Pickled Carrots Ingredients: 300g carrots 1 cup /­­ 250ml apple cider vinegar 1 cup /­­ 250ml water (or more if needed) 1 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1/­­2 Tbsp. fine grain sea salt small knob of ginger (about 10g), peeled and sliced Directions: 1. Scrub carrots well. Using a vegetable peeler, slice the carrots lengthwise into long, thing ribbons. Place into a 1-quart /­­ 1 liter glass container. 2. In a measuring cup combine the vinegar, water, maple syrup, salt and ginger, and stir to dissolve the salt. Pour over the carrots and top up with more water as needed to cover them completely. Place in the fridge for 24 hours and enjoy the next day. Grainy Mustard Dressing Ingredients: 3 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 1 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1 Tbsp. whole grain mustard 1 tsp. maple syrup generous pinch of sea salt Directions: 1. Whisk all ingredients together. Season to taste. Garlic Sourdough Rye Bread Croutons Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 200g stale dark sourdough, cut into generous cubes (any bread here would work, but make a healthy choice) 1 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee (ghee is definitely the tastiest) 2 fat cloves garlic, finely minced or grated on a microplane a couple pinches flaky sea salt Directions: 1. Melt oil in a small saucepan over low heat. When it is melted, grate in the garlic and stir to combine. Cook just until the garlic starts to simmer, immediately remove from heat and let cool slightly. Preheat oven to 400°F/­­200°C. 2. Cut bread into generous cubes and place in a medium sized bowl. Pour the garlic oil over the top and toss to coat, using your hands to squish the oil into the bread. Spread out bread cubes on a cookie sheet, sprinkle with salt and place in the oven. Toast for 10-15 minutes, tossing a couple times during cooking. Croutons are ready when they are crisp and golden around the edges. Once cool, store leftovers in an airtight container for up to three days. *   *   *   *   *   * Hey guys! I have some very exciting news...Im going on tour with my cookbook! Although we are still working out some of the hard details, I wanted to let you know when and where Ill be so you can make a note of it. It would be so rad to meet you, and I hope that you can come out and celebrate! I will update this page and post the events on my Events page and Facebook as they are finalized. Looking forward to it, more than you know! TORONTO April 9-14 VANCOUVER April 15-17 LOS ANGELES April 18 + 19 NEW YORK April 22 + 23 I hope that everyone who has pre-ordered the book is enjoying the Bonus Pack of recipes! Thanks for all of your very positive feedback so far. There is still time to get yours if you’re interested…click here!


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