calorie - vegetarian recipes

calorie vegetarian recipes

5 Vegetarian Swaps to Boost Nutrition in Sweet Treats

yesterday 20:10 Vegetarian Times 

Choose Whole Grains Theres a reason the Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend to make at least 50% of your grains whole: theyre packed with essential vitamins and minerals that keep your body running at its peak! When gearing up to bake that family favorite sugar cookie or bread loaf, consider swapping half of the all-purpose flour for a whole-wheat flour until you can make the full switch (this Healthy Chocolate Chunk Pumpkin Loaf is a great recipe to start with!) Traditionally, when you start small like this its an easy way to slowly get your pallet to adjust to the change while boosting the fiber of the entire slice (or cookie) too! If youre gluten-free, consider using a recipe that calls for gluten-free oat flour or almond flour (like these Healthy Pumpkin Muffins) so you also reap the benefits of the fiber. Amp Up Those Omegas with Walnuts Pumpkin, pecan, or apple pie calling your name this season? Consider swapping out that white flour and butter crust for a delicious (and nutritious) walnut-based crust. Walnuts pack 2.5 grams of the plant-based version of the omega-3 fatty acid known as alpha-linoleic acid (ALA), in addition to 4 grams of protein and 2 grams of fiber in a one-ounce portion. While many name brands have begun selling their own walnut crusts in the baking section at your local market, they often contain flour and butter in small amounts to help hold the crust together. Not a deal-breaker if youre tight on time, but defeats the purpose of the swap if youre trying to keep this treat gluten-free and vegan. Consider making your own (check out a simple recipe idea here) by pulsing walnuts with a date paste or syrup in your food processor, then shaping into a pie crust and freezing until ready to bake. Related: 7 Tips for Shaking Sugar Think natural When It Comes to Sugar Its no secret most people eat WAY more added sugar than recommended (for reference, on average Americans eat about 17 teaspoons of added sugar a day when the recommendation is closer to 12 teaspoons or below for a 2000 calorie diet!) And friends, beware, coconut sugar, maple syrup, honey, and good ole cane sugar are ALL just different types of added sugars (one isnt better than the other.) To help satisfy that sweet tooth, consider using the natural sugars found in sweet fruits and vegetables, like apples, dates, and sweet potatoes, in your baked goods. Depending on the type of recipe youre making, you should be able to reduce the added sugar by at least a third when you sub in unsweetened applesauce (like these Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Bars do!) Note you will also need to modify the fat amount (like the oil or butter used) so the texture continues to be the same. Boost Fiber with Beans Chocolate is abundant this season and for good reason: its delicious and its packed with flavonoids. But what if you took that decadent chocolate and brought it up a notch to boost the fiber and create a decadent dark chocolate dip to serve alongside graham crackers, gingerbread, or fresh fruit? Youd be the hostess with the most-ess for sure! Begin by pureeing a cup of beans alongside melted dark chocolate or dark cocoa powder, dates for natural sweetness, and your favorite nut or seed butter of choice. Blend until its a smooth, hummus-like consistency and enjoy! (Use this Sweet Hummus Recipe as your guide.) Power Up with Protein Cream pies and bundt cakes are certainly popular around the holiday season, but that doesnt mean you cant do over the dairy! Swapping in a portion of reduced-fat Greek or skyr yogurt for sour cream helps to boost the protein while minimizing the saturated fat of your treat. If youre still not a big fan of Greek yogurt, then ease into it by starting small with the swap, with roughly a third used in place of the sour cream. In no time youll be adjusted and making the full swap, pinky promise! (Try this Butterscotch Cheesecake Pie for a nice addition to your menu this year!) The post 5 Vegetarian Swaps to Boost Nutrition in Sweet Treats appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

10 Dietitians Share Their Tips to Add More Plant-Protein to Your Diet

November 19 2020 Vegetarian Times 

With the new year just weeks away, the media is honing in on the top nutrition trends we can expect to see in 2021, and to no surprise increasing plant-protein remains at the top. Whether youre eating more plant-based for sustainability, health, or just because, rest assured there are a variety of whole food options you can choose from to meet your protein needs. But, before you head straight into the freezer department at your local grocer to pick up the latest faux meat product, lets take a look at 10 whole food sources of plant-based protein you may just want to toss into your cart instead! Reader beware, you may end up saving a few bucks once you realize how convenient and affordable many of these options are. Lentils Just one cup of cooked lentils provides nearly 18 grams of plant-protein and 16 grams of fiber for just 225 calories. Lentils also contain many important nutrients, like iron, potassium, zinc and choline (a nutrient that 90% of Americans arent getting enough of!) Plus, theyre budget-friendly with a 16-ounce bag of dried lentils coming in at just $2.99.  Registered Dietitian Kim Rose of www.kimrosedietitian.com recommends making a pot of seasoned lentils on the weekends. Divide them into individual 1 cup servings, and then add them to different meals throughout the week!  Youll find me turning lentils into meatballs, or for a really quick fix, adding a little bar-b-que sauce to them to make tasty, vegan sloppy joes. Hummus This plant-based spread can be made from a variety of beans and legumes, not just the traditional garbanzo bean you may think! Depending on the bean used, the protein content will vary slightly, but a standard 1/­­4 cup serving (or about 70 grams by weight) has roughly 6 grams of protein for just 180 calories. Plus, it often packs heart-healthy unsaturated fatty acids that help keep you fuller for longer too! Brynn McDowell, Registered Dietitian and cookbook author of The Mediterranean Diet Made Easy recommends using hummus in place of mayo on sandwiches or spreading it on bagels or toast! She suggests thinning it out and using it as a creamy salad dressing to add more plant-based protein to meals. Pistachios Pistachios are a good source of plant-based protein with a 1-ounce serving of the nut (shelled) providing 6 grams of it! Plus, they pack dietary fiber, potassium, and antioxidants that help keep your body in tip-top shape. While the shelled variety tends to be a tad pricier, you can still pick up a 10-ounce in-shell bag for about $5.49 at most markets. Lauren Manaker, Registered Dietitian, and author of Fueling Male Fertility, recommends to use shelled pistachios as a salad topped in place of grilled chicken or shrimp. The plant-based protein boost that also gives you fiber and healthy fats for staying power. You can also toss pistachios in trail mixes and in oatmeal as a topping for added nutrition and crunch! Related: Healthy Late-Night Snacks Chickpeas One of the most common forms of plant-based protein on the market is the good ole chickpea (aka, the garbanzo bean!) With nearly 7.5 grams of protein, 6.5 grams of fiber, and 3.7 mg of iron in just 1/­­2 cup serving of cooked chickpeas, its a great way to increase the total nutrient density of your diet. The best part: a pound of chickpeas (dried) often comes in at less than $3.00! NYC-based Registered Dietitian, Natalie Rizzo, MS, RD, is a big fan of adding chickpeas to both meals and snacks! From grain bowls to veggie burgers, or roasted as a protein-filled snack, chickpeas offer a convenient and affordable plant-based protein to nearly every diet. Edamame (Soybeans) Edamame is the immature form of the soybean that is often eaten from the shell (or shelled) alongside traditional Asian dishes. Regardless of the form of soybean you eat, they can easily be incorporated into a balanced diet with two servings being a reasonable goal for adults. A half-cup of shelled edamame packs nearly 9.5 grams of plant-based protein and 4 grams of fiber, as well as iron, potassium, folate, and choline! Sarah Koszyk, Sports Nutritionist and author of 25 Anti-Aging Smoothies for Revitalizing, Glowing Skin, recommends pureeing edamame in a hummus, dip, or pesto. Spread the edamame purees on a sandwich or wrap, add it to a burrito, or toss it with a salad, pasta, or rice dish. If youre looking to venture into the other forms of soybeans (like tofu), Registered Dietitian Sylvia Klinger of Hispanic Food Communications suggests blending silken tofu with oil, spices and herbs makes for a delicious high protein dressing, or adding a soy-based curd to pancakes to boost the protein there as well! Tempeh Tempeh is a fermented product made from soybeans in addition to some whole grains, seasonings and other flavorings. A 4-ounce serving of this soy-based protein packs nearly 20 grams of protein, in addition to a host of nutrition benefits. For starters, tempeh is filled with nutrients like manganese, magnesium, phosphorus and B vitamins in addition to its role as a probiotic. Jenna Braddock, Florida based at MakeHealthyEasy.com recommends spending a little bit of time prepping it to make the perfect dish! Braddock suggests crumbling the tempeh, then marinating it and finishing with a sear in a hot pan to add instant protein to salads, wraps, bowls and tacos. Pill Nuts Pronounced peel-y, this nut is native to the pili tree often found in Northern Australia and the Philippines. While lower in protein comparatively speaking per serving size (a 1/­­4 cup serving provides 3 grams in comparison to some of the other nuts), it packs a nutritional punch in that it contains essential amino acids the human body needs. This nut is harder to find at local markets, and you will need to likely shop online and be willing to spend about $16.99 for a one-pound bag. Maya Feller, nationally recognized nutrition expert and author of The Southern Comfort Food Diabetes Cookbook, recommends enjoying this mildly flavored nut in yogurt form (yes, brands are now popping up incorporating this nut into their yogurts!) smothered over a stack of pancakes or in their raw form as a crunchy snack. Hemp Seeds Three tablespoons of hulled hemp seeds provide nearly 10 grams of plant-based protein to your meal for just 170 calories. Plus, theyre full of iron and unsaturated fats while offering a great nut-free alternative for crunch. While a bit more pricey than other seeds (a 12-ounce bag is roughly $12.99), theyre an easy addition to boost plant-protein on simple foods. Plant-based sports dietitian, Kelly Jones of kellyjonesnutrition.com recommends adding them to oatmeal, sprinkling them onto pancakes, using as a topper for soups and salads, and incorporating into homemade energy bites! Lupini Beans Lupini beans are a staple of the Mediterranean diet and making a name for themselves in the US due to their high protein content. In just a 1/­­2 cup cooked serving of the bean it packs nearly 13 grams of plant-based protein. But, where it packs in protein it lacks in fiber, with that same 1/­­2 cup serving providing only 2 grams. Found traditionally in the jarred food section of the market, there are a few ways you can cook with them! Amy Gorin, a plant-based registered dietitian and owner of Plant-Based Eats recommends draining and rinsing the beans as you would do with any other canned beans. Then, use them in your favorite dishes, like her delicious plant-based lupini salad! Quinoa One of the only whole grains that is a complete source of protein (containing all 9 essential amino acids), this is an excellent (and affordable) gluten-free, plant-based protein addition to nearly any diet! One cup of cooked quinoa contains nearly 8 grams of protein for just 220 calories (plus nearly 5 grams of fiber.) Quinoa also contains many important B vitamins as well as potassium and antioxidants. Registered Dietitian Tamara Hoffman of Unbeetable Nutrition and Wellness recommends adding quinoa to your taco Tuesday menus with a spicy Mexican seasoning or sauteing it into your stir-fry dishes with a soy sauce. The post 10 Dietitians Share Their Tips to Add More Plant-Protein to Your Diet appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Alternative Meats: A Convenience or a Curse?

November 2 2020 Vegetarian Times 

Have you started swinging through the drive-thru more frequently since fast-food chains decided to hop on board with plant-based burger options? Sure, Burger Kings Impossible Whopper and Carls Jr.s meatless Beyond Meat burger may seem like enticing options after a long day -- heck, even Ikea is rumored to be working on a meatless version of its famous Swedish meatballs. And of course, its an encouraging sign that a plant-based lifestyle is becoming more mainstream, especially when its accepted in restaurants known for their beefy offerings. But could racking up too many fast-food visits mean youre sacrificing some of the positive health benefits associated with a plant-based diet for the sake of convenience? Meat alternatives are taking center stage because more and more people are recognizing that taking meat off our menus is an imperative if we are to preserve the planets life support systems for future generations, says Brenda Davis, R.D., a world-renowned expert in plant-based nutrition and coauthor of Nourish: The Definitive Plant-Based Nutrition Guide for Families. Aside from being better for the planet, her coauthor, Reshma Shah, M.D., a plant-based pediatrician, notes the many health attributes with this lifestyle. Plant-based diets have been associated with longevity, a decreased risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, certain cancers, and a healthy gut, she explains. Studies suggest the people eating a plant-based diet have a lower risk of being overweight or obese. Additionally, plant-based diets have been shown to be an effective strategy for treating many of the chronic diseases that make up the leading causes of death in the United States and throughout the world. 5 Pros of Alternative Meats First, lets explore the benefits of adding alternative meats to your diet: - Easy protein source. Some people may benefit from these concentrated, and very bioavailable protein sources. For athletes who struggle meeting protein needs, these foods can rapidly boost protein intake, says Davis. Also, for seniors who have higher protein needs, and lower calorie intakes, it can be tough to meet recommended intakes. Meat alternatives can help boost protein intakes in a way that is simple and palatable for seniors. - A non-threatening way to transition to eating less meat. New to the world of plant-based eating? Or simply trying to replace a few meat-based dishes each week? Plant-based meat alternatives can offer convenience for busy families, provide an alternative in social situations, and make the transition to a plant-based diet more enjoyable and sustainable in the long run, says Dr. Shah. You may find that you rely on these foods more at the beginning of your plant-based journey. As many people become more comfortable cooking and enjoying a variety of whole, plant foods, they may end up eating these foods less often. - Cleaner fuel. Plant-based meats are lower in persistent organic pollutants that are most concentrated in products at the top of the food chain, such as meat, fish and dairy products, says Davis. Also, plant-based meats cannot form heterocyclic amines, which are carcinogenic compounds formed when meat, poultry or fish are cooked at high temperatures. - Lesser inflammatory response. Plant-based meats are much lower in endotoxins (also known as lipopolysaccharides) than ground meats, which Davis says are associated with chronic inflammation and several disease states. - Reduced risk of food poisoning. Plant-based meat alternatives don’t carry the risk of foodborne disease from bacterial contamination in the same way that animal-based foods do, says Dr. Shah. Related: Tofu: The Unsung Hero of Coronavirus-Related Meat Shortages 5 Cons of Alternative Meats There are some downsides to alternative meat consumption, too: - Processed food is still processed food. While it might be tempting to skip purchasing whole ingredients and making your meals from scratch, the tradeoffs may not be worth it. Most plant-based meat alternatives tend to be higher in calories, fat, sodium, and additives compared to whole plant foods -- like beans and rice, says Dr. Shah. While plant-based meat alternatives are higher in fiber -- animal foods contain no fiber-- and are devoid of cholesterol, they certainly would not be considered a health food when compared to a homemade burger made of black beans, quinoa, and veggies. - Budget-buster. Currently, meat alternatives are rather expensive, sometimes even more expensive than meat. As the demand increases, this may change. - Quality depends on the brand. Meat alternatives vary in their quality, but are generally fairly highly processed foods, says Davis. Some are made from extracted plant proteins, fats, seasonings and preservatives, while others are made from black beans and quinoa. Consumers who want minimally processed foods need to read the label. - Allergens abound. Are you sensitive to gluten, soy or nuts? Meat alternatives are often based on ingredients that are associated with common allergens, so be sure to read labels carefully to avoid a reaction. - Nutrient deficient options. Davis says that meat alternatives are not always fortified with vitamin B12 or zinc, both of which are relatively high in meat. Make sure youre getting enough of these nutrients via the rest of your diet or through supplements. Related: 8 Must-Try Alternative Milks How to Shop for Alternative Meats A simple ingredient list with recognizable foods is always a good place to start. Next, Dr. Shah says to consider the amount of fat (especially saturated fat), sodium, and other additives. One particular additive that has gained scrutiny is the addition of heme iron in certain plant-based meat alternatives, she says. Heme-iron is added to enhance the meaty flavor and appearance of these foods -- but its thought to be pro-inflammatory, cause increased body iron stores, and provide an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. How Often Should You Consumer Alternative Meats? As with most things in life, moderation is key. Eating plant-based meat alternatives from time to time can certainly be a part of a healthy diet, but relying on them on a regular basis -- especially if they are taking the place of whole, plant foods -- would not be considered health-promoting, concludes Dr. Shah. Its also important to note that the consumption frequency may depend on your overall state of health. What is safe and appropriate for one individual may be quite different for another, explains Davis. If you struggle with hypertension or cardiovascular disease, you will want to minimize intake of the high sodium, high-fat meat alternatives. The post Alternative Meats: A Convenience or a Curse? appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

VT Tried It: Nomad Nutrition meals

October 2 2020 Vegetarian Times 

Nomad Nutrition is the culmination of the pursuit of wild places and good food. Founder Denis Mikhailov, an avid climber, spent years looking for the best food to fuel his body and his adventures. Nomad Nutrition promotes a healthy, organic lifestyle with adventure meals geared towards backpackers, hikers, climbers, paddlers, hunters, and anyone on the go or venturing on overnight excursions. Nomad Nutrition has tweaked their recipes to contain the right ratios of healthy fats, lean protein and complex carbs. And theyre packed with nutrient-dense calories to keep the stoke high. They do their best to use organic, non-GMO, whole food ingredients, and all meals are gluten-free, with vegan and paleo options. These small batch meals are made in the Pacific Northwest, not in a lab or some factory overseas, and the company is working on becoming more and more sustainable. But how do they taste? Hungarian Goulash To be honest, Ive never had goulash, but its been the punchline for plenty of jokes, so I was quite surprised at how much I liked this! First of all, Nomad Nutritions meals are super low-effort: boil a cup of water, add to pouch, seal, and let cook. I suspect the potatoes and smoked paprika were my taste allies here, but there are beans to slip in some protein and nutritional value for even a carb-loving hiker like me. GF/­­dairy free, soy free, palm oil free, non GMO. Kathamandu Curry Ive been craving rice, and this is made with tiny rice noodles to stand in for the rice. Well spiced, and chickpeas for protein (20g per pouch). I love the coconut milk, but would have skipped the sundried tomatoes. Id still pick up a pouch of this over Mountain House in a heartbeat. GF/­­dairy free, soy free, palm oil free, non GMO. Try them out > The post VT Tried It: Nomad Nutrition meals appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

High-Vibe Condiment Classics

May 23 2020 My New Roots 

High-Vibe Condiment Classics Summer is fast-approaching (at last!) and I dont know about you, but to me this means grilling, eating outside, and enjoying all of the classic, warm-weather treats. But wait! Did you know that there are all kinds of funky ingredients hiding in the most innocuous places, like your ketchup, mustard and relish?! We shouldnt have to forgo these truly classic condiments just because were walking on the whole foods path. No way! So I decided to do a high-vibe makeover all of the condiments that youd find at a barbecue, picnic, or baseball game: ketchup, mustard, honey mustard, Dijon, relish, mayo and secret sauce, without any refined ingredients, colours, or preservatives. They are entirely vegan (except for the honey mustard), and taste absolutely incredible.  Making your own condiments from scratch is empowering, and you too will see that by whisking up your very own mustard, or blending your very own ketchup that you are incredibly capable in the kitchen! Its a serious delight to realize that youre not only qualified to make things you thought you needed to buy, but that youre also doing yourself a giant favour in cutting questionable ingredients out of your life. When I was a kid, I loved hotdogs with mustard and relish (not ketchup, that was for burgers). The vinegary tang of the yellow mustard with the sweetness of pickle relish perfectly offset the salty squishiness of a microwaved wiener. This was a typical Saturday lunch, with doughnuts for dessert, all washed down with a giant glass of milk. I wanted to recreate that nostalgia, minus pretty much everything else. The flavours bring me back to simple times and simple food. But simple food is not always so simple. Have you read the ingredients on a squeeze bottle of relish lately? Its a complicated collection of chemicals that I certainly wouldnt want in my body. High-fructose corn syrup, natural flavour, and food colouring are just a few of the ingredients that plague most tasty toppings. Food additives are everywhere, especially in shelf-stable products. If youre not going to refrigerate something or preserve it properly, it has to have things in it to prevent it from spoiling. It also has to look appealing and taste good, even after months (or years!) on a grocery store shelf. That is why it is so important to read labels and be discerning about what you choose to buy. This is not to say that these additives are inherently harmful, but they are far from natural, and Im a believer in eating as close to the earth as possible! Luckily my condiments are not only based on whole foods, but they taste amazing and are actually good for you.    Here is a small list of the food additives to watch out for and avoid, if possible. Remember to check the packages of your other summer favourites, like chips, salad dressings, sparkling beverages, soda and juice, ice cream, popsicles, and frozen yogurt.  High Fructose Corn Syrup Sometimes labeled HFCS, this highly-refined artificial sweetener has become the number one source of calories in North America. It is found in almost all processed foods, since it is cheap to make, shelf-stable, super sweet, and highly addictive. Excessive consumption has been linked to obesity, and type 2 diabetes. Watch out for it in condiments, salad dressing, bread, candy, soda, yogurt, breakfast cereals, even canned vegetables and fruit.  Natural Flavours This is a sneaky term meant to throw you off. When you see these words on an ingredient list, they refer to a naturally-derived flavouring agent that has to be extracted from plant or animal sources, designed to enhance the taste of food. Conversely, artificial flavours are synthetically created, with their original sources being manmade chemicals. Natural flavours however, are still made in laboratories by food chemists who can add any numbers of chemicals, including preservatives, solvents and other substances, which are defined as incidental additives, to what they are creating. Food manufacturers are not required to disclose whether these additives come from natural or synthetic sources, and as long as the original flavouring comes from plant or animal material, they can be classified as natural. The point is, natural flavours dont appear to be any healthier than artificial flavours, and they can still contain ingredients that may cause reactions in sensitive individuals, especially children. To avoid them, cut back on packaged products and stick to the real-deal whole foods!  Food Dyes /­­ Colours To make food look bright, fresh, and especially appealing to children, food manufacturers add dyes to obvious things like candy, sports drinks and baked goods, but also not-so-obvious things like condiments (!), pickles, cereals, salad dressing, yogurt, and chocolate milk. Some of these dyes are approved for use in certain countries, while others have banned them, making it challenging for consumers to navigate. The safety of food dyes is controversial, especially in regards to children. Studies have linked them to hyperactivity in sensitive kids, and they may cause allergic reactions in some people. Because most food dyes are found in unhealthy processed foods, its easy to avoid them if youre sticking to a more natural diet.  Hydrogenated /­­ Partially Hydrogenated Oils You know when the World Health Organization plans on eliminating these fats from the global food supply, they must be pretty problematic. Created by forcing hydrogen gas into vegetable fats under extremely high pressure to turn liquid into solid, hydrogenation creates trans fats, which increases the amount of LDL cholesterol, lowers HDL cholesterol, therefore significantly increasing the risk of coronary heart disease. Whats more is that these fats are pro-inflammatory. Although their use has been banned in several countries, trans fats still lurk in many processed foods.  As long as there is less than .5% per serving, it isnt required in to be listed in the ingredients or nutritional information. The best way to avoid them is by cutting out processed foods, especially margarine, coffee creamer, chips and crackers, frozen pizza, fast foods, baked goods, and microwave popcorn.   Health Claims – these are put on the front of the box to lure you in, and can include buzz words like natural, whole grain, low-fat, no added sugar, organic, light, low calorie, gluten-free, and enriched. Terms like these should be a red flag for you, so read the entire label, including the ingredient list, the serving size, the amount and types of sweetener and fat used. Think critically and be selective – if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.  The bottom line?! Stick to whole, or minimally-processed foods and ingredients as often as possible. Its better for you, and your family to make your own from scratch whenever possible. Not to mention, its fun to brag to everyone that youre a condiment master, a yogurt wizard, or a salad dressing whisperer.  I had so much FUN with these recipes! It was a blast to brainstorm which condiments I would attempt to health-ify, experiment with, and eventually master to make them all easy-to-make and delicious. My condiments wont last years in the fridge, but all of them passed the two-week mark with flying colours (all of them natural, of course). As long as youre using clean utensils to scoop out your servings, you shouldnt have a problem keeping these toppings around for a few weeks – ya know, if you can ration them for that long!  Yellow Mustard This was in fact my first attempt at making yellow mustard and it proved to be ridiculously easy! I think Id built it up in my head to be some complicated project, but wow was I mistaken. Just a few simple ingredients, and a little stovetop whisking will get you the brightest, tangiest, most beautiful ballpark mustard of your dreams! I must warn you, from one condiment-master to another, that the bubbling mixture gets darn hot and tends to splatter when its cooking. To avoid scalding yourself, use the pot lid as s shield (insert laughing emoji here).      Print recipe     Yellow Mustard Makes 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml Ingredients:  1 cup /­­ 250ml cold water 3/­­4 cup dry mustard powder 3/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­2 tsp. ground turmeric 1/­­2 tsp. garlic powder 1/­­8 tsp. ground paprika 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml apple cider vinegar Directions: 1. In a small saucepan, whisk together water, dry mustard, salt, turmeric, garlic, and paprika until smooth. Cook the mixture over medium-low to low heat, stirring often, until it bubbles down to a thick paste, 30 to 45 minutes. 2. Whisk the apple cider vinegar into the mustard mixture and continue to cook until its thickened to the desired consistency – this can take between 5 and 15 minutes depending on how thick you like it.  3. Let the mustard cool to room temperature. Transfer the mustard to an airtight glass jar or container, and refrigerate for up to 3 months.  Honey Mustard Depending on how sweet you like your honey mustard, its just the above yellow mustard recipe with as much honey stirred in as you like! I added two tablespoons and it was perfect for me, but if you want even more, got for it. I recommend avoiding very runny honey, since this will loosen the mustard. Instead, opt for something on the thicker side to maintain the consistency. If youre vegan, brown rice or date syrup would be the best choices, since they are more viscous than maple syrup, for example. I love this on sandwiches with lots of fresh veggies and sprouts!     Print recipe     Honey Mustard Makes 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml Ingredients: 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml yellow mustard (recipe above) 2 Tbsp. raw honey Directions: 1. Combine the mustard and the honey. Taste and add more honey if desired. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 3 months.  Grainy Dijon Mustard This style of Dijon is a whole-seed one, which is my favourite because of the great texture and colour variations. Its spicy and complex, and will only get better with time. Keep in mind that this recipe is in two stages, the first one requiring you to soak your mustard seeds the night before you plan on blending.      Print recipe     Grainy Dijon Mustard Makes 1 cup /­­ 250ml  Ingredients: 1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g yellow mustard seeds 1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g black mustard seeds 1/­­2 Tbsp. ground mustard 1/­­3 cup /­­ 75ml white wine vinegar 1/­­3 cup /­­ 75ml apple cider vinegar 2 tsp. maple syrup 1/­­2 tsp. sea salt Directions: 1. Combine all ingredients and refrigerate overnight (for 12-24 hours) to allow the mustard seeds to soften and absorb the flavours. 2. Place mixture in blender and mix on high for a minute or two, until the seeds have broken and the mustard thickens. 3. Transfer contents to a clean jar and enjoy! Dijon will keep for about one month in the refrigerator. Sweet Pickle Relish This was the most anticipated condiment to try and make myself, since its one of my favourites, but also one of the worst offenders for additives. I successfully recreated that gorgeous tang, and succulent texture of commercial relish that I loved so much as a kid. The taste of this one is off the charts! My recipe uses coconut sugar instead of refined sugar and syrups, so the colour is a little darker and browner than the conventional types, but I dont think youll notice – and you certainly wont miss the food colouring!     Print recipe     Sweet Pickle Relish Makes 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 340g finely diced cucumber 1/­­2 cup /­­ 85g finely diced yellow onion 1 tsp. salt, divided  1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml apple cider vinegar  1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g coconut sugar 1/­­4 tsp. garlic powder 1 tsp. yellow mustard seeds 1 tsp. dried dill 1/­­4 tsp. turmeric 1/­­4 red bell pepper, finely diced 1 tsp. arrowroot, dissolved in 2 tsp. water Directions: 1. Toss the cucumber and onion with 3/­­4 teaspoon of salt in a sieve set over a bowl, and let drain for about 3 hours. Next, press the ingredients against side of sieve to release as much liquid as possible, then discard liquid from bowl.  2. Bring the vinegar, coconut sugar, and remaining 1/­­4 teaspoon of salt to a boil in a small saucepan, stirring until sugar has dissolved, then simmer until reduced to about a 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml (just eyeball it), about 3 to 4 minutes. Add the garlic, mustard, dill, and turmeric, stir until fragrant, about 1-2 minutes. 3. Add the drained cucumber and onion mixture, plus diced red bell pepper, and simmer, stirring for about 2 minutes. Make the arrowroot slurry, then whisk it into the relish. Simmer, stirring, 2-3 minutes until noticeably thickened. Turn off the heat and transfer relish to a glass jar or storage container and leave uncovered until it cools to room temperature, then put in the fridge. The relish will keep for up to a month in the fridge.  Tomato Ketchup This ketchup was an old blog post that I revisited and revised. I used to make this recipe in the oven, but my new method eliminates the need to crank up the heat when its probably the last thing you want to do. Instead, the whole thing is made on the stove, then blitzed up in the blender. Its deeply spiced and complex, so much more interesting than store-bought ketchup. The first time I made the new version, I used a good portion of it for a soup base, then added more to a dip – both were delicious, so if you have leftovers, put it to use in an unexpected place. Its tasty with everything!      Print recipe     Tomato Ketchup Makes 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 1 Tbsp. coconut oil (expeller-pressed, flavour neutral)  3 star whole anise (make sure they are whole to remove easily!) 3 bay leaves 1 tsp. ground coriander pinch of chili flakes  1 large onion, chopped  3/­­4 tsp. sea salt  1/­­4 tsp. freshly ground black pepper 3 cloves garlic, minced 2.2 lbs. /­­ 1 kg tomatoes  2 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar 1 Tbsp. maple syrup  Directions: 1. Melt the coconut oil in a medium stockpot, then add the star anise, bay leaves, coriander, and chili flakes. Cook until fragrant about 2 minutes, then add the onions, salt and pepper, and cook until slightly browned, about 10 mins. Next add the add garlic, cook for 1-2 minutes, then add balsamic vinegar, scraping any stuck bits off the bottom of the pot. Add tomatoes and their juices, then bring to a simmer.  2. Cook on low heat for about 60 mins or until reduced and starting to caramelize on the bottom of the pot.  3. Turn off heat and remove bay and anise, add maple syrup. Let cool slightly and transfer to a blender, blend until smooth. Taste, and adjust seasoning to suit your taste.  4. Let cool to room temperature, then transfer to an airtight glass container and store in the fridge. Keeps for about one month.   Aquafaba Mayonnaise This was the most exciting discovery to make: vegan mayo using aquafaba! Aqua faba translates to bean water and its the cooking liquid from chickpeas. Although any can of chickpeas will have this, I make my own, since there are no additives or chemicals that have leached from the can itself. If you cook your own chickpeas from dried, you have aquafaba. Although I wouldnt normally consume large amounts of aquafaba, in this case its used in such a small amount that I think its fine. Plus, did I mention it makes vegan mayo?! The results are so unbelievably shocking and delightful that Im a convert, even though I eat eggs! I highly suggest using the most neutral-tasting olive oil you can find for this recipe. Since it makes up the majority of the flavour of the mayonnaise, a strong-tasting olive oil will overpower the delicate nature of this condiment. I used the one from Pineapple Collaborative, which works perfectly. I also tried avocado oil, grapeseed, and sunflower, but didnt like the results as much as mild olive oil. Its up to you! You can really use whatever you have on hand, just keep in mind that it will really dictate the taste of the final result.      Print recipe     Aquafaba Mayonnaise Makes about 1 cup /­­ 250ml Ingredients: 3 Tbsp. aquafaba 1/­­4 tsp. Dijon mustard 1/­­4 tsp. fine salt 1 1/­­2 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tsp. apple cider vinegar 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml mild olive oil (or other light-tasting oil) Directions: 1. Place the aquafaba in the bottom of a wide-mouth jar. Add the mustard, salt, lemon juice, vinegar, and the olive oil. Allow a minute for the oil to separate into a distinct layer. 2. Insert an immersion blender all the way to the bottom of the jar. (Note: this will not work with an upright blender) Start the blending process on medium speed and do not lift the blender until the mixture has thickened and turned white at the bottom of the jar. Only then, slowly move the blender up, waiting for the oil to incorporate as you go, until you get the texture of mayonnaise. Use immediately; refrigerate leftovers in a tightly sealed jar for up to 1 month. The mayonnaise will thicken slightly once cooled in the fridge. Smoky Secret Sauce This is the creamy, tangy, and perfectly seasoned sauce that most famously adorns the Big Mac burger from McDonalds. Whats best about my version is that it has zero secrets...nothing weird to hide here! I had the most fun with this recipe, since it required a number of the condiments that Id already made as ingredients. I did deviate a tad from the original and added smoked paprika, since I love the added dimension of smoke flavour to anything thats going on grilled food, but Ive also found this to be a stellar salad dressing, especially for chop-style salads that have chunky, less delicate ingredients. I hope you find some fun things to slather it on this summer. Its lip-smakingly tasty!      Print recipe     Smoky Secret Sauce Makes 1 cup /­­ 250ml Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml aquafaba mayonnaise (recipe above) 1 tablespoon yellow mustard (recipe above) 2 tablespoons sweet pickle relish (recipe above) 1 tsp. maple syrup 1/­­2 teaspoon white wine vinegar 1/­­2 teaspoon paprika 1/­­4 tsp. smoked paprika (not traditional, but delicious!) 1/­­4 teaspoon garlic powder 1/­­4 teaspoon onion powder Directions: 1. Fold all ingredients together in a small bowl or jar. Enjoy immediately, and store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for 2-3 weeks.    As a bonus, Ive included this stellar recipe for carrot hot dogs – since youll need a high-vibe wiener to put your condiments on! Hahaaa! I realize that carrot hot dogs are pretty 2018, but Id never tried them before and it was a very amusing undertaking. I looked at a number of recipes online and my version is a mash-up of the ones that sounded the most delicious. My method is also much easier and faster than other versions Ive seen, since its just a braise on the stove and a quick grill (no marinating, steaming, roasting, etc).  The important thing to keep in mind for this recipe, is that the amount of time you braise the carrots for,Im  will be dictated by the girth of the carrots. Mine were more sausage-sized (approx 1.5 or 3.5-3.75 cm) than a typical hot dog wiener, and a 20-minute simmer was the perfect amount. If your carrots are smaller, Id go down to 15 minutes. Insert a sharp knife to check on the doneness after 10 minutes or so, and take them out when they are tender, but way before they get mushy. Remember that youre also going to be grilling them for 10 minutes so they will cook even more, and you dont want them too soft. The final result should be tender all the way through, but shouldnt fall apart in your mouth.     Print recipe     Carrot Hot Dogs Serves 8 Ingredients: 8 large hot dog-sized carrots 8 hot dog buns 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml tamari 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml apple cider vinegar  1 cup /­­ 250ml vegetable broth or 1 tsp. vegetable bullion powder + 1 cup water 2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 2 Tbsp. coconut oil (preferably expeller-pressed, flavour neutral) 1 Tbsp. liquid smoke 2 tsp. yellow mustard 1 tsp. garlic powder 1 tsp. paprika 1/­­2 tsp. onion powder 1/­­2 tsp. ground black pepperWash and peel carrots. Round the edges of the carrot to look more like wieners, if desired.  Direcitons: 1. Whisk all marinade ingredients together in a large stockpot with a lid. Add the peeled carrots and bring to a boil, reduce to a gentle simmer, and cook with the lid on for about 20 minutes (less if your carrots are on the thin side, see headnote). Remove from heat and turn on the grill.  2. Grill the carrots over medium-high, turning every couple of minutes, basting them with the remaining braising liquid if desired. Cook until slightly charred and fragrant, 10 minutes total. Grill or toast the buns. Place a carrot on each bun and enjoy with all of the condiments! I wish you all an incredible summer ahead! I recognize that this season is going to look very different from years past, but as long as were all healthy and the sun is shining, weve got it pretty good. Stay safe out there, and keep fuelling your body with the whole foods it needs to thrive and feel alive!  All love and happy condiment-making, Sarah B The post High-Vibe Condiment Classics appeared first on My New Roots.

20 Unexpected Ways to Use Cauliflower

April 20 2020 Oh My Veggies 

You know the old saying… if life gives you cauliflower, make pizza crust. What--that’s not a saying?! Well, I propose right here and now that it should be. We all know cauliflower is a pretty great vegetable, sure. But do you know just how versatile it is? Did you know you can take a head of the stuff and make, yes, a pizza crust? Or a lightened-up version of mashed potatoes? How about hummus? Rice?! Popcorn! Buffalo wings!! This incredible cruciferous vegetable isn’t only low in carbohydrates (perfect for those eating lower-carb diets), it’s utterly packed with nutrients. So the fact that you can transform it into a myriad of other things--usually as as substitute for something that would have been far more calorie-dense--it’s a very good thing. Here are 20 brilliant cauliflower recipes from around the web that touch upon the infinite possibilities for this one remarkable vegetable.

Inexpensive Plant-Based Ingredients That Won’t Go Bad

March 30 2020 Meatless Monday 

Inexpensive Plant-Based Ingredients That Won’t Go BadEvery food item will eventually go bad, but there are many food staples that offer a terrific value, can be prepared in big batches, and have an incredibly long shelf-life. Some of these ingredients can serve as the centerpiece of a meal, like potatoes, beans, and pasta, while others act as supporting actors, providing quick bursts of flavor to ordinary dishes. Best of all, many of these foods are completely plant-based and rich in many of the essential vitamins and minerals necessary for a healthy body. Our list of plant-based ingredients all have a shelf life of over two months (when stored properly) and are relatively inexpensive. But most importantly, these pantry staples give you the opportunity to get in the kitchen and experiment with flavors and ingredients that you may have overlooked in the past. And Meatless Mondays are always a great opportunity to start a new healthy ritual. Beans Often sold for less than a dollar a can, beans are the ultimate plant-based protein. With so many different types to choose from -- kidney, black, pinto, cannellini, pigeon peas, butter beans -- the recipe possibilities are endless. Make a stew, vegetable chili , bean salad, or these black bean meatless balls with zucchini noodles . Diced Tomatoes (canned) Take a simple stew, stir-fry, or sauce to the next level with a can of diced tomatoes. At only a buck a can, diced tomatoes will become your new secret weapon in the kitchen. Try adding them to this boldly-seasoned spicy chickpea ragout. Frozen Fruits and Vegetables Toss them into a blender, soup pot or sauté pan to add some nutrients and heft to your mid-week meals. When stored properly, frozen fruits and vegetables will last years (but please dont make them wait that long). Some frozen vegetables -- spinach, collards, broccoli rabe -- should be thawed and drained before cooking, while others like broccoli, peas, and peppers can be thrown into a hot pan as-is and easily transformed into a garlic-ginger fried rice. Granola A bag of granola wont run you much more than $4.00, depending on the brand, but it will impart an invaluable crunch to yogurt and oatmeal. Many manufacturers sell granola with a shelf life of up to six months, but it should be good to eat it even past that point (although it might not retain its full crunch). Lentils (dry) At $1.50 per pound, a bag of dried lentils is one of the best bargains in the grocery store. Besides an almost indefinite shelf life, the lentil contains a laundry-list of essential minerals like iron, folate, and manganese, is packed with protein, and is a great source of fiber. If youve never before cooked with dried lentils, start with a simple stew or this easy French lentil salad with cherry tomatoes. Onions When stored in the refrigerator, onions can last for up to two months (sometimes longer). Theyre pretty cheap, too, costing only around $1.00 – $1.50 per pound. Sear on the stove top for a smoky, charred flavor or cook them low-and-slow to unlock their natural, caramel-like sweetness and sprinkle them over this sweet potato caramelized onion stew. Oatmeal Think of oatmeal as a blank canvas. Costing less than a quarter per serving, let your imagination run wild when it comes to cooking breakfast. Mix in everything from peanut butter, jam, nuts, seeds, or even savory spices. Dried oatmeal can last longer than a year when properly stored. Use oatmeal in this vanilla almond milk oatmeal or try using it to make dessert, like this apple cranberry oatmeal bread. Pasta Costing only $1.00 per box, your pantry should be loaded with pasta, but we recommend going beyond the standard semolina/­­durum wheat flour varieties and experiment with pastas made from whole grains, vegetables, lentils, and chickpeas. Try some unique flavor combinations to keep things interesting, like this recipe for green tea pesto pasta . Peanut Butter Whether you like it creamy or crunchy, peanut is the ideal pantry staple . A serving of peanut butter is packed with protein and healthy fats, both of which will keep you feeling nice and satiated. Peanut butter has a shelf life of more than a year (unopened), and many brands of sell for less than $2.00 a jar. Polenta (corn meal) Polenta is made by mixing cornmeal (dried, ground corn) with either water or milk. Inexpensive and versatile, polenta can serve as the foundation of any number of meals, pairing especially well with tomato sauce, like in this recipe for Italian white beans with kale and polenta.  Potatoes These starchy staples dont last forever, but when stored in a cool dark space they can last for between 2 - 3 months. At around .50 cents per pound, the potato is an excellent source of fiber, nutrients, and calories; they can add creaminess to soups or serve as a vessel for a delicious stuffed potatoes primavera . Rice Whether its white, brown, or wild, rice costs less than a quarter per serving. Rice can serve as an accompanying carbohydrate or act as the main meal. For a new take on everyones favorite grain, try this vegetarian biryani or meatless brown rice jambalaya . Salsa Jarred salsa is an excellent (and convenient) alternative to fresh varieties. Add a tablespoon to anything bean burritos and taco bowls to spicy puttanesca pasta and gallo pinto ; mash some together with a ripe avocado and youve got a quick-and-easy guacamole. Soy Sauce Drizzle soy sauce into your stir fry, salad, sautéed vegetable, or tomato sauce for a boost of salty umami flavor. You can also use it liberally in this yummy Asian noodle bowl with spicy almond sauce . Soy sauce can cost as little as $2.00 a bottle and can last nearly two years after opening when stored in the refrigerator. Sweet Potatoes The sweet potato is natures candy; slice it down the middle and heat in the microwave for five minutes and out comes tasting reminiscent of a sugary soufflé. If you want to try making a dish that requires a little more technique, cook up this spicy and aromatic sweet potato chana or a coconut milk sweet potato white bean soup . Vegetable Broth/­­ Bouillon A box of vegetable broth is a staple of any kitchen, but you can expand your soup selection by adding some chickn bouillon cubes to your pantry. Add some beans, frozen vegetables, and seasonings and you have a clean and simple dinner for around $1.00 per serving, or add some flour, nut-milk, and noodles for a creamy vegetable noodle soup . Curious about what other plant-based ingredients you should be storing in your pantry? Check out our list of 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients . The post Inexpensive Plant-Based Ingredients That Won’t Go Bad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Here’s How You Can Use Tofu to Recreate Your Favorite Comfort Foods

March 9 2020 Meatless Monday 

Here’s How You Can Use Tofu to Recreate Your Favorite Comfort FoodsInexpensive, packed with protein, and easy to store, tofu is an indispensable wonder food that you simply must have in your refrigerator at all times. Tofu is sold in different levels of firmness, which can range from silken (pillowy and custard-like) to extra firm (spongy). The less-firm varieties have higher water content, making them better for cream and dairy replacements. Tofu can also be used to boost the nutritional quality of your favorite dishes; blend a block of silken tofu into your typical roux-based cheese sauce for a plant-based protein boost, and no one will notice the difference. This Monday, experiment with tofu by incorporating this versatile ingredient into some of your favorite classic comfort foods. Our top tofu tips and hacks: o Press your tofu to remove water before cooking or marinating o Freeze and thaw tofu to achieve a texture more similar to meat o Marinate tofu with your favorite sauces, avoid oil-based marinades o Press, cube and air-fry or bake tofu with your favorite seasonings for easy and delicious toss-ins for salads, stir fry, burritos and beyond Alfredo Sauce Traditional Alfredo sauce is heavy, rich, but oh so delicious. Try using tofu for a version thats light, creamy, lower in calories, and higher in protein. Whats the secret? Just blend together silken tofu, vegetable broth, Italian seasoning, vegan butter, and a healthy amount of nutritional yeast. Liberally coat some fettuccine and enjoy. Buffalo Wings When battered, breaded, and baked, tofu becomes crisp on the outside, just like your favorite chicken wings. To make tofu wings, simply dredge extra-firm tofu blocks in cornstarch, dip them in a plant-based milk, coat in bread crumbs, seasonings and bake or air-fry until brown. You can create your own Buffalo sauce by mixing together hot sauce (Franks RedHot is the classic), butter or non-dairy butter substitute, and granulated garlic. Drooling for more? Check out this Crispy Tofu Finger recipe. Caesar Dressing No eggs or anchovies required to make this plant-based Caesar dressing . Blend together silken tofu, lemon juice and zest, garlic cloves, capers, Dijon mustard and nutritional yeast. Pour over some grilled romaine lettuce, and your first course it ready to go. Chicken Fried Tofu Chicken fried steak is a southern staple, but the technique, which involves a thinly sliced protein thats been breaded and pan-fried, can be made with tofu to produce the same crispy, comforting outcome. The recipe is straightforward : Simply drain, slice, and press tofu to remove as much moisture as possible; dip slices into a batter (use plant-based milk, flour, and some vinegar or lemon juice); and, finally, cover in your breading. Put the finished steaks on a wire cooling rack and bake, air-fry or sauté until golden and crispy. Jalapeno Poppers Ideal for game days and gatherings, the jalapeno popper has achieved mythical status as one of the ultimate appetizers. For a plant-based version , swap out the cream cheese for a tofu cream cheese -- which you can buy or easily make on your own . To make these plant-based bites, seed the jalapenos, slice down the middle, stuff with your tofu cream cheese and whatever other goodies you have available -- non-dairy cheese, scallions, chile powder -- and give them a quick roast in the oven until nice and charred, and top with some crushed potato chips for a little texture. Jamaican Jerk Tofu This is the kind of miracle dish that can convert anyone to tofu. The Jamaican jerk seasoning is sure-to-please. Its sort of like barbeque and sort of like curry, savory and sweet at the same time. The recipe for Jamaican Jerk Tofu is super simple: Just press and slice the tofu, submerge in the jerk marinade, and cook in a hot skillet. Lasagna Food doesnt get more comforting than lasagna. Approach this dish as you would your favorite lasagna recipe , but instead of ricotta cheese, blend together pressed tofu, nutritional yeast, garlic powder, and salt and pepper. Tofu Parmigiana   Italian night has never been easier. Press, bread, and sauté slices of tofu until their golden brown; add some tomato sauce to the bottom of a baking dish, line it with the lightly-fried tofu, top with remaining sauce, top with traditional or non-dairy mozzarella, and pop into the oven. Check out one of our favorite recipes here .   Click here for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Here’s How You Can Use Tofu to Recreate Your Favorite Comfort Foods appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Pile on the Protein with These 10 Plant-Based Foods

March 1 2020 Meatless Monday 

Pile on the Protein with These 10 Plant-Based FoodsFats and carbohydrates have faced their fair share of scrutiny over the decades, but protein has managed to coast through years of fad diets and conflicting-nutritional recommendations unscathed. Protein is essential for healthy body functions, responsible for growing and repairing muscle tissue, aiding in digestion and energy production, and helping bolster your immune system. With a lengthy list of benefits, its no surprise that getting enough protein is a dietary priority. Thankfully, theres an abundance of this crucial macronutrient in a variety of plant-based foods and ingredients. This Monday, kick-start a healthy week with delicious high-protein, plant-based foods.   Almonds A handful of almonds is a satiating snack that will keep a grumbling tummy at bay, but the tree nut is also a good source of protein. A quarter cup of almonds contains 6 grams of protein and plenty of fiber. Eat them on their own or incorporate them into your own custom snack mix . Black Beans Easy to prepare, cheap to buy, versatile, and nutritionally dense, the black bean is the ultimate pantry staple for people looking to incorporate more plant-based protein into their diet. Cooked black beans contain 8 grams of protein per half cup. Purchase them canned, or, if ambitious, dried, and transform them into plant-based burgers, taco fillings , soups, or meat balls . Chickpeas Cooked chickpeas are the main ingredient in hummus and boast nearly 15 grams of protein per cup. And remember, when using canned chickpeas, save the liquid -- also known as aquafaba -- for a terrific, plant-based egg white replacement. Edamame Popular in Japan and other areas of East Asia, edamame is as close you can get to a perfect food : One cup of cooked edamame contains 8 grams of fiber, 17 grams of protein, and is only 189 calories. Farro One of the lesser known ancient grains, farro needs to be on your radar . A quarter cup of uncooked farro contains 6 grams of protein. Its toothsome texture adds a pleasant chew to grain bowls and salads. Kidney Beans These hefty beans are dense, nourishing, and nutrient-packed. One cup of cooked kidney beans contains roughly 13 grams of protein (as well as 13 grams of fiber). Lentils With tons of fiber and almost no saturated fat, look to use lentils as the foundation of multiple meals throughout the week. A cup of cooked lentils contains 18 grams of protein and more than half your recommended daily value of fiber. Peanuts A staple of almost every pantry, the peanut (and peanut butter) is a tremendous source of plant-based protein and health fats. With nearly 10 grams of protein per quarter cup, the peanut is a great snack to take to the office or incorporated into this sweet and spicy Sweet Potato Peanut Stew.   Quinoa The trendiest of grains (well, its technically a seed), quinoa is a splendid source of protein that can serve as the foundation of any meatless meal . A cup of cooked quinoa boasts around 8 grams of protein. Tofu There are imitators and then there are originators. Tofu -- made from soy beans -- is sold in a variety of textures and forms, but no matter the type, youre guaranteed to get a solid dose of plant-based protein, with a half-cup offering around 10 grams. Our recipe for Jamaican Jerk Tofu (the most popular recipe on our website) will make you a lifelong tofu loyalist.   Click here for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Pile on the Protein with These 10 Plant-Based Foods appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Not Having these 10 Spices in Your Cupboard is a Disservice to Your Taste Buds

February 17 2020 Meatless Monday 

Not Having these 10 Spices in Your Cupboard is a Disservice to Your Taste BudsUnder-seasoned food tastes of...disappointment, but you can effortlessly breathe new life into your meals with the addition of a few key seasonings and spice blends. Spices instantly elevate the subtle flavors of vegetables, legumes, whole grains, and plant-based proteins without piling on extra calories (or dirty dishes in the sink). From sea salt to shichimi togarashi, weve got the 10 spices that you need to add to your spice rack. Adobo (all-purpose seasoning) Adobo is the ultimate all-purpose seasoning, and, although its traditionally used with animal proteins, its salty-garlicy flavor can give that same savoriness to any number of plant-based dishes -- from crispy tofu to vegetarian stews. Adobo seasonings vary in their composition, but they generally include a blend of granulated garlic, salt, oregano, black pepper, and turmeric. Ancho Chile Ancho chile, known as a poblano when fresh, has a deep, smoky, slightly sweet flavor comparable to a spicy chocolate-covered raisin. Its mild-to-medium heat makes it an appropriate addition to moles, enchilada sauce, soup, traditional chili, or even pasta. Black Peppercorns (in pepper mill) Pre-ground black pepper tastes vapid and boring compared to the fresh stuff; thankfully, many spice brands offer miniature grinders complete with whole peppercorns ready to be crushed. A couple rotations of the pepper mill adds a sharp, citrusy flavor, floral-like aroma, and crunchy texture to the tops of salads, soups, pastas, and these delicious tempeh fajitas.  Cumin The fragrant seed is a member of the parsley family, but its often sold as a powder rather than in its whole form. Cumin is aromatic and complex and can add a powerful smoky flavor to black bean burgers, curried potatoes, vegetarian chili, and lentil soups. Just remember to use this strong spice sparingly. Curry Powder Curry Powder is a mixture of different seasonings that differs slightly based on what brand you buy. That being said, many contain some combination of coriander, mustard, cumin, fenugreek, cayenne, cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, and turmeric, which gives curry powder its iconic yellow-orange color. Add some to roasted vegetables, blend into hummus, sprinkle on popcorn, or use as the base of this Thai tofu pumpkin curry. Everything Bagel Available at Trader Joes and a spattering of other retailers, the Everything Bagel spice blend is the ultimate compliment to any roasted potato or sautéed vegetable. Add some to a tahini dressing or sprinkle some on an avocado half with a squeeze of lemon and a squirt of sriracha. The spice mixture is a combination of all the wonderful bits youd find on the outside of an everything bagel: sesame seeds, sea salt, dried minced garlic, onion, and poppy seeds.  Red Pepper Flake Although it probably already exists somewhere on your spice rack, the raw, uncalibrated heat of red pepper flake brings a brutish pop to roasted cruciferous vegetables and elegant pastas. Sea Salt Dont roll your eyes just yet. In terms of utility in a dish, sea salt offers the same taste-enhancing qualities as traditional table salt, but when it comes to look, flavor, and texture, sea salt is in an ocean of its own. Its slightly richer flavor and crunch make it a natural fit for both savory entrees and desserts. Shichimi Togarashi Adorning the table of many ramen soup shops, shichimi togarashi is a complex spice blend that includes a combination of red chile pepper, orange peel, sesame seeds, Japanese pepper, ginger, and seaweed. Sprinkle this on literally anything -- noodles, fried rice, stir-fried tofu, soups, marinades, rubs, dressings, tempuras, roasted vegetables, etc. -- to instantly add a flurry diverse flavors and tastes. Star Anise Star anise is often sold in its ornamental whole form, but its much easier to incorporate into dishes as a powder. Its flavor is somewhere between licorice, cinnamon, and clove. Try adding it to broths, chutneys, mulled wine, or desserts, like this warm cranberry poached pear.  Click here for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Not Having these 10 Spices in Your Cupboard is a Disservice to Your Taste Buds appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Top 20 Plant-Based Proteins

January 27 2020 Meatless Monday 

Top 20 Plant-Based ProteinsWill I get enough protein? is one of the most common questions asked by people looking to add more plant-based foods to their diet. The short (and long) answer is -- YES. Check out our Plant Protein Power Kit for downloadable social media graphics, plant-protein GIFs and printable posters. According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the recommended dietary allowance for individual daily protein intake is 0.8 grams per of protein per every 2 pounds of body weight. Although this is an approximate calculation -- other factors such as age, sex, body type, and lifestyle must be considered for a precise nutrient recommendation -- it provides a reliable benchmark to measure your daily protein requirements.  This amounts to around 56 grams of protein per day for the average sedentary man and 46 grams per day for the average sedentary woman. So, how do you reach that daily number eating only plant-based foods? Easy, check out our guide below and discover which seeds, nuts, legumes, vegetables, and plant-based products pack the biggest protein punch. Still have questions? Learn more about plant-based protein from the nutritional experts at Johns Hopkins University. Broccoli One of the most popular vegetables is also one of the most protein dense, with one cup of cooked broccoli containing 6 grams of protein. Roast it, sauté it, or steam it for a quick and nutritious side dish. Chia Seeds Small but mighty, 1 ounce of chia seeds packs nearly 5 grams protein. Drop a spoonful into a smoothie or combine with a liquid like juice or nut milk to make a fun-textured chia pudding. Chickpeas Cooked chickpeas are the main ingredient in hummus and boast nearly 15 grams of protein per cup. And remember, when using canned chickpeas, save the liquid -- also known as aquafaba -- for a terrific, plant-based egg white replacement. Edamame Popular in Japan and other areas of East Asia, edamame is as close you can get to a perfect food: One cup of cooked edamame contains 8 grams of fiber, 17 grams of protein, and is only 189 calories. Farro One of the lesser known ancient grains, farro needs to be on your radar. A quarter cup of uncooked farro contains 6 grams of protein. Its toothsome texture adds a pleasant chew to grain bowls and salads. Frozen Veggie Burgers There are tons of different types of pre-made frozen veggie burgers varying in ingredients, texture, and flavorful, and although their nutritional profiles differ, you can generally expect between 10 - 15 grams of protein per patty. Try a range of brands and see which one(s) fit your palate. Hemp Seed Heralded as a superfood, hemp seeds have a subtle, nutty flavor similar to pine nuts. In baking, hemp seeds can be used as a nut replacement, but it can also be added to smoothies, with 2 tablespoons containing over 6 grams of protein. Jackfruit Jackfruit is often marketed as a plant-based alternative to pulled pork, with a meaty, stringy texture fit for faux barbecue platters and sandwiches. Jackfruit is rarely sold whole, but there are a handful of brands selling products made with jackfruit in the refrigerated section of supermarkets. Jack fruit is not the most protein-dense item on this list, but it still contains 3 grams per cup. Kidney Beans These hefty beans are dense, nourishing, and nutrient-packed. One cup of cooked kidney beans contains roughly 13 grams of protein (as well as 13 grams of fiber). Lentils With tons of fiber and almost no saturated fat, look to use lentils as the foundation of multiple meals throughout the week. A cup of cooked lentils contains 18 grams of protein and more than half your recommended daily value of fiber. Mung Beans Mainly cultivated in East and Southeast Asia, the mung bean is often used as the foundation of stews, vegetable patties, or dal. One cup of cooked mung beans contains 14 grams of protein. Note: mung beans are easier to find dry rather than cooked and canned. Nut Butters Although not all nut butters are considered equal when it comes to protein content (or flavor), they generally contain around 4 grams of protein per tablespoon. Oatmeal A cup of cooked oatmeal contains 6 grams of protein; pair it with a scoop of peanut butter and a sprinkling of hemp or chia seeds for a protein-packed breakfast. Plant-Based Meat Thanks to plant-based meat, sources of vegan protein are all the rage. A typical plant-based burger patty contains 20 grams of protein. Many quick-service restaurant chains now offer versions of their classic menu items featuring some variety of plant-based meat. Quinoa The trendiest of grains (well, its technically a seed), quinoa is a splendid source of protein that can serve as the foundation of any meatless meal. A cup of cooked quinoa boasts around 8 grams of protein. Seitan The original plant-based meat replacement, seitan -- which is made from wheat gluten -- is packed with protein and can be quite tasty when properly prepared. A 3-ounce serving of seitan includes between 15 - 20 grams of protein, a number that is comparable to most animal proteins. Soy Milk The market for non-dairy nut milks has exploded in recent years, but soy milk remains the most nutritious option. One cup of soy milk has 8 grams of protein, which makes it a nice base for smoothies and shakes. Sprouted Bread Sprouted bread is a certain category of bread made from grains that have been allowed to germinate (aka sprout) before being milled into flour. Ezekiel Bread -- a common brand of sprouted bread -- contains 4 grams of protein and only 80 calories per slice. Sunflower Seeds Who wouldve thought that the innocent little sunflower seed could pack such a protein punch? A half-cup of sunflower seeds has 15 grams of proteins. Bring some in a little baggy and keep with you for a quick and nutritious snack. Tofu There are imitators and then there are originators. Tofu -- made from soy beans -- is sold in a variety of textures and forms, but no matter the type, youre guaranteed to get a solid dose of plant-based protein, with a half-cup offering around 10 grams. Our recipe for Jamaican Jerk Tofu (the most popular recipe on our website) will make you a lifelong tofu loyalist.   Below, weve curated a sample a menu to demonstrate how easy it is to hit your daily protein target eating only plant-based foods. Breakfast: Overnight Pumpkin Pie Oats (17 grams of protein) Lunch: Garlicky White Bean Avocado Toast (13 grams of protein) Dinner: Veggie Meatballs (27 grams of protein) No time to cook? No problem. Meatless Monday On-the-Go is easier than ever. Creating a plant-based Meatless Monday masterpiece? Let us know by tagging @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday on your social media posts for a chance to be featured on our channels.   The post Top 20 Plant-Based Proteins appeared first on Meatless Monday.

How Many of These 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients Are in Your Pantry?

January 20 2020 Meatless Monday 

How Many of These 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients Are in Your Pantry?A properly-stocked pantry is essential for creating delicious plant-based dishes on the fly. But what does properly-stocked really mean? Sure, you need the basics -- olive oil, white flour, rice, pasta, etc., but there are some additional ingredients that you should consider adding to your collection. Alternative flours, exotic spices, seeds, nut butters, beans (butter beans will change your life), broths, and grains can all add extra levels of depth, dimension, and texture to any variety of plant-based dishes.   Youll likely be familiar with many of the items on this list, but there are also a few lesser known ingredients -- agar-agar, tahini, nutritional yeast, etc. -- which can be used to replace many traditional animal-based ingredients. So, grab a paper and pen, and make sure these items are on next weeks shopping list. Agar-Agar The perfect vegan gelatin replacement for your puddings, jellies, or gelées, agar-agar flakes are derived from seaweed and function similarly to animal-based gelatins. Alternative Flours Were not talking your run of the mill (went there) all-purpose, bleached white flour. Play around with some alternative flours like almond, chickpea, rice, or buckwheat. Many alternative flours are also gluten-free. Beans (canned) Explore the world of beans, and reap the benefits of a healthy, satisfying plant-based protein. Lentils, black beans, butter beans, kidney beans, chickpeas -- doesnt matter; theyre all easy to use, shelf-stable, healthy, and inexpensive. Broth A box of vegetable broth is a staple of any kitchen, but you can expand your soup selection by adding some chickn bouillon cubes to your pantry. Coconut Oil A shelf-stable saturated fat, coconut oil is a healthy alternative to other vegetable oils. In most cases it can be substituted 1:1 for other oils and butters. Its got a laundry list of benefits that range from weight loss to improved cognitive functioning. Chocolate All vegetables and no sweets make everyone hangry. A little bit of chocolate can go a long way in baking as well as a post-dinner night cap. If youre feeling adventurous try some exotic bars that contain a higher percentage of cacao. Diced Tomatoes (canned) Take a simple stew, stir-fry, or sauce to the next level with a can of diced tomatoes. Theyre every home cooks secret weapon. Tip: fire-roasted tomatoes add even more flavor to your meals. Frozen Fruits and Vegetables Toss them into a blender, soup pot or sauté pan to add some inexpensive nutrients and heft to your mid-week meals. Grains Theres an endless variety of grains available for your experimenting pleasure. Whole grains are best (think brown rice), but theres also a number of lesser-known grains that have their own unique texture and flavor profile. Try getting a bag of quinoa, amaranth, or farro and simply follow the cooking instructions on the back. Granola You can make your own or buy it for cheap at the store, but theres truly an endless combination of potential granola mixes. Bring it in a baggy as a post-lunch snack or use it to top your morning yogurt. Nut Butter High in protein and healthy fats, nut butters can add complexity to savory dishes and a nutty richness to sweets. Keep a range on hand -- almond, cashew, pistachio -- to add variety to baked goods, sandwiches, and sauces. Nutritional Yeast Just trust us with this one; we swear it tastes almost exactly like Parmesan cheese. Sprinkle on pasta, popcorn or use in macaroni and cheese if youre looking to cut out the dairy or need a boost of umami flavor. Olives Olives, especially the sliced green ones in a jar, add the perfect pop of brininess to pastas, rice bowls, and stews. Theyre a great value and can seriously elevate the flavor of ordinary dishes.  Pasta Thankfully, pasta has evolved to incorporate more alternative flours into its base. Now, you can get high-fiber, high-protein pasta made of anything from lentils to chickpeas to black beans. Pesto It is one of the most versatile condiments/­­sauces out there. A jar of pesto can last unopened in your pantry for months, and it can be your saving grace if you need to whip something up in a hurry. Add some to roasted vegetables or use it to top a tomato soup. Seaweed Snacks Low in calories and nutritionally-dense, seaweed is the ultimate snack food. Oh, and cats love it too. Spices Well, this one goes without saying, but having a pantry (or cupboard) thats properly stocked with all your necessary spices will make cooking (and eating) a whole lot more enjoyable. Some lesser known spices to add are aamchur (unripe mango), star anise, zaatar, or Aleppo pepper. Seeds Seeds are powerhouses of nutrition, texture, and flavor, and there are so many different varieties to choose from -- chia, flax, hemp, sesame, sunflower. Make chia pudding, a flax egg, or toss some hemp or sunflower seeds into your next salad or smoothie. Soy Sauce Umami in a bottle, soy sauce adds an earthy meatiness to dressings, sauces, and stir-fries. Some chefs even recommend adding a dash to tomato sauce for a boost of richness. Tahini You know it from every hummus youve ever eaten, but what might surprise you is that tahini paste is made entirely from pulverized sesame seeds. Combine a tablespoon of tahini with a dash of water, a sprinkle of cumin, and some salt for a quick and creamy dressing for salad or roasted vegetables.   If you decide to make one of these delicious recipes, let us know by tagging @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday on your social media posts for a chance to be featured on our channels.   The post How Many of These 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients Are in Your Pantry? appeared first on Meatless Monday.

The One Ingredient You Should Be Adding to All Your Plant-Based Recipes

November 4 2019 Meatless Monday 

The One Ingredient You Should Be Adding to All Your Plant-Based RecipesWere all familiar with the four basic tastes -- sweet, salty, sour, and bitter -- but umami, the mysterious fifth taste, remains an enigma. Umami is responsible for giving foods their deep, savory flavor. When used properly, umami adds a pleasant richness to plant-based meals, balances the natural bitterness of nutrient-dense vegetables, and simplifies cooking by reducing the need for salt and other flavor-enhancing ingredients. Umami can be found in everything from corn, tomatoes, and mushrooms to aged cheeses, nori and soy sauce. While its easy to find foods that contain umami, its not always as simple to coax that savory flavor out of them, which is why umami remains an underutilized culinary tool in many home kitchens across America. Thats why the team at Meatless Monday was so thrilled to work with Yondu Vegetable Umami to develop a free, downloadable e-cookbook complete with umami-rich plant-based recipes. When scrolling through the recipes, youll see the breadth and versatility of this one simple ingredient. But tasting is believing. For starters, try this super simple 3-Minute Veggie Soup , which includes aromatic leeks, sugary snap peas, cool slices of fennel, and a couple of tablespoons of vegetable umami. At only 54 calories per serving, its a nice, light way to open a meal. Catering to a crowd? Pulse together a creamy Minted Pea and Walnut Dip in a matter of minutes. Have some leftover cauliflower? A spattering of chili flakes and lemons zest, along with a drizzle of olive oil and umami will transform this simple vegetable into a Quick Roasted Cauliflower worthy of any restaurant menu. To celebrate the cookbook release, Yondu is giving away 50 free bottles of their vegetable umami. All you have to do is click the link HERE and sign up, but move quick -- its first come first serve. And if you missed the giveaway, Yondu is also offering a coupon code for 50% off your order! Use code: 50umamimeals.   Download your free copy of the e-cookbook HERE and click over to Amazon to purchase a bottle of Yondu, $8.99 (lasts quite a while). Thanks to Yondus vegetable umami, you can effortlessly add a richness to any of your Monday meals. Need more inspiration? Check out Yondu.Us for more recipes. Tag @MeatlessMonday and @Yondu.USA in your umami food posts and share the e-cookbook link with friends and family to inspire easy Meatless Monday meal ideas. The post The One Ingredient You Should Be Adding to All Your Plant-Based Recipes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Basic Herbed Cheese (Raw and Vegan)

August 2 2019 VegKitchen 

Basic Herbed Cheese (Raw and Vegan) Some vegetarians find it difficult to give up cheese even though some know its not the best food to consume. Cheese is very high in calories and fat. To that, add sodium and cholesterol. The post Basic Herbed Cheese (Raw and Vegan) appeared first on VegKitchen.

VT Tried It: ALOHA Protein Drinks

October 2 2020 Vegetarian Times 

ALOHA’s creamy organic plant-based protein drinks provide 18g of protein and 160 calories. These are sweetened with monk fruit extract, and the protein blend comes from pea and brown rice proteins. They also skip over common allergens--ALOHA’s protein drinks are soy-free, vegan, nothing artificial, no stevia, gluten-free, dairy-free, and no sugar alcohols, Coconut: Very creamy, monk fruit flavor was mild. Chocolate Sea Salt: This drink is chocolate-forward, almost like a thick chocolate milk that was very welcome on a rather warm day. Vanilla: I’m a big fan of anything vanilla-flavored, and this drink is no exception. I meant to just take a sip or two to take notes, but found myself drinking it throughout a meeting.  The post VT Tried It: ALOHA Protein Drinks appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Vegan Spanish Cauliflower Rice – Easy One Pot Recipe ( Low Carb)

April 26 2020 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Spanish Cauliflower Rice – Easy One Pot Recipe ( Low Carb) This easy One Pot Vegan Spanish Cauliflower Rice is full of sweet and smoky flavors and super easy to make! A great, healthy low carb alternative to white rice packed with nutrients. Gluten-Free, Paleo, Low Carb, Whole30, and Plant-Based. Jump to Recipe Looking for a quick and easy vegan side dish that is chock full of healthy veggies and brings back memories of carefree vacations in Spain. This easy One Pot Spanish Cauliflower rice is the perfect low-carb complement to any Spanish or Mexican main dish – but really any south-of-the-border meal. This meal is also relatively low-calorie. One cup of cooked cauliflower rice has only about 25 calories, and one cup of cooked brown rice has about 218. So there’s that. A great way to keep things lean without compromising on flavor.Continue reading: Vegan Spanish Cauliflower Rice – Easy One Pot Recipe ( Low Carb)The post Vegan Spanish Cauliflower Rice – Easy One Pot Recipe ( Low Carb) appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Recipe | Drunken Grilled Cheese Sandwiches

April 17 2020 Oh My Veggies 

I’m not sure why I love cooking with beer so much when I don’t like to drink beer at all. Escandalo! A food blogger that doesn’t like beer! Yes, it’s true; I’m just not a fan. I do like Guinness and I love me some lambic (my Chocolate Lambic Cupcakes are probably one of my favorite recipes on this blog), but other than that, beer is just yucky to me. And of course, when you don’t like beer, people never just take it at face value. No, they assume you’re judgy about drinking or that you’re uncool or super religious. Can’t a person just not like beer? Is it really that strange? C’mon, you know it tastes kind of foul. You know it does! Cooking with beer is another story, though. And that bitter flavor that keeps me from drinking beer is the very reason I love to cook with it--I like that slight bitter note that it lends to dishes. It adds interest and depth without adding a lot of calories. Case in point? These Drunken Grilled Cheese Sandwiches. After making Drunken Franks with Field Roast Frankfurters last week, I became a little bit obsessed with the idea of […]

Recipe | Apple Cinnamon & Quinoa Muffin Top Cookies

March 16 2020 Oh My Veggies 

When deciding on a name for these cookies, I was all excited thinking I had come up with something totally original--muffin top cookies! And then I did a search for the term and, sure enough, lots of people make muffin top cookies. But! I’m the only one that’s made Apple Cinnamon & Quinoa Muffin Top Cookies! So that’s something, right? This recipe is really a happy accident. I wanted to make a breakfast cookie that was low in calories and fairly substantive and healthy. I decided to put quinoa in the cookies, but I wasn’t sure how to go about doing it, so I adapted a recipe from Bon Appetit. One of the changes I made was to sub out white whole wheat flour for whole wheat pastry flour. In my mind, I couldn’t see much of a difference between the two–since I like whole wheat, I’ve never been one to buy the white wheat stuff. Well! It turns out that using pastry flour in cookies makes them cakey. I was expecting to open the oven and find chewy cookies waiting for me and instead, I had something that looked more like muffin tops. I resigned myself to buying the […]

Aloo Matar – Easy Pea & Potato Curry (Vegan)

March 1 2020 Vegan Richa 

Aloo Matar – Easy Pea & Potato Curry (Vegan)This easy Indian Aloo Matar – Pea & Potato Curry is done in 30 minutes, requires only a few basic ingredients and is such a simple and quick plant-based weeknight meal. Gluten-free, dairy-free, soy-free. Oil-free option included. Jump to Recipe Coming at you with a delicious Indian weeknight recipe that comes together quickly and needs very basic ingredients most of which you probably already have at home! One of those recipes that I can always make, even when I dont know what else to make because the fridge is almost empty! Aloo Matar! Bonus, it’s my mom’s recipe so obviously it’s the best and tested until perfect! What is Aloo Matar? Aloo translates to potato and matar to peas – potatoes and peas, that’s what we’re cooking today. But in the most delicious manner! This is a simple vegetarian Indian dish originating in the Punjab region of India. It is made of potatoes and peas in a spicy thick onion tomato gravy. The dish is made throughout the country in a few different versions. While some Aloo Matar recipes use a creamy coconut base, others simmer the potatoes in a tomato sauce. We are cooking the tomato version which is a bit lighter and lower in calories. Potatoes are used in tons of Indian recipes. Often they are paired with other vegetables like cauliflower in aloo gobi or spinach or beans! I love cooking with potatoes as they are a.) available all year long, b) cheap, c) delicious and oh so comforting. Right in the end, I listed you all my favorite Indian potato recipes. This recipe has just potatoes, green peas, onion, garlic, ginger, green chili, tomatoes, and a few basic Indian spices. A very simple and beginner-friendly recipe that you just cannot go wrong with. Its lightly spiced, so absolutely doable even for kids and/­­or sensitive tummies. Ingredients needed for making this Indian Pea & Potato Curry: - Peas: You can use fresh or frozen peas. Make sure not to overcook them or they will lose their pretty color. - Potatoes: Make sure to cut them into even-sized cubes so that they are all cooked at the same time. If you chop them too small, they will get mushy and might dissolve in the curry. As a short-cut, or if you have leftovers to use up, you could add boiled potatoes. Obviously, this takes off some of the cooking time. - Ground Spices: Cumin, coriander, turmeric, cayenne pepper, garam masala. Flavor central! - The holy trinity of ginger, onion, and garlic is added to the toasted spices to form the base of the gravy. - Fresh green chilie adds a bit of heat, but don’t worry – this dish is not spicy. Thai green chili pepper or Serrano pepper works well here. However, if you don’t tolerate any spice, leave it out. - Fresh tomato puree is added for color, body, and texture. I make it from scratch pureeing two fresh tomatoes. You could use canned diced tomatoes and puree them or  half the amount of canned tomato puree as it is more concentrated. Tips and Substitutions for making Aloo Matar: - To make this recipe oil-free, skip the first step. Saute spices in broth or water. You could also use boiled potatoes instead of raw. - Keep in mind that, as this dish sits the gravy will get thicker as the potatoes tend to absorb some of the liquid. When reheating, you might have to add a splash of water or broth. - To make the gravy even more fragrant, sprinkle garam masala into the gravy towards the end. - I also like to sprinkle some dried fenugreek leaves on top for additional flavor. How to make the best Aloo Matar: Heat oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add potatoes and cook them for 3 to 5 mins, stirring occasionally. Meanwhile coarsely crush the seeds in a grinder or mortar and pestle and chop the onion, garlic, ginger, chili by knife or using a food processor. Transfer the potatoes to a bowl. Heat a tsp of oil over medium heat. Add the crushed seeds and cook for half a minute. Now, add in the onion, garlic, ginger, chilies and cook for 3 mins or until translucent. Mix in the ground spices and stir in the tomato puree. Let everything cook for 3-4 mins to thicken it some more. Add the potatoes, salt and water, and cover and cook for 15 mins. Check for seasoning (add salt, if needed) and add more water if it has gotten too thick. Add the peas and half the cilantro and cover and cook until potatoes are fork-tender. Garnish your vegan Aloo Matar with more chopped cilantro and crushed pepper flakes. What shall I serve with Aloo Matar? I like serving this potato and pea curry with plain Basmati rice or a bowl of fragrant seasoned rice like this turmeric lemon rice. However, this pea potato curry also pairs extremely well with roti or any vegan flatbread of choice. More delicious Indian potato curry recipes from the blog: - Instant Pot Saag Aloo (Sweet Potato and Chard) - Potato Eggplant Curry - Chickpea Sweet Potato Spinach Curry - Aloo Gobi -Baked    Mums Aloo Matar This easy Indian Aloo Matar Pea & Potato Curry is done in 30 minutes, requires only a few basic ingredients and is such a simple and quick plant-based weeknight meal. Gluten-free, dairy-free, soy-free. Oil-free version included.   - 2 tsp oil (divided) - 3 medium potatoes cubed small. - 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds - 1 tsp coriander seeds - 1/­­4 cup chopped onion - 4 cloves of garlic (finely chopped) - 1 inch ginger (finely chopped) - 1/­­2 hot green chile (finely chopped) - 1/­­2 tsp turmeric - 1/­­3 to 1/­­2 tsp cayenne - 2 medium to large tomatoes (pureed) - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1 cup water - 1/­­2 cup peas - 1/­­2 cup chopped cilantro (loosely packed divided) - optional additions: sprinkle garam masala towards the end (1/­­2 tsp dried fenugreek leaves) - Heat oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add potatoes and Cook for 3 to 5 mins, stirring occasionally. Meanwhile coarsely crush the seeds in a grinder or mortar and pestle and chop the onion, garlic, ginger, chili by knife or a food processor. -  Transfer potatoes to a bowl. Heat a tsp of oil over medium heat. Wait till it's get hot. Add the crushed seeds and cook for half a minute. - Add the onion, garlic, ginger chilie and cook for 3 mins or until translucent. - Add the ground spices and mix in. Add tomato puree and cook for 3-4 mins to thicken. - Add the potatoes, salt and water and cover and cook for 15 mins. - Check and add more water if needed. Add the peas and half the cilantro and cover and cook until potatoes are tender to preference. -  Taste and adjust salt and flavor. Garnish with more cilantro, pepper flakes. - To make this recipe oil-free, skip the first step. You could also use boiled potatoes instead of raw. - Keep in mind that, as this dish sits the gravy will get thicker as the potatoes tend to absorb some of the liquid. When reheating, you might have to add a splash of water or broth. - To make the gravy even more fragrant, sprinkle garam masala into the gravy towards the end. - I also like to sprinkle some dried fenugreek leaves on top. - The nutrition facts do not include rice or any sides.        The post Aloo Matar – Easy Pea & Potato Curry (Vegan) appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Celebrate Healthy-Fat Tuesday by Adding These 8 Plant-Based Ingredients to Your Meatless Monday Menu

February 24 2020 Meatless Monday 

Celebrate Healthy-Fat Tuesday by Adding These 8 Plant-Based Ingredients to Your Meatless Monday MenuThis week, in honor of Mardi Gras, were celebrating Healthy-Fat Tuesday with a list of foods and ingredients rich in healthy fats. Fats are complex and often misunderstood nutrients. Despite their often-misleading name, fats play an important role in healthy balanced diets and their consumption doesnt necessarily lead to weight gain. Saturated and unsaturated are the two major categories of dietary fats. Saturated fats are typically solid at room temperature and are predominately found in red and processed meats, whole milk and whole-milk dairy products, cheese, and baked goods. Although fine in moderation, the USDA Dietary Guidelines recommend limiting saturated fat to under 10 percent of your daily caloric intake. Unsaturated fats come from vegetables, nuts, seeds, and fish, and are labeled as good fats because their consumption is associated with lower rates of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. Try incorporating these foods and ingredients into your weekly Meatless Monday menu. Avocado With 77 percent of calories from fat, this pretty green fruit is actually one of the fattiest plant foods on Earth. Avocado is rich in oleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid associated with reduced inflammation. Easily add some to your diet with this recipe for Garlicky White Bean Avocado Toast. Canola Oil Derived from the rapeseed, canola oil has a similar nutritional profile to olive oil but contains a slightly lower percentage of saturated fat. Its one of the most versatile cooking oils, which makes it excellent for frying and medium-heat cooking. It can also be used as the base for salad dressings, sauces, and marinades. Flaxseeds Flaxseeds are high in fiber and protein, but theyre also one of the richest sources of plant-based omega-3 fatty acids -- polyunsaturated fats that are associated with benefits for heart health. Hemp Seeds While technically categorized as a nut, the hemp seed is nutrient-dense and a terrific source of both omega-6 and omega-3 essential fatty acids. Try adding a scoop to smoothies, muffins, or chia pudding. Olive Oil Although it contains small levels of saturated fat, olive oil is predominately composed of a monounsaturated fat called oleic acid. Studies link oleic acid to lower levels of inflammation, but the health benefits of olive oil range from a reduced risk of stroke and heart disease to weight loss. Peanuts An easy and accessible snack, a little pouch of peanuts can instantly cure your hunger pangs. Peanuts are so satiating because of their high-fat content. Classified as an oilseed rather than a nut, the peanut is nearly 50 percent fat, most of which is mono- and polyunsaturated. Try adding some to this hot and spicy Peanut Noodle. Tahini Made from pulverized sesame seeds, tahini -- along with chickpeas -- is one of the main ingredients in hummus. Sesame seeds are made up of 80 percent mono- and polyunsaturated fats, which research shows can help lower cholesterol levels. Tahini makes the perfect dressing for roasted vegetables or this Curry Carrot Salad. Walnuts Like most nuts, walnuts contain good fats, but they are also an important vegetarian source of omega-3 fatty acids. Research shows that omega-3 plays a critical role in reducing oxidative stress in the brain and can even help with the development and function of the central nervous system. Eat them roasted or blend them up with lentils to make the perfect plant-based meatball.   Click here for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Celebrate Healthy-Fat Tuesday by Adding These 8 Plant-Based Ingredients to Your Meatless Monday Menu appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Eat Your Way to a Reduced Risk of Heart Disease

February 3 2020 Meatless Monday 

Eat Your Way to a Reduced Risk of Heart DiseaseHeart disease (also referred to as cardiovascular disease) is a term that covers an array of health conditions affecting the heart such as coronary artery disease, heart rhythm problems (arrhythmias), and congenital heart defects. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States for both men and women, with half of all Americans (47%) qualifying for at least one of the three key risk factors (high blood pressure, high cholesterol, smoking cigarettes). For more information about the relationship between diet and heart disease, check out our Meatless Monday heart-health guide . The good news is that you can manage two of these risk factors -- high blood pressure and high cholesterol --by making a few simple adjustments to your daily diet, without missing out on flavor. In honor of American Heart Month, weve put together a list of tips to help you eat your way to a reduced risk of heart disease. Eat More Fruits and Vegetables Fruits and vegetables contain the nutrients your body needs to function properly and ward off disease. Many fruits and vegetables, regardless of how theyre prepared (sans the deep fryer), are low in calories and contain vitamins, minerals, and fiber that help prevent heart disease. Focus on the Right Fats The American Heart Association emphasizes the importance of eating the right type of fats and oils. Saturated fats from animal products, trans fats, and hydrogenated vegetable oils should be replaced with healthy fats like olive oil and canola oil. Go with Whole Grains Whole grains provide the body with fiber and other nutrients that regulate blood pressure and promote heart health. Improve your diet by swapping out white rice, bread, and pasta for brown rice and whole-wheat varieties of your favorite carbohydrates. Maintain a Healthy Weight Excess weight and a large waist size have been found to raise the risk of developing heart disease. Reaching a healthy weight doesnt require an extreme diet, but rather a commitment to weekly exercise and an eating plan rooted in fruits, vegetables, legumes, and other minimally processed foods. Limit Consumption of Red and Processed Meats Processed meats contain high amounts of additives, chemicals, and sodium. These foods, which include deli meats, hot dogs, sausages, and bacon, should only be consumed in moderation. Think Mediterranean Studies show that a Mediterranean-style diet which includes a balanced proportion of fruits, vegetables, legumes, healthy oils, and monosaturated and polyunsaturated fats, reduced incidences of major cardiovascular disease. Avoid Too Much Sugar and Processed Carbohydrates Foods of minimum nutritional value like sugar-sweetened carbonated soft drinks, white breads, pastas, and other heavily processed carbohydrates are major sources of excess calories and can lead to weight gain and insulin resistance. Control Portion Size Moderation is key to any healthy diet. Reducing serving sizes grants you the flexibility to eat a wider variety of foods you enjoy. For more information on meat reduction and heart health: Reduce your risk of heart disease by starting healthy habits on Monday Check out the Meatless Monday Recipe Gallery for healthy, tasty recipes Join the community and share photos of your own plant-based creations by using the hashtag #MeatlessMonday and tag @MeatlessMonday. The post Eat Your Way to a Reduced Risk of Heart Disease appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Roasted Cauliflower Hummus

January 20 2020 Oh My Veggies 

You know what I hate? Suggested serving sizes. I love hummus. I don’t make usually make hummus myself (unless it’s Edamame Hummus) because it ends up being a disaster, so I buy the little tubs of hummus at the grocery store. And I totally want to eat half the tub in one sitting. But a serving size is almost always two tablespoons. Two tablespoons. Which is nothing! Who eats two tablespoons of hummus?! I am totally a volume eater. Hummus is a healthy food, but the calories really add up when you want to eat more than two tablespoons. So I thought I’d try replacing the chickpeas with roasted cauliflower. Oh sure, my hummus wouldn’t have as much protein, but I’d be able to eat a lot more of it, which is nice too, right? As usual, I thought I was being super innovative, but then I Googled it and about a gajillion recipes for paleo hummus made with cauliflower came up. Oh snap. Anyway, if you divide this Roasted Cauliflower Hummus into four HUGE SERVINGS (see, all caps means the servings are big), you end up saving about 90 calories per serving. I kind of wanted to have a […]

Recipe | Baked Sriracha Butternut Squash Fries

December 2 2019 Oh My Veggies 

I am perpetually counting calories. Which is a whole lot of fun! Perhaps this is just my perception, but it sure seems like the food blogging world is full of the “Oh gosh, I just eat whatever I want and I never workout!” types who weigh 110 pounds and post six dessert recipes a week, usually involving Rolos and/­­or several heaping cups full of Nutella and I resent them and their amazing metabolism. I am not one of those bloggers. Nope. I have to watch every single thing I eat. So butternut squash fries make a frequent appearance on our dinner table. If I’m making veggie burgers or grilled cheese or something else that’s a little bit high in calories, butternut squash fries are a good low calorie counter-balance to that. And they’re filling! And delicious! And healthy! Butternut squash is high in fiber, beta carotene, potassium, and Vitamins C & B6. So in addition to having fewer calories than potato fries, they’re more nutritious too. Lower calories! More nutrition! Really, you can’t go wrong with butternut squash fries. Okay, there’s one slight downside. Butternut squash fries are not as crispy as regular fries. They’re just as versatile, though. I […]

Chia Green Super Smoothie

August 12 2019 VegKitchen 

Chia Green Super Smoothie Green smoothies are all the rage, and are that much better with the addition of chia seeds. They are a great way to get a bold dose of veggies, fiber, and nutrients in a healthy, convenient, low-calorie way. Recipe and photo from Chia: The post Chia Green Super Smoothie appeared first on VegKitchen.

Veg Out for National Hot Dog Day with 5 Great Veggie Dogs

July 15 2019 Meatless Monday 

Veg Out for National Hot Dog Day with 5 Great Veggie DogsJuly 17th is National Hot Dog Day and the perfect time to try a delicious plant-based version of Americas classic summertime food. There are plenty of tasty meatless hot dog options available. Weve rounded up some of the most popular options, all of which are packed with tons of plant-based protein and taste.   Photo: Field Roast   Field Roast - (21 grams of protein) These hot dogs go by frankfurters and get their flavor from fresh garlic, fresh onions and Field Roasts own traditional blend of spices. Reviewers acclaim these fancy hot dogs have a texture that feels like a real meat hot dog and doesnt taste like fake meat. Do a taste test with your friends and family to see if they can tell the difference.       Photo: Tofurky     Tofurky - (17 grams of protein) Made with organic tofu and lots of flavor, this long-time veggie dog favorite has been described as having nearly the same texture as meat hot dogs but with a bit more spice. Who says tofu is bland?         Photo: Beyond Meat   Beyond Meat - (16 grams of protein) OK, a bit of a cheat. These are technically plant-based sausages, but hey, they fit on a hot dog bun. Beyond Meat is getting its fair share of press lately, and for good reason. They are popping up in global fast food chains, have tons of adoring fans and have been dominating the stock market with their recent IPO.       Photo: Lightlife     Lightlife - (7 grams of protein) Another plant-based hot dog on the list that has been around awhile. Which means people like them. And with only 50 calories per serving, they will fill you up, without weighing you down.             Photo: Morningstar Farms   Morningstar Farms - (7 grams of protein) Morningstar Farms products have been vegetarian staples for years. So theyve perfected the art of meatless cuisine. The texture for these veggie dogs is great, appealing to both vegetarians and carnivores alike. Insider tip, the hot dogs are a bit small for standard buns, so you might want to double the veggie dog fun to fill up the bun.     Let us know your fave. On June 17th post your favorite veggie hot dog using #NationalHotDogDay #MeatlessMonday and @MeatlessMonday Want more veggie inspiration? Weve got tons of plant-based recipes on our site. Check them out here. Head over to the Meatless Monday Summer Cookout Pinterest Board, where youll find plenty of tasty, plant-based BBQ ideas. The post Veg Out for National Hot Dog Day with 5 Great Veggie Dogs appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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