calcium - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

6 Ways to Use Pre-grated Carrots

Vegetarian Meal Plan | Corn and Zucchini Galette, Stuffed Miso Eggplant & Skillet Lasagna

Momos soup recipe | momo jhol achar | paneer momo dumpling soup

10 Benefits of Eating Raw Food










calcium vegetarian recipes

Maintaining a Vegan Diet During Pregnancy

May 25 2017 VegKitchen 

Maintaining a Vegan Diet During Pregnancy Maintaining a vegan diet during pregnancy always seem to cause concern, but it can be done! Here are some tips and valuable information. During pregnancy, your need for all nutrients increases. For example, you will need more calcium, more protein, and more folic acid. But calorie needs increase only modestly during pregnancy. In fact, you […] The post Maintaining a Vegan Diet During Pregnancy appeared first on VegKitchen.

10 Tips for Raising Vegan Children

May 5 2017 VegKitchen 

10 Tips for Raising Vegan Children Raising vegan children in an omni world will test your patience with the next person who casually wonders aloud if your kids will get enough protein and calcium. Fear not though, its not as hard as it seems. In fact, with todays increasing allergies, and people becoming more aware of what exactly theyre eating, its starting […] The post 10 Tips for Raising Vegan Children appeared first on VegKitchen.

Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus

April 7 2017 My New Roots 

Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus The first job I landed after moving to Copenhagen, was working as a chef in a little cafe. After a few weeks of consistently not burning lasagna and under seasoning everything, I was asked if I was interested in cooking on a few episodes on a local, public TV station. The producers suggested I choose a few dishes that I love, and filmed me in a friends kitchen, since mine was too small. My husband gently warned me beforehand that Danes dont respond well to overly-enthusiastic, hyperbolic Americans, so I faked it and was awkwardly not myself as I spoke lukewarmly about whole grains and beans, fermented things and dark leafy greens. The first recipe I made on the show was sprouted hummus, and although the recipe turned out well, I felt like a fraud. Because above all things, sprouts were, and still are, my true love. The show was on at 2 or 3 in the morning, and because I didnt have a television, I never actually saw it on air. Instead, I watched it on my computer on a borrowed CD, long after it had been on TV. Much to my dismay, the producers titled the show Cooking with Sareh, which still baffles me considering the fact that my name is spelled the exact same way in Danish. The program was poorly edited, badly lit, awkward in every sense, and in my attempts to come off as cool and nonchalant, I seemed utterly bored as I fondled chickpea sprouts - something that otherwise would get me pretty riled up. On the whole, this experience was totally mortifying, except for one small, redeeming factor. I was suddenly being recognized at work in the café, and on the bike paths of Christiania: hey sprout girl! theyd call at me. Its you! I didnt make your hummus, but your show is great, sprout girl, theyd say. If there was any consolation, this was it. I was Sprout Girl. So in case you missed my break out performance on Cooking with Sareh, and my reined-in, lackluster pitch about sprouts, here it is again. Because I am Sprout Girl forever and always. Sprouting is like any other kitchen endeavour: it seems pretty daunting until you actually do it, then youre left wondering what took you so long to try – a real facepalm moment. With simple equipment that you most likely have in your cupboard, and seeds that you already have in your pantry, its a fun and empowering practice that brings you one step closer to your food. Sprouts are so nutritious because they are life potential, ignited. When we soak a seed, we end its dormancy, and awaken the nutrition inside it needed to grow a plant which will in turn make more seeds and more plants. When we eat a sprout, we eat this potential! Pound for pound, sprouts have the largest amount of nutrients of any food. Did you get that? This is a big deal! And its all because sprouting increases vitamin content significantly, especially vitamin A, Bs, C and E, along with boosting calcium, iron, selenium, and zinc. The quality of protein and carbohydrates improves, as the sprouting process begins to break down the complex proteins and starches into amino acids, peptides, and simple carbohydrates needed by the seed to grow. At the same time, anti-nutrients such as phytic acid, protease and amylase inhibitors are neutralized. This makes a sprout very easy to digest with highly absorbable nutrients. Who is responsible for this influx of awesomeness? Its enzymes! Enzymes are compounds found in raw plants that are needed for nearly every biochemical process that takes place in our body, and something many of our modern diets are lacking. Sprouts are virtually loaded with them. There are up to 100 times more enzymes in sprouts than uncooked fruits and veggies! Enzymes are also what sets living food apart from raw food. Yes, raw foods still offer us enzymes, but eating a food that is alive guantees more enzymes, and in fact more nutrients altogether. As soon as a food is picked, it begins losing its nutrients. Imagine how much vitamin C is left in that orange, which has traveled hundreds, if not thousands of kilometers to get to your plate, and spent weeks, if not months in a storage facility before being dropped off at your local grocer. Sprouts are the remedy to this, pulsating with life and life-giving nutrients, and pretty much the freshest food you can eat outside of a garden. Sprouts are also incredibly low in calories, yet deliciously filling due to their high fiber and water content. A fantastic food to binge on, especially if youre trying to elbow out some of the other stuff from your diet. I love the versatility of sprouts, not only are there so many varieties, but they can be used in so many ways. Like this hummus for example! You can also go classic and top your sandwiches with sprouts, or fold them into grain salads, puree them into soups and even smoothies. I also love freshening up cooked dishes, like stir-fries, curries and pizzas with sprouts. Their crunch and earthy brightness are a welcoming balance to heavier, richer meals. If youre on a budget, sprouts are a sweet deal. Because the amount of food you sprout triples or quadruples in size, youll end up with way more to eat than you started with for the same price. Its kind of magical. Whats more, is that properly stored sprouts can last over a month, and some varieties up to 70 days. If youre prone to tossing away spoiled produce, sprouts will save you money, big time. Sprouting can take place anywhere you have access to fresh, clean water twice a day. Ive sprouted on road trips, beach holidays, visiting the in-laws...all over the place! And the groovy thing about taking your show on the road is that you can convince other people to get sprouting too. And sprouts are not just great for our health, but also the planet. Consider the fact that youre growing a garden right in your kitchen, using your own energy to make the magic happen. Its hyper-local food at its best! No chemicals or pesticides during the growing process, or fossil fuels for transportation. Could sprouts be the perfect food?! The answer is yes. But I may be a little biased. I am the Sprout Girl, after all. If you are concerned about mold or bacteria contamination, please understand that commercially-grown sprouts are propagated in an ideal environment for pathogens to proliferate. Just one more reason to grow your own sprouts at home where you can be sure of proper hygiene and care. Make sure that your jar or sprouting container is thoroughly clean, that youre rinsing your sprouts with cool water twice daily, and that your sprouts have plenty of airflow. After I drain my sprouts, I make sure that the seeds /­­ sprouts arent blocking the entire opening of the jar (see photo). If you follow these tips, you shouldnt have any problems. Scoring Seeds You can sprout just about anything, but the cheapest and easiest things are found in the bulk bin of your health food store! Lentils, beans, chickpeas, rice, buckwheat, wheat are all widely available and inexpensive. Its imperative that you choose organically-grown ingredients, as conventionally grown seeds are often irradiated, making them difficult, or even impossible to germinate. You can also purchase seeds online, especially the more specialty ones, like alfalfa, radish, onion, broccoli etc. Finding Equipment There are plenty of sprouting apparatuses that you can buy, but if youre just starting out, use a jar! I bet you already have one. – 1 sterilized, large-mouth, quart-sized glass jar with an airtight lid – small piece of cheesecloth – rubber band – a bowl or dish rack How to Sprout There are countless resources on this topic online, and even whole books written about sprouting, so I am presenting you with a very simple, yet rather foolproof technique. If you want to learn more (which I encourage you to do!) here’s a great place to learn about different methods, applications, as well as help and advice: Sprout People     Print recipe     Simple Sprouting Day 1 1. Prep (night) Take a quick glance at the seeds as you put them into the sterilized soaking container. Remove any stones, cracked /­­ damaged seeds, and rinse well. 2. Soak (night) A general rule is covering the seeds with 2-3 times the amount of water (e.g. 1 cup seeds : 2-3 cups water). Use pure, filtered, unchlorinated water. Skim off any seeds that are floating. Let sit for 8-12 hours. Day 2 1. Drain (morning) Put a piece of cheesecloth over the mouth of the jar and secure it with a rubber band. Drain the seeds letting all the water run out. 2. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 3. Rinse + drain again (night) Day 3 1. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 2. Rinse + drain again (night) Day 4 1. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 2. Rinse + drain again (night) 3. Enjoy (night) Your sprouts are ready! The tail should be at least the length of the seed itself (if it is not quite there yet, continue with the rinsing and draining process until it is. Some seeds take a couple more days). If youre not going to eat all the sprouts right away, make sure you let the sprouts drain for at least 8 hours after their last rinse before you put them in the fridge. Never store wet sprouts, as they will spoil quickly. Store sprouts in the sprouting jar with an airtight lid for one month, or more.     Print recipe     Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus Makes 4 cups Ingredients: 2 cloves garlic 1/­­3 cup /­­ 85ml tahini 1/­­2 tsp. fine salt, to taste 2 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­4 tsp. smoked paprika (optional) zest of 1 lemon 4 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 4 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 4 cups /­­ 500g sprouted chickpeas (start with 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 300g dried chickpeas) Directions: 1. Pulse the garlic in the food processor until minced. Add all other ingredients, except for the sprouted chickpea and blend until you have a paste. Add the chickpeas and blend on high until as smooth as possible. Season to taste and adjust more salt /­­ spice if desired. To achieve an even smoother consistency, scoop hummus into a high-speed blender and blend on high for an additional 10-15 seconds. Serve immediately and store leftovers in an airtight container for up to five days. I hope that this process seems simple enough for you to try. I promise that once you start sprouting, you won’t be able to stop! It’s so easy, fun, and connecting – not to mention delicious. Good luck and happy sprouting, dear friends! xo, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   * Hey Copenhagen! I am thrilled to announce my first two cookbook events in CPH this Spring. The first will be an intimate talk and demonstration at SLOW Copenhagen, and the second will be a magical, celebratory dinner in collaboration with the local, organic grocer and kitchen, Kost. Click on the images for more info and tickets! Can’t wait to see you there.    The post It’s Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus appeared first on My New Roots.

A Guide to Plant-Based Calcium

February 16 2017 Oh My Veggies 

Concerned about maintaining healthy bones on a vegan or vegetarian diet? Our nutritionist shares her recommendations for getting adequate plant-based calcium.

Pear Cranberry Chai

October 30 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Pear Cranberry Chai Are you guys dressing up for Halloween? I’m not, but Paloma is going to be John Lennon circa 1974 (the rest of her friends are princesses). Yep, the Beatles obsession is as strong as ever. Right now, John is the absolute favorite. 1980 (year of his death) is the WORST number, not to be spoken in the house, and she’s been know to put on Imagine and cry to it more than a few times. And this is an otherwise cheerful, happy kid too. Crazy! Anyways, whether you are participating in this weekend’s spooky activities or not, maybe you can consider treating yourself with this seriously autumnal chai, or better yet, plan to serve it at some sort of holiday occasion. I’m confident your guests will be blown away. As far as I can recall, this is the best chai I’ve ever tried. Besides all the required, invigorating spices, this one is infused with fresh pears and cranberries, which add lovely flavor and a tiny hint of sourness. It’s a bit sweet, spicy, gingery and creamy. And if you are wondering what I do with all the leftover stewed pears, I blend them into a pear sauce and spoon it onto all kinds of dishes. There are some weekend links after the jump. Have a nice one :) Protein, Iron, Calcium – I’ve been finding Gena’s articles about protein/­­iron/­­calcium-rich plant food combinations so helpful Urban Moonshine – I’ve been taking these digestive bitters before almost every meal and have really noticed a difference. Highly recommended if you have any mild issues with digestion or even as a blood sugar stabilizing aid. Also, want to make this Happy Belly Seed Mix soon. Sophie Buhai’s New Jewelry Collection – the photos! Exceptional Advice from Anthony Bourdain’s New Book – please never change Tony .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Pear Cranberry Chai appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Peach and Avocado Overnight Oats with Moringa Powder

August 10 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Peach and Avocado Overnight Oats with Moringa Powder This post was created in partnership with Moringamio. This little blog started out as a raw foods recipe journal. Back then, in 2010, I was struggling with some very unexpected health issues that kept popping up after I had my second daughter a bit later in life. My thyroid was acting up, and I had trouble sleeping, but none of the treatments offered by the doctors seemed right to me. Most of the medicine was meant for covering up the symptoms, and not any actual healing, while having terrifyingly long lists of side effects. I decided to go the holistic route, having been into natural healing since I was very young, and having had some previous success with homeopathy and herbs. I started looking into healing through diet, and came across a little paperback on raw food, and how it had changed a whole family’s life by allowing them to regain their health. Something clicked after I read that book – the idea that plants can feed our cells in the most powerful way just made so much sense to me. I was incredibly inspired from that point on and ate and ‘cooked’ exclusively raw for a while, which really helped me feel much better. Since I was cooking up a storm, Masha and I decided to document the recipes online, and here we are, six years later. The recipes and my diet have evolved since then to be much less restrictive, but still largely plant-based. But I’m really here today to talk about an avocado, oat and nut breakfast porridge that I discovered during that honeymoon phase of eating raw foods. It was somewhat similar to the overnight oats I have for you today, but a bit more weighed down with nuts and sweetness. Upon making it for the first time, I was amazed at how easy and tasty it was, and became completely obsessed, eating it every morning for months on end. I recently remembered about that breakfast, not without some nostalgia, and decided to elaborate on the original recipe. These overnight oats are a breakfast that will likely keep you full past noon, perfect for a busy day when lunch seems like a distant prospect. It’s quite energizing and full of healthy fats and fiber, not to mention absolutely delicious. The texture here is fluffy from the oats and peach puree, and the fresh berries add juicy bursts throughout the creamy porridge. I think I’m obsessed all over again. There’s also a special, new-to-me ingredient in these overnight oats that I’m very excited about – moringa leaf powder. I first learned about moringa when my friends went blueberry picking at a nearby farm, where the farm’s owners also grew moringa and raved about it endlessly. My friends ended up coming home with a moringa seedling, to plant in their own back yard. Moringa powder is made of ground up leaves from the moringa tree, which is a drought-resistant tree from south Asia and Africa. Many parts of the plant have been utilized for culinary and healing purposes since the antiquity, and widely used in Ayurvedic medicine. Moringa is very nutritionally dense, containing all nine essential amino acids, along with vitamins A & C, iron and calcium, earning itself the label of ‘superfood,’ and you know you love those :) It has a pleasant, grassy aroma, sort of similar to matcha, which I love, but also very much its own, unique product. So of course I was very excited when Moringamio sent me their moringa leaf powder to sample, as their stuff is the best of the best, being incredibly high-quality, organic and very fresh. I’ve tried it in lattes and smoothies, and it works perfectly in these overnight oats, making the breakfast even more invigorating and nutritious. For more moringa recipes, check out Amy’s breakfast bowl and Sophie’s matcha moringa latte. Enjoy! Peach and Avocado Overnight Oats with Moringa Powder   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 3 medium, sweet and ripe peaches or nectarines - pitted and roughly chopped ¼ cup honey or maple syrup, plus more for serving, if desired 1¼ cup rolled oats - I used old-fashioned and gluten free 2 tablespoons chia seeds 1 ripe but firm avocado freshly squeezed juice from ½ lemon 1 tablespoon moringa leaf powder handful hemp hearts or other nuts (optional) topping suggestions cacao nibs goji berries bee pollen hemp hearts dried mullberries fresh berries sliced peaches fresh mint Instructions Place peaches and honey/­­maple syrup in a blender or food processor and pulse until pureed. Thoroughly mix the peach puree with the rolled oats and chia seeds in a medium bowl, cover and refrigerate overnight. In the morning, roughly chop avocado and place it into a food processor, along with lemon juice, oat and peach mixture, moringa leaf powder and hemp herts/­­other nuts, if using. Pulse briefly to combine. Taste and add a splash of honey if desired. Serve with fresh berries, cacao nibs, goji berries/­­dried mullberries, bee pollen, etc. (see topping options above). 3.5.3208 This post was created in partnership with Moringamio, with all opinions being genuine and our own. Thank you for considering the sponsors that help keep Golubka Kitchen going. You might also like... Raw Black Currant Panna Cotta Roasted Root Vegetable, Red Rice and Lentil Stew Sprouted Sunflower Seed Cocoa Bars Mint and Chocolate Milkshake with Aquafaba Whipped Cream - Ice Cream S... .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Peach and Avocado Overnight Oats with Moringa Powder appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Kale is the New Spinach

June 7 2016 VegKitchen 

Kale is the New Spinach Kale, a dark leafy green vegetable, thats become a favorite in recent years, is packed with vitamins and minerals. Its health benefits are indisputable,as one of the foods richest in vitamin A, vitamin K, beta carotene and even calcium. Kale is one of the oldest cultivating vegetables on earth and until the Middle Ages it was one of the most popular vegetables in Europe.

Why Garlic Should Be a Diet Staple

April 5 2016 Vegetarian Times 

Why Garlic Should Be a Diet Staple Garlic is a favorite ingredient for cooks around the world--and provides a variety of health benefits. Heres how to get the most from this ancient superfood. Garlic may stink, literally, but when it comes to health benefits, this plant is a winner. Not only is it rich in phosphorus, calcium, and copper, but when incorporated into a regular diet, it may reduce risks of cancer and heart disease. Garlic Benefits Garlics benefits include lowering total cholesterol and blood pressure, reducing oxidative stress--which has been linked to numerous health conditions--controlling infections, helping keep iron in circulation, and possibly reducing the risk of cancer, says George Mateljan, Hawaii-based author of The Worlds Healthiest Foods (GMF Publishing, 2015) and founder of Health Valley Foods. Cooked vs. Raw Garlic As for its famous odor? Not until you cut into a garlic clove will its sulfur compounds release their smell. The compounds found in raw garlic confer the greatest health benefits, but cooked garlic is a superstar, too--lending a flavor kick to soups, stews, breads, meats, vegetables, sauces, and dressings. It can also be roasted on its own so that each clove becomes soft and spreadable. Meanwhile, letting crushed garlic stand for 10 minutes before cooking with it can prevent the loss of its cancer-fighting properties, according to a study in the Journal of Nutrition. See also High and Low: Garlic Presses Know Your Garlic Supermarkets usually carry just one kind of garlic, but there are actually hundreds of different types--they can be found at farmers markets and garlic festivals (see left). They all fall into one of two general categories: Softneck Characteristics >> Most frequently found in grocery stores, this type produces stalks, but usually also has more individual cloves than the hardneck types. Flavor profile >> Generally milder than hardneck. Common types >> Silverskin and artichoke Hardneck Characteristics >> Garlics in this category feature hard, woody stalks that often send up a floral stalk, and are larger but provide fewer cloves per bulb than softneck varieties. Flavor profile >> This category includes a wider variety of flavors--including some that border on intense--than softneck garlics. Common types >> Rocambole, porcelain, purple stripe, marbled purple stripe, glazed purple stripe Garlic supplements to try Although garlic and its derivatives are included on the Food and Drug Administrations Generally Recognized As Safe list, check with your doctor before taking garlic supplements, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on blood-thinning medications. Here are a few options: Kyolic Aged Garlic Extract $21.99/­­300 Formula 100 capsules; kyolic.com Metagenics SuperGarlic 6000 $31.95/­­90 600 mg concentrate tablets; metagenics.com Natural Factors GarlicRich Super Strength Garlic Concentrate $13.97/­­90 500 mg coated softgels; natralfactors.com Natures Way Garlic Bulb $5.49/­­100 580 mg vegetarian capsules; naturesway.com The Vitamin Shoppe Aged Garlic Extract $15.99/­­200 600 mg capsules; vitaminshoppe.com

Do Food Cravings Mean Your Nutrient Deficient?

February 19 2016 Vegetarian Times 

Do Food Cravings Mean Your Nutrient Deficient? Myth: You crave a certain food because youre deficient in one of its nutrients. If youve ever found yourself desperately pushing through a crowd to get at the double-chocolate cupcakes in a display window, youre well aware of the power of food cravings. Some people suggest that such cravings are an effort by your body to correct a deficiency in a certain nutrient. In the case of chocolate, that might be magnesium--cocoa is considered a good source of this vital mineral. The urge to dig into a tub of salted caramel ice cream, some would say, is an indication you are coming up short in bone-building calcium. And if youre desperately searching for that strawberry shortcake in your fridge, are you deficient in vitamin C? Probably not. Your hankering for certain foods is more likely caused by a mixture of social, psychosocial, cultural, and environmental cues rather than nutritional ones. Case in point, we most often yearn for foods laden with fat, sugar, and salt rather than nutrient-dense choices such as leafy greens and lentils. See also 8 Foods Every Vegetarian Should Eat A study in The Journal of Clinical Investigation found that volunteers who received an infusion of fatty acids (similar to what you would get from comfort foods) while being exposed to depressing stimuli, such as dreary music, reported feeling less sad. And a British study looking at the state of mind of participants right before a craving struck found that they were prone to being anxious or bored and to experiencing a depressed mood. These findings indicate that areas of the brain involved in emotions and moods are strongly affected by dietary elements that can impact cravings and the urge to eat. So when youre feeling down in the dumps, a warm muffin may positively impact parts of your brain--and result in a learned craving for that item. Outsmart a Craving Heres how to outsmart cravings for foods laden with sugar, salt, or fat, which can lead to unbalanced eating and weight gain. STEP OUT The next time you sense a craving for a brownie coming on, lace up your shoes instead. Research shows that a brisk walk can be enough to dampen the urge for sugary snack foods. GET SLEEP Research suggests that people who get more hours of shut-eye tend to be slimmer. KEEP NOTES A detailed food log can help you pinpoint craving trends. You can then take measures to fight back, such as using yoga to deal with stress that induces cravings. UPGRADE Look for healthier substitutes for the foods you crave. For example, try salty tasting nori snacks instead of potato chips or sweet frozen grapes instead of candy. See also Cut the Sugar in 3 Easy Steps The Reality of Food Cravings Cravings are more about wanting than needing. While your body can coax you into drinking more water when youre parched, its not likely to urge you to eat more pumpkin seeds when you need magnesium. Psychological and external factors, though, are the main motivators that drive people to indulge in food cravings. Canada-based Investigative Nutritionist Matthew Kadey, RD, sets us straight on misleading nutrition claims.

Q & A: Daily Greens CEO and Breast Cancer Survivor Shauna Martin

October 27 2015 Vegetarian Times 

Q & A: Daily Greens CEO and Breast Cancer Survivor Shauna Martin In honor of Breast Cancer Awareness month, we asked breast cancer survivor Shauna R. Martin ten questions to get to know her and her business a little better. Shauna is not only surviving but thriving as founder and CEO of Daily Greens, which is distributed in more than 2,000 outlets including Whole Foods, Krogers,  Safeway, and Costco. VT: What inspired you to begin juicing? Shauna: I vividly recall sitting on the floor of my shower with water and tears streaming down my face trying to figure it all out. I could not stop thinking . . . why me? What did I do wrong? On July 28, 2005, my sons first birthday, I had been diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of thirty-three. My life was flashing before my eyes, as I struggled with the question of whether I was ready to die. It did not take me long to conclude that I was in fact not ready to die–I had a young child and a husband to live for! I had to muster the strength to get out of the shower and take care of my family, but 9 months of chemotherapy and a year of surgeries to first remove my breasts and then reconstruct them had left me weak, bald, and hopeless. After all that I had been through, my doctors told me I still had an up to 40% chance of a recurrence. I wondered how that could that possibly be, after everything I had done to fight my cancer over the past two years? One thing I knew for sure: I had to stay alive for my son and husband, so I resolved to get up off the shower floor and do something about it. I had heard that food could have powerful healing attributes, so I decided to investigate. I read everything I could get my hands on, and my journey lead me to understand that a plant-based diet, filled with raw vegetables, could not only help detox my body from all the toxins from my breast cancer treatment, but it could also potentially prevent a recurrence of my breast cancer. I was so excited to finally find something that would be under my control, so I went for it. I read that the most efficient way to consume raw veggies was to juice them, so I ordered my first juicer and started making a green juice every day. I immediately started to regain my energy and my former stamina. My hair grew back quickly, my skin and eyes started to glow. I was blown away, so I studied further and determined that the right thing for me was to move to a fully plant-based diet. This took several years of slowly eliminating animal protein from my diet, but when I finally got there, the result was amazing. I still eat a fully vegan and plant-based diet 10 years later, and I now know the answer to the why? I was meant to go on my breast cancer journey and struggle so that I could help bring a message of health and hope to America! VT: Whats the process for making these juices? Shauna: All of our juices start with a base of dark leafy greens because greens are the most nutrient dense plants on the planet. We source raw, organic whole greens, veggies, and fruits from farmers we know. We then cold-press them in our state-of-the-art juicing facility. We make them safe for our customers by then putting our finished bottles in our high pressure machine which kills harmful bacteria, while preserving all the nutrients. VT: Tell us about the flavors. Shauna: Our core line of green juices consists of six wonderful flavors using a variety of dark greens, juicy veggies, and fruits. They are all low in calories and sugars, with no added water. We use a large variety of dark greens, ranging from spinach and kale to watercress and dandelion greens, with names like, Renew, Elevate, and Harmony. The very first flavor that I juiced and took to the farmers’ market was Vitality, which I developed after attending a BBQ with my friends and family in Texas. I knew if I was going to get folks in my home town of Austin, Texas to drink a dense green juice it needed to have that familiar sweet and salty taste of BBQ with a kick of heat. Vitality has pineapple juiced with the kale, pink Himalayan salt, and a touch of jalapeno. We also have a line of plant-based hemp protein drinks infused with super greens and other fabulous ingredients like matcha green tea. Our line of hemp milks are a convenient and natural source of plant-based protein, iron, and calcium. We launched the first nationwide line of kid-friendly raw, organic green, and fruit smoothies kmade from whole fruits and greens, making raw, organic, ready-to-drink green smoothies available for the whole family. Finally, our core line of green juices is available in a cleanse kit which contains an excerpt from my Daily Greens 4-Day cleanse book with instructions for completing a 4-day juice and raw food cleanse. VT: Whats your personal favorite flavor? Shauna: Purity, which is the original juice that I started making 10 years ago to help heal myself. Purity is wonderfully simple blend of just greens and veggies. Lately however, I have really been loving Rejuvenate, a blend of carrot and collard greens with a touch of turmeric. VT: Whats the best compliment youve received from someone trying a delicious green juice? Shauna: I was hosting a book signing one day at Whole Foods and a woman came rushing in and said she had just completed my 4-Day juice and raw food cleanse using Daily Greens juices and my vegan raw food recipes. She said: I have felt so terrible for so many years, and after drinking your juices and eating your raw vegan recipes I have more energy and feel better than I have in my entire life. Please tell me how I can continue to feel this way forever! I explained that all she had to do was continue her habit of drinking a green juice every day in combination with a plant-based diet. VT: What are the benefits of a cleanse? Shauna: Periodically giving your intestines a break from digesting will help cleanse your cells of toxins and detox both your body and your mind. This can be accomplished by doing a juice and raw fruit fast during the day and then consuming a raw vegetable dinner, high in fiber, to help move toxins out of the body. It is important to include green juice in any cleanse to continually infuse the body with nutrients and electrolytes as well as lots of high fiber salads and raw vegetable dishes to help move the intestines on a regular basis. Check out our blog, Are Juice Cleanses Healthy? VT: Whats your favorite recipe on Vegetarian Times website? I love this Orange-Sunflower-Slaw recipe. It is very similar to a slaw I make on a regular basis in the summer, but with the addition of orange and sunflower seeds. So fun and yummy! VT: Which breast cancer organizations does Daily Greens benefit? Shauna: Daily Greens has partnered with and donates a portion of its top line sales to the Young Survival Coalition. This is the only national organization specifically focused on the needs of young women battling breast cancer. Having gone through breast cancer at such a young age, I understand the huge need for resources for women under the age of 40 facing breast cancer, and the YSC provides those resources on a national basis. VT: Whats one thing people would be surprised to learn about these juices? Shauna: Folks are usually really surprised at how good our Daily Greens juices are. They are also usually surprised at how different all of them taste, given that they are all very similar in color. VT: What is one thing people should know about the juices? Shauna: I really believe so much in the healing power of drinking a green juice every day, so I encourage folks to try all of our Daily Greens flavors until they find the one that they crave. If folks dont have access to Daily Greens ready-to-drink juices then I encourage making them at home. Whatever it takes, my mission and vision is that everyone gets a green juice in their life each and every day.      

Perfect Pickle: Grillo’s Vegan, All-Natural Pickles

September 8 2015 Vegetarian Times 

Perfect Pickle: Grillo’s Vegan, All-Natural PicklesPhoto Courtesy Grillo’s Pickles Besides Grillos Pickles being vegan, all-natural, gluten-free, paleo, and kosher — theyre just plain good. Varieties include: Italian and Hot Italian (in both spears and chips) and Sweet Bread & Butter in chips (which are the perfect size for our Black Bean and Edamame Sliders and our Smoky Baby Portobello Sliders). Founder Travis Grillo starting selling spears -- two for $1 -- out of a wooden cart on the Boston Common. He made them by night using an old family recipe. After generating buzz on the Common, Whole Foods and the Boston Red Sox approached him about creating professional partnerships. Pickle Prep The pickles are made simply, with old-school Italian recipes. Only natural ingredients are used: water, distilled white vinegar, salt, dill, garlic, and grape leaves. For the hot variety, habanero and jalape?o peppers are added. For the sweet, they add red peppers, yellow onion mustard seed, celery seed, turmeric, and a pinch of all-natural sugar. The grape leaves actually act as a natural preserver, thus avoiding the use of chemicals and preservatives such as calcium chloride and sodium benzoate, which are found in most pickle products. They opt not to ferment these pickles; they believe theyre freshest and crispest the way they make them. Pickle Pairing We asked the Grillos Pickles team to pick all-star recipes that would go great with their pickles: Carrot Fritters with Dill-Yogurt Sauce -- Weve had success mixing our Italian dills with anything that heavily features carrots, and weve also made a yogurt-based dip with the dill chips. I think adding some sliced/­­chopped dills to this sauce would yield awesome results. Red Quinoa Zucchini Burger -- The Italian dill chips would add a nice zest, and the HOT Italian chips would provide a good bite. I would personally add the hots; Ive done so to veggie burgers many times. Sweet-and-Sour Baked Tofu Sandwich -- The sweet bread & butters would give a refreshing sweet flavor, while still maintaining the crunch of the cabbage.

Health Summit for Health Professionals at VegfestUK Vegan Festival London Olympia

August 4 2015 World Vegetarian And Vegan News 

Health Summit for Health Professionals at VegfestUK Vegan Festival London Olympia As part of the continuing efforts to Vegducate as many people as possible about the vegan solutions to avoidable world problems that threaten our planet VegfestUK is now hosting a Health Summit for Health Professionals at London Olympia on Saturday 10th October. Sadly there are still many health professionals that are unaware of the evidence based science that supports the solution of a healthier balanced plant based diet to common health problems and the vegan diets suitability for all age groups. Harley Street nutritional therapist Yvonne Bishop-Weston reveals "I am frequently contacted by mothers at their wits end because of pressure put upon them by Doctors to start eating meat and cheese and feed animal products to their children, like there is some magical ingredient that can only be found in meat and dairy. It reveals a lack of understanding about basic nutrition and the nutrients found in food" "Yes a person may fair better on a diet higher in protein, may have some health condition that requires extra omega 3 EPA and DHA, or vitamin B12 or vitamin D3 or probiotics but there are now excellent plant based versions of all of these nutritional tools." Earlier this year The Vegan Society reached a historic agreement with The British Dietetic Association. The Vegan Society and The British Dietetic Association have agreed to collaborate to bring  reliable plant based nutrition information to every community in the UK. Tony Bishop-Weston, executive consultant Vegan Chef and Author of The Vegan Cookbook,  has helped VegfestUK bring together some leading lights in Nutrition and Dietetics to provide a line up of distinguished speakers to provide evidence based science that backs up the argument for vegan solutions to the scourge of avoidable self inflicted health problems we face. Chef says "For too long many health professionals, GP's, midwives, dietitians, nutritionists, health workers have written off plant based diets as unnatural and exclusionary. This may be partly because of the way vegan diets were better known for what wasn't vegan, what they didn't eat rather than what vegans do eat - messages were full of negative messages, not this, don't eat that, no no no rather than yes yes yes and motivational provocative messages focused on delicious and dynamic vegan solutions. That's all changed. Bookshops are awash with beautiful vegan cookbooks with deliciously inspiring vegan recipes. The supermarkets now sell edible melting vegan cheese, vegan sausages, dairy free ice cream in fact everything from plant based caviar to vegan haggis. Thanks to 70 years of UK veganism there's now plenty of people to prove that a vegan diet can be far healthier than the average UK diet" Speakers at The VegfestUK Health Summit for Health Professionals include Professor Thomas Sanders  Professor of Nutrition & Dietetics Kings College London who will be talking about his CRESSIDA study and it's relevance to those on vegan diets Prof Tom Sanders Professor of Nutrition Kings College LondonDr Emma Derbyshire, PhD, is a registered public health nutritionist government adviser on nutrition and diet matters and award-winning nutrition and health writer.  Dr Emma Derbyshire NutritionistSandra Hood RD - A specialist dietician for the NHS Sandra runs education sessions on diabetes for patients and health professionals. Sandra is author of 'Feeding your Vegan Baby with Confidence' published by The Vegan Society and has had numerous articles published in magazines. She worked closely with Plamil Foods to produce Infant Case Histories to prove the efficacy and benefits of a plant food based diet for infants. Sandra is currently working on nutrition material for the Vegan Society and BDA collaboration. She will be joined by Nutritional Therapist Yvonne Bishop-Weston Sandra Hood registered Dietitian Dr Nina Bailey -BSc Hons, MSc, PhD, ANutr: Nutrition Scientist - Head of Clinical Nutrition Igennus Healthcare Nutrition - Dr Nina Bailey is a leading expert in marine fatty  acids and their role in health and disease. Dr Bailey holds a master's degree in Clinical  Nutrition and received her doctorate from Cambridge University and is a published scientist,  regularly featured in national health publications. Dr Nina Bailey Nutrition ScientistMikkel Jungersen - Scientific Advisor in Scientific Affairs at Chr. Hansens  Health & Nutrition Division where he is responsible for scientific issues for Chr. Hansens  probiotics Mikkel Jungeresen - Scientific Advisor  Other speakers include Paul Appleby from the Oxford University/­­European EPIC Study, Dr Tushar Mehta from Toronto, motivational expert Brian Jacobs and yoga guru talking about and demonstrating yoga as a tool to alleviate some of the effects of stress. http:/­­/­­london.vegfest.co.uk/­­prof-tom-sanders http:/­­/­­london.vegfest.co.uk/­­dr-emma-derbyshire http:/­­/­­london.vegfest.co.uk/­­sandra-hood http:/­­/­­london.vegfest.co.uk/­­yvonne-bishop-weston http:/­­/­­london.vegfest.co.uk/­­dr-nina-bailey SATURDAY Health Professionals Health Summit Talks Room 12:00 - Dr Emma Derbyshire - Protein and Calcium Solutions on a Vegan Diet 1:00 - Prof Tom Sanders - King's College London CRESSIDA Study 2:00 - Sandra Hood RD Yvonne Bishop-Weston BSc DipION mBANT - Safer Vegan Pregnancy & Childrens health 3:00 - Mikkel Jungersen, MSc - Probiotics and Women's health 4:00 - Dr Nina Bailey - Essential Fats and Vegan Diets 5:00 - Dr Tushar Mehta - Vegan is the Answer: What's The Question? SATURDAY Health Professionals Health Summit Workshop Room12:00 - Paul Appleby  - Oxford Uni EPIC Study and Vegan Findings 1:00 - Debate - Raw food vs Cooked food 2:00 - Dr Tushar Mehta & Peter Gleave - Can you reverse Diabetes? 3:00 - Christine Bailey - Good Fats, Healing Fats.  Its time to Feel Good About Healthy Fats 4:00 - Brian Jacobs - Solutions for motivational strategies for encouraging healthy eating 5:00 - The Sivananda Yoga Vedanta Centre - Stress Management Free certificated CPD for Health Professionals will be on offer. Contact your professional body for more details. More Vegan and Vegetarian News at Vegan News - Health, Diet and Nutrition News

How to Prepare Collard Greens Easily and Quickly

June 3 2015 VegKitchen 

How to Prepare Collard Greens Easily and QuicklyCollard greens can look pretty intimidating -- they range from large to gigantic, and look like they’d take hours to prep and even longer to cook. But this is totally not the case. If you know how to tame them, they’re easily prepped and very quickly cooked. They’re a boon to the plant-based diet, as they’re a fantastic source of calcium (better than kale) and rich in vitamins, minerals, and micronutrients. Forget about the old way of cooking them in a bit pot of boiling water. That way, collards lose color, flavor, and nutrients. Prepping them with this easier, more contemporary technique preserves all that is great about collards.  Step 1. Cut away the tough stem with kitchen shears or a small sharp knife so that the leaves are cut in half lengthwise. Step 2. Stack 6 or so similar-sized half leaves one atop the other. Step 3. Starting from one end, roll the leaves up tightly. Step 4. Cut the rolled up leaves crosswise. The technique of cutting veggies into ribbons is called “chiffonade,” in case you were wondering … Step 5. The ribbons will be long, kind of like noodles, so if you’d like them to be shorter you can give them a cut in the opposite direction. Step 6. Use these collard ribbons any way you’d like. Toss them into stir fries or soups; or add them to roasted veggies about 10 minutes before the roasting process is done. My favorite way, and the simplest, is to sauté a little garlic in a stir-fry pan for a minute or so, then add the collard ribbons, turn up the heat, and stir-fry for 3 to 4 minutes until bright green. Season with salt and pepper and a splash of lemon juice or apple cider vinegar and serve. Yum! Recipes using this technique for prepping collard greens: - Cold Sesame-Ginger Soba Noodles and Greens - Stir-Fried Greens with Napa Cabbage and Tofu - Sesame Soba Noodles with Collard Greens and Tempeh Croutons

How to Be Supportive When Your Kid Goes Veg

May 12 2015 Vegetarian Times 

How to Be Supportive When Your Kid Goes Veg Got a kid who just ditched meat? Dont worry: children and adolescents can get all the vitamins and minerals they need from a well-planned veg diet, according to both the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and the American Academy of Pediatrics. Todays children are very engaged in how their eating makes a difference, says Sharon Palmer, RDN, author of Plant-Powered for Life. I suspect more and more young people will come home and tell their parents theyd like to go plant-based. Your childs new diet doesnt have to make your life more difficult. Heres what to do when your little vegetarian (or vegan) makes the big announcement. Listen to Reasons for Going Meatless Invite kids to share their motivation for giving up meat. Think of it as an opportunity to get to know their values and worldview (or at least which of their peers is influencing them). Lorraine Buckmaster, of Baltimore, was all ears when her twin daughters became vegetarian in high school and vegan in college. After listening to their reasoning--and learning a lot about factory farming--Buckmaster understood why the girls felt the way they did, even if she and her husband werent ready to join them in going full-fledged veg. Assign Homework for a Balanced Diet Have new vegetarians make a list of nutritious snacks and meals, draft a shopping list, or go over the vegetarian food pyramid and explain how they will eat a balanced diet. Palmer advises focusing on nutrients of concern to vegans and vegetarians, such as protein, calcium, vitamin D, and vitamin B12. Theres a great deal of nutritional misinformation on plant-based diets on the Internet, she says. Finding a credible source, such as a registered dietitian or an organization such as Oldways Vegetarian Network, Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, or Vegetarian Resource Group is important. See also How do you get picky kids to eat veggies? Be Patient Chances are, youll be hearing a lot about your childs new interest. Yes, it might be uncomfortable or even annoying to get all the gory details about animal cruelty or health statistics, but keep an open mind, and ask for articles to read another time if you need a break from the topic. There are many bad choices that a child can make in this world, and being vegetarian is definitely not one of them, notes Susan Custer, of Midlothian, Va., whose daughter went vegetarian then vegan in her teens. I was impressed by her willpower and determination to stick with it. Set Ground Rules for a Healthy Diet Make it clear that junk-food vegetarianism wont fly. No need to ban chips and cookies, but whole foods--and a variety of them--should be the focus. Picky eaters may need to loosen up a bit. If youd like help with grocery shopping, meal prep, or lunch-packing, request that your child pitch in. Also, its fair to ask that mealtime be free of heated food discussions. Mutual respect is key: Dad doesnt need to hear about gestation crates during breakfast, and your veg kid shouldnt be teased for skipping meat. See also Why Go Veg? Cook and Eat Together Sharing recipes and trying unfamiliar foods can be a sweet way to bond. Borrow cookbooks from the library, or post recipes to a shared Pinterest board. With a little thought and effort, meals can be tweaked to satisfy everyone. Buckmaster focused on foods they could all eat: Wed have tacos--Id put the fixings out, and everyone could make their own. With pasta, my husbands portion would have meat sauce, and Id eat the veg topping with the kids. Pizzas always good. You can veganize almost anything. Be willing to stock up on fruits, vegetables, legumes, and whole grains, as well as new-to-you veg staples such as tofu and tempeh. Says Custer, The best thing has been the world that her choice has opened up for all of us: the variety of foods, healthier restaurants, and learning to shop the outside edges of the grocery store. Learn The Labels Youre about to become a lot more familiar with product labels. Non-veg ingredients pop up in unexpected places, whether its lard in baked goods, meat stock in soups, or gelatin in candies. Visit vrg.org/­­ingredients for a comprehensive list. If you have a smartphone, download the Animal-Free app to quickly determine if an ingredient is off-limits. Buying whole foods and products with short ingredients lists will make this task easier. See also Veg Supplement Guide

Chia Lemon Cake

January 17 2017 Veganpassion 

Chia Lemon Cake Chia seeds are my latest discoveries. The small seeds look like tiny pebbles and they have great nutritional values. The superfood contains antioxidants, calcium, potassium, iron, omega-3 fatty acids and omega-6 fatty acids and withal they are very versatile! Today I want to share my Chia Lemon Cake recipe with you. Very delicous and even healthy :-). If you don't want to use any sugar you can bake the cake with any alternative you like. You can use xylit, agave sirup or stevia . Makes a 7 inch (18cm) cake springform pan. For the dough: 1 3/­­4 cup (200 g) spelt flour 7/­­8 cup (100g) raw cane sugar 1 1/­­2 tsp. baking powder 3 tsp. vanilla sugar 1 pinch of salt 1 tbsp. soy flour or arrowroot flour 2 tbsp. chia seeds 1 pinch of curcuma juice and skin of one lemon 1/­­4 cup (50 g) margarine or vegan butter, melted 1/­­8 cup (30 ml) oil  3/­­4 cup (180 ml) water In a bowl mix together flour, sugar, backing powder, vanilla sugar, salt, chia seeds, curcuma and lemon abraison. Grease cake springform pan with margarine and fill in the dough. Bake at 338°F (170°C) for about 40 minutes. Let the cake cool off in the pan and sprinkle it with powdered sugar. Enjoy your meal.

Pear Cranberry Chai – Holiday Recipe Month

October 30 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Pear Cranberry Chai – Holiday Recipe Month Are you guys dressing up for Halloween? I’m not, but Paloma is going to be John Lennon circa 1974 (the rest of her friends are princesses). Yep, the Beatles obsession is as strong as ever. Right now, John is the absolute favorite. 1980 (year of his death) is the WORST number, not to be spoken in the house, and she’s been know to put on Imagine and cry to it more than a few times. And this is an otherwise cheerful, happy kid too. Crazy! Anyways, whether you are participating in this weekend’s spooky activities or not, maybe you can consider treating yourself with this seriously autumnal chai, or better yet, plan to serve it at some sort of holiday occasion. I’m confident your guests will be blown away. As far as I can recall, this is the best chai I’ve ever tried. Besides all the required, invigorating spices, this one is infused with fresh pears and cranberries, which add lovely flavor and a tiny hint of sourness. It’s a bit sweet, spicy, gingery and creamy. And if you are wondering what I do with all the leftover stewed pears, I blend them into a pear sauce and spoon it onto all kinds of dishes. There are some weekend links after the jump. Have a nice one :) Protein, Iron, Calcium – I’ve been finding Gena’s articles about protein/­­iron/­­calcium-rich plant food combinations so helpful Urban Moonshine – I’ve been taking these digestive bitters before almost every meal and have really noticed a difference. Highly recommended if you have any mild issues with digestion or even as a blood sugar stabilizing aid. Also, want to make this Happy Belly Seed Mix soon. Sophie Buhai’s New Jewelry Collection – the photos! Exceptional Advice from Anthony Bourdain’s New Book – please never change Tony .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Pear Cranberry Chai – Holiday Recipe Month appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Farmers Market Finds: Protein-Packed Produce for Meatless Monday!

August 8 2016 Meatless Monday 

Farmers Market Finds: Protein-Packed Produce for Meatless Monday!National Farmers Market Week, August 7-13, is a wonderful time to explore the markets in your community and plan new and exciting meatless meals with local fruits and veggies. In honor of the week-long celebration, we’ve put together this list of protein-packed produce to look for at the market and add to your menu plan. These delicious (and nutritious) veggies make it easy to create balanced meals for Meatless Monday!     1. Green Peas At the farmers market youll often find fresh-picked green peas still in the peapod. Peas have a powerful serving of protein - up to 9 grams of per cup when cooked -and are also rich in fiber, potassium, iron, zinc, folate, B vitamins, vitamin A and vitamin K. Make them the star of your entrée or add them to soup, salad, or stir fry.       2. Broccoli Farm-fresh broccoli is as rich in flavor and fiber as it is in protein. Broccoli can be enjoyed raw, steamed, roasted, stir-fried, baked in casseroles or stirred into soups. Broccoli provides over 5 grams of protein per cup and plenty of vitamin A, niacin, vitamin E, vitamin C and vitamin K and high levels of potassium, calcium and phosphorus.     3. Mushrooms Mushrooms are a protein-rich food but are better known for their savory flavors, meaty textures, and versatility in the kitchen. On their own one cup of raw mushrooms has roughly 2 grams of protein – add them to dishes with other veggies for even more flavor and vegetable protein. Ask farmers in your local market which varieties you should try.       4. Brussels Sprouts If youve never seen brussels sprouts fresh on the stalk, youve got to find them in person at your farmers market this season. This tiny, protein-packed (about 4 grams of protein per cup) cruciferous vegetable may have gotten a bad rap in popular culture, but youll love what happens when you roast them with a little olive oil and your favorite spices.         5. Asparagus Asparagus is a wonderful vegetable for summer being perfect for the grill, roasting, quick blanching, or even eating raw. This veggie contains up to 4 grams of protein per cup and also adds a lot of fiber and minerals like potassium, calcium, iron, folate and chromium to your meal. Asparagus looks fancy, but its an easy-to-cook nutritional powerhouse.         6. Artichokes Artichokes might be known for their flavor and fiber content, but they have substantial protein to offer as well (roughly the same as spinach). These flowers can be blended, steamed, roasted, or transformed into a delicious dip. Get fresh artichokes at the farmers market and your dinner guests will be more than impressed with a meatless spread.       7. Spinach Spinach is probably the most famous protein-rich veggie in the bunch; this vibrant seasonal green is not to be missed. Spinach shines as a raw ingredient in salad, sautéed with other veggies, or blended in green juices and smoothies. With over 5 grams of protein per cup, spinach makes getting your daily servings of protein easy.         8. Kale Kale is a versatile, protein-filled green that works well in everything from salads and smoothies to soups and casseroles. With nearly as much protein per serving as spinach, kale offers fiber, vitamin A, and more vitamin C per serving than oranges. Farmers cultivate a variety of types of kale, including curly, frilled, and textured dinosaur leaves.         9. Cauliflower A cruciferous cousin of broccoli, cauliflower makes a moderate protein impact of its own while adding texture and body to meatless meals. Cut your fresh head of cauliflower into thick slices width-wise to make cauliflower steaks, chop into florets and swap in for broccoli in your favorite recipes, or mash it with potatoes to a less starchy alternative.       Farmers markets offer a huge variety of protein-rich foods to make your Meatless Monday fresh, tasty and healthy. Stop by your local market to find even more ideas for delicious meals this season!   Hungry for more fresh farmers market finds? Tour the Union Square Greenmarket with Chef Bryce Shuman of Betony Restaurant in NYC: The post Farmers Market Finds: Protein-Packed Produce for Meatless Monday! appeared first on Meatless Monday.

There’s a new milk in town…and it’s delicious

May 5 2016 Vegetarian Times 

There’s a new milk in town…and it’s delicious Almond, cashew, coconut, hemp, soy – there is definitely no shortage to the list of non-dairy milks available to us. Well, it’s time to welcome one more ingredient to the plant-based party: yellow peas. Ripple, a new nutritious, dairy-free milk, is processed using yellow peas. And what does this alternative milk taste like, you ask? The VT team recently tasted the all-natural milk and found it’s smooth, creamy, refreshing, and tasty. Flavors include original, unsweetened original, vanilla, and a rich, sweet chocolate. Better yet, there is a whopping 8 grams of protein per serving, half the sugar of dairy milk, and contains calcium, iron, potassium, Omega-3s, and Vitamin D. This vegan, gluten-free milk is also surprisingly eco-friendly. According to Ripple, they have a 93% lower water footprint than dairy milk. Peas require less water than almonds and emit 69% less carbon dioxide than cashews, coconuts, and almonds. Plus, it’s bottled in 100% post-consumer recycled plastic, which can also be recycled. Check out their website for more information and where you can find this milk.

Kale, Romaine, and Apple Salad with Sesame-Avocado Dressing

February 20 2016 VegKitchen 

Kale, Romaine, and Apple Salad with Sesame-Avocado Dressing Heres a fresh and crunchy kale salad with a double dose of sesame (tahini and seeds). Did you know that sesame seeds are a good source of calcium? This salad goes with just about any kind of meal -- bean and grain dishes, stews, chilies, veggie burgers.

Do Food Cravings Mean You’re Nutrient Deficient?

February 19 2016 Vegetarian Times 

Do Food Cravings Mean You’re Nutrient Deficient? Myth: You crave a certain food because youre deficient in one of its nutrients. If youve ever found yourself desperately pushing through a crowd to get at the double-chocolate cupcakes in a display window, youre well aware of the power of food cravings. Some people suggest that such cravings are an effort by your body to correct a deficiency in a certain nutrient. In the case of chocolate, that might be magnesium--cocoa is considered a good source of this vital mineral. The urge to dig into a tub of salted caramel ice cream, some would say, is an indication you are coming up short in bone-building calcium. And if youre desperately searching for that strawberry shortcake in your fridge, are you deficient in vitamin C? Probably not. Your hankering for certain foods is more likely caused by a mixture of social, psychosocial, cultural, and environmental cues rather than nutritional ones. Case in point, we most often yearn for foods laden with fat, sugar, and salt rather than nutrient-dense choices such as leafy greens and lentils. See also 8 Foods Every Vegetarian Should Eat A study in The Journal of Clinical Investigation found that volunteers who received an infusion of fatty acids (similar to what you would get from comfort foods) while being exposed to depressing stimuli, such as dreary music, reported feeling less sad. And a British study looking at the state of mind of participants right before a craving struck found that they were prone to being anxious or bored and to experiencing a depressed mood. These findings indicate that areas of the brain involved in emotions and moods are strongly affected by dietary elements that can impact cravings and the urge to eat. So when youre feeling down in the dumps, a warm muffin may positively impact parts of your brain--and result in a learned craving for that item. Outsmart a Craving Heres how to outsmart cravings for foods laden with sugar, salt, or fat, which can lead to unbalanced eating and weight gain. STEP OUT The next time you sense a craving for a brownie coming on, lace up your shoes instead. Research shows that a brisk walk can be enough to dampen the urge for sugary snack foods. GET SLEEP Research suggests that people who get more hours of shut-eye tend to be slimmer. KEEP NOTES A detailed food log can help you pinpoint craving trends. You can then take measures to fight back, such as using yoga to deal with stress that induces cravings. UPGRADE Look for healthier substitutes for the foods you crave. For example, try salty tasting nori snacks instead of potato chips or sweet frozen grapes instead of candy. See also Cut the Sugar in 3 Easy Steps The Reality of Food Cravings Cravings are more about wanting than needing. While your body can coax you into drinking more water when youre parched, its not likely to urge you to eat more pumpkin seeds when you need magnesium. Psychological and external factors, though, are the main motivators that drive people to indulge in food cravings. Canada-based Investigative Nutritionist Matthew Kadey, RD, sets us straight on misleading nutrition claims.

Zucchini Pappardelle with Corn Cream

September 18 2015 VegKitchen 

Pappardelle are flat noodles about one inch wide that are usually served with rich creamy sauces and gravies. In this dish, thinly sliced zucchini stand in for the pasta. Look for young zucchini for the best results. Recipe and photo from The Almond Milk Cookbook* by Alan Roettinger, @2015 The Book Publishing Company. Reprinted by permission. Save Print Zucchini Pappardelle with Corn Cream Author: Alan Roettinger Recipe type: Vegetable side dish Cuisine: Vegan /­­ Healthy Prep time:  15 mins Cook time:  15 mins Total time:  30 mins Serves: 4   In this creamy side dish, thinly sliced zucchini stand in for pasta. Look for young zucchini for the best results. Ingredients 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 cup finely diced white onion 2 cups fresh or frozen corn kernels 1 cup unsweetened almond milk or Homemade Almond Milk 1 clove garlic, minced 1/­­4 teaspoon sea salt 3 tablespoons snipped fresh chives 2 pounds zucchini, thinly sliced lengthwise (see tip) Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste Instructions Combine the oil and onion in a large saucepan over medium heat and stir well. Spread the onion out to evenly cover the bottom of the saucepan. Decrease the heat to low, cover, and cook, stirring occasionally and spreading out the onion again, for 30 minutes. If the onion is sticking, add 1 tablespoon of water. Do not let the onion brown. Add the corn, almond milk, garlic, and salt, and stir to combine. Increase the heat to medium-high and bring to a boil, stirring constantly. Decrease the heat to medium and cook, stirring frequently, until the corn is tender, about 8 minutes. Transfer to a blender and process on high speed until smooth. Return to the saucepan and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until the sauce is thick enough to coat a spoon, about 10 minutes. Add 2 tablespoons of the chives and stir to combine. Fill a large saucepan halfway with water and bring to a boil over high heat. Add the zucchini and cook, stirring occasionally, until just tender, 1 to 2 minutes. Drain well and add to the sauce. Toss gently but thoroughly. Season with salt and pepper and toss again. Garnish with the remaining tablespoon of chives and serve at once. 3.3.3077   Tip: A mandoline is very helpful for obtaining thin, uniform slices of zucchini. Or, you can also use a vegetable peeler. Nutrition information Per serving: 196 calories; 5g protein; 8g total fat; 27g carbs; 210 mgs calcium; 5g fiber; 205 mgs sodium - Here are more recipes for Zucchini and Other Summer Squashes. *This post contains affiliate links. If the product is purchased by linking through this review, VegKitchen receives a modest commission, which helps maintain our site and helps it to continue growing!

12 High-Protein Vegan Main Dishes Featuring Tempeh

August 14 2015 VegKitchen 

12 High-Protein Vegan Main Dishes Featuring TempehTempeh is a fermented soyfood,and like its culinary cousin tofu is quite versatile, but has a more distinct flavor as well as a dense, chewy texture. Though somewhat of an acquired taste, it’s one worth cultivating -- tempeh is high in complete protein and rich in all kinds of nutrients perfect for the plant based diet. Learn more in this informative post on tempeh.  Let’s get cooking with it, starting with Tangy Tempeh with Portobello Mushrooms (above). It has a meaty heartiness, with balsamic vinegar providing a bit of tang. Serve this sumptuous stew-like dish over a cooked grain or on pasta. In these delectable Mango Tempeh Lettuce Wraps from Oh My Veggies, crumbled tempeh and sweet champagne mangos combine to make a perfect filling for easy vegetarian lettuce wraps. Tempeh and Green Beans with Shiitake-Miso Gravy is a filling dish featuring a flavorful shiitake-miso gravy. Serve with simple cooked quinoa, especially if you cooked extra earlier in the week; its also good on rice or noodles.  Sesame Soba Noodles with Collard Greens and Tempeh Croutons is an Asian-flavored dish featuring high-protein tempeh and calcium-rich collard greens is flavored with a triple dose of sesame (another great source of calcium): tahini, seeds, and oil. In Tempeh and Walnut Soft Taco Filling, two high-protein foods (with lots more going for them nutritionally) team up in a tasty filling that goes a long way. Ginger Tempeh Vegetable Stir-Fry by Leslie Cerier features summer squash and bok choy. Serve over rice and a colorful salad for an easy meal. Ayinde Howells Sriracha Tempeh Sliders with Ranch Dressing offers an ingeniously easy way to make these mini-burgers. You can replace the sriracha with BBQ sauce if its too hot you! Sweet-and-Sour Stir-Fried Vegetables with Seitan or Tempeh features a choice of these plant proteins plus colorful vegetables and pineapple, has several steps but can be made easily and at a leisurely pace. Tempeh, Kale, and Sweet Potato Skillet shines with a nourishing trio of ingredients and makes for a quick, colorful, and comforting meal. Another yummy offering from Leslie Cerier, Tempeh Stew with Brussels Sprouts, Sweet Potatoes, and Shiitakes is like Thanksgiving in a bowl. It is indeed a good choice for the holiday, but you can make it any time you want a hearty cool-weather meal. Even those who arent quite sold on tempeh will be enticed by this delectable, veggie-filled Tempeh, Cauliflower, and Cashew Curry.  Along with potatoes and plenty of spices, this is a colorful and warming stew. Skillet Potato and Tempeh Hash gives you a hearty vegan spin on a meaty classic. Embellished with bell pepper and kale, this is as good served as a quick dinner as it is an offbeat and hearty breakfast.

9 Farmers Market Veggies that Put Protein on Your Plate

August 3 2015 Meatless Monday 

9 Farmers Market Veggies that Put Protein on Your PlateNational Farmers Market Week, August 2-8, is a wonderful time to explore the markets in your community and plan new and exciting meatless meals with local fruits and veggies. In honor of the week-long celebration, we’ve put together this list of protein-packed produce to look for at the market and add to your menu plan. These delicious (and nutritious) veggies make it easy to create balanced meals for Meatless Monday!     1. Green Peas At the farmers market youll often find fresh-picked green peas still in the peapod. Peas have a powerful serving of protein - up to 9 grams of per cup when cooked -and are also rich in fiber, potassium, iron, zinc, folate, B vitamins, vitamin A and vitamin K. Make them the star of your entrée or add them to soup, salad, or stir fry.       2. Broccoli Farm-fresh broccoli is as rich in flavor and fiber as it is in protein. Broccoli can be enjoyed raw, steamed, roasted, stir-fried, baked in casseroles or stirred into soups. Broccoli provides over 5 grams of protein per cup and plenty of vitamin A, niacin, vitamin E, vitamin C and vitamin K and high levels of potassium, calcium and phosphorus.     3. Mushrooms Mushrooms are a protein-rich food but are better known for their savory flavors, meaty textures, and versatility in the kitchen. On their own one cup of raw mushrooms has roughly 2 grams of protein – add them to dishes with other veggies for even more flavor and vegetable protein. Ask farmers in your local market which varieties you should try.       4. Brussels Sprouts If youve never seen brussels sprouts fresh on the stalk, youve got to find them in person at your farmers market this season. This tiny, protein-packed (about 4 grams of protein per cup) cruciferous vegetable may have gotten a bad rap in popular culture, but youll love what happens when you roast them with a little olive oil and your favorite spices.         5. Asparagus Asparagus is a wonderful vegetable for summer being perfect for the grill, roasting, quick blanching, or even eating raw. This veggie contains up to 4 grams of protein per cup and also adds a lot of fiber and minerals like potassium, calcium, iron, folate and chromium to your meal. Asparagus looks fancy, but its an easy-to-cook nutritional powerhouse.         6. Artichokes Artichokes might be known for their flavor and fiber content, but they have substantial protein to offer as well (roughly the same as spinach). These flowers can be blended, steamed, roasted, or transformed into a delicious dip. Get fresh artichokes at the farmers market and your dinner guests will be more than impressed with a meatless spread.       7. Spinach Spinach is probably the most famous protein-rich veggie in the bunch; this vibrant seasonal green is not to be missed. Spinach shines as a raw ingredient in salad, sautéed with other veggies, or blended in green juices and smoothies. With over 5 grams of protein per cup, spinach makes getting your daily servings of protein easy.         8. Kale Kale is a versatile, protein-filled green that works well in everything from salads and smoothies to soups and casseroles. With nearly as much protein per serving as spinach, kale offers fiber, vitamin A, and more vitamin C per serving than oranges. Farmers cultivate a variety of types of kale, including curly, frilled, and textured dinosaur leaves.         9. Cauliflower A cruciferous cousin of broccoli, cauliflower makes a moderate protein impact of its own while adding texture and body to meatless meals. Cut your fresh head of cauliflower into thick slices width-wise to make cauliflower steaks, chop into florets and swap in for broccoli in your favorite recipes, or mash it with potatoes to a less starchy alternative.       Farmers markets offer a huge variety of protein-rich foods to make your Meatless Monday fresh, tasty and healthy. Stop by your local market to find even more ideas for delicious meals this season! The post 9 Farmers Market Veggies that Put Protein on Your Plate appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Sesame Soba Noodles with Collard Greens and Tempeh Croutons

May 26 2015 VegKitchen 

Sesame Soba Noodles with Collard Greens and Tempeh CroutonsI’m a complete noodle fanatic, but a bowl of pasta with tomato sauce doesn’t quite do the trick for me. For me, an ideal noodle dish is one in which veggies have at least equal billing. This Asian-flavored dish of soba noodles and calcium-rich collard greens is flavored with a triple dose of sesame (another great source of calcium): tahini, seeds, and oil. Another bonus -- soba noodles made purely of buckwheat are gluten free. If that’s not of concern to you, other long noodles -- udon or even whole wheat spaghetti -- can be substituted. Recipe by Nava Atlas, from Living the Farm Sanctuary Life by Gene Baur with Gene Stone, (C) 2015 by Gene Baur. Photographs (C) 2015 by Rodale Inc. Reprinted by Permission of Rodale Books. Serves: 4 Total time: 25 to 30 minutes Sauce - 1/­­3 cup tahini - 1/­­4 cup lime juice - 2 tablespoons reduced-sodium natural soy sauce or tamari, or more if needed - 2 tablespoons natural granulated sugar (cane, coconut, or date) or agave nectar Tempeh croutons - 2 teaspoons dark sesame oil - 1 tablespoon reduced-sodium natural soy sauce or tamari - 1 package (8 ounces) tempeh, any variety, cut into 1/­­2″ dice Noodles - 1 package (8 ounces) soba (buckwheat) noodles - 10 to 12 collard green leaves - 1 tablespoon dark sesame oil - 1 large red or yellow onion, cut in half and thinly sliced - 1/­­4 small head green cabbage, cut into long, narrow shreds - 1 medium red bell pepper, cut into long, narrow strips - 1/­­2 cup chopped fresh cilantro, basil, or Thai basil leaves, or more as desired - 1 tablespoon black or tan sesame seeds Red-pepper flakes or Sriracha sauce To make the sauce: In a small bowl, combine the tahini, lime juice, soy sauce or tamari, and sugar or agave nectar. To make the croutons: In a large or wide-bottomed skillet, heat the oil and soy sauce or tamari over medium heat. Add the tempeh and stir to coat. Increase the heat to medium-high and cook the tempeh until most sides are golden brown. Remove the tempeh croutons to a plate. To make the noodles: Cook the noodles according to package directions. When they’re al dente, remove from the heat and drain. Meanwhile, cut the stems from the collard leaves with kitchen shears or a sharp knife. Stack 6 or so halves of leaves at a time. Roll the leaves up tightly from one of the narrow ends, almost like a cigar shape, then thinly slice them. Let them unroll to create ribbons of collard greens. Give them a good rinse in a colander. In the same skillet used to make the croutons, heat the oil. Add the onion and cook over medium heat until softened and golden. Add the collard ribbons, cover, and cook for 7 to 8 minutes, or until they wilt down a bit. Add the cabbage and bell pepper. Increase the heat and cook for 3 minutes, or just until the veggies are on the other side of raw. Remove the skillet from the heat. Add the cooked noodles to the pan and use a large fork to mix the noodles thoroughly with the veggies. Pour the sauce over the mixture. Add the cilantro or basil and sesame seeds. Scatter the croutons on top. Season with the pepper flakes or Sriracha to taste. This can be served warm or at room temperature. - Here are more recipes for enjoying Asian Noodles.

Cherry-Pomegranate Refrigerator Jam

May 7 2015 VegKitchen 

Cherry-Pomegranate Refrigerator JamThis flavorful combination of cherries and pomegranate juice is cleverly thickened into spreadable jam by using chia seeds. Theres nothing like spreading a little fiber, vitamins C, K, and B, calcium, melatonin, calcium, and potassium on your morning toast! Recipe and photo by Ann Oliverio, from   Crave, Eat, Heal: Plant-Based Whole Food Recipes to Satisfy Every Appetite* reprinted with permission (C) 2015 Front Table Books. Makes: 1 pint Prep time: 5 minutes or less Cook time: 15 to 20 minutes - 1 1/­­2 cups frozen sweet cherries - 1 cup 100% pomegranate juice - 1/­­4 cup chia seeds - 1/­­2 teaspoon fresh lemon juice - 1/­­2 teaspoon cherry-flavored liquid stevia - 1/­­4 teaspoon vanilla-flavored liquid stevia Put the cherries and the pomegranate juice in a small saucepan and bring to a boil. Turn the heat down and simmer the cherries for 15 to 20 minutes. Remove the cherry mixture from the heat and stir in the chia seeds, lemon juice, and stevia liquids. Allow the mixture to cool for a while before spooning into a pint-sized mason jar. Store in the refrigerator for up to 1 week. Variations - Use your favorite berry in place of the cherries. - Use your preferred sweetener to taste. - Use 2 teaspoon kuzu powder in place of the chia seeds.  Combine the powder with 4 teaspoons water, and stir this into the cherry-pomegranate mixture during the last 2 to 3 minutes of cooking.  


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