cabbage - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Hendrix College Serves Up First-Ever Hearty Meatless Monday Breakfast Spread

Sweet Potato and Lentil Mason Jar Salad

Poppyseed Dukkah-Stuffed Baked Apples with Coconut Caramel

Butternut Miso Soup with Arame and Wasabi










cabbage vegetarian recipes

Poppyseed Dukkah-Stuffed Baked Apples with Coconut Caramel

November 14 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Poppyseed Dukkah-Stuffed Baked Apples with Coconut Caramel Popping in really quickly today to share the recipe for this holiday table dessert contender – baked apples! These babies are fun to make and on the healthier side as far as desserts go, but still so satisfying and festive. They are taken up to that next level with the pockets of poppyseed dukkah cozied up inside each apple, as well as a crucial drizzle of homemade coconut caramel :D I first had the idea to make sweet dukkah (Egyptian spice and nut/­­seed mix, aka a condiment from heaven) a few years ago, when I wrapped it up in these Sweet Dukkah Cigars (which is another great dessert for coffee or tea time after a holiday meal). I do a mixture of walnuts and hazelnuts, sesame seeds, poppyseeds, aromatic spices, and dates. I especially love the combination of poppyseeds and caramel, so I upped them in this particular sweet dukkah recipe. The result: delicate, warm apples with a pleasant amount of fall-appropriate spice and crunch from the dukkah and delicate sweetness from the mandatory drizzle of coconut caramel. Some vanilla ice cream would be great on the side as well! Hope you enjoy these :) Poppyseed Dukkah-Stuffed Baked Apples with Coconut Caramel   Print Serves: 6 baked apples Ingredients for the baked apples 6 small honeycrisp apples juice from ½ lemon poppyseed dukkah (recipe below) 1½ cup apple cider rosemary, thyme or other aromatic herbs for infusing the cider (optional) olive oil - for drizzling coconut sugar - for sprinkling coconut caramel (recipe linked) for the poppyseed dukkah 1 cup raw hazelnuts or walnuts, or a mix of both ¼ cup sesame seeds 4 tablespoons poppy seeds 3 green cardamom pods - crushed in mortar and pestle, green shells removed ½ teaspoon coriander seeds 1 teaspoon cinnamon ½ teaspoon nutmeg 3 soft dates - pitted and chopped pinch of sea salt Instructions to make the baked apples Preheat oven to 350° F (180° C). Cut the top off each apple (refer to photos) and set aside. Carefully core the apples using a small knife or apple corer and drizzle the lemon juice over them. Generously stuff the apples with dukkah, piling it over the top. Close the apples with the apple tops and transfer the apples into a rimmed baking dish. Pour the apple cider over the apples and add the aromatic herbs to the bottom of the dish, where the cider accumulates, if using. Drizzle the apples with olive oil and sprinkle with coconut sugar. Bake for about 1 hour, until soft throughout, drizzling with the baking liquid every 15 minutes. Take care not to overbake the apples, as they might start coming apart at the seams. Let the apples cool just a bit and serve drizzled with the coconut caramel and sprinkled with more dukkah. A scoop of vanilla ice cream wouldnt hurt either :) to make the poppyseed dukkah Preheat oven to 350° F (180° C). Spread hazelnuts/­­walnuts on a baking sheet and toast for 5 minutes. Add sesame and poppy seeds and continue to toast for another 5 minutes. Remove from the oven. Toast the cardamom and coriander seeds in a pan over medium heat until fragrant, for about a minute or so. Finely grind in a mortar and pestle. Add the hazelnuts/­­walnuts to a bowl of a food processor and pulse a few times. Add the sesame and poppy seeds, cardamom, coriander, cinnamon, nutmeg, dates and salt to the food processor. Pulse to combine to the consistency of coarse bread crumbs. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Raw Green Mountain Parfait Lychee Sorbet and Marinated Rhubarb Compote Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut + Giveaway Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Bites .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Poppyseed Dukkah-Stuffed Baked Apples with Coconut Caramel appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Black Beans, Sweet Potatoes, Harissa

November 7 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Black Beans, Sweet Potatoes, Harissa We finally pulled together another meal plan! This ‘mini’ is very simple, seasonally-inspired, and will leave you with a bunch of nourishing food for the week. Everything starts out with a pot of black beans, a batch of roasted sweet potatoes, and a jar of homemade harissa (so easy to make, and such a flavor bomb ingredient!), which will then make their way into three interconnected savory meals and one snack. Ready? Menu - Roasted Sweet Potato and Black Bean Soup - No-Huevos Rancheros - Curried Cauliflower Rice and Beans - Harissa Black Bean Dip *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free, see the recipes for serving sizes Shopping List (Print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, its got all the ingredients youll need for the recipes in this meal plan mini. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Add whatever other ingredients you’ll need for the week here, if doing shopping for the whole week. Produce - 1 large head of garlic - 3 medium sweet potatoes - 3 large yellow onions - 1 large carrot - 2-4 celery ribs - 1 bunch kale (2 packed cups) - 3 limes - 2 lemons - 1 large bunch of cilantro - 2-3 avocados - 1/­­2 lb crimini mushrooms - 1 small head of red cabbage - 1 large head of cauliflower Bulk - 4 cups black beans - 2 cups Basmati rice - 3 large prunes Spices - black pepper - curry powder (1 tablespoon) - bay leaves - 8 dried chipotle chilis - whole caraway seeds - whole coriander seeds - whole cumin seeds - harissa paste – if not making your own Staples - neutral coconut oil or avocado oil - red wine vinegar - sea salt - tahini - kombu (optional) - balsamic vinegar (optional) Other - corn tortillas or other tortillas of choice - 8 sun-dried tomatoes Basic Prep 1) Cook the Black Beans Pot of Black Beans   Print Ingredients 4 cups black beans 2-3 garlic cloves - smashed 2-3 bay leaves 1 sheet of kombu (optional) sea salt Instructions Soak the beans overnight or up to 24 hours in plenty of purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar. Drain and rinse the beans. Place them in a large soup pot with plenty of purified water (about 10 cups). Add the garlic cloves, bay leaves and kombu, if using. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 30 minutes. Taste for doneness. If the beans are not completely soft and buttery inside, continue to cook until fully done. Salt at the last 10 minutes. Drain, saving the cooking liquid. Discard the bay leaves and kombu, if using. 3.5.3226   2) Cook the Rice Pot of Basmati Rice   Print Ingredients 2 cups basmati rice Instructions Cook 2 cups of basmati rice according to the instructions on the package (if your rice came in a package). Or cook the rice according the this method, or any other rice cooking method you prefer, like in a rice cooker, etc. You should end up with about 5-6 cups of cooked rice. 3.5.3226   3) Roast the Sweet Potatoes Roasted Sweet Potatoes   Print Ingredients 3 medium sweet potatoes avocado oil or other neutral oil of choice sea salt freshly ground black pepper Instructions Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare 2 parchment paper-covered baking trays. Peel and cube two of the sweet potatoes and place them on the trays. Sprinkle with avocado oil, salt and pepper, toss to cover and spread into a single layer. Leave the third sweet potato whole, just scrub it and prick with a fork, and place on one of the baking trays. Roast the sweet potatoes for 20-30 minutes, until the cubed ones are soft and browned in places. Toss at half time. The whole sweet potato will take a little longer to bake. Cook it until its easily pierced with a knife. Store the potatoes in an airtight container in the refrigerator. 3.5.3226   4) Make the Harissa (you can also buy harissa paste) Harissa   Print Adapted from Vibrant Food Serves: about 1 cup Ingredients 8 dried chipotle chilis 8 sun-dried tomatoes 1 tablespoon whole caraway seeds 1 tablespoon whole coriander seeds 1 tablespoon whole cumin seeds 1 large garlic clove - minced ¼ cup olive oil juice from ½ lemon 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 1 teaspoon sea salt Instructions Place the chipotle chilis and sun dried tomatoes in a medium bowl and cover with boiling water. Cover the bowl and let soften for about 30 minutes. Toast the caraway, coriander, and cumin seeds in a dry pan over medium heat until fragrant, about 2 minutes, stirring regularly. Grind the seeds using a spice grinder, dedicated coffee grinder, or mortar and pestle. Drain the chilis and sun-dried tomatoes. Remove the seeds and stems from the chilis (wear gloves to protect your hands if sensitive to spice). Place the chilis and sun-dried tomatoes in a food processor, add the toasted and ground spices, garlic, olive oil, lemon juice, vinegar, and salt. Process into a slightly chunky paste. Refrigerate in an air-tight container for up to 1 month. 3.5.3226   Recipes This soup is cozy and incredibly quick to put together once you’ve done all the prep. It gets its rich, earthy flavor from the black bean broth and harissa. Roasted sweet potatoes bring more depth and nourishment to the table, and kale provides a dose of dark leafy green magic. Roasted Sweet Potato and Black Bean Soup   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil or avocado oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped 1 large carrot - sliced 2-4 celery ribs - sliced thin 3 large prunes - chopped sea salt 3 garlic cloves - minced 3 cups cooked beans (from above) 3 teaspoons harissa or more to taste (from above) 5-6 cups black bean broth (from above) 2 cups packed chopped kale leaves 2 cups roasted sweet potatoes (from above) splash of balsamic vinegar (optional) juice of 1 lime cilantro - for garnish Instructions Warm the oil in a medium soup pot over medium heat. Add the onion, carrot, celery and prunes, and sauté for 8 minutes, until the vegetables are soft. Add salt and garlic, stir around for 1 minute. Add the beans, harissa and black bean broth, and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 30 minutes, until all the vegetables are completely cooked. Add the kale, sweet potatoes, splash of balsamic vinegar, if using, and more black bean broth, if needed. Bring back to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for another 10 minutes. Add the lime juice. Taste for salt and spice and adjust if needed. Serve over the prepped rice, garnished with cilantro. This soup freezes very well. 3.5.3226   This huevos rancheros-inspired dish utilizes crimini mushrooms, together with the already prepped black beans, sweet potatoes, and harissa, to make a delicious topping for warm tortillas. Everything comes together in a flash, and it’s a meal that can be easily eaten for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. No-Huevos Rancheros   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil or avocado oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped sea salt ½ lb crimini mushrooms - sliced 1½ cups cooked black beans (from above) harissa - to taste (from above) roasted sweet potatoes (from above) corn tortillas or other tortillas of choice - warmed or charred avocado - sliced or cubed shredded red cabbage - for garnish lime - for serving cilantro leaves - for garnish Instructions Warm the oil in a medium pan over medium heat. Add the onion and salt and sauté for 7 minutes, until translucent. Add mushrooms and sauté for 8-10 minutes, until all the liquid released by the mushrooms evaporates. Add the beans, harissa, and prepped sweet potatoes (amount to taste), and stir to incorporate and warm everything through. Serve the mushrooms and beans over tortillas, topped avocado, shredded red cabbage, a squeeze of lime, and cilantro. 3.5.3226   This re-imagined rice and beans recipe gets its bright flavor from the addition of curry, which is always great at providing a shortcut to flavor. It’s also full of cruciferous goodness from cauliflower, a little zing from lime, and some serious freshness from the essential topping of cilantro. Curried Cauliflower Rice And Beans   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil or avocado oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped 1 large cauliflower - chopped into small florets sea salt 5 garlic cloves 1 tablespoon curry powder, or more to taste 3 cups cooked black beans (from above) 3 cups cooked basmati rice (from above) juice of 1 lime cilantro - to garnish Instructions Warm the oil in a large saucepan. Add the onion, cauliflower and salt, and sauté for about 15-20 minutes, until the cauliflower is soft. Splash some water in the pan if things begin to stick. Add garlic and curry powder, and stir around for 1 minute. Add the beans and rice, and stir to mix everything together until warmed through. Pour the lime juice over top and stir to incorporate. Serve, garnished with cilantro. 3.5.3226   A flavorful dip is a great thing to have on hand at all times. It saves the day during snacking emergencies, but can also be spread on sandwiches and dolloped into bowls. Homemade dips are usually cheaper, healthier, and more flavorful than store-bought ones, and they’re easy to make. All of that is definitely the case with this black bean dip, which is made with the remaining, prep day black beans and whole baked sweet potato. If you happen to have any chipotle in adobo, those are a great addition to this dip as well. Harissa Black Bean Dip   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients the rest of the cooked black beans (from above, about 4 cups) 1 whole roasted sweet potato (from above) - peeled ¼ cup tahini juice from 1 lemon harissa (from above) - to taste sea salt black bean broth (from above) - for thinning, if needed Instructions Combine the beans, sweet potato, tahini, lemon juice, harissa, and sea salt to taste in a food processor and blend until smooth. Add some black bean broth if necessary to thin the dip out. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve, garnished with more harissa, toasted sesame seeds, and a drizzle of good olive oil. This dip freezes well if you end up with leftovers. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Sweet Potato and Kale Salad Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower Coconut-Ginger Eggplant Fried Rice Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Black Beans, Sweet Potatoes, Harissa appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Chow Mein

October 27 2018 VegKitchen 

Chow Mein Chow Mein is the Chinese dish par excellence. Chow means “fried” and mein means “noodles.” This dish was imported by the first Chinese migrants from Hong Kong to North America, and its one of the classic restaurant dishes that everyone loves! The “chow mein” is a Cantonese dish, in which noodles are accompanied by vegetables and topped with a base of soy sauce. This comforting dish will become a favorite of the whole family! Save Print Chow Mein Prep time:  15 mins Cook time:  20 mins Total time:  35 mins Serves: 4   Ingredients 100 g cooked udon or rice noodles 1 yellow pepper 1 cup sweet peas 1 large onion cut into strips 2 tablespoons garlic 1 tablespoon fresh ginger 1 carrot cut into strips 50 g sliced white cabbage 2 cloves garlic crushed 1 teaspoon grated ginger 4 tablespoons soy sauce 1 teaspoon vinegar 2 tablespoons maple syrup a little olive oil salt Instructions Put the olive oil in a hot pan. Add the onions. As soon as the onions start to brown, add the ginger and garlic (mix). Add peppers and sweet peas. Cook on high heat for 5 minutes . Add the cabbage, stir well, and cook for 2 […] The post Chow Mein appeared first on VegKitchen.

10 Best Vegan Restaurants - Boston

October 18 2018 VegKitchen 

10 Best Vegan Restaurants - Boston If youre a dedicated vegan, where do you go to eat when in Boston? The city is swimming with art and culture, but does its culinary scene have the range to satisfy someone on a plant-based diet? You wont be surprised to learn that the city has some of the countrys best vegan restaurants. Boston has a lot to offer. From your basic veggie bowls to fine dining, this city has no shortage of culinary delights. Check out the best vegan restaurants Boston has to offer. If you havent gone vegan yet, these restaurants just might convince you. 1. Whole Heart Provisions If youre craving a veggie bowl, Whole Heart Provisions has you covered. With two convenient locations and a third soon to be open in Harvard Square, Whole Heart is providing Boston with yummy plant-based meals no matter where you are in the city. Check out one of their signature bowls, like the Kaya Special. The bowl is packed with veggie goodness like red cabbage slaw and roasted broccoli. You can also challenge your creativity and make your own bowl. There are a few places to dine in, but if youre new to the city, you can grab something […] The post 10 Best Vegan Restaurants - Boston appeared first on VegKitchen.

ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

August 29 2018 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on KickstarterThe Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA just launched on Kickstarter! watch the video: PRE-ORDER the ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2NrnNXl This year I traveled to Ethiopia in the weeks before Easter - one of several special times of fasting, when the majority of the country eats entirely vegan! I explored the central cities, traveled overland to the north, went trekking in the highlands and stayed with families in remote villages. As with all my travels and culinary research, I am extremely grateful for the privilege to learn, share & exchange, and be guided & supported by many families and professional cooks who invited me in their kitchens and shared amazing meals with me. Since returning to Berlin, I’ve been cooking Ethiopian and Eritrean food practically non-stop, recreating recipes and dishes, constantly inviting friends and guests to my cooking studio for lunch and dinner parties. Abebech showing me traditional village cooking in the Ethiopian Highlands. Making Injera for the first time in Ethiopia The Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA is my newest cookbook with original recipes, artwork, photography and stories inspired by these latest culinary adventures. It includes over 70 recipes based on the mouth-watering meals in bustling cities & towns, at road-stop eateries, and in rural highland villages. As with my previous 5 cookbooks, I have written, illustrated, cooked, photographed, and designed this book myself. The Lotus and the Artichoke is the ultimate combination of my passions: art, travel, vegan cooking, and photography. The ETHIOPIA Cookbook at a glance: - My 6th cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide - 140 pages with 70+ recipes and over 60 full-page color photos - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by my travels and culinary adventures in East Africa - Also based on experiences with international communities of Europe (London, Paris, and Berlin) and North America (Philadelphia, New York, and Washington D.C.) and over 25 years of vegan cooking - Ethiopian & Eritrean classics, familiar restaurant & family favourites, delicious delights, wonders & surprises, and creative culinary experiments - Discover new flavors, tasty spices, and cooking skills - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients (Cook everything, anywhere!) - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Doro Wat – spicy seitan stew Spinach Dinach Butecha – Chickpea “Egg” Salad Minchet Abish – spicy soy mince & walnuts Duba Wot – pumpkin stew Shimbra Asa – chickpea “fish” Asa (Jackfruit) Tibs Fosolia – green beans & carrots Pizza Lalibela Ingudai Tibs – spicy mushrooms Shepherd’s Pie – lentil filling & mashed potato topping Ambasha – sweet bread Recipes in The Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA - Traditional Berbere spice mix (simple + advanced) - Nitir Qibe – spiced butter/­­oil - Mitmita – extra hot spice mix - Yewot Qimen – black pepper spice mix - Shiro – chickpea/­­bean spice mix - Data (Yekarya Delleh) – roasted chili, garlic, onion & herb sauce - Traditional Injera – Ethiopian sourdough crepe - Quick Injera - Ambasha - sweet raisin bread - Doro Dabo – baked stuffed bread - Difo Dabo - spiced bread - Pizza Lalibela - with tomato sauce & roasted potato topping - Sambosa – savory pastry with lentil filling - Senig Karia – roasted spicy stuffed chilies - Injera Firfir – traditional flatbread with spicy tomato sauce - Yesuf Fitfit – chopped injera & lemon sunflower seed dressing - Kita (Injekita) – sweet breakfast flatbread & jam - Chornake /­­ Pasty – fried bread - Genfo – roasted wheat & barley porridge - Selata - super simple salad - Selata Delux - with mango, dates, avocado mixed greens & lentils - Butecha - chickpea “egg” salad - Selata Timtim - tomato salad - Selata Dinich - potato salad - Selata Bekarot - carrot salad - Telba - roasted flax dressing - Shiro Wot - chickpea puree - Misir Wot – red lentils - Doro Wot – spicy seitan - Soy Tibs - spicy soymeat strips - Ingudai Wot - spicy mushrooms - Bamia - spicy okra - Minchet Abish - spicy soy mince & walnuts - Shimbra Asa – spicy chickpea “fish” - Kik Alicha – yellow lentils - Atakilt Alicha – cabbage, carrots & potatoes - Keysir - beet root - Duba Alicha - pumpkin stew - Tikr Gomen - greens with garlic - Spinach Dinich - spinach & roasted potatoes - Fosolia – green beans & carrots - Asa Tibs – lemon pepper jackfruit fritters - Tofu Alicha - batter fried tofu in mild garlic & onion sauce - Ingudai Alicha – mushrooms w/­­ creamy cashew, lemon, pepper, thyme, parsley - Peppers & Potatoes - garlic ginger stir-fry - Inkulal Firfir – spicy tofu scramble & tomatoes - Ful – fava beans - Ayib – cottage cheese - Bedergan – roasted eggplant - Vegetable Lentil Soup - Vegetable Pasta – spaghetti with mixed chopped vegetables - Macaroni Firfir – noodles with garlic onion tomato sauce on injera - Shepherd’s Pie – lentil filling & mashed potato topping - Ethiopian Mashed Potatoes - Traditional Coffee Ceremony - Spiced Black Tea - Roiboos tea with lemon, ginger &cardamon - Mango Moringa Banana Smoothie - Injera w/­­ dates - Banana Bread - Fasting Muffins - Rooibos Tea Ice Cream Video: Justin P. Moore Music: Nils Kercher Nanfulle from Ancient Intimations (live) (C)2016 Ancient Pulse Music PRE-ORDER the ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2NrnNXl The post ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

10 Cooling Vegan Recipes for August

August 14 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

10 Cooling Vegan Recipes for AugustThe hot humid weather is back in full force and so is my desire for quick and easy meal solutions. On hot days like the ones weve been having lately, I prefer to do any cooking that needs to be done early in the morning to save me from heating up the kitchen later in the day. Today, I’ve put together a list of some of my favorite vegan recipes for the blisteringly hot days of August. 10 Cooling Vegan Recipes August Cucumber and White Bean Ceviche - Traditionally made with raw fish or scallops, I like to make this lime-marinated salad from Peru with cucumbers and white beans for a nice contrast of refreshingly crisp and creamy. Fire and Ice Sesame Noodles - The evocative name refers to the heat from the sriracha and the cold since I usually serve this dish chilled. You can serve it at room temperature, if you prefer, but fire and room temperature just doesnt have the same ring to it. Indonesian Gado Gado - Gado-Gado is an Indonesian main-dish salad of raw and cooked vegetables tossed with a spicy peanut sauce. The flavor improves with time, so plan on making this crunchy salad the day before you need it. Bánh M? Tostadas - East meets West in this tasty fusion combo. Tostada means toasted in Spanish and is the name of a Mexican dish in which a toasted tortilla is the base for other ingredients that top it. Bánh m? is a popular Vietnamese sandwich that features crisp pickled vegetables, fragrant cilantro, chiles, and zesty hoisin and sriracha sauces. Soba Slaw - Plus - The Soba Slaw in Quick-Fix Vegan, with its chewy noodles and crunchy cabbage and carrots, is a nice refreshing salad on its own. To make it a heartier meal, however, I usually add some cooked shelled edamame or some diced baked tofu, and a little sriracha sauce to give it some heat. Chilled Glass Noodles with Snow Peas and Baked Tofu - This light but satisfying salad should be prepared at least 30 minutes ahead of time for the best flavor. Made from mung bean flour, glass noodles are also called cellophane noodles, bean thread noodles, and harusame. English Garden Salad- Little gem lettuce has spoiled me for other types of lettuce--its everything we love about butter and romaine lettuce, all in one compact little head-- and its perfect for this English Garden Salad. Chickpeas Nicoise - One of my favorite flavor combos is the one found in a Nicoise Salad:  the melding of creamy potatoes, fresh green beans, sweet tomatoes, and piquant olives hits all the right flavor notes. Watermelon Paletas- These watermelon popsicles make a refreshing end to a spicy meal or a cooling snack on a hot day. Pina Colada Squares -  These no-bake treats arent too sweet if you use unsweetened coconut. The post 10 Cooling Vegan Recipes for August appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Smoky Chipotle Black Bean & Roasted Sweet Potato Tacos

January 8 2018 Meatless Monday 

Black beans and sweet potatoes are a perfect pair and this taco recipe amps up their flavor with mushrooms, avocados and high-impact seasonings like chipotle powder and bitter orange marinade (often found in the international aisle). This recipe comes to us from Maribel of Food 4 Thought NYC. Serves 4, 2 tacos each - 1 can of black beans, rinsed - 1 medium sweet potato, peeled and diced - 1 cup of diced bella mushrooms - 1 cup shredded cabbage - 1 avocado, sliced - 1/­­2 red bell pepper, chopped - 1 bunch fresh cilantro, cleaned and trimmed - 8 white corn tortillas - 2 tbsp. of olive oil, separated - 2 large cloves of garlic, minced - 1 tbsp. of tomato paste - 1 tbsp. of naranja agria (bitter orange) marinade (substitute lime juice if unavailable) - 2 tsp. of salt, separated - 1/­­2 tsp ground cayenne - 1 tsp ground chipotle powder - 1/­­2 tbsp. dried oregano - 1/­­2 tsp. garlic powder - Freshly ground black pepper Preheat oven to 400°F. Line a small rimmed baking sheet with foil, add sweet potatoes, 1 tbsp. of oil, 1 tsp of salt, cayenne, and freshly ground black pepper; mix well. Place sheet in oven and bake for approximately 20 minutes or until potatoes are golden and tender. While potatoes are baking, heat remaining oil in a skillet over medium flame. Cook the minced garlic for 1-2 minutes, but be careful not to burn them otherwise youll end up with a bitter flavor. Add mushrooms and red peppers, stirring occasionally for 3-5 minutes. Once the veggies have softened, throw in the rinsed beans along with the paste, salt, chipotle, oregano, garlic powder, and black pepper. Mix everything together and allow it to cook for 8-10 minutes. About halfway through, add the bitter orange marinade (or lime juice). Remove from heat. Make sure you have all of your taco toppings ready on the side for easy prep. Turn on a burner to low-medium flame. Working with one tortilla at a time, carefully place it over the flame using tongs. Once you see the edges darken and it puffs up in the center, then flip it over. Cook each side for about 1-2 minutes. Place on serving plate. Spoon about 1 tbsp. of black bean and mushrooms, along with 1 tbsp. of sweet potatoes on each tortilla. Top with sliced cabbage, avocado, and a small handful of cilantro. Squeeze a bit of lime juice on top if you have it, or just enjoy it as is. The post Smoky Chipotle Black Bean & Roasted Sweet Potato Tacos appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Grapefruit Radicchio Salad

December 25 2017 Meatless Monday 

Pecans are candied in a skillet with caramelized sugar, then seasoned slightly savory with smoked paprika and salt. These salty sweet nuts are the perfect accent to sit atop this salad of hearty cabbage, spicy radicchio and tart grapefruit. This recipe comes to us from Amy of Cooking with Amy. Serves 4 - 1/­­4 cup pecans, chopped - 2 teaspoons sugar - 1/­­8 teaspoon smoked paprika - a pinch of salt - 2 cups radicchio, shredded - 1 cup Napa cabbage, shredded - 1 grapefruit - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 1 teaspoon white wine vinegar Toss the pecans with the sugar and 1 teaspoon of water in a small bowl. Transfer the pecans to a small frying pan over medium-high heat. Cook, stirring constantly, for 2-3 minutes, or until the sugar gets very brown. Take the pan off of heat and sprinkle with the smoked paprika and a pinch of salt. Stir well, taking care to ensure the nuts are separated, and let the pecans cool in the pan. Toss the radicchio and cabbage together in a medium sized bowl. Peel the grapefruit with a knife. Cut between the membranes to remove only the segments and drop the grapefruit segments into the bowl. Squeeze the remaining grapefruit juice from the membranes and peel onto the cabbage and grapefruit segments. Add the olive oil and vinegar to the cabbage and grapefruit, taking care to toss to ensure the dressing is evenly distributed. Divide the salad into 4 servings, top with the candied pecans and enjoy! The post Grapefruit Radicchio Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Self-Care Interview Series: Sasha Swerdloff

December 10 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Sasha Swerdloff Sasha Swerdloff is a Certified Ayurvedic Consultant and blogger at Tending the Table, where she shares plant-based recipes and writes about sustainability, health, and wellness. We love Sasha’s thoughtful approach to cooking, breathtaking photography, and Ayurvedic advice. In this interview, Sasha tells us about her morning, bedtime and exercise routines, as well as self-care as a type of non-violence, addressing the root cause of health-related imbalances, the breathing technique she uses during stressful times, skincare, nourishment, yoga, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Routine is super important for me. Without it I tend to feel scattered, flustered and irritable. I think this has a lot to do with my constitution. I know that I tend to struggle with uncertainty so having a routine makes me feel a little more in control and a little less terrified. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I usually wake up around 7am, do my morning stuff (scrape my tongue, do neti, wash my face etc.) then try to drink a big mug of hot lemon water. I like to listen to NPR and snuggle on the couch with my pups while I drink my morning matcha latte. Then I do yoga before making breakfast. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Ive struggled with insomnia a fair amount but paying attention to my stress level and having a solid bedtime routine has helped a lot. A hot bath and self massage with plenty of herbal oil especially on my head works wonders. I also really love sipping on some warm almond milk with spices before bed. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast - Sautéed greens, a fried egg from the chicken ladies in the backyard, and sourdough toast. Lunch - Soup or a big bowl of roasted veggies with some sort of cooked grain, some protein, and a half an avocado. Snack - Apple and almond butter Dinner - Soup, roasted veggies, salads, veggie tacos with beans, roasted sweet potato, cabbage slaw and avocado. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Ive never been able to drink coffee or black tea without getting super jittery but it took me years to finally listen to what my body was telling me. Instead of coffee I drink a matcha latte with almond milk and raw honey every morning. --  Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? Not having sweet stuff around is the only way to stop me from eating a whole bar of chocolate or way too many cookies. --  Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? Im not a fan of taking lots of herbs or supplements for long periods of time. Its easy to take a pill but its a lot harder to address the root cause of an issue and make diet and lifestyle changes to address that imbalance. In the long term though, addressing the root cause through diet and lifestyle is a whole lot more affordable and leads to long term results. I do take Ashwagandha and Vit D regularly to support my nervous system and to keep me sane through the dark winters here in Seattle. Exercise --  Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I try to practice at least an hour of yoga daily. I also walk a fair amount and jog every once in a while. In the winter I cross country ski as much as I can. Ive noticed that the forms of exercise I enjoy most incorporate some sort of rhythmic, repetitive motion which I find to be super calming and meditative. Also, any time I can get outside Im happy. --  Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? Both. There are days when I dont exercise or get outside but I try to not beat myself up about it. Its too easy to get into a pattern of negativity and its much more beneficial long term to practice having compassion for yourself. The things that motivate me to get on my mat each day are my physical and mental health, someone else (my husband) holding me accountable, and the respect and admiration I have for my yoga teacher and the Ashtanga lineage. Beauty --  What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Confidence is beautiful to me. I feel more beautiful when I stand up straight and hold my head high. Im slowly learning that its less about how I look and more about how I feel. --  What is your skincare approach – face and body? My skin has always been sensitive and problematic and Ive always had negative body image issues associated with it. Im finally starting to get a handle on it by going off of hormonal birth control and eliminating sugar and dairy. I also have a pretty strict routine that helps keep my skin free from breakouts. In the morning I wash my face with warm water and moisturize with January Labs Revitalizing Day Cream or Osmia Organics Purely Simple Face Cream . In the evening I cleanse and exfoliate with Beauty Counters Charcoal Cleansing Bar and the Clarisonic skin brush then moisturize with grapeseed oil and Living Libations Dew Dab which helps prevent breakouts and combat hyper pigmentation. In the summer I spritz my face with rose water to help me cool down. --  Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I started taking a zinc supplement a few months ago for my skin and it has helped a ton. Overall though, I notice that cutting out sugar and dairy from my diet makes the biggest difference. --  Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Like I said before, for me, diet makes a huge difference. But I also love my Clarisonic skin brush. It seems like a weird gadget but it has made all the difference for me. Stress, etc. --  If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Making sure not to get too over stimulated or overcommitted helps me stay grounded but if I do get spun out I practice Nadi shodhana breathing and take some Anxiety Soother to take the edge off. I also like to do Yoga Nidra . Getting some fresh air and planting my feet on the ground or pulling out the watercolors always helps too. --  What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I usually mega dose on Echinacea and Sambu Guard then take a hot bath and bundle up. I also try to slow down since for me, colds are often the result of stress. If I slow down my body can usually heal itself. Motivation --  Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I like to think about yoga philosophy and the eight limbs. The first limb is yama. The yamas are a set of five precepts that help us interact with the world in an ethical manner. The first yama is ahimsa or non-violence. This means non-violence towards all living things, including ourselves,  in thoughts, words and actions. For me self-care is a type of non-violence towards my physical and mental being. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I take a break from whatever it is that Im struggling with and do something else to clear my mind. Knowledge --  What was your path to studying Ayurveda and yoga and how do you incorporate that knowledge into your everyday?  I first learned about Ayurveda from my yoga teacher, Christine Hoar . I had been practicing yoga with her for a year or so and was struggling with some health problems so decided to do an Ayurvedic consultation with her to see what she could recommend. Her simple diet and lifestyle recommendations completely changed things for me. I felt like all of a sudden, all of the issues I had struggled with throughout my life made sense and fit into a bigger picture of who I am. I continued studying Ayurveda with Christine and then after college completed an Ayurvedic Certification program and Kripalu. For me, Ayurveda provides a framework from which to view the world and my place in it. Im constantly thinking about the qualities of the foods I eat and the things I do or experience from an Ayurvedic perspective. Ayurveda helps me understand and take control of my health. --  Do you practice a certain type of yoga, and why did you choose that particular branch?  I practice Ashtanga Yoga. I sort of stumbled into it. A college friend told me about a summer special at a nearby studio and suggested I sign up. I did and I went to class there every day for a month. After the month was up I just kept going. I was hooked. I think a big part of why Ive stuck with Ashtanga is because of my teacher. Shes pretty incredible and has been a huge influence in my life. The method of Ashtanga also really resonates with me. I enjoy the repetition, the meditative quality of the breath, the focus and concentration required, the rigor of it and the tradition. --  Do you have any recommendations for someone who wants to establish a daily yoga practice but doesnt know where to begin? Find a teacher you connect with. Finding the motivation to practice on your own is challenging but if you have a teacher you admire and respect and a community of fellow students who are counting on you, youll show up every day. --  Your recipes are so beautiful, approachable and inventive. What is your process when it comes to developing recipes? Thank you! Sometimes Im inspired by meals Ive had while travelling but mostly I draw inspiration from whatever produce I have on hand. I love combining flavors and experimenting with spices and herbs to elevate something simple and make it unique. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Im excited to be incorporating more Ayurveda and wellness themes into my work. Its a big part of my life and I want to share it with others so they can feel empowered to heal themselves. Ill be teaching my first Ayurvedic workshop in the Spring here in Seattle which should be a lot of fun. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I love a good pedicure or a trip to the Korean spa for a soak and body scrub. But more often I find myself going for a walk or taking myself out to tea if I need a boost. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book - Mary Oliver New and Selected Poems Song/­­Album - No Hard Feelings The Avett Brothers Piece of Art -  Satsuki Shibuya -- What are your favorite places to eat in Seattle? We dont eat out all that often, but when we do we usually head to Delancey , Seawolf , The Whale Wins or Frankie and Jos . -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? -Earplugs – Anxiety Soother -A headlamp -Licorice tea -A big scarf – Lip balm -A snack (always) -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Jessie Snyder of Faring Well Photos by Sasha Swerdloff and Renee Byrd You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Sasha Swerdloff appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

cabbage manchurian recipe | dry cabbage veg manchurian recipe

October 21 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

cabbage manchurian recipe | dry cabbage veg manchurian recipecabbage manchurian recipe | dry cabbage veg manchurian recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. one of the popular street food recipes which can be served as a sides dish or as a starters. the taste resembles very similar to veg manchurian recipe, but cabbage fritters are on more crispier side. it tastes great when served with veg hot and sour soup or schezwan fried rice. Continue reading cabbage manchurian recipe | dry cabbage veg manchurian recipe at Hebbar's Kitchen.

spring roll noodles recipe | how to make noodles spring roll recipe

October 10 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

spring roll noodles recipe | how to make noodles spring roll recipespring roll noodles recipe | how to make noodles spring roll recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. traditionally spring roll recipes are native to chinese cuisine and is mainly prepared with cabbage leaves. these savoury rolls are mainly served as appetizer with along with fried rice or noodles soup recipe. Continue reading spring roll noodles recipe | how to make noodles spring roll recipe at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Veggie Tray Extra Everything

October 1 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Veggie Tray Extra Everything We’ve got a small, square shaped wooden table with three chairs + a highchair in our kitchen. I bought the table when I moved to my first 1-bedroom apartment and it was perfect for that tiny space. Back then I only had two chairs and the table mostly carried pasta dishes and red wine glasses. Eighteen years, four apartments and three children later, we still eat most our meals on it. It is honestly not very pretty and its wine stains are now mixed with blueberries, turmeric, coconut and all the stains, smudges and scratches that come from years of feeding babies. Because it is square shaped and we are five in the family, Luise or I end up either eating our meals standing up or snugged on an extra chair on a corner. Its a small but pretty striking symbol that: A) I am too sentimental about my furniture. B) We werent entirely prepared for how life with three children would be. I wrote a little text on Instagram about this. That behind glossy photos of food, travels and a kitchen that on good days looks picture perfect, we are still trying to figure out life. And find somewhere to sit. The plan is to get a round table that hopefully both will fit into the kitchen and have seats for the entire family. But until then, I’ll keep eating standing up. I first shared this recipe/­­method about a week ago on Instagram stories (hence the poor image quality above) and judging from the number of direct messages in my inbox, I thought I’d post an more outlined version here as well. We cannot get enough of tray bake dinners in our family. They are simply one of the easiest and most delicious weekday solutions we know and this recipe represents much of what we love about food. Easy to make, easy to like, easy to adapt. It combines warm and cold and sweet and savory. It is vegetable centered, comforting and leaves a minimum of dishes. And the kids like it too. Our twist is that we add lots of fresh ingredients to the tray once it’s ready in the oven; yogurt, pesto, lettuce, spinach, black beans and pomegranate seeds. They add texture and make it feel more like a proper meal. Some days we act like adults and put plates on the table. Other days we just stick the kids a fork each and we all eat from the same tray (sorry mum!). Weve shared the recipe exactly as we made it last week but weve also included a list of variations below the recipe. So don’t get hung up on any specific ingredients, simply use this more as a starting point. The important thing in this recipe is the combination of roasted ingredients + fresh veggies + fruit + something creamy. I hope you give it a try. All-in-One Veggie Tray We wrote a similar recipe for the September issue of Jamie Magazine. We added raw spiralized vegetables (makes it even prettier!) and halloumi instead of yogurt. We add kale and Brussels sprouts midway through roasting since they need less time. The goal is that they will be perfectly crunchy at the same time as the other vegetables are ready. It can be a little tricky to time it right on your first try but second time around you usually get the hang of it. Warm ingredients 1 kg /­­ 2 lbs potatoes 3-4 carrots, peeled 1 broccoli  250 g /­­ 1/­­2 lb Brussels sprouts 3-4 large kale leaves olive oil Cold ingredients 2 handfuls baby spinach 1 avocado 1 cup cooked black beans yogurt pesto (you can thin it out with a little olive oil) lemon Cut potato, carrots and broccoli into bite-sized pieces. Add to a large tray and drizzle with oil and salt. Bake at 200°C /­­ 400°F for approx. 15-20 minutes. Cut the Brussels sprouts in halves. Trim off the thick stalks from the kale and tear the leaves into smaller pieces. Drizzle with oil and salt, add to the tray and bake for 10-15 minutes more or so. The vegetables are ready when they are golden and tender and the kale chips are crunchy. Scatter baby spinach, sliced (or mashed) avocado, black beans, dollops of yogurt and pesto evenly over the vegetables. Squeeze over a little lemon and drizzle with oil. Dig in! Variations Roasted ingredients: Carrots /­­ Broccoli /­­ Cauliflower /­­ Cabbage /­­ Sweet potato /­­ Bell pepper /­­ Brussels Sprouts /­­ Kale /­­ Potatoes /­­ Parsnip /­­ Beetroot Fresh ingredients: Lettuce /­­ Aragula /­­ Spinach /­­ Avocado /­­ Cucumber /­­ Cherry Tomatoes /­­ Spiralized Carrots, Beetroot or Zucchini Fruit: Apple /­­ Orange /­­ Pear /­­ Pomegranate Seeds /­­ Grapes Sauce: Yogurt /­­ Tahini /­­ Pesto /­­ Romesco /­­ Hummus /­­ Dijon Vinaigrette /­­ Coleslaw Extra: Nuts /­­ Seeds /­­ Beans /­­ Boiled eggs /­­ Halloumi cheese /­­ Feta Cheese /­­ Goat’s Cheese

Cabbage Pakora (Bhajia)

September 21 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Cabbage Pakoras Cabbage Pakoras or Crispy Cabbage Fritters are a great any time snack. They especially taste delicious when they are served with Chutney and hot cup of tea. They are also easy and quick to make. Surprise your guests and treat them with these mouthwatering crispy cabbage pakoras. - 3 cup thinly sliced cabbage (patta gobhee) - 1 cup besan (gram flour) - 1/­­4 cup rice flour - 1 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 2 tsp coriander powder (dhania) - 1/­­2 tsp red chili powder (lal mirch) - 1 tsp salt - 1/­­8 tsp asafetida (hing) - 2 Tbsp chopped cilantro (hara dhania) - 1 Tbsp thinly sliced green chilie (adjust to taste) - Also need oil to fry - Combine all the dry ingredients, to cabbage besan, rice flour, cumin seeds, coriander, red pepper, salt, asafetida, cilantro, and green chili in a bowl. Mix it well. Add water as needed, mixture consistency should be of sticky soft dough. - Heat at least one inch of oil in a frying pan over medium high heat. To test, put one drop of batter in the oil. The batter should float and not change color instantly. - Place about one tablespoon of mix holding with your fingers into the oil. Do not overlap the pakoras. - Fry the pakoras in small batches; after you turn the pakoras one time press the pakoras lightly. - This will take five to six minutes per batch. Fry the pakoras, turning occasionally, until both sides are golden brown. - Repeat this process for the remaining batches. - The crispy, delicious Cabbage Pakoras are now ready to serve. Tips If the oil is too hot the pakoras will not be crisp; if the oil is not hot enough, the pakoras will be greasy. The post Cabbage Pakora (Bhajia) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Easy Black Bean Burritos

September 18 2017 Meatless Monday 

These burritos are so delicious, youll want to eat them every night - and theyre so easy to make, that you can! Here, canned black bean soup, seasoned with onions, pepper and extra virgin olive oil, get a kick of flavor from smoky chipotle chiles. The beans are stuffed into burritos with tender rice, crisp cabbage, creamy avocado, tangy pico de gallo and lime juice. The result is the perfect meal, all wrapped up into one delicious pouch. This recipe comes to us courtesy of our friends at Goya. Support their “Can Do” campaign in September and October by using their red label black bean soup for this recipe and help support Feeding America and local food banks. Serves 8 - 3 cans (15 oz. each) black bean soup - 1 chipotle chile, finely chopped, plus 1 tbsp. sauce from 1 can (7 oz.) chipotle chiles in adobo sauce - 1 pkg. (20 oz.) large flour tortillas, warmed according to package instructions - 3 cups cooked extra long grain rice - 4 cups shredded cabbage - 2 avocados, chopped (about 2 cups) - 1 cup mild chunky salsa, drained - 2 limes, juiced (about 2 tbsp.) Add black bean soup, chopped chipotle chile and sauce to small pot over medium heat; bring soup to boil. Reduce heat to low; simmer, stirring occasionally, until bean mixture thickens, about 10 minutes. Assemble burritos: To center of tortilla, add about 1/­­3 cup cooked rice, 1/­­2 cup beans with sauce, 1/­­2 cup shredded cabbage, 1/­­4 cup chopped avocado, 2 tbsp. salsa and 1 tsp. lime juice. To roll up tortilla into burrito shape, fold in left and right ends of tortilla. Then, holding the closed ends, fold tortilla in half from bottom to top. Using the top layer of tortilla, push filling towards you to compact. Roll tortilla into log and wrap in foil to secure. Repeat with remaining ingredients; serve. The post Easy Black Bean Burritos appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Caribbean Greens and Beans Soup

October 16 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Caribbean Greens and Beans SoupThis Caribbean Greens and Beans Soup is inspired by a delicious Jamaican soup made with callaloo (taro) leaves in a light coconut broth. My version calls for the more readily available spinach, although cabbage, kale, or chard may be used instead. The soup has a nice heat from the jalape?os, but you can omit them for a milder flavor or increase them if you want more heat. Caribbean Greens and Beans Soup This soup is inspired by a delicious Jamaican soup made with callaloo (taro) leaves in a light coconut broth. My version calls for the more readily available spinach, although cabbage, kale, or chard may be used instead. The soup has a nice heat from the jalape?os, but you can omit them for a milder flavor or increase them if you want more heat. - 1 tablespoon (15 ml) olive oil or 1/­­4 cup (60 ml) water - 1 medium-size red onion, chopped - 3 garlic cloves, chopped - 2 medium-size sweet potatoes, peeled and diced - 1 medium-size red bell pepper, seeded and chopped - 1 or 2 jalape?os or other hot chiles, seeded and minced - 1 can (14.5 ounces, or 410 g) of diced tomatoes, drained - 1 1/­­2 cups (266 g) cooked dark red kidney beans or 1 can (15.5 ounces, or 440 g) of dark red kidney beans, rinsed and drained - 4 cups (950 ml) vegetable broth - 2 teaspoons fresh thyme or 1 teaspoon dried thyme -  1/­­4 teaspoon ground allspice - Salt and freshly ground black pepper - 9 ounces (255 g) baby spinach - 1 can (13.5 ounces, or 380 ml) of unsweetened coconut milk - Heat the olive oil or water in a pot over medium-high heat. Add the onion and sauté for 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute longer. Add the sweet potatoes, bell pepper, jalape?o, tomatoes, and beans. Stir in the broth, thyme, and allspice and season to taste with salt and pepper. Bring to a boil and then reduce the heat to a simmer and cook until the vegetables are tender, about 30 minutes. - Stir in the spinach and coconut milk, stirring to wilt the spinach. Taste and adjust the seasonings. Cook for 5 to 10 minutes longer to wilt the spinach and blend the flavors. Taste and adjust the seasonings if needed. Serve hot. From One-Dish Vegan by Robin Robertson (C) 2018 Quarto Publishing Group USA Inc. Used with permission. The post Caribbean Greens and Beans Soup appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Cilantro-Jicama Slaw with Lime-Orange Dressing

August 21 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Cilantro-Jicama Slaw with Lime-Orange Dressing A relative of the sweet potato, jicamas taste similarly to water chestnuts and can be eaten raw or cooked. They are especially good in this sprightly Cilantro-Jicama Slaw. To save the time, you can use a julienne peeler to cut the jicama, or even shred it, if you prefer. Cilantro-Jicama Slaw with Lime-Orange Dressing A relative of the sweet potato, jicamas taste similarly to water chestnuts and can be eaten raw or cooked. They are especially good in this sprightly slaw. To save the time, you can use a julienne peeler to cut the jicama, or even shred it, if you prefer. - 1/­­4 cup freshly squeezed lime juice - 1 tablespoon orange marmalade - 1 teaspoon finely grated lime zest - 1 teaspoon agave nectar - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 4 cups shredded cabbage - 1 jicama, peeled and cut into thin matchsticks - 1 large carrot, shredded - 1/­­2 cup chopped fresh cilantro - In a small bowl, combine the lime juice, marmalade, lime zest, agave, and salt. Mix well, then whisk in the oil and set aside. - In a large bowl, combine the cabbage, jicama, carrot, and cilantro. Pour on the dressing and toss gently to combine. Taste and adjust the seasonings, if needed. This recipe is from Vegan Without Borders (C) Robin Robertson, 2014, Andrews McMeel Publishing, photo by Sara Remington.   The post Cilantro-Jicama Slaw with Lime-Orange Dressing appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Sweet Potato Sandwiches

February 9 2018 My New Roots 

Sweet Potato Sandwiches Necessity is the mother of invention, and when youre missing all of your kitchen equipment, you get creative. Weve been living out of a single suitcase for some months now, and although I have found a couple of major necessities in the mountain of unpacked moving boxes, I havent been able to locate my silicon loaf pan. As someone who makes the Life Changing Loaf of Bread on the reg, its been a challenge living without, but a stellar opportunity to come up with bread alternatives that dont involve a lot of ingredients or special equipment. As I was chopping up some sweet potato for a soup a couple of weeks ago, it dawned on me: what if I cut the sweet potato the other way and turned it into a slice of bread?! It was just crazy enough to work. And it did. Ever since then, Ive been roasting sweet potato slices once a week, keeping them in my fridge and having a sandwich-like-thing when the mood strikes. Its delicious! Not to mention wildly satisfying and so easy to make. Ive experimented with different herbs and spices on the sweet potatoes, using special salts, and even drizzling with flavoured oils once theyre out of the oven. So far, Im digging smoked salt and garlic powder, but the cinnamon, ginger, and cardamom combo was a close second at breakfast, smeared with chunky hazelnut butter.    The spread Ive come up with as a pairing to this sandwich sitch, is a horseradish and beetroot schmear. Partly because I like saying the word schmear, but mostly because its incredible in combination with the sweet potatoes. Its earthy, spicy, and complex - a great counterpoint to the sweetness of the spuds. I also like the texture difference: the sweet potatoes are so smooth and creamy, while the beet schmear is chunky and toothsome. If youve never had fresh horseradish before, be prepared to be blown away! This stuff is so, so special and delicious, I have no idea why its such an under-utilized root veggie. A part of the Brassicaceae family, horseradish shares ties with mustard, broccoli, cabbage, and wasabi. In fact, most commercially-available wasabi is made of horseradish (along with mustard, starch, and green food dye) since wasabi is challenging to grow and therefore much more expensive. But that familiar and addictive rush of sinus-clearing pleasure-pain? Thats the action of isothiocyanate, the compound found in wasabi, horseradish, and strong mustard that gives off heat when crushed, grated, or chewed. This stuff tends to mellow out once it hits the air, which is why horseradish snobs (they exist!) insist on grating it fresh. In the case of my schmear here, it will still taste delish a day or two after youve made it, but you may want to grate a little fresh over the top for a boost. Its the best way to clear out those nasal cavities this side of a neti pot! Horseradish has been used as powerful winter medicine for hundreds of years. Widely recognized for its expectorant capabilities, it is incredibly effective at removing mucus, and aiding with bronchial and lung disorders. Horseradish is a good source of vitamin C and zinc, two key players in immune system support, so consuming it in the colder months will help ward off the seasonal bugs flying around. For sore throats and coughs, combine one tablespoon of freshly grated horseradish with one teaspoon of raw honey, and one teaspoon of ground clove to some warm water. Sip the brew slowly, or use it as a gargle. This is more of a concept than a recipe, and a chance to try out sweet potatoes in a new way. Cut them as thick or as thin as you like. Mine are around 1cm, but that is just my personal preference. Remember that the slices will definitely shrink a bit during cooking, so slice them a tad thicker than you would want the finished roasted slice to be. You can even make shapes with a cookie cutter – great for kids lunches! Let your imagine run with this one, and keep me posted on which spreads and seasonings youre vibing on.     Print recipe     Sweet Potato Sandwiches Makes 6-8 sandwiches 2-3 fat, stubby sweet potatoes (organic if possible) coconut oil for rubbing (optional) salt and pepper + other spices or herbs 1 batch Horseradish Beet Schmear (recipe below) sliced fresh veggies: bell peppers, cucumber, avocado, sprouts, grated carrot etc. Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 375°F /­­ 190°C. 2. Wash and scrub sweet potatoes well, then slice lengthwise into 1 cm-thick slabs (approximately .4 inches). Place on a baking sheet and rub with coconut oil if using, and sprinkle with salt and pepper, plus any other spices or herbs youd like. 3. Place in the oven and bake until tender, about 20-25 minutes. Remove from oven and use immediately or store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for up to five days. 4. To assemble, spread one slice of sweet potato with the Horseradish Beet Schmear. Top with your favourite sliced veggies, sprouts, salt and pepper and another slice of sweet potato. You can also add mustard, vegan mayo, or any other condiment that you like. Enjoy! Horseradish Beet Schmear Makes 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 1 lb. /­­ 500g beets (about 4-5 small) coconut oil for rubbing 1 small clove garlic 3 Tbsp. freshly grated horseradish, or more to taste 3 Tbsp. tahini 3 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt, to taste 1/­­4 tsp. freshly cracked black pepper Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Rub beets with a little coconut oil, set on a baking try, and place in the oven. Roast for 20-30 minutes until you can easily pierce the beets with a sharp knife tip. 2. Remove baking tray and let cool until you can handle them. Slide off the skins, or use a vegetable peeler. Roughly chop the beets and set aside. 3. In a food processor, pulse garlic until minced. Add horseradish, tahini, lemon juice, olive oil, salt and pepper, then blend on high to combine. Add the chopped beets and pulse to chop. Blend as much or as little as you like – I like my spread a bit chunky. Taste and adjust seasoning as necessary. Some may like more horseradish - go for it! Remember that the bite will mellow out when its mixed with everything in the sandwich. 4. Use immediately, and store any leftovers in a tightly sealed container in the fridge for up to five days. Although the past few months of life limbo have been pretty frustrating, there are so many exciting things on the horizon that I cannot wait to share with you! First, my family and I are getting closer and closer to our new move-in date (you can watch house renovation updates on my Instagram Stories). Second, Im heading to Palm Springs for an EPIC bloggers retreat organized by my friend Sasha Swerdloff at the end of this month. And Im finishing up details on a sweet collaboration with one of my favourite juice bars in Toronto, that we will launch with a free public event! Stay tuned for more details on all the things. Love you guys. Now go have a sandwich, Sarah B   The post Sweet Potato Sandwiches appeared first on My New Roots.

Favorite New Year Reset Recipes

January 4 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Favorite New Year Reset Recipes Happy New Year, friends! We wanted to stop by with a round-up of 18 vegan and gluten-free New Year reset-friendly recipes that are vegetable-forward and deeply nourishing, but also satisfying and delicious. We’ve got you covered on healing soups and stews, vibrant mains, energy-boosting breakfasts and snacks, a powerful cold remedy drink, and even a minimally sweetened dessert that still very much tastes like a treat. Wishing you all the health and happiness in 2018 :) No-Recipe Healing Soup (v, gf) One of our most popular recipes of 2017. This is a highly customizable soup, built on a powerful broth made with immunity-friendly ingredients. It’s delicious and warming, but especially helpful to those under the weather or low on energy. Make sure to seek out 100% buckwheat soba noodles to make this recipe gluten-free. Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices (v, gf) A deeply nourishing and simple stew recipe, heavily influenced by South Indian cuisine, with a high potential for customization. Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew (v, gf) The ultimate, cozy stew from our Fall Meal Plan, loaded with so many star ingredients of fall/­­winter fare: mushrooms, carrots, garlic and onion, as well as jarred tomatoes, brussels sprouts and lentils. Check out the whole meal plan, too – it has all kinds of other great ideas for a new year reset menu for a whole week. Bright & Grounding Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale Soup (v, gf) A soup that’s both creamy and chunky, full of grounding, winter-appropriate ingredients. Mango Curry with Fennel and Parsnip (v, gf) Mango season is coming soon, and this curry is the perfect way to celebrate the sunny fruit’s arrival. Besides the mango, it’s loaded with all kinds of other nutritious, health-promoting produce like broccoli and fennel. Make sure to seek out 100% buckwheat soba noodles to make this recipe gluten-free. Mung Bean Falafel (v, gf) Mung beans make for a great alternative falafel base. They are incredibly nutritious and affordable, and their cooking time is a lot shorter than that of chickpeas. This falafel is very simple to prepare, and it makes for a perfect component to complete a bright and flavorful veggie bowl. Creamy Millet Polenta with Rainbow Chard and Chickpeas (v, gf) An incredibly savory, alternative polenta recipe made with millet instead of corn. Simple in looks, but surprisingly complex in flavor. Taco Collard Green Rolls (v, gf) All the flavors of a great veggie taco, contained in a collard green roll. A crowd-pleaser through and through. Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans (v, gf) If you happen to have access to good zucchini this time of year, try out this light, plant-powered dish. One of my favorites to prepare when I’m feeling sluggish and non-vibrant. Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango (v, gf) Another great recipe for ushering in mango season. Cucumber noodles are a life-changing discovery, and the glazed tofu technique is our absolute favorite way to prepare tofu. Quick Marinated Beans (v, gf) A great thing to make on the weekend, to have in the fridge throughout the week. These marinated beans are able to transform any salad or bowl into a complete, satisfying meal. Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut (v, gf) Incorporating more fermented foods into your diet is always a great idea, especially during a new year reset. Gut health is everything! If you are up for a home fermentation project, consider making this colorful sauerkraut. Omit the blueberries if you can’t find any this time of year. Sweet Potato Toast, Two Ways (v, gf) Taking a break from grains or bread? Sweet potato toast might be the perfect thing to curb any toast cravings or withdrawals you may be having. It’s also just a really delicious dish in its own right. Immunity-Boosting Beet and Camu Camu Breakfast Bowl (v, gf) Raw beet, avocado, cranberries, camu camu: these are just some of the ingredients in this powerful, immunity-boosting bowl. Makes for a perfectly vibrant breakfast. Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways (v, gf) These are truly healthy pancakes, made with nutritious, protein-rich, gluten-free grains, and vibrant veggies. The blender technique makes them very easy to put together, too. Sweet and Savory Energy Bites (What to Do with Leftover Nut Milk Pulp) (v, gf) Having healthy snacks on hand is the key to success, in our opinion. These energy bites are one of our favorite things to make with leftover nut milk pulp, and they make healthy snacking easy and delicious. Almost Savory Raw Chocolate (v, gf) We know that a lot of people take a break from sugar after all that holiday indulgence. This chocolate recipe is a life-saver for any true chocoholics having a hard time with that idea (aka us). You can make it with zero sugar, but still feel like you’ve had your chocolate fix after having a square or two of this stuff. It’s gold! Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy (v, gf) If you or anyone around you is thinking of getting sick, MAKE THIS! It’s helped us and countless friends of ours fight off colds in their beginning stages. It’s also an invigorating and firey tonic, perfect for any bitter winter day. You might also like... Mango Curry with Fennel and Parsnip Simple Spicy Strawberry Gazpacho Garlic Onion Veggie Dip from Food Loves Writing Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Favorite New Year Reset Recipes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Mediterranean Brussels & Beans

December 11 2017 Meatless Monday 

Dress up winter’s favorite miniature cabbage with sweet sun-dried tomatoes and protein-packed cannellini beans. Feta cheese and thyme lend Mediterranean flavors to this simple dish. This recipe comes to us from Sarah of So Hungry I Could Blog. Serves 2 - 15 medium-large Brussels sprouts - olive oil - sea salt or kosher salt - 1 - 1 1/­­2 cups cooked cannellini beans (about 1 can) - 1/­­2 cup sun-dried tomatoes, sliced thin - 1/­­2 cup feta cheese, crumbled or cubed - leaves from 2-3 sprigs of fresh thyme - pepper Rinse the Brussels sprouts in a colander. Trim the ends of the Brussels and cut in half, length-wise. Remove the outer leaves and discard (these leaves will usually fall right off after cutting the sprouts in half). In a glass or tin baking dish, toss the Brussels in a few teaspoons of olive oil and a few pinches of salt. Roast at 400 degrees for 15-20 minutes. Toss the sprouts and roast for an additional 15-20 minutes, or until browned and slightly crisped. While the sprouts are cooking, combine the beans, feta, tomatoes and thyme -- tossing carefully so as not to break up the cheese too much. Add the warm Brussels sprouts to the bean mixture and gently combine. Drizzle with a little extra olive oil and a sprinkle of fresh pepper before serving. Makes about 4 servings as a side dish. The post Mediterranean Brussels & Beans appeared first on Meatless Monday.

(Jalapeno) Sauerkraut

November 4 2017 Vegan Dad 

(Jalapeno) Sauerkraut I feared fermenting veggies for a long time. What if I give my family food poisoning? How will I know if something is fermented properly? Isnt it all too complicated? But now that I took the plunge, I wish I had done so earlier. This recipe, even though it has 8 steps, is utterly simplicity and produces a tender, tangy, and flavourful kraut. A chopped jalape?o only deepens the flavour without adding too much heat. Add two if you want more zip. Im not a big fan of veggie dogs, but with a homemade bun and this kraut, I would eat them any day. INGREDIENTS - 1 head of cabbage - 2-3 tbsp coarse salt (like pickling or kosher salt)--more as needed - 1 chopped jalapeno pepper (including seeds)--optional METHOD 1. Remove 2-3 outer leaves from the cabbage. 2. Core cabbage, and slice very thinly (a food processor works wonders here). 3. Woking in batches if necessary, place cabbage (and jalape?o, if using) in a large non-reactive bowl and sprinkle with salt. Start mashing/­­squeezing the cabbage with your hands, or use a wooden sauerkraut pounder. This will force liquid from the cabbage. The cabbage will start to go translucent, and you should get a good amount of liquid from it. If not, use a little more salt. 4. Transfer the cabbage to a large glass jar. I use a big 56 oz jar. Tamp down the cabbage (here is where the sauerkraut pounder really comes in handy) so that the liquid covers the cabbage. 5. Cover the cabbage with the leaves your removed in step 1. Rip the leaves into small pieces if necessary. Fully cover the cabbage right to the edges of the jar. Use a knife to tuck the edges down a bit so that pieces of cabbage dont float tup during the ferment (see pic above). 6. Tamp the cabbage leaves down so that they are submerged. 7. Place a smaller jar (or something non-reactive) on top of the leaves. It needs to reach the top of the bigger jar. Place the canning lid on upside down (i.e. rubber seal up), and then tighten on the metal ring. The idea here is to keep the kraut and leaves compressed and submerged throughout the ferment. The upside down lid will allow gas to escape during the ferment. 8. Place somewhere away from sunlight and direct heat (coolish room temp is great). Ferment away! I think 1.5 weeks makes for the perfect kraut. It will bubble and foam--this is what you want to see. Check every few days: remove the lid and take a sniff. It should not smell rotten or unpleasant. To my nose, kraut that has not fermented long enough has a slightly metallic air to it which mellows out after about 10 or 11 days. Remove the cabbage leaves from the top and enjoy! Refrigerate until used up.

Veggie Spring Rolls Fried Rice – 1 Pot 30 Mins

October 16 2017 Vegan Richa 

Veggie Spring Rolls Fried Rice – 1 Pot 30 Mins1 Pot, 30 Minute Veggie Spring Rolls Fried Rice! Fridge clean up fried rice with cabbage, carrots, bell pepper,  with rice or other cooked grains for a quick weeknight meal. Vegan Gluten-free Nut-free Recipe. Deep fried Veggie Spring Rolls deconstructed! and tossed into rice to make a 1 pot meal. All the veggie fun and no assembly or frying. Add some toasted wonton wrappers as garnish to this fridge clean up meal for a fun weeknight dinner! Veggies like thinly sliced cabbage, carrots and peppers are cooked lightly. Some soy sauce, ginger and garlic powder and black pepper adds flavor. You can use this veggie mixture to fill up spring roll or wonton wrappers and bake as well. Or fold in cooked rice or grains of choice to make veggie fried rice and serve as is or as a side with some sweet and sour or kung pao dishes. Delicious!  While you are here, do catch a feature about my second book on Huffington post here, talking about it on Main Street vegan here and a wonderful question answer session at VeganMofo here.  Get a copy here. Back to this 1 Pot simple meal! Continue reading: Veggie Spring Rolls Fried Rice – 1 Pot 30 MinsThe post Veggie Spring Rolls Fried Rice – 1 Pot 30 Mins appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Meatless Monday Pittsburgh Hosts Vegan Night with the Pittsburgh Pirates

October 2 2017 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Pittsburgh Hosts Vegan Night with the Pittsburgh PiratesLast Monday, September 26th, Meatless Monday Pittsburgh hosted the first ever Vegan Night with the Pittsburgh Pirates! The event was a great success with over 300 tickets sold. Each ticket included a corner box seat for the Pirates vs. Orioles game, as well as access to the exclusive vegan menu. Guests dined on delicious meatless fare including: - Pretzels, chips and dips (house chips with French onion dip, corn chips with smashed avocado salsa, pretzel sticks with local PA maple mustard) - Power chop salad (kale, cabbage, grilled vegetables, garbanzo beans, sunflower seeds, pepitas, citrus-dijon dressing) - Ultimate vegan burger (beefless beef patty, lettuce, tomato, dill pickles, vegan house sauce, sesame seed bun) - Buffalo cauliflower with vegan ranch dipping sauce - Sweet potato tacos (black beans, cilantro, salsa verde, tortilla threads, nondairy sour cream, flour tortilla) - Watermelon and berries for dessert     The delicious meat-free menu was enjoyed by vegetarians, vegans, and flexitarians alike. Everyone left the ballpark full and the Pirates bringing home a win was the cherry on top! The post Meatless Monday Pittsburgh Hosts Vegan Night with the Pittsburgh Pirates appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut + Giveaway

September 27 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut + GiveawayThis post was created in partnership with Raw Rutes, fermenting crock giveaway below. I grew up with home-pickling and fermenting as the norm. Food in the Soviet Union was not only scarce, but also highly seasonal, so if you didn’t take care to preserve some tomatoes or cucumbers for the winter, you wouldn’t be able to taste any until the next summer. My mom made sure to stock our cool basement with jars of pickles, tomatoes, and fruit preserves every summer, as did pretty much every woman around. Other common fermentation projects included kombucha (or the ‘tea mushroom’ as we call it) way before it was cool, kefir, and of course sauerkraut. I can’t say that I’ve continued all these traditions. I do make my own kombucha, but I can’t motivate myself to do a big batch of pickles, and you can buy such good ones in the store anyways. Same goes for tomatoes, especially since California grown ones are available all year round, and will do if a big craving hits. Sauerkraut is a different story though, because it takes very little work, and the return is so good. I’ve fermented sauerkraut in jars and in big pots, inventing weighted contraptions out of any appropriately-sized object I could find, but what I’ve always dreamed about is a nice, clay fermenting crock with custom weights that fit inside perfectly. The two things that have stopped me from getting a proper fermenting crock were the hefty price tag and the considerable size that they usually come in, which is not very countertop-friendly. I was incredibly excited when Raw Rutes reached out about their Yaozu 2 Liter Fermenting Crock, because it addressed those two points perfectly. It’s petite and sits on my countertops very compactly, yet it can still fit two small-medium heads of shredded cabbage. It’s also quite a bit more affordable than traditional crocks. I love that it’s a clean white too, because they are often brown – not my favorite color, at least for my kitchen. If you’re not familiar with fermenting crocks, the main thing to know is that they make the whole fermenting process really easy and safe. All you have to do is shred whatever vegetables/­­fruits you want to ferment, salt them with either salt or salty brine until they are covered with water, weigh them down, and leave them be for a few weeks while they magically transform. The natural clay that the Yaozu crock is made with makes the environment clean and safe, and the water channel up top takes away the need for an airlock. The crock comes with clay weights, which fit inside perfectly, and ensure that all your veggies are submerged in the brine, which prevents any mold from developing. It’s truly a magical pot. For my first fermenting project, I wanted to do a sauerkraut that was a bit more colorful and exciting than the traditional kind. I used purple cabbage together with blueberries and apple, with a bit of coriander seeds for extra interest in flavor. It took about a week and a half, and came out really delicious. The predominant flavor is of sauerkraut, but there are juicy, sweet and salty bursts from the blueberries, as well as a bit of crunch and sourness from the apple. I can’t wait to experiment more. I even know my next project – the fruit kimchi from Sandor Ellix Katz’ book, The Art of Fermentation. Making your own kraut/­­any fermented vegetables is a really addicting activity. Once you try your first batch, you won’t be able to stop, which is great, since fermented foods are so nourishing. Probiotics are on the tip of everyone’s tongue nowadays – we’ve all heard that having a balanced microbiome is key for good health. Completing little fermenting projects at home and enjoying the results daily is the perfect, incredibly affordable way to contribute to that gut health of yours :) Giveaway: Raw Rutes, the charming online shop full of back-to-basics kitchen tools, is giving away their Yaozu 2 Liter Fermenting Crock to one Golubka Kitchen reader. To enter to win, leave a comment here with your favorite item from the Raw Rutes offering or favorite fermented food until October 11th, 2017 (USA only). Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut   Print Serves: about 2 large jars Ingredients 2 small-medium heads of red cabbage 2-3 tablespoons sea salt 2 green apples - peeled and sliced into 1-inch sticks 12 oz blueberries 2 teaspoons coriander seeds (optional) Instructions Rinse your cabbages and remove the outer leaves. Save a few of the leaves and set them aside. Cut the cabbages in half and cut out the core. Cut each cabbage half into quarters and shred on a mandolin slicer or with a sharp knife. Put the shredded cabbage in a large bowl and mix in the salt, then massage it well until the cabbage starts to release juices. Let the cabbage sit in the bowl for about 30 minutes to release more juices. Mix in the apple slices, blueberries, and coriander with your hands. Pack everything tightly into your fermenting crock using your fist. Cover the surface with the reserved cabbage leaves - this will make sure that nothing will float to the top. Place the ceramic weights on top. At this time, all the contents of the crock, including the ceramic weights, should be completely submerged in juices. If thats not happening, let everything sit for a few more hours and see if the cabbage releases more juices to submerge. If there is still not enough liquid after a few hours, make brine with 1 cup filtered water and 1 teaspoon sea salt. Pour the brine into the crock, until the weights are just covered with the liquid. Its important to have everything submerged in liquid at all times to prevent any mold from forming. Pour brine or filtered water into the water channel and cover the crock with its lid. Let everything ferment for 1-2 weeks, tasting periodically, until the flavor is sour to your liking. Refill the water in the water channel as it evaporates. After a few days of fermenting, the brine should be nice and bubbly. If you have a cool basement, you can also start out the fermentation in a warmer room for the first week, and then move the crock to the basement to finish off the process (the basement should not be too cold!). Once your sauerkraut is done, pack it into clean glass jars, covered with brine, and keep it refrigerated. Save some of leftover brine to use as a starter in your next fermentation project, which will kick-start the process much quicker. You can also take little shots of the brine for a nice probiotic, booster. Have fun! 3.5.3226 You might also like... No Bake Blueberry Coconut Bars Roasted Parsnip and Apple Soup with Radish Greens Babamesco Dip Smoky Summer Vegetable Tangle .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut + Giveaway appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Cauliflower ‘Pesto’ Pasta

September 20 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Cauliflower ‘Pesto’ Pasta I’m back with another recent weeknight dinner favorite. It’s a hearty pasta dish, and it’s a keeper. I can always count on pasta to get Paloma (9) eating dinner without too many negotiations, and I generally try to hide/­­pack as many vegetables as possible between the noodles. She would definitely be much happier eating plain pasta with a few grates of sheep’s milk cheese on top, but she’ll also tolerate most veggies when they’re interwoven with any pasta-like food. This one is made wholesome with a special, cauliflower ‘pesto’ with pistachios, herbs and golden raisins. We roast cauliflower florets pretty often around these parts, and I go through phases where I get very sick of roasted cauliflower. I’m in one of those phases now. I still automatically grab a head of cauliflower every time I buy groceries for the week, and that’s when I’m forced to be a bit more creative and figure out something else to do with it. If I’m lazy, I’ll just steam and freeze the cauliflower to use in the veggie-packed smoothies that Masha and I are obsessed with right now. If I’m a bit more motivated, I’ll experiment and generally come up with something really tasty like this ‘pesto’ number. I credit cauliflower with all my experimental success, since it’s one of the most delicious and versatile vegetables, in my opinion. Pulsed cauliflower sautéed with onion takes the leading role in the ‘pesto’, much like basil would in a traditional pesto. There are nuts, herbs and garlic, too, and it’s quite flavorful and almost like a chunky sauce in texture, hence the choice of name. Plumped, golden raisins take the whole thing to the next level – imagine sweet, juicy pockets in the midst of everything savory and carb-y. Delicious all the way. Any leftover cauliflower pesto is really good on toast, in salads or bowls. We are going to Italy next week, Rome and the Amalfi Coast to be more specific. If you’ve been there, we would greatly appreciate any recommendations you might have as far as things to see /­­ do /­­ eat. Thank you :) Cauliflower Pesto Pasta   Print Serves: serves 4 Ingredients half a cauliflower head - roughly chopped 2 tablespoons coconut oil 1 yellow onion - chopped 8 oz pasta (preferably noodle shape like fettuccine, linguini, spaghetti, etc.) sea salt 3 garlic cloves - sliced pinch of red pepper flakes juice of 1 lemon 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon smoked paprika ¾ cup golden raisins ½ cup chopped pistachios ¼ cup chopped parsley large handful of basil leaves (optional) Instructions Place the chopped cauliflower florets in a food processor and pulse into rice-sized pieces (some will be bigger, some smaller, and thats fine). Set aside. Warm the coconut oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add onion and sauté for 7 minutes, or until translucent. In the meantime, bring a large pot of water to a boil, add salt and cook your pasta according to the time on the package. Drain, reserving ½ cup of cooking water and set aside. Add salt, garlic and red pepper flakes to the sautéed onion and cook for another minute. Add the riced cauliflower and lemon juice, increase the heat and stir around until the lemon juice is absorbed/­­evaporated. Lower the heat back to a medium. Add the reserved pasta cooking liquid, mustard, paprika, raisins and pistachios. Mix well and cook for about 8 minutes, until the cauliflower is cooked, but not mushy. Add the cooked pasta and toss to combine. Mix in the herbs and serve. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Tahini Hot Chocolate Creamy Millet Polenta with Rainbow Chard and Chickpeas Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Cauliflower ‘Pesto’ Pasta appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Rice Paper Rolls

September 18 2017 Meatless Monday 

These Vietnamese treats are filled with vermicelli, Chinese cabbage and bean sprouts and seasoned with lime, mint, chili and cilantro. A shallot miso dipping sauce provides the perfect balance to these light rice paper rolls with unexpectedly intense flavors. This recipe comes to us from Trudy of veggie.num.num. Serves 6 For the dipping sauce: - 1 tablespoon water - 2 tablespoons sweet chilli sauce** - 1 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce** -  1/­­2 shallot, finely diced -  1/­­2 tablespoon fresh mint, finely chopped -  1/­­2 tablespoon cilantro, finely chopped - 1 teaspoon miso paste** To complete the rice paper rolls: - 4 ounces vermicelli, cooked according to instructions - 1 cup Chinese cabbage, shredded -  1/­­2 cup bean sprouts - 1 bell pepper, thinly sliced -  1/­­2 cup fresh mint leaves, finely chopped -  1/­­2 cup cilantro, finely chopped - 1 fresh red chili - Juice of 1 lime - 1 1/­­2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce** - 1 1/­­2 tablespoons sweet chili sauce** - 15-20 rice paper sheets** *Found in Asian markets or the ethnic food or sauce sections of most grocery stores. To make the dipping sauce: In a medium bowl whisk together the water, chili sauce and soy sauce. Whisk in the shallot, mint, cilantro and miso paste until thoroughly combined. To complete the rice paper rolls: After the vermicelli noodles are cooked, drain and rinse well. Roughly chop the cooked noodles. In a large bowl combine the chopped noodles, cabbage, sprouts, bell pepper, mint, cilantro and chili. Dress the veggie filling with the lime juice, soy sauce and sweet chili sauce. Toss until well mixed. Soak one individual rice paper sheet in a large bowl of water for 15-30 seconds, or until just soft. Pat dry on a clean towel. Place 2 tablespoons of filling inside the soaked rice paper roll. Fold in the edges and then roll them up firmly. The edges should seal neatly when pressed together with your fingers. Repeat the rice paper roll soaking and filling process individually until all the rice paper sheets are used up. Serve the rice paper rolls with dipping sauce on the side. The post Rice Paper Rolls appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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