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Garlic paratha recipe | chilli garlic lachha paratha | lahsun ka paratha

Pea Alfredo Pasta

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burdock vegetarian recipes

Self-Care Interview Series: Adriana Ayales

April 28 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Adriana Ayales Adriana Ayales is a rainforest herbalist from Costa Rica and the founder of herbal apothecary Anima Mundi. We are in love with Adriana’s world and creations, and so excited to share this interview. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Although I love the grounded power of routine, I’m living in a phase of being open and free. With kids, and a beyond full time devotion to running a business, I just ride the waves as they come. I’ve learned to surrender that not everything has to look the way it should look. Lifes situations and patterning moves around like the seasons. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I love getting up before the kids, and sneaking into the kitchen to make myself a healing cup(s) of medicine. First thing I do is a big ole cup of vitamin C rich goodness, sometimes its mangosteen hibiscus with a lemon squeeze, or fresh picked turmeric from the garden grated with ginger, along with camu camu and lemon water. Then I make a seasonal fruit bowl of sorts, with oatmeal, or homemade granola loaded with mineralizing herbs (like nettle or mesquite powder). Followed by my favorite, and not so healthy friend, Coffee. Ah coffee. I cant tell you how wonderful locally grown heirloom coffee is here, paired with deliciously fresh cacao and medicinal mushrooms and homemade almond. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Massaging the face, forehead and skull with warm oil at night is one of the simplest and most restorative practices we can do to induce deep sleep. I love using a mix I make at home of jojoba oil, with rosehip, infused with clary sage and a fine sandalwood. Another one of my all time favorites for evening relaxation is blue lotus. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  Sipping tea mindfully in nature, witnessing time in silence is one of my favorite things. I tap into my feelings, breath, mind, and begin to clear energy. Sustenance -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I do love caffeine. Growing up in Costa Rica has woven me into loving a good cup of locally roasted coffee. Depending on the day, I love adding reishi, or a mix of medicinal mushrooms, raw cacao with mucuna, along with a homemade plant based milk. I also love having an aged puerh, or traditional matcha with added herbs for nourishment, like moringa. -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? Sometimes I do, especially when I’m tired or running on low energy. When im over-worked, or running on stress I definitely crave more carby and sugary things, and this is usually due to skipping a meal, or needing a quick-fix. Some tips I bare in mind during stressful moments that ignite the sweet tooth (or just in general!) are: always go for fruits before you opt for a sugary dessert, always choose low glycemic sweeteners vs. sugar (some faves are coconut sugar, maple syrup, and real stevia extract -- not the synthetic ones!) For carbs avoid empty carbs and refined flours, and opt for ones that are more easily absorbed, like coconut, almond and cassava flour. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness?  Oh my, so many! I seasonally change my herbal intake, but certainly stick with some favorites. I love having my potent singles (single herb tinctures) on me at all times, like shisandra berries and blue lotus. A Brain tonic while I’m working, usually with herbs like gotu kola, ginkgo, brahmi and lion’s mane mushroom. Two that I dose with very often are the Happiness tonic (st johns wort, mucuna, ashwagandha, etc.) and euphoric/­­mood elevating herbs like catuaba, mucunam muira puama and damiana. I also love our Liver formula for daily cleansing and nourishment, like the moringa, burdock, nettles, chlorella. And of course beauty herbs like He Shou Wu, Mangosteen and more! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Absolutely, I love doing a mix between yoga and pilates. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I love the torture! When I feel a little lazy and not like suffering in an intensive workout, I just remind myself how excellent I feel when I finish it. Not just seeing physical results, but especially the mental peace and happiness after working out. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? A feeling of wholeness. When your mood is high, your gut is vibrant, and you feel confident and beautiful. When there is no sense of lack, imbalance or deficiency. When you feel aligned. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I love making my own body and face oils. I usually infuse collagen boosting herbs, and skin strengthening herbs and lather up. I also like to keep things simple, like using cacao butter with coconut oil, or just a fluffy shea butter for deep moisture.  -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Yes! I’m a big fan of eating herbs and supplements that protect the skin, increase our own collagen receptors and help activate our natural glow. The herbs I designed for the vegan collagen formula have been my go-tos for quite sometime. Horsetail, He Shou Wu, Calendula, Nettle seed + leaf, Comfrey, and others like Mangosteen, Camu Camu and Hibiscus are great for the skin too. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? I love making edible masks. Infusing a high potency extract into a raw clay and avocado, along with an activating source like apple cider vinegar, or more protein like flax, and making a smooth paste to lather all over the face, body and even hair is one of my all time favorites. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Visualization is huge for me. Sitting in silence and tuning in is vital, along with the help of nervines and adaptogenic herbs that assist in de-compression like skullcap, blue lotus and ashwagandha. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I like taking a walk or hike in nature, get in the ocean/­­lake/­­river or any kind of body of water. I completely unplug from work, the phone, or computer. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Before the cold kicks in, I take strong echinacea extracts in a soothing tea, mixing turmeric, lemon, grated ginger, apple cider vinegar, garlic and aloe in warm water. It works every time. I make a large batch and dose all day long --  even my kids love it!  -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? This certainly overlaps for me, which can honestly be a bitter sweet reality. I love everything surrounding plants, and its medicinal uses, as well as teaching, and medicine making. I love that my business is all about honoring ancestral ways, plant medicine, the art of herbalism, righteous cultivation, and medicine making. Yet, like any business owner would understand, there are many tasks to the job that are exhausting and certainly not what made you fall in love in the first place. For me personally, Ive learned to reconcile by doing what I love doing the most, medicine making and wildcrafting. I made a commitment to myself in making space for this no matter what, and not disregarding it by prioritizing business with the things that dont really matter in life. Its vital that we take moments in our free time that refine our focus and intention in life, re-align to what inspired the dream, without getting side swept with busy-ness. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Over the last couple years Ive struggled with this because of having babies. Which Im sure a lot of new moms can relate to this! Every time I get a moment between being a mother, wife and business owner, my priority to feel more self loving (and more human!) is yoga. The simple act of getting oxygen, doing conscious breathing, and distracting the monkey mind from its patterning, you become yourself again.  -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Herbs. Integrating plant medicine into everything has significantly changed my body mind and soul. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Off the top of my head I love these: Healing with Whole Foods with Paul Pitchford, Gabriel Cousens’ Spiritual Nutrition, The Body Ecology Diet by Donna Gates, and of course The Medical Medium by Anthony William. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming an herbalist and starting Anima Mundi? Growing up I learned closely with curanderos on plant medicine and rainforest herbalism overall. I then attended herbal schools in California where I learned a lot of native, northern and european herbalism. Life somehow took me to NYC (a place I NEVER thought I would ever go to) after living in California for quite some years, and I started practicing privately as an herbalist. I kept noticing the common trends, symptomology and imbalances folks that came in had, and started developing mother formulas to be able to make large batches. -- How do you approach sourcing herbs for Anima Mundi?  First and foremost we try to create a direct relationship with the people/­­farmers that cultivate. Although we value certification of prime ingredients, there are many ethical wild crafters and farms that do not have special certifications, yet cultivate sustainable practices and have quality products that we also like to support. We are also adamant of supporting local economies as much as possible, particularly with rainforest herbs sourced directly from indigenous people, supporting their craft as well as ethically crafted botanicals. -- What are some of Anima Mundis best sellers? Our plant-based Collagen Booster, Happiness Tonic, Adaptogenic Immortality Tonics, Curam Beauty Elixir, our 100% Coconut Cream Powder, Mushroom Mocha Milk and more...! Fun and Inspiration -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Women Who Run with Wolves Song/­­Album –  Cuatro Vientos /­­ Danit Movie –  Loving the The OA lately! Piece of Art –  Ayahuasca art by Pablo Amaringo Photos by Renee Byrd and from Anima Mundi’s IG /­­ This post contains Amazon Affiliate links. The post Self-Care Interview Series: Adriana Ayales appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

A Book Tour and a Full Heart

May 11 2015 My New Roots 

A Book Tour and a Full Heart Hi. Its been a while. I guess I should have expected that touring with my cookbook would be more than just totally life-affirming and amazing - turns out its quite a time-intensive thing, and in between gigs I find it difficult to much other than feed myself and rest! But I am not complaining, just explaining my absence. I could actually fill this entire post with my overflowing gratitude for everything thats happened in the past few weeks. But I think some pictures would help tell the story - I once heard that each one is worth a thousand words. I will take a brief moment however to say thank you. Everyone who has been a part of and engaged in this tour in some way has really put it all in perspective for me. Its so strange how most of what I do is completely solitary, and even when I put a post out into the world, I cannot see who is reading, where, or that they actually cook the recipes. In a way, I like it this way - less pressure and responsibility for little ol me, because if I were to actually comprehend the scope of this I may feel slightly overwhelmed. But this project, my cookbook, finally being out in the physical world and me along with it, has shown me that My New Roots is so much bigger than I could have imagined. Meeting so many of you at book signings, lectures, cooking demos, and connecting through conversation across a dinner table, hearing your stories, how this little blog has touched you or changed your life in some way, feels like a miracle to me. And I am so, so humbled. Ive received boundless inspiration through these connections, and proof that this isnt just some teeny project anymore, but a veritable force. Much like literal roots this has grown silently under the surface, going deep and lateral and gaining enough life force before breaking through to where it receives the light it needs to thrive. That is what this tour is: a surfacing and a confirmation that we are building a powerful community of healthy people. I feel like every drop of energy Ive put into My New Roots from the first day has just hit me like a spectacular tsunami of love. A question I was asked a lot on tour was about the food blogging community, and whether or not I think it is competitive. Without hesitating, I always said heck no!, because my experience is quite the opposite. Among my peers I feel nothing but support, camaraderie, and celebration for one anothers achievements. When I asked fellow bloggers to review the cookbook, of course they said yes, because that is how we roll. I am honoured to post their gorgeous photos below, and share their perspectives on my recipes. So if you havent received a copy of the book yet, you can try out a number of the dishes from their posts! Thank you to everyone who participated. You are such an inspiring and talented bunch of people, and I am proud to share the blogosphere with you. Laura at The First Mess took a stab at making my raw vegan version of the Ben & Jerry’s classic and well-loved Chunky Monkey, and definitely one-upped me by adding a swirl of date syrup for a ripple effect. Nice one, Laura. You rock. Get the recipe here. Sara of Sprouted Kitchen tested and wrote about one of my favourite recipes in the book, Sunflower Sesame Seed Brittle, and one that I made many times on tour for readers to taste! You can read her post here. Emma from My Darling Lemon Thyme made my scrumptious Roasted Pumpkin on Black Rice with Tangerine Tahini Sauce. This sauce is boss, ya’ll. Pour it on everything! Check out the post and recipe here. Angela over at Oh She Glows made my scrumptious Banoffee Pie! A combination of banana, toffee, and coconut cream. Get the recipe here. Lane of Green Spirit Adventures made my Oyster Mushroom Bisque. Check out the recipe here. If you’re making recipes from the book and want to tag them, here’s what I’m using: #MNRcookbook And now for just a few highlights from the events in North America. Thank you again to everyone who helped put these together, and to all of you who came out to give me a high-five. It meant so much to me. A stunning dinner at Burdcok & Co. in Vancouver. The meal was all spring recipes from the cookbook. My interview and audio-only cooking demo – an interesting experience! – with the imcomparable Cherly McCay of CBC radio. Hear the program here, and skip to 35:45 to catch my segment. Enjoy! Barbara-Jo’s Books to Cooks hosted a My New Roots dinner right in the bookstore! A night to remember for sure. I did three televised cooking demos in Canada. Thanks to Global and CTV for their support! Book signing at the always inspiring Moon Juice in Los Angeles. I was high on green nut milk and all the love! Getting a tad silly with Jo and my Pi?a Colada Passionfruit Popsicles at Delish.com. I’ll post the video once it’s live. It’s a real hoot! Food52 invited me for lunch! I cooked my Ghee-Poached Radishes on Dandelion Greens with Smoked Sea Salt for lunch.  The Q&A and book signing at NeueHouse in NYC. Thanks to my gorgeous friend Pippa of Sous Style for the incredible night! Lastly, an interview at my all-time favourite station Heritage Radio Network in Bushwick, Brooklyn. And quite possibly the coolest recording studio of all time. I’ll post the podcast once it’s online!   So, I’m back in my kitchen now. A new blog post (a very rad one) is on the way and I know you’re going to love it. Stay tuned dear friends. xo, Sarah B

Ramen Revisited + How to make Dashi

March 31 2015 My New Roots 

Ramen Revisited + How to make Dashi My parents made my lunch every day that I was in school from the time I was barely old enough to hold a brown paper bag, right up until my last days of high school. It was always exactly the same format, with slight variations: sandwich, juice box, granola bar, piece of fruit. Pretty standard fare for most of my peer group if I remember correctly, and I never complained about it. That is until the day I peered over my bologna-on-a-bun to see Alexis at the popular kids table in the junior high cafeteria slurping over what looked like a rather foreign and intriguing styrofoam cup of something hot and tasty. Oh, thats Mr. Noodles, my best friend Julie said, and went on to explain that all you had to do was pour boiling water into the cup and wait a few minutes before eating the noodle soup-like meal. I looked down at my cold, relatively flavourless, pedestrian food and felt left out. Not only was I totally un-cool, but suddenly my lunch was too. Could life get any worse?! I ran home and told my mom about the cup noodles and begged her to buy some at the store, promising her that this could not only save her time, but most importantly, my lunchroom reputation. Dont you want me to be popular?!, I wailed. Convinced this was my ticket to the promised land of spin-the-bottle and weekend shopping mall hang-outs, I persuaded her to invest the fifty cents on a couple trials and see what all the fuss was about. When she came home I had the kettle boiled and ready to get down to business. Folding back the paper lid, I spotted a magical little package of flavoured powder inside, which I read was meant to be emptied into the cup before adding the water. A couple shriveled, token peas fell out amongst the dust and my mom looked pleased to see green. The boiling water was added, I closed the lid again and waited - the longest four minutes of my life thus far. But oh, what ceremony! What rapture! The timer on my ironman wristwatch beeped, I stirred the cup, and dug in. It was salty. Very salty. Thats about all I can recall. The noodles, semi-cooked and crispy in parts were underwhelming and bland, while the broth, if I can all it that, was shockingly saline. But none of that mattered. I would have eaten cow dung if it meant sitting next to Alexis. I finally had the answer to the question of cafeteria coolness. Needless to say, eating ramen did not initiate me into the popular crowd, nor did it inspire a great love of this ubiquitous, cheap eat canonized by hung-over college kids everywhere. Until very recently this had been my only experience with ramen. But when yet another ramen recipe request landed in my inbox, I knew it was time to revisit this famous dish. It needs to be said that instant ramen is a far cry from its traditional roots of noodles in broth, which when prepared properly with care and intention, can be utterly delicious. I suppose its like most things that go from revered, regional dish to the freezer section of the gas stations grocery aisle, or worse. Shouldnt these things receive a different name or label in respect to the original recipe? Its somewhat maddening, but I surrender to the fact that there is only so much I can change in this world. The backbone of all ramen is the broth, or dashi. Dashi is a clear stock that is traditionally made using kombu, Japanese sea kelp, and katsoubushi or bonito, dried fish. Other dashi bases can include shiitake mushrooms, and because my recipes are plant based, Ill be showing you how to make this variety and the kombu one today. Once you have this base, you can spike your dashi with shallots, garlic, ginger, miso, etc. but today were keeping things simple and I leave the fun and improvisation to your ramen-hungry minds. Toppings vary widely, but vegetarian ingredients can include noodles (obviously), mushrooms, strips of nori or other tasty sea veggies, greens, spring onions, shredded cabbage, kimchi, garlic, and the ever-so-popular soft-boiled egg. If you are vegan, simply leave this ingredient out – it’s the only animal product in the recipe and still delicious without it. The one thing I love about ramen is its versatility and infinitely customizable combinations to suit every season, taste, and budget. On Salt, Sodium and Finding a Balance The big bad deal with packaged ramen and its accompanying powdered broth or flavour packet is the incredibly high sodium content, some brands containing an entire days worth in just one serving! On the flip side, making your own dashi allows you to control the sodium level and provide you with balanced saltiness for overall wellbeing. Sodium is not only important to us, our survival depends on it. Its role in the human body is to work in conjunction with potassium to maintain cellular fluid levels, acid/­­alkaline balance, and keep the nerves and muscles functioning properly. Sodium plays a role in hydrochloric acid production in the stomach, and is used during the transport of amino acids from the gut to the blood. Because sodium is needed to maintain blood fluid volume, excessive sodium can result in increased blood volume and elevated blood pressure, especially if the kidneys are compromised in any way and unable to clear it efficiently. Hypertension and premenstrual problems are more frequent in people who have a high salt intake, especially when there is a relatively low level of potassium in the diet to counteract it. Virtually all whole unprocessed plant foods contain more potassium than sodium. Grains, legumes, fruits and vegetables, especially leafy greens, offer ten to several hundred times more potassium, and yet the average American is said to be deficient in potassium. Although there is no standard ratio of sodium to potassium to recommend, eating a balanced, whole foods diet (surprise!) is the best way to achieve equilibrium. So how much sodium should be eating in a day? First it needs to be established that sodium and salt are two different things. The salt we consume is in fact a combination of two ions, sodium and chloride, in percentages of roughly 40% and 60%. Most nutrition experts agree that sodium intake on a daily basis should not exceed 2 grams per day. This amount is equal to 5 grams of salt, or 1 teaspoon. Yup. Thats it. Put into those terms, its easy to see how one could overdo it...by lunch hour. To avoid excess sodium intake, limit processed foods. As I mentioned above, a little recon revealed that some instant ramen brands cover the daily sodium base in just one serving. Yikes! Sodium lurks in some very unexpected places, so be savvy and read labels. To be extra cautious avoid high-salt foods such as commercially-prepared pickles, olives, and saurkraut, canned and instant soups, processed cheese, condiments like ketchup, barbeque sauce, gravy, alfredo sauce, salad dressings, mayonnaise, soy sauce, snacks foods like chips, salted peanuts and pretzels, crackers, and boxed breakfast cereal. Remember, cooking for yourself is the only way to know exactly what you are getting in your food. There are a few things that need to be mentioned about this recipe. First, you need to start the process the night before (or the morning of) by simply soaking the dashi ingredients in water and set in the fridge. This is how you make the broth. You can hurry the process by cooking the ingredients in hot water if youre in a rush, but the results are better if you follow this slower method (plus, your fridge does all the work). I will also say that traditional dashi is delicate and mild-flavoured, unlike the instant dashi that is saltier and stronger due to the addition of artificial, chemical flavour enhancers. When you try the dashi for the first time, try not to compare it to the ramen broth youve had in the past - this is the real deal. Appreciate its clean, pure taste and it subtlety, and add tamari or miso only as needed to enhance the natural flavour. Second, you can make and enjoy the dashi bases separately if you like, or combine the two for a more complex flavour. I really like the combination of the kombu and shiitake dashi together. They both contain good amounts of umami, so united they deliver a deep, multifaceted taste experience without the meat. Third, get organic ingredients if you can. Sea vegetables and mushrooms are both like little sponges in their respective environments so finding the cleanest and highest quality you can is a good idea. Finally, purchase the most high-vibe ramen noodles you can find. The other reason I was inspired to write this recipe and post was because of all the incredibly awesome ramen Ive seen at the health food store. Made with whole grains, some of them even gluten-free, I couldnt say no! Now, you could make your own noodles if you like (this is an art I greatly admire) but in the interest of saving a smidgen of time, buy yourself some noodles and get to the ramen even faster.     Print recipe     Ramen Revisited + How to make Dashi Serves 4 (each dashi recipe below serves 2) Dashi 4 cups /­­ 1 liter water : 60g dried shiitake mushrooms (do not use fresh) 4 cups /­­ 1 liter water : 20g kombu Directions: For the kombu dashi, place .7oz /­­ 20g of kombu in 4 cups /­­ 1 liter of water overnight in the fridge. In the morning, discard the kombu, strain the remaining liquid and warm it in a pot on the stove until just barely simmering. Serve. For the shiitake dashi, remove any dirt or debris from the dried mushrooms and place in 4 cups /­­ 1 liter of water. It is important to submerge the mushrooms, so place something on top of them, such as a smaller glass lid, and set them in the fridge overnight. In the morning, remove the mushrooms, squeezing out as much liquid from them as you can. Set the mushrooms aside, strain the remaining liquid and warm it in a pot on the stove until just barely simmering. Serve. Ramen 3-4 bunches baby bok choy, quickly stir-fried in a little shallot and garlic 2 carrots, julienned 2 spring onions, sliced 2 soft-boiled or medium eggs (to suit your taste) (optional) 1 pack whole grain ramen noodles (gluten-free, if desired) To serve dried or fresh chilies tamari or miso, to taste (use discretion!) Directions: 1. Prepare all the ingredients: stir-fry the bok choy or other greens, julienne the carrots, slice the spring onions, slice the rehydrated shiitake mushrooms, soft boil the eggs. 2. Bring a pot of water to the boil. Add the noodles and cook according to the package instructions. 3. While the noodles are cooking, ladle the broth into the bowls. Add the hot noodles and all other ingredients. Take a moment to arrange the food in a pleasing way, sit, and enjoy.   *   *   *   *   *   * Hey everyone! Mybook comes out today!!! I am so ridiculously excited to see this day arrive and the book arrive in your homes and kitchens. The reviews have been so positive so far and for that, I thank you. Please note that although most stores in North America that are carrying the book should have it in stock today, some may take a few days to longer. If you want to purchase the book online, there are many retailers listed here. I would like to take this time to acknowledge the couple of misprints in the book. During the editing process the following mistakes were made: on page 21, the ghee recipe is labeled vegan. On page 241-242 buckwheat and spelt switched places so that buckwheat is in the gluten-containing section of the grains chapter, while spelt is in the gluten-free section. In other news, my Vancouver tour dates and events have been confirmed! Here is where and when you can find me in Van city (this will be my first time there, can you believe it?!). Click the links for more details and ticket information. April 15: Burdock and Co. Collaborative Dinner + Book Signing April 16: Whole Foods Cambie Cooking Demo + Book Signing April 17: Interview + Afternoon Tea with CBCs Sheryl MacKay Barbara Jos Books to Cooks Dinner Event + Book Signing Looking forward to seeing you all there! Also, check out my most recent interview over at the gorgeous site, The Coveteur.

A Winter Weekend Cleanse

January 9 2015 My New Roots 

A Winter Weekend Cleanse Happy 2015, dear friends! I wasnt sure about doing a detox post this year simply because it seemed predictable, but over the past couple weeks, my body told my brain to stop thinking so much and just do what I feel. Smart body. There are many reasons people feel the need to press the reset button this time of year. Overindulgence, chronic stress, feelings of fatigue or sluggishness are the usual suspects, but there are also positive grounds for clearing out the cobwebs such as wanting to gain more energy and increase vitality, achieve higher levels of clarity, and realign with our internal guidance systems. I know the telltale signs for myself, and they usually involve a slight disinterest in eating (sounds crazy, I know), along with the desire to examine my food-body-mind relationship. Since I am often cooking everyday for a living, I can sometimes lose sight of the total magic that food is. If I slice open a head of red cabbage and fail to swoon, or that pomegranate doesnt bring me to my knees in awe, I know its time to take a break, simplify, and make space for those feelings again. But how can we make this really easy? Ive gotten so much positive feedback from my past cleanses and detox programs for Oprah magazine and Whole Living magazine, (all of which are still online here, here and here), but one thing that people mention is how much food there is! Taking that into consideration, I thought I would design a super-simple plan this year with only two recipes and you can make the decision how long you want to go for. One smoothie. One soup. Both are alkalizing, filling yet detoxifying, mega green but super tasty. In fact, Ill wager that youll love both of these recipes so much that youll be enjoying them long after the cleanse is over! The Ginger-Mint Pear Smoothie is luscious, sweet-and-spicy with cooling mint and creamy avocado. The Cilantro Spinach Sweet Potato Soup is like eating a crazy-delicious hug. Detoxifying Habits Its true that certain foods and herbs can aid in the detoxification process, but what else can we do to boost our cleansing process on a daily basis? Exercise: Moving our bodies is essential for balance and overall health because it creates the conditions to breathe deeply, stretch, circulate the blood and lymph, and sweat. The more we move, the more efficient our body becomes at circulating and flushing out toxins. Gentle, low-intensity exercise such as yoga, stretching, or walking is best during a juice fast or reduced-calorie diet (such as this weekend cleanse), while high-impact exercise is recommended at least 3 times a week once you are back to eating a regular, healthy diet. Dry skin brushing: Dry skin brushing helps stimulate your lymphatic system, which is responsible for ridding the body of toxins. Skin brushing improves the surface circulation on the skin and keeps the pores of the skin open, encouraging your bodys discharge of metabolic wastes, and resulting in an improved ability to combat bacteria, plus helping your skin to look and feel healthier and more resilient! Skin brushing also strengthens the immune system and helps aid the digestion system, both of which are greatly involved in the detoxification process. Take a sauna: Although it is a major eliminative organ, most people’s skin is very inactive. Sweat is a most important elimination route for toxins. Repeated use of the sauna can help slowly restore skin elimination. Viruses, toxin-burdened cells, and tumours are weaker than normal cells and tolerate heat poorly. The heating of the tissues, which takes place in a sauna helps the body heal from infections and disease more quickly. I make it a habit to go to the sauna once a week for a deep, cleansing sweat. It feels amazing and does a body good! Below is a sample plan for the Winter Weekend Cleanse. You can do the program for just one day, but I would recommend at least two to really feel the benefits. You can also go longer if you like, and include one or more of the recipes from my previous programs to compliment the new one, just so those taste buds of yours stay excited! Drink as much water as you feel like /­­ need, but consume at least 1 1/­­2 liters throughout the day. Always begin the day with warm water with lemon, as this will assist in flushing your digestive system, preparing your tummy for food by increasing stomach acid, and alkalizing your entire system. Herbal teas are acceptable, but choose ones that are particularly detoxifying. Burdock, cleavers, chickweed, yarrow, nettle and plantain are some of my favourites. I also have a wonderful Detox Tea Blend recipe here. You can eat your smoothie for breakfast and afternoon snack, but it also fills in for a lunch if that is all you feel like. You can make up the entire batch for a day (the recipe makes about 3 cups /­­ 700ml) if you know youll be on the go and sip on it when you need a pick-me-up. Or you can divide the ingredients in half and make it fresh if youll be near a blender. Since we are in the colder months of the year here, Id encourage you not to use frozen fruit, as its important to keep warm when the weather is not! I like to enjoy this smoothie at room temperature, and I promise its just as delicious as its cold counterpart. The soup can be eaten for lunch and dinner or as a snack too. I really like it blended, but feel free to keep it chunky too! Winter Weekend Cleanse Plan Upon rising: warm water with lemon Breakfast: Ginger-Mint Pear Smoothie Throughout the day: water! Aim for 1 1/­­2 – 2 1/­­2 liters a day (about 6-10 cups), depending on your activity level Lunch: Cilantro Spinach Sweet Potato Soup Snack: Ginger-Mint Pear Smoothie Dinner: Cilantro Spinach Sweet Potato Soup Repeat on the following day, for as many days as you like. Things to Avoid: caffeine, sugar, alcohol, tobacco, computer time, television, stressful situations. Things to Embrace: sleep and rest, time outdoors, yoga, meditation, deep breathing, sauna, dry skin brushing.     Print recipe     Winter Weekend Cleanse Recipes Ginger-Mint Pear Smoothie Makes 3 cups /­­ 700ml Ingredients (all organic if possible): 2 pears 1 avocado, flesh scooped out 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 35g firmly packed baby spinach 1 cup /­­ 250 ml water 2 tsp. minced ginger 1 1/­­2 Tbsp. freshly-squeezed lemon juice 10-20 mint leaves (to your taste) Directions: 1. Place all ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth. Enjoy. Cilantro Spinach Sweet Potato Soup Makes 6.5 cups /­­ 1.5 liters Ingredients (all organic if possible): 1 Tbsp. coconut oil 2 medium onions, chopped 5 cloves garlic, minced 1 tsp. sea salt 3 cups /­­ 700ml water 2 medium-large sweet potato, scrubbed and cut into 1 cubes 1 Tbsp. freshly-squeezed lemon juice pinch – 1/­­4 tsp. cayenne pepper (to your taste) 2 cups /­­ 60g cilantro (leaves and tender stems) 2 cups /­­ 50g firmly packed baby spinach Directions: 1. Heat coconut oil in a large stockpot. Add onions and salt, stir to coat and let cook until onions have softened, about 5-7 minutes. Add garlic, stir, cook 1 minute. Add sweet potato and water. Bring to a boil, reduce to simmer and cook until the sweet potatoes are tender, about 12-15 minutes. 2. Place soup contents in a blender. Blend on high until smooth, then add spinach, cilantro, lemon and cayenne. Season to taste. Serve and enjoy. Store cooled leftovers in the fridge.   I hope you all find your own reasons for trying out this simple cleanse, and that it proves to be as helpful as it is delicious! Remember to take things slow, set realistic goals for yourself and be celebrate each small victory! I truly wish you all the best for 2015 - this year is going to be the cleanest, greenest yet. Love and light, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   * Check out my interview with the gorgeous McKel over at Nutrition Stripped!


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