bulgur - vegetarian recipes

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bulgur vegetarian recipes

Lentil Kibbeh

February 27 2017 Oh My Veggies 

Spiced red lentils and bulgur wheat fritters are baked and served over crisp romaine with a drizzle of yogurt to make this vegetarian lentil kibbeh.

Moroccan Aubergine & Chickpea Stew

November 25 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Moroccan Aubergine & Chickpea Stew Here is a dinner suggestion in case you are looking for a new recipe to try over the weekend. We first made this stew for lunch a few days ago. I’ll admit that it was slightly over-ambitious as a lunch project, but it did tick all the right boxes for a late november meal and we are pretty sure it is something you will appreciate as well. Both Luise and I are obsessed with Moroccan flavors. Our approach is rarely strictly traditional, we usually just throw a whole bunch of Moroccan-ish ingredients, like mint + cinnamon + cumin + raisins + pomegranate seeds + lemon + almonds into the same dish and then blindly call it Moroccan. That is also what we have done with this Aubergine & Chickpea Stew. It is a little bit like a winter version of our (favorite) Moroccan salad recipe from Green Kitchen Travels. It’s warm and comfy with large chunks of slow-cooked aubergine, super flavorful with sweetness from cinnamon, saffron and raisins, has crunchy toasted almonds on top and freshness from mint, yogurt and pomegranate seeds. If you skip the yogurt on top, it’s also entirely vegan. We have had it for lunch and dinner three times this week and we are still not tired of it. Ok, maybe just a tiny bit. Especially Elsa. She always tells us that “we are the worst parents ever” whenever we serve repeat-meals and photo shoot leftovers for dinner. Saffron is actually used as a Christmas spice in Sweden, so in case you are looking for an untraditional Christmas dinner, I think this would be a pretty great option. Especially with those pretty jewel-like pomegranate seeds on top. Our recipe is perfect for 4 persons but it can easily be doubled if you are cooking for a crowd, just use a large saucepan. In case you haven’t cooked with millet before, it is time to add it to your repertoire. It is a gluten free seed that is soft and flavourful and works perfectly as an alternative to couscous or bulgur. It also has a comfortably short cooking time. Moroccan Aubergine & Chickpea Stew Serves 4  2 tbsp coconut oil or olive oil 2 onions, peeled 3 garlic cloves, peeled 1 large chunk fresh ginger 1 aubergine 2 tsp ground cinnamon 1 tsp ground cumin 1/­­2 tsp ground paprika 1 tsp sea salt 3 tbsp tomato paste 1  x 14 oz /­­ 400 g tin crushed tomatoes 3 cups vegetable stock 1/­­4 tsp /­­ 0,5 g crushed saffron or approx. 6 saffron threads 1 x 14 oz /­­ 400 g tin chickpeas /­­ garbanzo beans (or 200 g cooked chickpeas) 3/­­4 cup /­­ 100 g yellow or brown raisins 1 lemon, zest (save the rest of the lemon for the salad)  Cooked Millet 1 cup /­­ 200 g uncooked millet 2 cups /­­ 500 ml water 1/­­2 tsp sea salt Lemon, Avocado & Herb Salad 2 large ripe avocados, cut in half, destoned and flesh scooped out 1 large handful flat-leaf parsley (or coriander/­­cilantro), coarsely chopped 1 large handful mint leaves, coarsely chopped 1 lemon, juice 2 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil sea salt & ground pepper To Serve 1/­­2 cup /­­ 75 g toasted almonds*, coarsely chopped 1/­­2 pomegranate, seeds 1/­­2 cup /­­ 120 ml Turkish yogurt (optional) Add oil to a large saucepan on medium heat. Cut the first onion in large chunks and the second one finely along with the garlic and ginger. Add them all to the saucepan and let sauté for about 10 minutes or until soft. Meanwhile cut the aubergine into bite-size chunks. Add it to the pan along with all the spices and tomato paste. Let fry for 5-6 minutes, stirring frequently. Add a splash of water or oil in case the spices begin to burn against the bottom of the pan. Then add the crushed tomatoes, 2 cups of the vegetable stock and the saffron, stir around until it boils and then lower the heat. Put a lid on the sauce pan and let slowly simmer for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the chickpeas, 1/­­2 cup of the raisins and the last of the stock (if it looks like it’s needed) and let simmer for 15 minutes more or until the aubergines are soft and tender, stir in the lemon zest right at the end of the cooking. Meanwhile, add the millet to a medium-sized sauce pan and dry-toast on low heat for 2-3 minutes, then add water and salt, increase the heat and bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and let simmer for about 8-9 minutes. Take it off the heat and let sit for a few minutes to absorb all the water. Add the remaining raisins and use a fork to integrate the raisins and fluff the millet. Prepare the salad by cutting the avocado into chunks, coarsely chopping the herbs and placing them in a bowl along with the pomegranate seeds. Whisk together lemon juice, oil, salt and pepper, add it to the bowl and toss. Serve in bowls with the stew scooped on top of the millet, the salad on the side and almonds, pomegranate seeds and yogurt on top. Enjoy! * We toast almonds by soaking raw almonds in heavily salted water for 20 minutes and then draining the water and roasting/­­toasting them in the oven on 300°F /­­ 150°C for 20 minutes. But you can also toast them in a pan. Or simply use store-bought dry-roasted almonds.

Syrian Yogurt Soup + More Than Food

October 17 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Syrian Yogurt Soup + More Than Food The recipe for this soup is at the end of this post, but we hope that you will take the time to read this text as well. It is slightly longer but way more important than our usual posts. Let’s start from the beginning. The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) and the European Commission asked if we would be interested in meeting Syrian refugees living in and outside of camps in Turkey to bring home some of their stories, learn how modern food aid is working and explore the different aspects of food. It was doubtless the most meaningful request we have ever received and something we really wanted to do. Timing wise it wasn’t perfect. I had to leave Luise alone with the kids while she was 36 weeks pregnant, but she gave her blessing. So a few weeks ago, I went on this mission. I flew to Istanbul, Turkey on an early flight and then on to a domestic flight to Hatay, a few miles from the Syrian border. During my days there, I visited a refugee camp to see how it works and talk to some of the people living there. I got to know the WFP staff and was amazed by their compassion. I was also invited home to a few Syrian families living outside of camps. Their situation is often a lot more difficult than inside the camps, as they have more costs and less support but the families were incredibly friendly and inviting. We talked, drank tea, cooked together and shared food. If you follow me on instagram, you might already have read the stories of some of the people I met. I have included the story from one of the families in this post, and I have also recreated one of the dishes that I learnt to cook together with them. It is very easy to look away from the horrible situation that is going on in Syria. But I hope that by reading these stories that do have bright moments in the midst of all the darkness, you will get a better understanding and openness towards the millions of Syrian people that have been forced from their homes and don’t wish anything more than being able to return to them one day. It was a very emotional trip and it affected me a lot deeper than I was prepared for. I am still trying to figure out what to comes next. Obviously, we want to continue working with recipe development and food photography as it is something we love doing. But it’s my hope and intention that we also will continue working more actively with human aid and support this cause any way we can in the future. Enough about this. Here is Suad. (1/­­5) I had everything before the war. My husband and I were the owners of a supermarket in Aleppo. We lived in a large and beautiful two-story house in a rural area. All my furniture was new - nothing was second hand - and we had many rooms. There was a big courtyard outside our house where the children played and rode their bicycles. ***** This is the story of Suad. She is Syrian and fled from her home together with her family when the conflict came to her town, 4 years ago. Suad is nine months pregnant and lives with her husband, their two sons Ahmed (10 years) and Muhammed (6 years) and their daughter Nurulhuda (12 years) in a small one-bedroom apartment in a rundown building in the old town of Antakya in Turkey, close to the Syrian border. Her parents and sisters live in an apartment one floor up. Her husband now works as a tailor so they can pay the rent. Even though they have lost everything, Suad is not broken. Her strength and pride really got to me. They cant afford decorating their home but have instead made paper and textile decorations and drawings that are covering the walls inside, making it less a lodging and more of a home. I had the honour to be welcomed into her home and I spent a day together with her and her family, listening to their story, drinking many cups of tea, going to the supermarket and preparing a dinner together. (2/­­5) Back in Aleppo, we renovated our kitchen entirely when we got married. It looked very nice. It was a big, bright kitchen with a large marble countertop. The kitchen was the colour of cappuccino and some of the cabinets had glass doors. I used to place some of my finest colourful vases and glasses there, so you could see them through the glass. ***** I was invited into Suads kitchen to assist her in dinner preparations. There were no marble countertops. And no glass doors. But she still placed her best looking glasses and plates on the shelf above the sink, hiding the rest behind a curtain her husband had sewn. Due to the small space, we did all chopping and preparations while sitting on the living room rug. The family laughed at my difficulties sitting with my legs crossed on the floor doing the chopping and they kept telling me that the tomatoes needed to be more finely chopped for the tabbouleh. Her mother also pointed out that I had very thorough knife skills (meaning slow). (3/­­5) My mother-in-law taught me most of these recipes in Aleppo, as she was living in our house. And cooking this reminds me of our life there. Now, my mother lives in the same house as us, so I am actually passing these recipes on to her and my daughter as well. Food means sharing to me - with my neighbours, friends and family. Before the conflict, we were a couple of families that took turns inviting each other over. We baked sweets, cooked food, ate and sang together. Now, the most important thing is to make sure my children arent hungry, but we still share food with our neighbours, even if it just is a small plate or the smell of our cooking. When we first arrived, we didnt have any money to buy ingredients and therefore we had to eat whatever food was provided for us. But after we were approved for the e-food card we were able to buy our own ingredients, so now I can cook food that reminds me of home. ***** We prepared a Syrian version of Tabbouleh with cucumber, tomatoes, lemon, lettuce, fresh parsley, fresh and dried mint, pomegranate syrup, tomato paste and a finely textured bulgur. We also did a delicious yogurt, rice and mint soup called Lebeniyye, a fried eggplant dish with tomato sauce called Mutabbaqa and a vegetarian version of Kepse, which is a flavorful long-grain rice dish topped with toasted almonds and walnuts instead of meat. (4/­­5) Me being a man, a stranger in their house and also a foreigner, I was aware that my visit would be an awkward situation and a difficult environment for everyone to be relaxed in. And the first hours of conversation were quite honestly very polite and trembling. But something happened when we started cooking. Once we gathered around the ingredients and Suad started explaining the dishes we were making, she suddenly began smiling. In the complete sadness of their situation, food definitely brings out a spark of joy. It connected us. In-between exchanging chopping boards and mincing vegetables, they suddenly started asking me questions about how we eat in my country, how my kitchen looks and how we take care of the elderly in our families in Europe (her father gave me a disapproving mutter, when hearing my response). We started sharing photos of our children and all of a sudden, we werent strangers anymore. We finished preparing the last recipe just as it got dark outside. Nurulhuda placed all the food on a large tray on the rug in the living room. Suad invited her children, parents, all her sisters and even the driver of our car to join. And with one spoon each, we all shared from the same plates. It is a very intimate way of eating, sitting on the floor, dipping our spoons into the same bowls of soup. They also ended the meal with a traditional Arabic saying: Now that we have shared bread and salt, we are like relatives. (5/­­5) My story is the story of every Syrian ***** The Syria conflict is the worlds largest humanitarian crisis since World War II. There are currently over 2,7 million Syrian refugees living in Turkey. Only about 10% are living in refugee camps and have guaranteed access to food, shelter and basic needs. The rest are living off-camps - in small apartments, basements, garages and even caves. If you found this story interesting, please also read Emira’s story. And the story of Semira, who works as a Field Monitor Assistant for WFP. I have also written about the E-cards that WFP have developed with help from the European Commission to support refugees and give them the ability to shop and choose food themselves. The trip was part of a initiative that WFP call More Than Food. Pauline and Rens will also be going on similar trips. Here is a short video that explains the project and the E-card a bit more. Thank you for following along! Lebaniyye - Syrian Yogurt Soup Serves 4  I was particularly intrigued by Suad’s Yogurt Soup as I had never tried anything similar before. I have now been cooking it a few times since I returned. Warm yogurt might sound awkward but I found its tanginess really tasty when combined with the mint and rice. Suad served it more as a starter (traditionally I believe it is served with meatballs) but I have taken the liberty to add a bit more topping to make it even more nourishing and flavourful. Suad also cooked the rice and yogurt together from the start but I found that if you dont stay focused and stir continuously, there is a risk that the yogurt will curdle. So I instead cook the rice until its almost done before slowly stirring in the yogurt mixture. Make sure to check the cooking time for the rice. Our rice cooks in 30-35 minutes, but some are pre-steamed which would half the cooking time for the soup. Yogurt Soup 1 cup /­­ 200 g wholegrain rice or brown rice 5 cups /­­ 1,25 liter vegetable stock (or water) 1 garlic clove, grated or finely chopped 4 cups /­­ 1 liter full fat yogurt (we use Turkish yogurt) 1 egg 1 tbsp cornstarch 1 tbsp dried mint 1 tsp salt black pepper   Garlic & Chili Oil 1/­­4 cup olive oil 2 garlic cloves 2 tsp chili flakes    To serve 2 cups /­­  500 ml cooked puy lentils (or chickpeas) 1 large handful fresh spinach 1 large handful fresh mint 1 large handful fresh parsley Rinse the rice and add it to a large, thick-bottomed sauce pan along with vegetable stock and garlic. Bring to a boil and then turn the heat down slightly until it simmers. Meanwhile, add yogurt and egg to a mixing bowl and whisk rapidly until combined and smooth. After the rice has cooked for about 20 minutes, add the cornstarch to the yogurt and then use a soup spoon to ladle some of the warm stock into the yogurt mixture while using your other hand to stir (this is to slowly heat the yogurt and prevent it from curdle when mixed with the rest of the stock and rice). Then pour the yogurt mixture slowly back into the large saucepan with rice and stock while stirring. Add mint, salt and black pepper. Keep the heat on low/­­medium, so it just barely simmers and keep stirring slowly but frequently. When the rice is cooked through and the soup has thickened slightly, it is ready. Taste and adjust the flavours to your liking (I find that it needs quite a bit of salt to balance the tanginess). Remove from the heat and prepare the Garlic & Chili Oil. Heat oil in a small sauce pan on low/­­medium heat. When warm, add garlic and chili flakes, let sauté for about 45 seconds and then remove from the heat. Let steep while you ladle the soup into bowls and chop the spinach and herbs. Top the soup with a generous scoop of lentils, chopped fresh spinach, mint, parsley and a drizzle of the Garlic & Chili Oil.

Metch – Oil Free Armenian Style Bulgur Salad

August 7 2016 Fatfree Vegan Recipes  

Metch – Oil Free Armenian Style Bulgur Salad More details and complete nutritional information can be found at LoveLowFat.com/­­eech-eetch-itch-metch-delish-quick-bulgur-recipe/­­. Bulgur wheat is a versatile and healthy way to get in your whole grains. Bulgur is a type of dried, cracked wheat, often used in European and Middle Eastern dishes, such as tabbouleh. The thing I like most about bulgur is its chewy, nutty texture. My favorite bulgur recipe is a simple but delicious Armenian dish called metch. Its also known as eetch, itch or etch. Its got very few ingredients, and because bulgur is par boiled before its dried and sold for retail, you dont even have to cook it! You just let it  sit in hot water for about 20 minutes or so before mixing it with your other ingredients. Be sure not to confuse bulgur wheat with regular cracked wheat. Regular cracked wheat is not precooked and would require different preparation. Also keep in mind when shopping for bulgur is that it comes in different sizes, some more coarse or more fine than others. The size is differentiated by number. For our recipe youll be using bulgur no 2. You can usually find it in a supermarkets grain or bulk aisle. Its also available online. Ingredients: 1 cup dry bulgur (no. 2) 2 cups hot water 1/­­2 large sweet onion, chopped Juice of 1 large lemon 1 tablespoon hot red pepper paste/­­sauce 2 tablespoons tomato paste 1 yellow or red bell pepper chopped (optional) 1/­­4 cup chopped parsley (optional) Instructions: 1. Let the bulgur soak in hot water for about 20 minutes, or until it absorbs the water and plumps up. You can use cooler water but you will have to soak the bulgur longer. 2. After the bulgur is prepped, drain excess water, add the rest of the ingredients, and mix well. 3. Thats about it! Its pretty much ready! If youre like me, you wont want to wait and youll eat it right away. And you certainly can do that! But Ive noticed the more I let the ingredients meld with each other the better it tastes. This bulgur recipe is flexible since you can modify the ingredients and their measurements to suit your taste. For instance, Im inclined to add more lemon and more hot pepper sauce for extra zing, but some people might prefer their metch on the milder side. And, as mentioned in the ingredients list, for an option you can add some chopped bell pepper, preferably red or yellow. Chopped parsley goes nicely as well. Some people even like to add chopped scallion. For myself I prefer it the simple way as described above. Recipe makes roughly 4 servings. (C) ayalnaor for Fatfree Vegan Recipes, 2016. | Permalink | No comment | Add to del.icio.us Post tags: McDougall, Quick & Easy

Mediterranean Baked Bulgur

April 23 2015 Vegetarian Times 

1 | Preheat oven to 425°F. Coat 13- x 9-inch baking dish with cooking spray. 2 | Toss cauliflower and red onion with oil in baking dish. 3 | Add bulgur, tomatoes, broth, feta, dill, and salt to baking dish. Gently stir with rubber spatula to moisten all ingredients. Sprinkle pine nuts on top. 4 | Cover baking dish with foil. Bake 20 minutes, or until most of liquid is absorbed and cauliflower is tender. Remove foil. Adjust oven heat to broil, and broil 5 minutes, or until cauliflower and onion are lightly browned.

Acorn Squash Chickpea Bulgur

November 10 2014 Meatless Monday 

This hearty dinner creates delectable flavors by preparing four distinct foods simply to show off their best qualities and then contrasting them. Acorn squash is steamed, bulgur is soaked and chickpeas are sauteed before its tossed with fresh baby spinach and seasoned with lemon juice, cinnamon and paprika. This recipe comes to us from Jennifer of Eat Well Meal Plans. Serves 4 - 1 cup bulgur* - 2 medium acorn squash, cut in half & seeds removed - 1 14.5 ounce can chick peas, drained, rinsed & dried - 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided - 1 tablespoon butter - 2 cups baby spinach - 1 tablespoon lemon juice - 2 teaspoons cinnamon -  1/­­2  teaspoon paprika -  1/­­2  teaspoon salt -  1/­­4  teaspoon pepper *found in the grain section of most grocery stores. Bring 2 cups of water to a boil in a large pot over medium-high heat. Add the bulgur to the pot. Remove from heat, cover and soak for about 30 minutes, or until most of the water has been absorbed. Place the seeded squash halves on a microwave-safe plate. Pour 1 teaspoon water in each of the 4 squash cavities. Microwave on high for 15 minutes, or until the squashs flesh softens. Scoop the softened flesh from the outer shell and transfer it to a bowl. Heat 1 tablespoon of the olive oil in a large pan over medium-high heat. Add the chickpeas and sauté, stirring often, for about 4 minutes, or until they start to brown. Set aside. In the same pan, heat the remaining tablespoon of the olive oil and 1 tablespoon of butter over medium heat. Add squash by the spoonful, about 2 to 3 tablespoons per scoop. Cook for about 5 minutes on each side, or until lightly browned. Drain any excess water from the bulgur and transfer it to a large serving bowl. Add the chickpeas, squash and baby spinach. Toss lightly to wilt the spinach. Season with the lemon juice, cinnamon, paprika, salt and pepper. Toss gently to combine and enjoy. The post Acorn Squash Chickpea Bulgur appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Classic Veggie Chili with Lots of Variations

September 22 2014 VegKitchen 

Classic Veggie Chili with Lots of VariationsThis chili recipe isnt revolutionary, but a plant-based repertoire wouldnt be complete without it. For a classic combo, serve with Corn Kernel Cornbread and a colorful salad, combining mixed greens, tomatoes, carrots, cucumbers, olives, and pumpkin or sunflower seeds. Recipe from   Plant Power: Transform Your Kitchen, Plate, and Life with More Than 150 Fresh and Flavorful Vegan Recipes  by Nava Atlas. (C)2014, published by HarperOne, reprinted by permission. Photos by  Hannah Kaminsky. Serves: 6 to 8 - 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil or 3 tablespoons vegetable broth or water - 1 large onion, chopped - 3 to 4 cloves garlic, minced - 1 medium or large bell pepper (any color), finely diced - 4 to 5 cups cooked or two 28-ounce cans (drained and rinsed) beans of your choice (see Variations) - 28-ounce can crushed tomatoes - 11/­­2 to 2 cups cooked fresh or thawed frozen corn kernels - 1 to 2 fresh hot chili peppers (see Variations), seeded and minced, or one 4- to 8-ounce can chopped mild green chilies - 1 tablespoon good-quality chili powder, or to taste - 2 teaspoons ground cumin - 2 teaspoons unsweetened cocoa powder (optional; highly recommended) - 1 teaspoon dried oregano - Salt to taste Optional toppings (any or all) - Lightly cooked or raw chopped onions or scallions - Chopped fresh cilantro - Grated nondairy Cheddar-style or pepper Jack-style cheese - Diced ripe fresh tomatoes Heat the oil, broth, or water in a large soup pot. Add the onion and garlic and sauté over medium heat until the onion is golden. Add remaining ingredients except salt along with 1/­­2 cup water. Simmer gently, covered, for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Season gently with salt and adjust the other seasonings. If time allows, let stand for an hour or so off the heat, then heat through as needed before serving. The chili should be very dense, but if youd like it a bit more on the soupy side, add another 1/­­2 to 1 cup water and continue to heat through. Ladle into bowls and pass around the garnishes. Variations - Use pink, pinto, red, or black beans, varying your choices each time you make this. Using two different beans in the same pot adds to the visual appeal. - If using fresh chilies, for a spicier effect, use jalape?o or serrano peppers or 1 or 2 chipotle peppers in adobo sauce (the latter come in cans or jars and are supremely incendiary). For a milder effect, use poblanos. - For added texture, stir in a cup or so of cooked grain--quinoa, whole-grain couscous, or bulgur all work well. Adjust the liquid as needed. - Winter squash or sweet potatoes added to chili are not only delicious but also add to its visual appeal. Toward the end of cooking time, add 2 cups or so cooked diced sweet potatoes or winter squash. Butternut or sugar pumpkins are particularly good. Nutrition information Per serving: Calories: 265 with oil, 245 without oil; Total fat: 4g with oil, 2g without oil; Protein: 15g; Carbohydrates: 47g; Fiber: 13g; Sodium: 25mg

Tabbouleh Pasta Salad

August 1 2016 Vegan Richa 

Tabbouleh Pasta SaladTabbouleh Pasta Salad.  Parsley, tomatoes, fusilli pasta dressed with olive oil, salt, pepper and lemon. Fresh Summer Salad. Vegan Soy-free Recipe. Can be made gluten-free with gf pasta. Pin this Recipe.  Tabbouleh or Tabouli  is a middle eastern salad made with tomatoes, onion, chopped parsley, mint, bulgur (or couscous)  olive oil, lemon juice, and salt. It is generally available in similar forms in middle eastern restaurants as a side or a part of the mezze.  This past week has been very hot in here in the PNW and I have been craving cold things to eat. I made this salad the other day with whole grain fussilli with the rest of the ingredients as a tabbouleh. Cook the pasta. Chop all the veggies and parley. Toss well with freshly sqeezed lemon juice, fresh extra virgin olive oil, salt and pepper. Let chill for a few minutes and serve this hearty Summery Tabbouleh Pasta Salad. Continue reading: Tabbouleh Pasta SaladThe post Tabbouleh Pasta Salad appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Edamame Bulgur Salad

January 26 2015 Meatless Monday 

In this  twist on tabbouleh, zucchini and yellow squash are grilled, chopped and tossed with fresh mint, parsley and green onion. Edamame gives the salad an exotic flare and the wheat bulgur is sure to keep you full until dinner. This recipe comes to us from Elyse, Michelle and Owen May of Veggie Teens. Serves 6 - 2 cups wheat bulgur - 2 cups water - 1 medium zucchini, sliced lengthwise 1/­­4 inch thick - 1 medium yellow squash, sliced lengthwise 1/­­4 inch thick - a little olive oil, for grilling the zucchini and squash - salt, to taste - 3/­­4 cup frozen shelled edamame, thawed - 1/­­4 fresh mint leaves, chopped - 1/­­2 cup fresh parsley, chopped - 1 cup fresh spinach leaves, sliced in a chiffonade - 3 green onions, thinly sliced - 3 medium tomatoes, diced - 2 cloves of garlic, finely minced - 1/­­4 cup olive oil, divided - juice of 1 lemon Place bulgur in a large bowl and cover with the water. Allow the bulgur to soak for one hour. While bulgur is soaking, brush the zucchini and yellow squash with a light coating of olive oil. Sprinkle with salt and grill for 3-5 minutes, flip and cook for 3-5 minutes on the other side, or until the zucchini and squash are soft and marked by the grill. Remove from the heat to allow the zucchini and squash to cool completely and then chop them coarsely. Drain the soaked bulgur and place it in a large bowl. Add the chopped, grilled zucchini, squash, edamame, mint, parsley, spinach, green onions, tomatoes, garlic, olive oil and lemon juice. Stir to combine and enjoy! The post Edamame Bulgur Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Sesame Seeds: Ways to Use and Health Benefits

September 28 2014 VegKitchen 

Sesame Seeds: Ways to Use and Health BenefitsSesame seeds are worth much more than their weight, both in nutritional benefits and in culinary properties. The flavor of sesame seeds is mild and nutty. It greatly intensifies when they are expressed into oil or are ground into a paste (known as tahini) or into a butter. When buying sesame seeds, look for the whole, unhulled variety, which have not been stripped of their nutritious, deep-tan hulls. If they look shiny and white, this tips you off that they’ve ben refined. Look for black sesame seeds as well. They add visual interest to simple dishes. Whole sesame seeds will keep well for many months in a tightly lidded jar in a cool, dry place. Refrigerate them during the summer.  Sesame seeds are 48 percent fat, with roughly equal parts polyunsaturates and monounsaturated and only a small proportion of saturated fat. Sesame seeds are about 18 percent protein. Two tablespoons contain 110 calories. Sesame seeds are valued for their high vitamin E content. They are also rich in minerals iron, zinc, potassium, and phosphorous and provide substantial amounts of the B vitamins niacin and folacin.  - Sesame seeds are an excellent garnish sprinkled on almost any types of casserole, stir-fried vegetables, Asian noodles dishes such as vegetable lo mien, and green salads.  - Sesame seeds may be sprinkled over or incorporated into yeast breads, quick breads, crackers, and muffins. - Use whole or ground sesame seeds in granola or sprinkle a tablespoon or so over a serving of cold cereal.  - Toss a small quantity of sesame seeds into simple cooked grains such as brown rice or bulgur or into grain pilafs. - Incorporate them into homemade energy bars and other unbaked or baked desserts. A few recipes that highlight sesame seeds: - Chocolate- Orange-Sesame Truffles - Sesame Zucchini “Noodles” with Snow Peas - Simple Sesame-Roasted Asparagus - Simple Sesame Soba Noodles - Sesame-Ginger Salad Dressing - Homemade Chocolate Energy Bars For lots more features on healthy lifestyle, please explore our  Healthy Vegan Kitchen  page . Here are more of VegKitchens   Natural Food Guides .


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