brown rice - vegetarian recipes

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brown rice vegetarian recipes

Jamaican Red Beans and Rice

October 5 2018 VegKitchen 

Jamaican Red Beans and Rice This is an easy version of a traditional Jamaican dish that is often simply referred to as rice and peas (though the peas are actually small red beans). I first learned to make this the authentic way from a Jamaican friend -- cooking the beans from scratch and cracking open and grating a whole coconut. Coconut milk and canned beans are good shortcuts! This dish is traditionally served with sautéed plantains, a starchy, banana-like fruit. Try them if youre feeling adventurous. You can also serve with Banana Fritters, another adaptation of a traditional Jamaican recipe. Photos by Evan Atlas. Save Print Jamaican Red Beans and Rice Author: Nava Recipe type: Grain and bean main dish Cuisine: Jamaican Prep time:  10 mins Cook time:  35 mins Total time:  45 mins Serves: 6 to 8   This is a version of a traditional Jamaican favorite, there simply called rice and peas (though the peas are actually small red beans). I Ingredients 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 large onion, finely chopped 3 cloves garlic, minced 1½ cups uncooked brown rice (see note) One 15-ounce can light coconut milk 3½ to 4 cups cooked small red beans (or two 15- to 16-ounce cans, drained and rinsed) 4 to 5 scallions, thinly sliced ½ teaspoon […] The post Jamaican Red Beans and Rice appeared first on VegKitchen.

Chana with Sweet Potatoes

September 24 2018 Meatless Monday 

One of Indias most popular dishes -- Chana Masala -- features chickpeas simmered with tomatoes. This recipe features sweet potatoes and greens to make the dish even more interesting and satisfying. This recipe comes to us from Oldways. Serves 4   - 1/­­2 large onion, chopped as you like - 1 tablespoon vegetable oil of your choice - 1 teaspoon cumin - 1/­­2 teaspoon cinnamon - 1/­­2 teaspoon turmeric - 1/­­2 teaspoon coriander - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cloves - 1/­­4 teaspoon red pepper flakes - 1-2 cloves garlic, minced - 1 tablespoon freshly grated ginger - 1 (15 oz) can chickpeas, drained and rinsed - 1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes - 2 small or 1 large sweet potato, cut in chunks - 1/­­2 (15 oz) can light coconut milk or 1/­­4 can of regular coconut milk - 1 cup chopped spinach or other greens   Heat the oil in a large skillet, and cook the onion 4-5 minutes until soft and slightly golden. Add the dry spices. Amounts dont need to be exact; start with these amounts, and adjust to your taste later. Add the garlic and ginger then continue cooking gently for ten minutes to allow the flavors of all the spices to marry with the onions. Now add the tomatoes, chickpeas, sweet potatoes (cut large or small, depending on how you like them) and coconut milk. Bring to a boil, cover, and simmer on low for 45 minutes. The potatoes will soften sooner than that, but keep cooking to develop the flavors. Just before youre ready to serve, add the chopped greens and cook for a few minutes until the greens are wilted. Add salt to taste, and serve with brown rice or some other grain, or with some whole wheat naan. Active time: 1 hour The post Chana with Sweet Potatoes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Coconut-Ginger Eggplant Fried Rice

September 19 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Coconut-Ginger Eggplant Fried Rice Our farmers market is painted with all the stunning violet and purple shades of eggplant right now. I have the hardest time choosing which eggplants to get, since they are all so different and beautiful: plump, dark ones, speckled ‘graffiti’ ones, skinny Japanese eggplants… I want to buy them all. Eggplant is definitely up there among my favorite vegetables of all time. I also know that it’s quite a polarizing one, since a lot of people don’t enjoy the flavor or find eggplant intimidating to prepare. Whenever someone tells me they don’t like eggplant, I try to point them in the direction of my marinated eggplant recipe – it’s in our latest cookbook, and it impresses seemingly everyone. Eggplant is spongy and absorbent, so marinating it transforms it into this super flavorful, velvety version of itself that seriously tastes like heaven. I also really like adding eggplant to curry or ciabotta and broiling it in the oven with a miso glaze. It has so much potential to be really delicious! This eggplant fried rice is our latest obsession. It’s weeknight-friendly, satisfying, and full of fresh, late summer flavors. The preparation here is quite simple. Eggplant is cooked first and separately from all the other components of the dish, because that’s how it tastes its best in my experience. After that, all the ingredients are added to the same pan in stages, building up the flavor from the bottom up. What makes the flavors pop here is the addition of a quick, ginger-lime sauce, as well as a few tablespoons of desiccated coconut, which gets nice and toasty together with the rice. Don’t be afraid of adding tons of basil here, too. It does such a great job of elevating the whole dish with its brightness. Hope you enjoy this one! Coconut-Ginger Eggplant Fried Rice   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients 2½ tablespoons coconut oil - divided 1 large or 2 small-medium eggplants - cubed into 1 pieces sea salt 1 small yellow onion - diced 1 large or 2 small bell peppers or sweet peppers - sliced pinch of red pepper flakes 2 garlic cloves - minced 1½-2 piece of ginger - peeled if not organic juice from 1 large or 2 small limes 1 tablespoon coconut aminos or tamari 1 tablespoon brown rice vinegar ¼ teaspoon sesame oil 3 cups cooked white or brown basmati rice (from 1 cup dry) - preferably leftover or chilled 2 tablespoons unsweetened desiccated coconut, plus more for garnish large handful of basil - sliced handful of crushed toasted cashews - for garnish (optional) Instructions Heat up a large sauté pan over medium heat. Melt 1 tablespoon of coconut oil in the pan. Add the eggplant and sauté until soft and golden brown on all sides, about 15 minutes. Mix in a pinch of salt towards the end. Remove the eggplant from the pan to a plate or bowl and set aside. Wipe the pan clean if necessary. Add another 1 tablespoon of coconut oil to the pan, along with the onion, pepper, red pepper flakes, and another pinch of salt. Sauté until the onion and peppers are cooked through, about 10 minutes. Add the minced garlic and stir it around for another 30 seconds, until fragrant. While the vegetables are cooking, grate the ginger into a jar or a bowl through a fine strainer. Add the lime juice, coconut aminos/­­tamari, brown rice vinegar, and sesame oil, and stir/­­shake to mix. Once the onions and peppers are done, push them over to one side of the pan and add another ½ tablespoon of coconut oil to the empty side of the pan, letting it melt. Add the rice and desiccated coconut to the pan and mix it with the onions and peppers. Increase the heat a little bit, and let the rice and coconut toast for 2-3 minutes, stirring frequently. Mix in the ginger-lime sauce and let it absorb for about a minute. Stir in the eggplant and let it heat through with the rest of the ingredients. Turn off the heat and stir in the basil. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve the rice, garnished with toasted cashews, if using, and more desiccated coconut. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Tahini Hot Chocolate Mint and Chocolate Milkshake with Aquafaba Whipped Cream - Ice Cream S... Apple Pecan Pie with Salted Pumpkin Caramel Spring Tea Party by The Rose Journals .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Coconut-Ginger Eggplant Fried Rice appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Roasted Veggie Grain Platter

March 27 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Roasted Veggie Grain Platter Hi, David here. I’ll get to the recipe soon but first I just wanted to share a little scene from last night. Isac was watching a baking program for kids and as I was tucking him in, he thoroughly explained the whole process of making croissants to me. You have so much butter in croissants, dad. Like, a lot. You put it on the dough and fold it over the butter like this. And you hit it with the rolling pin like this, bam bam bam. When it comes to numbers and letters, he can be a little clueless, but the fact that our three year-old had memorized all the details in croissant baking from just watching it once on tv, made me all happy and proud. I’m not saying that mastering a croissant is more important than math, but teaching our kids how to cook has been one of the things I’ve really looked forward to as a dad. And he is really into it. The little kids stove has long been his favorite toy both at home and in kindergarten an he often serves imaginary pancakes to all his friends. I’ve promised him that we will make croissants together tonight so I’m off to prep a dough right after this (making the rye croissants from Green Kitchen Travels). I’ll report back with how it goes. Today’s recipe doesn’t have anything to do with croissants but Isac does play a little part as kitchen helper in the video below. So, the recipe. There is one obvious reason why grain bowls have become so popular in the last couple of years. Their looks. If you don’t know what a grain bowl is, it’s basically a mix of roasted and raw vegetables on a bed of grains and herbs arranged in a bowl. The mix of vegetables often make these bowls super colorful and therefore also very popular on instagram. Grain bowls are however more then just pretty. They are hearty and provide a variety of textures and flavors. They are also very easy to adapt to what you have at home and what’s in season. We often make grain bowls for lunch, with any cooked grain, millet or quinoa as the bed, adding leftover vegetables from the fridge on top. In this recipe, we have taken the grain bowl concept and turned it into a platter. It’s topped with roasted and fresh spring vegetables, feta cheese, egg halves and hazelnuts. It’s a beautiful dish and a great one to make for Easter dinner. If you want to take the Easter concept even further, you could add roasted asparagus as well. We use an organic five-grain mix (emmer wheat, barley, gamut, brown rice and oat groats) from Zeta as the grain base but if you can’t find something similar, go with your favorite grain. Grains thrive with flavor friends, so we have paired these with a quick salsa made from marinated bell peppers, olives, capers, herbs and lemon. And stirred in a bit of feta cheese and toasted hazelnuts as well. It’s all there, flavours, looks and textures. Roasted Veggie Grain Platter with Bell Pepper Salsa Serves 4 To make this vegan, you can simply skip the eggs and feta cheese. 1 x 250 g bag Zeta 5-grain mix (or grains of choice) Roasted vegetables: 1 bunch carrots 3 purple spring onions or 2 red onions 2 small zucchini 1 tbsp olive oil sea salt Bell pepper & olive salsa: 100 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup grilled marinated bell pepper 100 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup Lecchino olives 3 tbsp capers 5-6 stalks fresh parsley and mint 1/­­2 lemon, juice 4 tbsp olive oil Topping: 2-3 medium soft boiled eggs 150 g feta cheese 100 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup hazelnuts, toasted and chopped 2 handfuls mache lettuce 6 heirloom cherry tomatoes, halved 1 bunch radishes Preheat the oven at 200°C /­­ 400°F and cover a baking tray with baking paper. Peal or clean the carrots and trim off the outer layer of the onion. Cut the onion lengthwise and the zucchini in bite-size pieces. Place the vegetables on the tray. Drizzle with oil and salt and roast for 15-20 minutes. Cook the grains in a large bowl of salted water according to the instructions on the package and drain in a sieve once they are ready. Make the salsa by chopping all the ingredients finely. Place in a bowl, squeeze over lemon juice and drizzle with oil. Fold the salsa into the grains, reserving some of it for serving. Crumble 2/­­3 of the feta cheese into the grains and half of the hazelnuts. Toss so everything is mixed. Pour the grains onto a platter, top with the roasted vegetables, lettuce, tomatoes, radishes, egg halves, feta cheese and hazelnuts. Drizzle with olive oil and serve with the remaining salsa and some sourdough bread on the side. Disclosure: We were compensated by Zeta for creating this recipe and video using some of their products. All words are our own. 

Kichadi: The Realistic Reset

January 16 2018 My New Roots 

Kichadi: The Realistic Reset Happy 2018 dear friends! I hope that you all had a restful and relaxing holiday, and that youre ready to take on the new year. As most of you know, the past few months have been all-over-the-place (literally) for my family and I, so Ive been giving myself plenty of freedom when it comes to what Im eating and how often Im exercising. With my regular routines out the window, Ive felt an immense sense of liberation - its great to let go once in a while! - but now its gotten to the point where my body is really craving some stability and grounding, especially after the holidays. Sometimes I like to go drastic and embark on a 10-day juice fast or something like it, but my body and my mind arent feeling a hard-core anything at the moment, so Im turning to kichadi to gently ease my way back into eating with more balance. Kichadi, sometimes called and spelled khichdi, kitchari, kitcheree or khichri, is the famous one-pot wonder Indian dish that combines rice and lentils or quick-cooking pulses or legumes, such as mung beans. Its best known in Ayurvedic tradition as a cleansing and complete protein meal, very easy to digest, and a cinch to make! It is delicious, super comfort food, and even if youre not down with eating the exact same thing for every meal for several days in a row, youll be thrilled to learn its also the perfect thing to tuck into on a cold winter night. Because of its simplicity and ease, many people find that doing a kichadi “mono-diet” is very pleasant and far less of an ordeal than a juice fast for example (although I need to be clear that a juice fast is far deeper and more effective). Taking three to seven days to eat this dish exclusively gives the digestive organs a serious break since kichadi is very easy to break down and assimilate. And because digestion is at the core of human health, putting a practice in place that supports this essential process makes room for the miracle of self-healing: something the body is constantly striving for, but often distracted from by poor dietary and lifestyle choices. When we forgo processed foods, alcohol, caffeine, and common allergens for a few days, we give our bodies the space it needs to do what it naturally does anyway: clean itself up! I like to eat a kichadi diet in the colder months when the weather is unfriendly and I need some reassuring, grounding, warm food - and juicing sounds about as fun as a hole in the head. Its also a wonderful way to glide yourself into the process of cleansing if youve never tried it before. Since it doesnt involve abstaining from food, most first-timers find it totally do-able, and dare I say it, enjoyable! Ive just completed three days of eating kichadi for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and Im feeling sooo much more balanced, clear-headed, and energized - the ways I would like to feel at the beginning of a brand new year! I hope that this simple and realistic reset is up your alley, and that you give it a go. First things first, youre going to need to do a bit of planning for the kichadi diet. Set a realistic goal for yourself - ideally youll be eating this dish for at least three days, up to seven, but if one is all you can handle, that is okay too. Since youre eating throughout this practice, going about your regular life is usually fine, but if you want to go the extra mile and give yourself a real treat, do the kichadi diet over a long weekend or break from work so that you can focus on some other cleanse-enriching experiences, such as a massage, a sauna visit, daytime napping, reading an actual book, and maybe even going offline completely. Gasp! I started my kichadi diet on a Monday and carried out my normal routine with work and family life, and just made sure to give myself lots of juicy personal time in the evenings (essential oil bath, yin yoga sesh, early lights out etc.). Aside from a cleanse-classic mood swing on the last day, no one around me even noticed what I was doing. Since they were too busy eating pizza.    Before you begin youll want to start by cutting back on alcohol, caffeine, sugar, meat, dairy, processed foods, and anything else you know is throwing you off balance. If you abstain from these things for at least a couple of days before you begin, your experience will be much smoother, as you won’t be distracted by gnarly withdrawal symptoms while you’re trying to chill. You can also add any bad habits you have to your hit list, and reduce or eliminate the daily practices that arent making your life extra groovy. Whatever day you are starting the kichadi on, soak the rice and pulses /­­ legumes together the night before. This step is important for improving the digestive qualities of kichadi, but if you are really pressed for time or you forgot, get them in water as soon as you can. Remember that even soaking for an hour is better than nothing! Cook the kichadi daily if possible, since the fresher the food is, the more energy, or prana it contains. My recipe makes about six servings for my appetite (eight for people who eat less) and I can easily stretch one batch over two days if no one else in my family wants it. Regardless, youll have to make at least two batches if youre going for three days, and I would not recommend keeping kichadi around for longer than that. Freezing is an option, but freeze it in the portion size youd want to eat so that youre not heating more than you need at one sitting.        Daily routine The night before: soak the rice and pulses together in plenty of filtered water overnight. Morning: upon rising, drink a large glass of warm water with freshly squeezed lemon juice, followed by another glass of pure water. Make your first batch of kichadi, and enjoy it for breakfast. Store leftovers in the fridge. Midday: Drink a couple large glasses of water at least 30 minutes before eating. Heat your desired amount of kichadi and enjoy it for lunch. Evening: Drink a couple large glasses of water at least 30 minutes before eating. Heat your desired amount of kichadi and enjoy it for dinner. Night time: Drink a cup of herbal detox tea if desired, enjoy something that nourishes you (bath, meditation, stretching) and go to bed early. Repeat for three to seven days. Kichadi Reset tips 1. Eat when youre hungry. This may seem like an obvious one, but many people eat according to the clock, instead of listening to their bodies. Take these days to really tune in and see when your body actually desires food, and how much you need to eat to feel satisfied. When you feel real hunger, your body is giving you the signal that it is actually ready to receive. 2. Cook mindfully. Remember that cooking is something to be grateful for. If you normally approach cooking from a lets get this over with standpoint, use this opportunity to make your meal prep a ceremony, and see it as a gift to yourself. Take your time washing and cutting vegetables, delight in the sound of the spices popping, the scent that wafts up while youre peeling ginger. The attention and intention you put into your food will come back to you, and nourish you in ways that you never thought possible. 3. Keep things interesting, by adding a squeeze of lime instead of lemon to your kichadi. You can use parsley instead of cilantro, and adjust the spices to suit your personal taste. If you really need some variety, top the kichadi with some of your favourite sprouts, grated raw carrot, or fold in some spinach while its still hot. 4. Cravings are normal, especially when youre knowingly depriving yourself! If you feel a craving coming on, first identify what the craving is. Be curious...maybe it has nothing to do with the food, but more your emotional or mental state. If you really cant shake the feeling, drink water first, then try a piece of fruit, or some raw veggie sticks. 5. Drink a lot of water. The body functions optimally when properly hydrated. It is especially important when were resetting, since were letting go of things that need to be flushed out. Water is essential to this process, but it will also prevent cravings, combat fatigue and brain fog, and keep the bowels moving. Remember to drink water away from mealtimes for optimal digestion (30 minutes before eating, 2-3 hours after unless youre very thirsty). Other beverages, even if they are mostly water like coffee and tea, are not water. Only water is water. After the Kichadi diet Although it is extremely tempting to celebrate and indulge after denying oneself certain things, this is not the best time to do so. Even though this process keeps your digestive system humming along, your body is still in a sensitive place. Introduce new foods slowly, and keep combinations small and uncomplicated (i.e. dont have a meal with 20 different foods together). Limit meat, dairy, sugar, and processed foods for as long as possible. That congratulatory slice of cake should wait until youre pretty much back to normal, or maybe even find an alternative ; )     Print recipe     Simple and Cleansing Kichadi Serves 6-8 Ingredients: 1 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee 1/­­2 Tbsp. cumin seeds 1/­­2 Tbsp. mustard seeds 1/­­2 Tbsp. coriander seeds 1/­­2 tsp. ground turmeric 1 cinnamon stick 1-2 Tbsp. minced ginger (to taste) 1 large tomato, chopped (optional) 2 medium yellow onion, diced 2 medium carrots, chopped 1 small /­­ 250g sweet potato (or other seasonal root veggie), chopped 1 cup /­­ 200g brown rice 1/­­2 cup /­­ 110g mung beans or brown lentils 1 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1 cup /­­ 140g green peas, frozen or fresh 4 cups /­­ 1L water (or more, as needed) a couple handfuls finely chopped cilantro lemon to garnish Directions: 1. If possible, soak the rice and pulses together overnight, or for 8-12 hours. Drain and rinse very well. 2. Melt the oil in a large stockpot. Add the cumin and mustard seed and fry just until the mustard seeds start to pop. Add the remaining spices, stir and then add the tomato and ginger (if youre opting out of the tomato, simply use a few splashes of water). Fry for a couple minutes until fragrant. 3. Add the onion, carrots, sweet potato, brown rice, mung beans, salt, and water. Bring to a boil, reduce to simmer and cook for about 45 minutes, until the rice and beans are soft. About five minutes before serving, add the peas whether fresh or frozen, and cook until they are warm. Add more water for a stew-y consistency, or if the pot becomes dry while cooking. 4. Serve kichadi hot, garnished with cilantro and a squeeze of fresh lemon juice. Give thanks and enjoy. I hope that many of you try the kichadi diet out, and rejoice in the fact that there is no need to do something radical and overly deprivational during the winter. This is a time for closing in, for being quiet and gentle, and nourishing oneself in a tender way. And remember, you can enjoy this delicious kichadi even for a day, and any season of the year when you need to find your equilibrium once again. Its a tasty way to come back to center, every time, anytime. In health, vibrancy, and abundance for the year ahead, Sarah B. Show me your kichadi on Instagram: #mnrkichadi The post Kichadi: The Realistic Reset appeared first on My New Roots.

Rice Pudding with Berries

January 8 2018 Meatless Monday 

The Chinese often begin their day with a congee, or rice porridge. This breakfast rice, sweetened up with cinnamon and berries, is a great way to use up leftover rice. You can use any type of rice. Serves 4     - 2 cups brown rice, precooked - 1-1/­­2 teaspoons cinnamon - 1/­­2 cup almonds, slivered - 3 cups soymilk - 1/­­2 cup mixed berries Mix all ingredients and simmer until thick, stirring constantly. Serve hot or cold and garnish with berries. The post Rice Pudding with Berries appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Big Batch Golden Milk

December 18 2017 My New Roots 

Big Batch Golden Milk So we moved. Across the ocean. Its been a wild ride so far with plenty of excitement and relief coupled with awkward transitioning, and astronomical culture shock (small town Ontario is preeeeeetty different from Copenhagen). Were also renovating a very old home by Canadian standards, and the hidden surprises lurking under every lifted floorboard are creating a project slightly larger and lengthier than predicted. But wouldnt it all be so boring and predictable without those fun discoveries?! Right! Who needs a kitchen anyway? Oh wait. Amongst the self-inflicted chaotic state of affairs, Ive actually found some peace in the simple living weve got going on. Since we dont really have any friends in our little village yet, theres been plenty of time to actually take care of myself and our family. Afternoons are spent building toy train sets, cooking big batch meals, and making snacks for the days ahead. Ive started taking aerial yoga and NIA, going for nature walks every day, and having candlelit baths on the regular. Funny what removing ones social life will make room for! An important part of my self-care routine these past weeks is my simple ritual of making golden milk. Warm, comforting, and satisfying, this drink has everything needed to combat winter blues and movers remorse (I kid, I kid). Usually I make golden milk on the fly, one cup at a time, but recently I realized how handy it would be to just make a huge batch and have it ready to spoon into some hot milk when the mood strikes. Genius. For those of you that arent yet familiar with this wonder drink, Im excited for the vibrant, spicy world that is about to open up to you. Golden milk, or haldi ka doodh, actually dates back thousands of years in Ayurvedic tradition where it has been used to aid digestion and respiration, prevent colds and flu, decongest the liver, ease sprained muscles and joint pain, purify the blood, clear the skin, and aid sleep. The main ingredient in golden milk responsible for all of this awesomeness is the curcumin in turmeric, a compound that is responsible for its vibrant hue. Curcumin has been widely studied for its powerful anti-inflammatory properties, but it is also supports detoxification, helps balance blood sugar, and lowers the overall risk of cancer. How do we get the most out of this powerful phytonutrient? Simply by combining it with black pepper and fat - two important ingredients in golden milk! A compound in black pepper called piperine actually helps the body absorb curcumin, and shows to increase the bioavailability of it by up to 2,000 percent. And the good news is, you only need a very small amount to reap the synergistic benefits. Then melt a little coconut oil in, and the curcumin can be directly absorbed into the bloodstream through the lymphatic system. That’s a cooperative one-two punch of absorption and deliciousness. Once mixed, your Big Batch Golden Milk spice blend will last for up to six months. Keep it in a cool, dry place out of direct light - a closed cupboard is perfect. Do not store it right next to the stove or on top of the fridge, where the warm environment will speed spoilage. We wanna keep our medicine fresh! The Big Batch Golden Milk recipe below makes about 120 servings, so there is plenty to divvy out to your most beloved, and even save some for yourself. Make sure to include the directions so that your lucky recipients can make golden milk themselves. Ive divided them below so that you can print out just the single serving instructions for your friends and family. I’ve also included a recipe if you want to sample just one cup for yourself before committing to an entire jar. My version of golden milk has a few more spices than some blends that Ive tried, but this unique combination just tastes that much better. If youre on a tight budget, or you simply cannot find some of the spices listed, leave them out. The main ingredients you need are the turmeric, ginger, cinnamon and black pepper. The others are there for added health benefits and of course flavour, but the recipe will still be delicious without them. The milk for this recipe is totally flexible. Coconut is classic, but almond, cashew, or hemp are tasty options. You can also do half milk, half water if you like. It will be less creamy, but its great if youre trying to make your milk stretch a little farther! The most important thing to remember when making golden milk is to not overheat the spices, as they will become bitter-tasting and therefore not all that enjoyable. If you choose to use milk in your recipe, warm it gently on the stove, then remove from heat and gently whisk in the golden milk spice blend. If youre going with water, do NOT pour boiling water over the spice blend, but instead pour the recently-boiled water into a cup, let it cool for 30 seconds or so, then whisk in the golden milk spice blend. I also advise you not to add the honey or coconut oil until the spices have been stirred into the liquid youre using, as theyll incorporate easier if the spices have dissolved. If you want to use a vegan sweetener, maple syrup is my favourite choice, but brown rice syrup, coconut palm sugar, and stevia are also good options. I also love adding a sprinkling of vanilla powder right at the end for some extra va-va-voom. I recommend enjoying your golden milk first thing in the morning (right after your lemon water, of course!), or right before bed. If its a particularly cold day outside, this intelligent spice combo will warm your cells up from the inside out. Or, if youre looking for a luxurious way to unwind down after a long day, I find that golden milk is also a very effective sleep tonic. Whatever the time you choose to enjoy this drink, you will absolutely love its warm, and satisfying vibes. Make it a ritual yourself: spoon lovingly, stir consciously and sip gratefully. One more thing I should mention, is that the Big Batch Golden Milk spice blend is not only delicious as a drink, but that it can also be incorporated into a number of your favourite recipes. Toss a teaspoon into a smoothie, stir some into your morning porridge or pancake batter, fold it into a basic cookie dough or cake batter, and even try it in curries, soups and stews. The flavour is warming and pungent, so use it anywhere youd like a burst of sunshiny spice that is as good as gold.     Print recipe     Big Batch Golden Milk Spice Blend Makes approx. 120 servings Ingredients: 1 1/­­2 cup /­­ 200g ground turmeric 2/­­3 cup /­­ 70g ground ginger 1/­­3 cup /­­ 35g ground cinnamon 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. /­­ 20g ground black pepper 2 Tbsp. /­­ 20g ground cardamom scant 3 Tbsp. /­­ 20g ground cloves 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. /­­ 20g ground nutmeg 3 Tbsp. 20g ground star anise 1/­­4 cup 20g ground coriander Directions: 1. Combine all spices in a large bowl. Stir well, then transfer to a large jar or several smaller ones, and seal with an airtight lid. Keeps for up to 6 months.     Print recipe     Golden Milk Ingredients: 1/­­2 Tbsp. golden milk spice blend 1 cup milk of your choice (coconut milk is classic, but I also like cashew milk or hemp milk) 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. virgin coconut oil 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. sweetener of choice (I like raw honey) Directions: 1. In a small saucepan over medium heat, warm milk until just before it simmers. Whisk in golden milk spice blend until smooth. Remove from heat and stir in coconut oil and sweetener, if desired. Enjoy!     Print recipe     If you want to make just one batch of my golden milk, heres the single-serve recipe. Single-serving Golden Milk Ingredients: 1 1/­­2 tsp. turmeric 1/­­2 tsp. ginger 1/­­4 tsp. cinnamon pinch black pepper pinch cardamom pinch cloves pinch nutmeg pinch star anise pinch coriander I wish you all a super sweet holiday with tons of delicious food shared amongst family and friends, and that your 2018 is bursting with health and happiness. Much love to all out there, from my chilly, but cozy, little corner of the world to yours. xo, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   * In wrapping up 2017, I cannot help but look on the Wild Heart High Spirit retreats with deep gratitude and pure joy. I had a strong vision for the endeavor from the beginning: gather women in a beautiful and serene space, teach them how to reconnect to their bodies through food and movement. But I never imagined just how deep these lessons would go, how profound the changes would be, and how much fun we would have! After three this year, I can confidently say these experiences are incredibly special, and I feel very lucky to work with such a talented partner to create them. Thank you to all of the women who have traveled from all corners of the earth to join us. We love you! Here are some highlights from our trips to Bali, Ibiza, and Portugal. Click on the images below to see photos from each of our magical locations. .       We also have some very special community partners who have generously made our experiences even more abundant! Big thanks to: Naturgligolie Coconut Bowls Jukserei Pachamama Raw Bite Four Sigmatic Gourmet Print Shop We are now weaving plans for future retreats. If you are interested in learning more or joining us one day, please sign up to our mailing list to be kept up to date. We hope to see you one day soon! The post Big Batch Golden Milk appeared first on My New Roots.

Roasted Potato and Split Pea Salad with Miso Vinaigrette

November 15 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Roasted Potato and Split Pea Salad with Miso Vinaigrette This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. I’ve been wanting to come up with a worthwhile roasted vegetable salad ever since the weather turned chilly. I can’t be the only one who loses appetite for cold, super-green, lettuce-y salads once it’s cold outside. I’ll still say yes to something like a hearty kale salad, but most other ones make me shiver, if not accompanied by something warm. This salad is anything but shiver-inducing. Fingerling potatoes, carrots, and red onion all get roasted together in the oven, then mixed with green split peas, parsley, and a very special miso vinaigrette. The result is a substantial and hearty fall salad that makes for a great side dish or even lunch. Lets talk about split peas for a second. Did you know they are not only good for soups? When I was growing up in the Soviet Union, split pea soup or split pea puree was on the menu of every kindergarten/­­school lunch, and neither item was my favorite. Since then Ive learned that I like my split peas left intact, with a little bit of bite even. They are protein-rich, instantly making any dish more nourishing, and they are great at drinking up any dressing that theyre mixed with, which makes them perfect for salads. They take this salad from being just a plate of vegetables to a complete, well-rounded dish, thats acceptable to eat on its own. Do you have any favorite split pea recipes? Whether you use split peas, beans, lentils or chickpeas, making a habit of incorporating at least 1/­­2 cup of cooked pulses in your cooking a few days a week will lead to some sustainable, nourishing and affordable meals. For more recipes using pulses, check out our White Bean Tuna Sandwich, Smoky Chickpea Croutons, Fennel-Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans, Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans, Red Lentil Gazpacho, or any recipes on the Half Cup Habit website. Roasted Potato and Split Pea Salad with Miso Vinaigrette   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the miso vinaigrette 2 tablespoons white miso paste 2 tablespoons brown rice vinegar 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime or lemon juice 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil 1 teaspoon tamari 1 garlic clove - minced ¼ cup olive oil for the salad 1 cup green or yellow split peas - soaked in purified water w/­­ a splash of acv overnight sea salt 2 lb fingerling potatoes - halved or quartered 1½ tablespoons neutral coconut oil - melted freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons chopped rosemary (optional) 3 medium carrots - diced diagonally 1 medium red onion - cut into small wedges 1 small bunch parsley - finely chopped handful of dill - finely chopped (optional) Instructions to make the vinaigrette Place the the miso paste into a small bowl. Add 1 tablespoon of the brown rice vinegar and mix until smooth. Add the rest of the brown rice vinegar, lime/­­lemon juice, sesame oil, tamari and garlic, stir to combine. Continue stirring and slowly pour in the olive oil to emulsify. to make the salad Drain and rinse the split peas and combine them with plenty of purified water and sea salt in a medium pot. Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a simmer and cook, partially covered, for about 30 minutes, until soft, but not mushy. Drain over a colander and set aside. In the meantime, preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare two parchment paper-covered baking trays. Place the potatoes on one of the trays, drizzle with half of the oil, sprinkle with salt, pepper, and half of the rosemary, if using, and mix. Put the carrots and onion on the second tray, do not mix them together. Drizzle both with oil, salt, pepper and the rest of the rosemary, if using, and toss to coat. Place both trays in the oven and roast for 30-40 minutes, until all vegetables are golden and cooked throughout. The onion might cook quicker than the potatoes and carrots. Remove it from the baking sheet earlier, if thats the case. Let the roasted vegetables cool slightly and combine them with the cooked split peas in a large bowl, add the herbs and the vinaigrette, and toss to coat. This salad gets even better with time, as everything marinates in the vinaigrette. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Metabolism Boosting Everything Salad Watermelon Panzanella Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin Baked Veggie Spring Rolls .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Roasted Potato and Split Pea Salad with Miso Vinaigrette appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Stuffed Squash with Brazil Nuts and Pistachios

November 7 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Stuffed Squash with Brazil Nuts and Pistachios This flavorful and colorful Stuffed Squash with Brazil Nuts and Pistachios makes an attractive entrée for a Thanksgiving dinner. Use a dense, sweet, orange-fleshed squash such as buttercup, acorn, or kabocha for the best results with this recipe. I like to use Brazil nut butter, but you can use any type of nut butter that you prefer. Stuffed Squash with Brazil Nuts and Pistachios  This flavorful and colorful Stuffed Squash makes an attractive entrée for a Thanksgiving dinner.  - 1 tablespoon olive oil or 1/­­4 cup water - 1 yellow onion, minced - 2 cloves garlic, minced - 2 cups cooked brown rice - 1 cup cooked wild rice - 1/­­3 cup Brazil nut butter - 1/­­4 cup sweetened dried cranberries - 2 tablespoons chopped pistachio nuts - 2 tablespoons chopped Brazil nuts - 1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley - 1 teaspoon dried tarragon - Salt and ground black pepper - 1 large winter squash, halved and seeded (such as buttercup, acorn, or kabocha) - 1 1/­­2 cups hot water - Preheat the oven to 350°F. Heat the oil or water in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the onion, cover, and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. - Stir in the rice, wild rice, Brazil nut butter, cranberries, nuts, parsley, tarragon, and salt and pepper to taste. Mix well and spoon the mixture into the squash cavities -  Place the squash halves in a baking dish, stuffing sides up. Add the water to the bottom of the baking dish and cover tightly with a lid or aluminum foil. Bake until the squash is tender, about 1 1/­­2 hours. From The Nut Butter Cookbook by Robin Robertson. (C)2014 Robin Robertson. Used by permission from Vegan Heritage Press. Photo by Lori Maffei. Save Save The post Stuffed Squash with Brazil Nuts and Pistachios appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 1

November 1 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 1 This summer, we set out to share one practical, budget-friendly, and non-boring plant-based meal plan per season. Here is our meal plan for the Fall of 2017! We are really excited about the recipes in this one. It all starts out with cooking a pot of lentils and a pot of rice, roasting some winter squash, and prepping some kale. Those foundations then make their way into breakfast, lunch and dinner recipes that will take you through a whole week of nourishing and cozy fall meals. As usual, we are splitting this meal plan into two parts. This first part will focus on weekend prep, as well as breakfast and lunch recipes. Part 2 is here, and it’s all about dinner and dessert recipes. Here we go! Menu (see Part 2 for dinner and dessert recipes) Breakfast Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins Lunch Grain Bowl with Marinated Delicata Squash, Coconut Kale, and Lentil Hummus Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup Dinner Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers w/­­ Any Fixings of Choice Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew Dessert Rosemary-Roasted Plums with a Cardamom Sprinkle *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free and will make enough for a week, for 2-3 people Shopping List (print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, its got all the ingredients youll need for the recipes in this meal plan. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Produce Vegetables - 1 large and 1 medium butternut squashes - 2 medium delicata squashes - 1 lb Brussels sprouts - 2 bunches kale (or 1 very large bunch) - 4 cups baby spinach - 1 jalape?o pepper - 1 lb crimini mushrooms - 2 medium carrots - 3 large yellow onions - 2 heads of garlic Fruits - 2-3 green apples - 1 lemon - 1-2 limes (if using in place of brown rice vinegar for the marinated delicata) - 8 ripe plums Herbs  - rosemary - sage - green onions (optional) - thyme (optional) Other - 3 cups almond milk or other plant milk of choice - 1 13.5 oz can unsweetened Thai coconut milk - 1 28 oz can or box crushed tomatoes - 1 cup brown rice flour or other gluten free flour - sesame tahini - white sweet miso - burger fixings like buns, lettuce, or anything else you like w/­­ your veggie burgers - vanilla ice cream or plain yogurt to serve with the roasted plums (optional) - crackers to snack on with the hummus or sourdough bread to eat with the hummus, soup or stew (optional) Bulk - 2 1/­­4 cups dried green lentils - 3/­­4 cup millet - 1 1/­­2 cups brown rice (2 cups if using rice for the grain bowl) - 1 cup other grain of choice for the grain bowl, or 1/­­2 more cup of brown rice - 5-7 Medjool dates - 2 cups pumpkin seeds – toasted - unsweetened coconut flakes (optional) - cacao nibs (optional) Pantry /­­ Refrigerator Staples - neutral coconut oil - apple cider vinegar - brown rice vinegar (if not using limes for delicata marinade) - balsamic vinegar (optional) - tamari - olive oil - toasted sesame oil - tomato paste - coconut sugar - sea salt - maple syrup or honey - sriracha/­­chili sauce of choice - baking soda - baking powder Spices - whole cumin seeds - whole coriander seeds - green cardamom pods - smoked paprika - black peppercorns - turmeric - red pepper flakes - bay leaves (optional) Day by Day Prep List Saturday Night (Night Before Main Prep Day): These are just quick tasks that need to be done the day before your main prep day. Soaking grains and lentils helps rid them of phytic acid, which makes them easier to digest. It also kickstarts the germination process, making the grains and lentils more nutritious. - Soak 3/­­4 cup of dried millet overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. - Soak 2 1/­­4 cups of lentils overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. - Soak 1 1/­­2 cups of brown rice (2 cups if you are using it for the grain bowl) overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. - If not using brown rice for the grain bowl, soak 1 cup of another grain of choice for the grain bowl in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. Sunday (Main Prep Day): This is your main prep day, which you can also split into multiple days, depending on your schedule. You will find all the recipes for this prep day in this post, which includes two breakfast options and two lunch options for the whole week, as well as some simple prep for the dinners for the coming week. - Roast the butternut and delicata squashes to be used in Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash, Apple and Squash Muffins, Lentil and Squash Hummus, Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup, Veggie Burgers, and Grain Bowl. - Cook the lentils to be used in the Lentil and Squash Hummus, Veggie Burgers, and the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew. - Cook the brown rice to use in the Veggie Burgers and the Grain Bowl, if that’s your grain of choice for the bowl. - If you chose another grain for the grain bowl, cook it now as well. - Cook the kale and coconut kale to be used in the Grain Bowl and Veggie Burgers. - Make the Lentil and Squash Hummus to be used in the Grain Bowl, on the Veggie Burgers, and on crackers/­­bread as a snack throughout the week. - Marinate the roasted delicata squash to use in the Grain Bowl. - Make the Simple Butternut Squash and Apple Soup. - Bake the Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins. - You can also cook the Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash for your breakfasts ahead of time, but I suggest making it in the morning. It’s pretty quick. Monday Night: Make the Veggie Burgers to have for dinner on Monday, Tuesday, and possibly Wednesday nights. This will be fairly quick, since you’ve already cooked the squash, rice, kale and lentils that are called for in the recipe during prep day. Roast the plums for dessert on Monday or Tuesday night, it’s quick and you will have enough for dessert for the rest of the week. The recipes for the Veggie Burgers, Brussels Sprout Stew and the Roasted Plums are in Part 2.  - Make the Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers. - Make the Rosemary-Roasted Plums with Cardamom Sprinkle. Wednesday/­­Thursday night: Once you’ve finished eating the Veggie Burgers, prepare the Brussels Sprouts Stew for dinner starting Wednesday or Thursday night and until the end of the week. The recipe for the stew is in Part 2.  - Make the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew.   Prep 1. Winter squash is a beautifully versatile vegetable that can be used in millions of ways in both sweet and savory dishes. It’s always a great idea to roast a bunch of squash on the weekend, to use in all kinds of dishes throughout the week. In this meal plan, we use Butternut and Delicata Squashes in the Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash, Apple and Squash Muffins, Lentil and Squash Hummus, Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup, Veggie Burgers, and Grain Bowl. See what I mean? It really is a super-vegetable. Roasted Butternut and Delicata Squashes   Print Ingredients 1 large and 1 medium butternut squash - cut in half lengthwise and seeded 2 medium delicata squashes - seeded and sliced into ½-inch rings neutral coconut oil - soft sea salt freshly ground black pepper Instructions Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare 2-3 parchment paper-lined baking sheets. Arrange all the squashes on the baking sheets in a single layer. Oil them with the coconut oil and sprinkle with salt and paper. Roast the delicata squash for 10 minutes, then flip all the rings and roast for another 15-20 minutes, until cooked through and golden on both sides. Delicata squash skins are edible, so no need to peel off the skin. Roast the butternut squashes at the same time, for about 40 minutes or until soft throughout. You should end up with about 3 cups of roasted mashed squash flesh from the large butternut squash, which you will use for the hummus, muffins, porridge and burgers. The remaining 1 medium butternut squash will be used for the Simple Squash and Apple Soup. 3.5.3226   2. A pot of lentils, cooked on the weekend, can easily take you through a week of meals. They are nourishing, affordable, and can work as a base for so many meals. In this meal plan, we use French lentils in the Lentil and Squash Hummus, Veggie Burgers, and the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew. Pot of Lentils   Print Ingredients 2¼ cups dried French lentils - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the lentils. Place them into a medium-large pot, cover with purified water, and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook for about 15-20 minutes, or until soft, but still intact. Add salt at the last 5 minutes. Drain and use in recipes right away or store in an airtight container for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   3. Similarly to lentils, a pot of rice or any other grains, prepared on the weekend, can help you pave the way to quicker and better meals throughout the week. In this meal plan, we use brown rice in the Veggie Burgers and the Grain Bowl (if that’s the grain you chose for your bowl). Serve any leftover rice with the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew. If you chose a different grain for your grain bowl, cook it now as well. Pot of Brown Rice   Print Ingredients 1½ cups brown rice (2 cups if using rice for your grain bowl) - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar 2½ cups filtered water (3½ cups if cooking 2 cups of rice) sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the rice. Combine it with the water and plenty of sea salt in a medium pot, cover with a lid and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 25-40 minutes, until all the water is absorbed and the rice is cooked. Use in recipes right away or store refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   4. Blanching kale is one of my favorite, low maintenance ways of prepping a whole bunch of it for the week. In this meal plan, it will be used for the Coconut Kale and the Veggie Burgers. I also like to use the leftover kale cooking water for soups, stews, etc. In this meal plan, you can use the leftover kale broth for the Coconut Kale, the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew and even the Simple Squash and Apple Soup. Half of this blanched kale gets stored away for later use in the Veggie Burgers, while the other half becomes the Coconut Kale for our grain bowl lunch. You’re going to love the coconut kale – it’s velvety, creamy, and keeps well throughout the week. Blanched Kale and Coconut Kale   Print Ingredients 2 bunches (or 1 very large bunch) kale of choice sea salt 1 can unsweetened Thai coconut milk Instructions Separate the kale leaves from the stems. Wash and tear the leaves into roughly bite-sized pieces. Reserve the stems to use in homemade vegetable broth in the future, if desired. Place the torn kale leaves in a large pot and cover with purified water. Add salt and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes. Drain the kale, reserving the cooking liquid for the Coconut Kale and the Brussels Sprouts Tomato Stew. Return half of the kale to the same pot. Squeeze the other half of the kale dry and store it away in an air-tight container, in the refrigerator, to use later in the veggie burgers. Add ½ cup of the reserved kale cooking liquid and 1 can of coconut milk to the pot. Bring to a strong simmer and cook for 10-20 minutes, until creamy. Add more of the kale cooking liquid throughout the cooking time, if needed. Taste for salt and adjust, if needed. Eat right away or store refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   5. The good news is, you already have all the important ingredients prepared for this hummus – you’ve cooked the lentils and roasted the squash, which you’re going to puree with autumn herbs, garlic, tahini, lemon juice, and olive oil. Though for efficiency’s sake, we use lentils instead of the traditional chickpeas here, the spread still very much tastes like hummus. And not just any hummus – it’s fresh, savory, earthy hummus that’s better than anything you can get at the store. Use it throughout the week in the Grain Bowl, on top of the Veggie Burgers, or as a quick snack with some crackers. Lentil and Squash Hummus   Print Ingredients ¼ cup plus 2 tablespoons olive oil - divided 4-5 cloves of garlic - peeled and sliced 1-2 tablespoons chopped herbs, such as rosemary, sage and thyme 1 cup roasted mashed butternut squash (from the large butternut squash from above) sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1½ cups cooked green lentils (from above) juice from 1 lemon ¼ cup sesame tahini 3-4 tablespoons cold water toasted pumpkin seeds - for garnish (optional) Instructions Warm 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a small sauté pan over medium heat. Add garlic and herbs and sauté for about a minute, until garlic is fragrant and cooked, but not burnt. Add the squash, salt and pepper, and toss to coat. Stir around for a minute or so for the flavors to mix. Add the mixture to a food processor or a high-speed blender like a Vitamix. Add the lentils to the food processor/­­blender, followed by the lemon juice, sesame tahini, and more salt, to taste. Process until smooth, scraping the walls if needed. With the motor still running, pour in ¼ cup of the olive oil through the funnel, followed by the cold water. Pour in the water 1 tablespoon at a time until you achieve a desired, creamy consistency. Sprinkle the hummus with the toasted pumpkin seeds when serving, if using. Store the hummus in the refrigerator in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   6. Marinating vegetables is one of my favorite preparations, especially if I’m cooking ahead. It’s as easy as mixing up a marinade, and the veggies will only get more flavorful with each passing day. This miso-marinated delicata squash has got it all – it’s a little sweet, a little savory, and a bit spicy. It’s the perfect, powerful component to a memorable grain bowl, which is how it’s utilized in this meal plan. If you are planning on eating this squash at work/­­social settings, you might need to be cautious with the garlic – the squash is still really good without it! Miso-Marinated Delicata Squash   Print Ingredients 2 sliced and roasted delicata squashes (from above) 2 tablespoons white sweet miso paste 1 tablespoon maple syrup or honey (not vegan) 2 teaspoons chili sauce, such as sriracha 4 tablespoons brown rice vinegar or lime juice 1 tablespoon tamari 2 teaspoons sesame oil 1 garlic clove - minced (optional) 1 tablespoon finely chopped green onion (optional) Instructions Place the sliced and roasted delicata squash in a shallow dish. In a small bowl, combine the miso with the maple syrup and sriracha, and mix until smooth. Add the rice vinegar/­­lime juice, tamari, and sesame oil, and mix until smooth. Mix in the sesame seeds, garlic and green onion, if using. Pour the marinade over the delicata squash and toss to coat. Cover and let marinate at room temperature for 1-3 hours. Keep refrigerated for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   Recipes 1. These gluten-free muffins make for a great breakfast or snack. They are very subtly sweet – sweetened only with dates – and get their soft, crumbly texture from the roasted squash that’s hiding in the batter. There are pockets of cubed apple throughout, and the pumpkin seeds on top add a nice bit of crunch. Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins   Print Serves: 10 medium-sized or 12 small muffins Ingredients 1½ tablespoons neutral coconut oil, plus more for oiling the pan ¾ cup brown rice flour or other gluten-free flour pinch of sea salt 1 teaspoon baking powder ½ teaspoon baking soda 5-7 soft Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in 1 cup of hot water for 10 minutes ½ cup roasted mashed butternut squash (from the large butternut squash from above) 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar 1-2 Granny Smith apples - peeled and finely cubed (optionally slice some of the apple to decorate the tops of muffins) 2 tablespoons chopped sage leaves (optional) pumpkin seeds - for sprinkling Instructions Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Prepare a muffin pan by thoroughly oiling the holes or lining it with paper muffin liners. Combine the flour, salt, baking powder and baking soda in a medium bowl. Put the dates in an upright blender, together with their soaking water. Add the squash and blend until smooth. Add the coconut oil and vinegar and pulse to combine. Pour the wet mixture into the bowl with the dry ingredients and quickly stir to mix. Fold in cubed apples and sage, if using. Fill the muffin holes with the batter until each hole is about ⅔ full. Sprinkle each muffin with pumpkin seeds and decorate with apple slices, if using. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until a toothpick comes out clean. Let cool a little, then remove the muffins from the pan and let them cool on a cooling rack. Enjoy right away or store in an air-tight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   2. This millet porridge is warming, cozy, satisfying, and overall perfect for chilly fall mornings. Millet is a humble and affordable gluten-free grain, but it has the potential to be quite creamy and luxurious when cooked in plant milk with turmeric and squash. The porridge is pictured here topped with some of the roasted plums from Part 2 of this meal plan, which makes it even more special. Turmeric Millet Porridge   Print Ingredients 2 tablespoons coconut oil or ghee (not vegan) 1 teaspoon turmeric a few grinds of black pepper (to activate the turmeric) ¾ cup millet - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar 1½ tablespoons coconut sugar pinch of sea salt 4 cups almond milk or other plant milk (or 3 cups milk and 1 cup water) - divided 1 cup roasted butternut squash (from the large butternut squash from above) toasted pumpkin seeds and coconut flakes - for serving (optional) Instructions Warm the oil/­­ghee in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the turmeric and black pepper, and stir around for about a minute. Add the millet, coconut sugar, salt and 3 cups of plant milk (or 2 cups of milk and 1 cup of water). Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 20 minutes. Stir periodically to prevent the porridge from sticking to the bottom. In the meantime, blend the squash and the remaining 1 cup of plant milk in a high-speed blender. Mix the blended mixture into the porridge after the 20 minutes of cooking and stir to combine. Simmer everything for another couple of minutes. (Alternatively, skip blending the squash and the remaining plant milk in a blender and add both the squash and the rest of the milk to the porridge, stirring to warm everything through. This will result in a less smooth porridge with some pockets of squash, which I like as a nice change from a smooth porridge). Serve the porridge topped with toasted pumpkin seeds and coconut flakes, if desired. Store in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. Reheat gently over medium low heat with more ghee/­­coconut oil and a splash of plant milk or water. 3.5.3226   3. This grain bowl will come together very quickly during a weekday lunch, since you’ve already gotten all the components ready during prep day. As an alternative to the bowl, you can spread the hummus on some sourdough bread and top that with the squash for an open-faced sandwich, with the coconut kale on the side. Marinated Delicata Squash, Coconut Kale, and Lentil Hummus Grain Bowl   Print Ingredients cooked brown rice or another grain of choice (from above) coconut kale (from above) miso-marinated delicata squash (from above) lentil and squash hummus (from above) toasted pumpkin seeds Instructions Heat up the rice and coconut kale in a pan or saucepan with a bit of oil or water. You can also gently heat the miso-marinated squash, but be careful not to heat it too much because of the miso. Serve all the components together in a bowl, sprinkled with toasted pumpkin seeds. 3.5.3226   4. Our second lunch option is a very lovely and very simple pureed fall soup, with flavors of butternut squash, green apple, and autumn herbs. Simple Butternut Squash and Apple Soup   Print Ingredients 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped 1 green apple - peeled, cored and chopped 2 garlic cloves - sliced 1 teaspoon coriander seeds - preferably freshly ground about 1 tablespoon chopped sage and rosemary sea salt freshly ground black pepper flesh from 1 medium roasted butternut squash (from above) Instructions Warm the oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion, apple, garlic, coriander and herbs, if using, and sauté everything for 10 minutes. Scoop the flesh out of the roasted squash and add it to the saucepan, followed by the sea salt, pepper and 3 cups of purified water. Bring to a boil and simmer for 10 minutes, until all the flavors are combined well. Carefully blend everything in an upright blender until smooth. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve right away or store in an airtight container for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226 Continue to Dinner and Dessert Recipes > > >  You might also like... Moroccan Stew and Sunshine Crackers from The First Mess + a Giveaway Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies Squash Noodle Soup with Healing Turmeric-Ginger Broth, Roasted Carrots... Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 2 .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 1 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso

September 6 2017 My New Roots 

Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso I have to start by saying how incredibly moved I was by the comments on the last post, and the emails I received from you guys - a deep, heartfelt thank you. I knew that opening myself up would spark a lot of conversation, but I never imagined the impact it would have, not only in regards to the incredible outpouring of support, but for sharing your own stories and struggles. Time and time again I am reminded of the power in vulnerability and open communication. I feel truly blessed to have a community of conscious and loving readers, and that we can all share our journey with one another. That is what makes us stronger, and certainly healthier human beings in every sense of the word. Before I dig deeper into what Ive been doing to eat for balancing my hormones, Id like to just follow-up with the topic of orthorexia. Many of you expressed surprise at my struggles, thinking that because I do what I do, I must have had it all together. The truth is I thought that I did have it all together for a very long time, and creating My New Roots has been the most powerful catalyst in my healing. For the last decade, Ive felt very grounded in my choices and excited to celebrate them with you. But like I mentioned in the last post, the experience of changing my diet has brought back many of the challenges, dark thoughts and feelings that I had convinced myself were gone forever. Putting new restrictions on myself made me to put food into good and bad categories. This probably doesnt sound so terrible, but like I said before, this is a slippery slope into full-blown disordered eating for me. I see now that there is an incredibly fine line between caring about what I eat and caring too much. I believe that my relationship to food is something that I may have to keep in check for the rest of my life, or at least as long as I choose to use it as a tool to become a healthier person (so, like, forever). In the last four months of tuning into what I need right now, and eating more consciously, Ive really experienced a positive difference in how I feel, which is the biggest reward anyone could ask for! But Ive also had bad days where I wasnt prepared, and suddenly being at a wedding or a birthday party, or out for dinner with friends without much to eat in the good category, wasnt so rad. My blood sugar would crash, Id feel desperate, totally out of control and the voices would come back. What Ive learned from these experiences is that I need to be as prepared as possible in these situations, but if I can’t, I simply have to let go. I cannot control everything and I cannot always be prepared, but that in order to move forward, I have to maintain flexibility, and stop being so darn hard on myself! I firmly believe that there is more strength in being fluid and forgiving, than rigid and judgmental. I am just a person, after all. Since many of you were curious about the connection between food and hormone balance, Id like to discuss it in more detail, and share what Ive been doing to keep these miraculous chemicals in check, and keep them working for me, not against me! Upping my fat and protein intake – but especially fat Fats are an essential part of a healthy, well-balanced diet, and they are especially important for hormone balance. Fats actually create the structural components of hormones, and cholesterol specifically is responsible for our reproductive hormones; estrogen, progesterone and testosterone. The type of fat you choose however, is critical to achieving a positive effect, as the ones you consume become the building blocks for your hormones. Saturated fats like coconut oil, butter and ghee, and monounsaturated fats like olive oil, nuts, eggs, and avocados are excellent choices and should be consumed responsibly every day. Cut back on or eliminate corn, canola, sunflower, safflower and soybean oils, and replace them with the aforementioned instead. Ive also increased my protein intake, and consciously replacing more high-carbohydrate foods with more protein-rich foods such as tempeh, hemp, sprouts, activated nuts, eggs, and quality protein powder has really made a difference in stabilizing my energy levels and appetite. Getting enough protein on a vegetarian diet is totally possible, but I find that if Im not really paying attention, I can dip below the ideal 45 grams a day. Loosely (not obsessively) keeping track of my daily intake of protein has helped me feel my best. Keeping my blood sugar stable It may seem totally unrelated, but blood sugar and hormones are in fact inextricably linked. One of the main functions of the endocrine system (the system that creates and transports hormones in your body) is delivering glucose to your brain, muscles, and heart. So if anything in that process isnt working properly, than mismanaged blood sugar is the inevitable result. But whats worse is that it creates a cascade effect whereby none of the other parts of your endocrine system will work either. Sheesh! Walking the line between high and low blood sugar is something that Ive really been focusing on lately, and its working well, but it is an ongoing process that takes some getting used to. Including more fat and protein in my diet has been a game-changer for me, since those macronutrients digest slower than carbohydrates - even the complex ones from things like sweet potatoes, quinoa, and chickpeas. I try to eat a large and protein-rich breakfast within an hour of waking up (after the lemon water, of course!). Lunch is where I get the majority of my calories since that is when I need the most energy. I like eating roasted vegetables, avocado, eggs, and sprouted pseudo-grains like quinoa and buckwheat. I snack in between meals when Im hungry, but instead of reaching for a slice of rye bread or a rice cake, Ill have veggies with a high-fat dip, or a handful of my Maple Cinnamon Grain-free Granola. Dinner is mostly grain-free these days and I stick to salads, soups and stews. I go to bed no longer than four hours after dinner so that Im not hungry right before I hit the pillow. Then I like to have a break of about 14 hours between dinner and breakfast the next day, as my digestion does well on the rhythm of intermittent fasting. Eating more vegetables (and less bread a.k.a. DUH) I almost always had a couple slices of rye bread at lunch. Not that there is anything wrong with doing so, but Ill admit to feeling pretty foggy-headed afterwards. And because it filled me up so much, I had less room for veggies. Now Im prepping raw and cooked vegetables ahead of time and keeping them on hand specifically for my big lunches. Some favourites to roast in the oven are cauliflower, sweet potato, pumpkin, red onion, zucchini, tomatoes, and broccoli. Ive also started cutting up a big plate of veggie sticks in the early afternoon, before I even get hungry, so that it is there and waiting for me - no excuses. Right before diving in I douse it in freshly squeezed lemon juice, Maldon salt and Aleppo pepper. Its honestly delicious. I dont have to tell you that vegetables are full of filling fiber, replenishing phytonutrients, and yes, protein. Especially dem green ones. Eat more plants. Habits + meal prep I think this was the other big hurdle for me when it came to changing things up with my eating habits. I knew that if I was going to start eating food differently, Id have to start preparing food differently too - and a lot more often. I already spend a lot of time in the kitchen (obvi) and I love it, but I am also a person who likes to spend her non-work hours away from the cutting board. Eating this way admittedly does take more time, and makes it more challenging to eat out, or just grab something on the go. Coming to terms with this was challenging, but Ive realized that I have to dedicate more time to my diet if I want to be successful. No matter how you slice it, meal preparation is a very big part of sticking to your goals, whatever they may be. Of course there are times when its just not possible to do, and divergent days are fine, but the majority of your food youre should fall into the category that helps you feel your best, however you define that. Instead of prepping one day a week, which I know a lot of people like to do, I actually prefer to pepper it throughout the week in a way that is a little more fluid for me. If the Life-Changing Loaf of Bread is in the oven for instance, Ill chop up a bunch of veggies, and put them in too. If Im washing greens for a salad, Ill do all of them so that theyre ready to chuck into a smoothie on a whim. Lee from Americas Fat Balls have also been a super snack these days. And like I mentioned before, having fresh veggies washed and sliced up for afternoon cravings is very helpful. I can prepare two or three days worth at a time and keep them in the fridge. Mindset Instead of looking at food in terms of good and bad which I think is a dangerously judgemental way to categorize what were eating, I like to say yes to certain things, and the others fall into the not-right-now basket. For instance, I love brown rice to the ends of the earth and back, but Im not eating it right now since it doesnt make me feel all that great. And just because Im not eating brown rice these days doesnt mean I’ll never eat it again! This leaves room for flexibility and creates a far more sustainable way to look at ones diet. Isn’t it relieving to know that if you are out for dinner and there’s only rice for example, that you could potentially eat it and not beat yourself up? Ahhhh…did you feel that?! What a relief, eh? Tomorrow you’ll get back on the horse, no big deal at all. Making changes should be fun, and keep those labels for tin cans! You’re a fluid being, ever-changing, so make space for that in your meal planning too. Self-care routine, stress-reduction, exercise, and sleep I used to see self-care as something that only people with time have. Well, after totally hitting the wall a while ago, I realized that it just has to be a priority, respected as a part of a holistic approach to health, and something to actually schedule in the calendar. Staying active, sleeping, and treating myself to some yummy stress-reducing activities like spending time in nature, bodywork, and cooking (go figure) keeps me feeling happy and relaxed. Squelching stress doesnt happen by accident: it is truly a daily practice and something to be mindful of. Listen to yourself. How can this moment be juicier and more relaxing? Its fun to love yourself! Keeping stress levels low means that your body will be relaxed and not producing hormones that should only be reserved for emergency situations. Cortisol is a stress hormone released by the adrenal glands. Every time we experience a stressful situation we secrete this hormone into the blood stream so that our bodies can deal with the stressor at hand. Although cortisol is our friend in acute situations, our systems arent designed to be pumping it out round the clock as we juggle and struggle with backlogged emails, fussy kids, and traffic jams. This is why chronic stress is so detrimental to our bodies: prolonged, elevated cortisol levels wreak all kinds of wrong inside of us, raising our blood pressure, causing unwanted weight gain, exhaustion, anxiety, impaired brain function, and weakening the immune response. All the more reason to take self-care seriously, and do the things you love more often. Its actually healthy. Sleeping 7-9 hours a night is another non-negotiable. Getting enough sleep helps us to control our cortisol production, balance our blood sugar, and put us back in line with our natural circadian rhythm. Turning screens off an hour before bedtime will help signal to your body that it is in fact, night time. Create a relaxed, cozy environment and spend the last hour before bed reading, stretching, or meditating. I still struggle with this one, as I love looking at Instagram right before turning out the light, but Im becoming more mindful and doing my best. Required Reading There are a few really amazing books out there that I recommend every woman reads, whether or not you’re seeking advice on a particular health issue. Understanding our bodies and cycles is the first step in helping ourselves become healthier, stronger, more connected women. Woman Code by Alisa Vitti has been hugely educational and supportive for me. Her book is a guide to figuring out what the heck is going on inside you, and how to correct it through diet and lifestyle. I appreciate her easy-to-understand language and humour in this book, because let’s face it: nothing is very funny when you’re hormones are raging! The Complete Natural Medicine Guide to Women’s Health by Dr. Sat Dharam Kaur has been and continues to be another excellent resource for me. This book is more of an all-round toolkit for lifelong health and healing, than specifically about hormone balance. I love the holistic approach to all conditions, and inspiring programs to get us back in touch with our natural cycles in connection to the earth. The third book I recommend is Hormone Balance by Carolyn Dean. Dean is a naturopathic doctor that utilizes both traditional and alternative solutions to help readers rebalance their hormone levels. Her writing is engaging and inspiring, and this book is full of ways for women to achieve greater overall health. Oh man, I havent even talked about the tacos yet! So. I got the idea for these this past summer when I was chopping up tempeh to replace ground beef with in a tomato sauce for pasta. It turned out so meaty, satisfying, and delish that I thought I could perhaps take that same idea, spice it up a little differently, and serve them in a taco. Woot! I knew that grilled veggies and red cabbage would help cut the richness, but that I would also need a boss sauce to put them over the top. During one of my retreats I made a raw queso in our cooking class and everyone went wild for it. It seemed like a natural fit! Topped with some lime, avo, pickled red onions, and cilantro these were the best tacos Ive ever had. Ever. Ever. And Ive had a lot of tacos. I know some of you are going to ask about the corn tortillas and probably remind me that corn is a “grain”. Yes, I am aware of that, and I’ll remind you that I am not grain-free, just cutting way back. I stick mostly to pseudo-grains and make sure they are soaked prior to cooking, and enjoy a treat like this once in a while. I only purchase tortillas made with sprouted corn, or from corn that has been nixtalmized (that topic is a whole other blog post!). I buy my corn tortillas from Hija de Sanchez here in Copenhagen. Their tortillas are made fresh daily using nixtamalized corn imported from Mexico, so they taste unbelievably good. Of course taco fillings are important to a good taco, but the tortilla quality should not be overlooked! It makes the dish. Go find the good ones.     Print recipe     Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso Serves 3-4 Tempeh Taco Meat 250g /­­ 8.8oz organic, non-GMO tempeh 1 medium red onion 4 cloves garlic 1 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee 1 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. chipotle or smoked hot paprika, to taste 2 Tbsp. tamari 2-5 Tbsp. water, as needed Grilled vegetables 1 medium zucchini 1 medium red onion 1 red bell pepper 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1 tsp. ground cumin a couple pinches of cayenne, if desired 12 small corn tortillas (try to find organic, non-GMO if possible) 1 batch Raw Cashew Queso, recipe below Optional add-ins: 1 ripe avocado 1 small bunch cilantro pickled red onion or thinly sliced red onion shredded red cabbage tossed with a little salt and lime juice limes for serving hot sauce Cooking and assembly: 1. Start by making the Raw Cashew Queso (see recipe below). 2. Heat your grill or barbecue to medium-high. If not using a grill, simply cook everything in a skillet on the stove. 3. Finely chop or crumble tempeh into whatever size appeals to you (mine were rather small to mimic ground beef). Set aside. Mince red onion and garlic. Set aside. 4. Soak wooden skewers in water while you prepare the vegetables, or longer if you remember. If using metal skewers, skip this step. 5. Wash and cut the zucchini and onion into rings, the peppers into chunks. Place in a large bowl and toss with the salt and spices. 6. Skewer the vegetables so that their largest surface will lay flat on the grill (see photo). Alternate veggies until youve used them all. Place on the grill and cook until stating to char on the underside, anywhere from 5-10 minutes, depending on your cooking method. Flip and cook on the other side. 7. While the vegetables are grilling, cook the tempeh. H eat your cooking oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the onion and a few pinches of salt. Cook until starting to brown, about 7-10 minutes. Add garlic and cook for another minute until fragrant. Add crumbled tempeh, cumin, chipotle, and stir well to incorporate. Pour in the tamari, followed by a couple tablespoons of water. Stir well and add water as needed - youre after a moist mixture. Taste and adjust seasoning as desired. Cook for a total of 10 minutes. The mixture should be golden brown, hot and delicious! 8. Warm the tortilla shells on the grill or in a pan over medium-high heat. 9. Spoon the desired amount of tempeh into each tortilla shell. Followed by the roasted veggies, avocado, cabbage, cilantro and pour on the Raw Cashew Queso. Enjoy! Raw Cashew Queso Makes about 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 150g cashews, soaked for 4-8 hours or overnight 1 red bell pepper 1/­­2 tsp. salt 2 Tbsp. nutritional yeast 2-3 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice, to taste 1/­­2 clove garlic 1 small piece fresh turmeric ground cayenne, to taste 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water Directions: 1. Drain and rinse the cashews. 2. Put all ingredients, except water, in a high-speed blender or food processor and blend, adding water one tablespoon at a time until the desired consistency is reached. If you want a thick cream, use less water, for a thinner sauce, use more. (You will not achieve a perfectly smooth sauce with a food processor, but it is still delicious!). Before I go I just want to reiterate how wonderful it felt to be met with such open arms after the last post. I wish I could write back to every single one of you who shared their story with me, and everyone else here, but I simply couldnt get to them all. I am moved beyond words that so many of you felt open and supported in this space too, and I will urge you to seek out help if you need it. And if you know someone who you think may struggle with disordered eating, reach out and help them in a loving, and non-judgmental way. We are all in this together. In love and light, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   *   * http:/­­/­­www.goldencircleretreats.com/­­portugal/­­index.html Dear friends! I am thrilled to share the location for my next wellness retreat in magical Comporta, Portugal, November 5-11, 2017. Join Mikkala Marilyn Kissi and I at Sublime Comporta for seven days of luxurious living, divinely delicious meals, inspiring cooking classes and nutrition seminars, yoga, Pilates, meditation, and breath work. Come press the reset button with me! Ride horses on the beach, dance under the stars, and cozy up by the fire. This will be a week to remember. I cant wait to see you there! Click here for more info and tickets. The post Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso appeared first on My New Roots.

Cinnamon Crunch Cereal and Hemp Milk

August 14 2017 My New Roots 

Cinnamon Crunch Cereal and Hemp Milk It is easier to change a man’s religion than to change his diet. – Margaret Mead Yup. Pretty much. This entire shift began when I had a particularly gnarly couple of months with manic mood swings that rivaled my adolescence, acne flare-ups, bloating, low energy, night sweats, and all-round malaise. Knowing what I know, I looked at my diet first to see what could be adjusted. Everything was organic, whole, plant-based and totally healthy by most peoples standards. But it just wasnt working anymore. I knew something had to give. Delving in deeper, a typical day for me was a whole-grain porridge in the morning, topped with all kinds of seasonal fruit, homemade granola etc. Lunch was a couple slices of organic sourdough rye bread from the local bakery, with homemade hummus, avocado, sprouts etc. Dinner was often a mixed bowl, the base of which was brown rice, quinoa, millet or buckwheat covered in a rainbow of vegetables, homemade pickles, superfood-loaded sauce, and fresh herbs. I wasnt eating sugar, drinking coffee, I was keeping up with my exercise and sleeping well. So what was the problem? In this case, I had a feeling it was a big ol grain overload. The idea of cutting back on my morning oats, bread, and grain bowls was literally devastating to me. I cried. On multiple occasions, just talking about giving up muffins made me weep, and I felt like there was just no way I could make even more changes, or think about my diet even more than I already did. I have had two serious experiences with orthorexia in my life. For those of you who dont know what orthorexia is, it is defined as an obsession with healthy eating. It is considered an eating disorder, and one that is becoming more prevalent in Western culture as healthy eating becomes increasingly trendy. The first bout happened the year I moved out of the house to study at university. While many of my friends were bingeing on junk food and beer, I swung in the opposite direction entirely and took advantage of the incredible meal program that was offered at school, and fueled myself with enormous salads, delicious sandwiches and wraps, veggie-heavy soups and stews, and protein-rich smoothies. I also signed up for the free fitness classes at the university gym, got hooked on kickboxing, step aerobics, boot camp drills, and the weight literally fell off me. I lost about 25 pounds that year, and for the first time in my life I felt like I was in control of the way I looked. The sudden attention from guys – which I had never had before – further stoked the fires for my desire to be even thinner, even though my initial motivation to eat this way stemmed from a desire to be healthy. As my attitude towards food morphed from friend to enemy, I flirted with a full-on eating disorder at this point, playing games with myself to see how long I could go without eating, how many exercise classes I could fit in between classes and study groups, how long I could make my bean salad from lunch last (too long!). Eventually my energy levels dropped to the point where I had a very hard time getting out of bed in the morning and I couldnt concentrate well in school. I realized that I had taken things too far and started eating in a more balanced way again. I put the experience behind me without giving it too much thought. The second time this resurfaced was, ironically, while studying holistic nutrition. While I was learning all about foods and how my body worked, I became almost afraid to eat, toxifying my body, or poisoning it with sugar, gluten, dairy and the rest. I became obsessed with detoxing and subsisted only on clean foods; mostly vegetables. I was stressed, my hair started falling out, my acne came back and my energy hit an all-time low. Despite my obvious physical misery, I somehow felt validated since I wasnt putting anything bad in my body. Eating as healthy as possible became obsessive for me and my classmates, and wed all proudly bring our lunches to school, subtly scrutinizing each others Tupperware contents. Again, food had lost its pleasure, its joy, and had become something that I saw as more of an enemy than a friend. And that really scared me. After graduating, I finally got a grip, and once again slowly re-established a healthy relationship to what I was eating. It is for these reasons that food is such a tender subject for me, and changing my diet dangerous territory. I spent so many years struggling to achieve a positive connection with food, and when I finally got there and it felt like such a relief. The prospect of having to go back to that place of thinking about food more than I already did felt unsafe for me, and slipping back into an obsessive place felt like an inevitability. Meanwhile, the negative self-talk voices were loud and overpowering, telling me how I was fat, flabby, weak, old - things that I KNEW werent true. But thats the sad thing about internal monologues, they dont need to make sense to play like broken records in our minds all day every day. Its enough to drive a person insane. The cruel voices coupled with my extreme fear of reverting back to my old thought patterns and eating habits absolutely terrified me. I felt like I had hit a wall of hopelessness. And all I wanted to do to feel better was to eat a piece of eff-ing bread. The reason I suspected the grain thing was because of the unique relationship that blood sugar has to our hormones. If were consuming carbohydrates at a faster rate than our bodies are utilizing them for energy, that extra glucose gets stored in the fat cells of the liver, which decreases its ability to breakdown excess estrogen, and allowing it to hang around in our systems longer than it should. This excess circulating estrogen causes a whole host of symptoms, including, you guessed it: mood swings, bloating, sluggish metabolism, tender breasts, fatigue, foggy thinking, PMS, and many more less-than-desirable issues. Now, these things can be exacerbated by stress (shocker), inadequate fat and protein intake, and environmental factors, all of which I was likely suffering from. I set out by making a plan, since I know how hard it is to make positive changes without preparation. Instead of focusing on the all the things I wanted to reduce or eliminate, I focused on the foods I could have, foods higher in fat and protein, since I knew that those things would naturally elbow out the things I would normally fall back on (Im looking at you, banana bread). I made a list that I could refer to when I was grocery shopping for ingredients. I cooked and froze things. I stocked the fridge and pantry. I was ready. Within the first few days I already noticed a difference: my energy was incredibly stable, my emotions were in check, the bloating in my stomach dissipated, and I just felt good. As the days rolled on my compulsive urges to down half a dozen muffins subsided, and it was like I could clearly see that what I had actually been battling was blood sugar issues - not just too many grains or carbohydrates. It became clear that I had been taking my bod on a wild rollercoaster of high and low blood sugar for years, which had in turn been tossing my hormones around like a pair of sneakers in a washing machine. Stabilizing blood sugar is the first step in managing your endocrines system ability to do its job properly. I realized that if I was going to eat grains (or any carbohydrate-heavy food), I had to eat them in smaller amounts, balance them out thoughtfully with enough fat and protein, and make sure that I was actually using that energy instead of letting it sit around in my body. So far, things have been going incredibly well, and I am so darn proud of myself for not only identifying the issue, but actually doing something about it. We are fluid beings with needs that evolve and change over time. Our diets need to reflect that, which is why its imperative to listen to our bodies and be advocates for our own health. No one knows your body better than you, and once you quiet all the noise out there telling you how to eat in black-and-white terms, youll be able to hear yourself, without judgement, and choose the way of eating that is just right for you, right now. It may be different tomorrow, and that is okay too. In sharing this all with you, I am trying to set an example, because you too have this intuition that is telling you just what you need to eat and do right now. Its actually fun to be connected to yourself, your unique rhythms and needs. Learning about how you operate and designing a plan that caters to your exceptional self means that you can celebrate, instead of berate your body the whole month through, and experience pleasure in every stage of our cycle. I promise. This is undoubtedly a huge topic, and one that I plan on chipping away at over the next few blog posts. Some things I want to reiterate here are, that I do not believe that grains or carbohydrates are bad. No natural food group should be vilified, just as no macronutrient should be either. If youre thinking about giving up carbs, Id advise you not to. Glucose, the sugar found in carbohydrates is your brains primary fuel source, and when consumed responsibly, carbs will help you on your wellness journey, not hinder you. I still stand behind each and every one of the recipes that I have created for this blog, the app, and both of my cookbooks, and I believe that they are appropriate for many people to enjoy. However at this stage of my life, some of the recipes do not serve my needs any longer, and Ive had to make small changes to them, or put them on the shelf for another time. Im okay with that. Whew! Now for some notes on the recipe. The base recipe for my Cinnamon Toast Crunch-inspired cereal is grain-free, but it does rely on almond flour, which can be expensive. If you can tolerate pseudo-grains, feel free to top up the base with buckwheat flour. This will bulk up the cereal considerably so youll have more for less money. This cereal is r-i-c-h. You really only need a small amount to fuel you in the morning - not like the bottomless bowls of that were used to consuming in the morning without every really feeling satisfied, ya know what I mean? And paired with a luscious liquid like my Super Creamy Hemp Milk will keep you full for even longer, help stabilize your blood sugar, not to mention flood your bod with the delicate nutrients and powerful enzymes that store-bought, plant-based milk is missing. This recipe is dead simple and pretty much like cream – I shouldnt even call it milk, since its so rich and thick. And since were thinking outside the cereal box here, dont stop at breakfast...this milk is amazing in coffee and tea, in raw treats and baked goods, soup, smoothies, ice cream and popsicles. Youre gonna love it! I made the cereal the first time with just almond flour and a full half-cup of applesauce. It was definitely delicious, but I loved it just as much when I cut this amount in half. If you dont want all the sweetness, use just 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml of applesauce instead of the full amount. If youre using buckwheat flour, you will need the full amount of the applesauces moisture to bind it all together. I havent tried a version without the coconut sugar, so if youre not into that stuff feel free to play with the recipe on your own.     Print recipe     Grain-free /­­ Gluten-free Cinnamon Crunch Cereal Makes 5-7 servings Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup ground flax seeds /­­ 50g 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 150g blanched almond flour 1 1/­­2 Tbsp. cinnamon 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­4 cup /­­ 35g coconut sugar 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml - 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml applesauce ( 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml if using buckwheat flour) 1 Tbsp. coconut oil, melted optional: 1/­­2 cup /­­ 85g buckwheat flour Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 325°F/­­160°C. 2. Combine the ground flax seeds, almond flour, cinnamon, salt, and sugar in a large mixing bowl. Stir well. Then add the desired amount of applesauce and coconut oil, and stir to fully incorporate (you made need to use your hands if it gets too dry). Gather dough into a rough ball. 3. Place dough ball on a sheet of baking paper with another sheet on top. Using a rolling pin, roll the dough as evenly as possible, about 2mm thickness (not quite paper thin). If youre using buckwheat flour, youll need to separate the dough into two batches to achieve this. Remove top sheet of baking paper, and using a paring knife, score the dough into small squares of your desired size (mine were about 1.5cm /­­ .5 square). 4. Place in the oven to bake for about approximately 25 minutes until turning golden around the edges, then turn the oven off and let the cereal sit in there until cool (this will help dry it out and make them extra crisp). 5. Once the cereal is completely cool, break up the pieces into squares and place in an airtight glass container. Store for up to one month at room temperature. Super Creamy Hemp Milk Makes 1 liter /­­ 1 quart Ingredients: scant 4 cups /­­ 1 liter water 3/­­4 cup hulled hemp seeds /­­ hemp hearts Totally optional add-ins: sweetener (stevia, dates, honey, maple syrup...) vanilla sea salt raw cacao powder Directions: 1. Place all ingredients in the blender and blend on high until smooth (this make take a couple minutes). 2. Pour directly into a sterilized bottle and store in the fridge for up to 5 days. Initially, I was really afraid to come out about any of this stuff - the changes my diet is undergoing, the orthorexia, the internal voices! But I know in my gut that if Im going through it, someone else out there is too. And the reason I wanted to start My New Roots in the first place was to create a safe space for everyone to share and support each other on our health journeys, so I have to be as transparent and honest as I feel I can be to set that example. I want to say a huge heartfelt thank-you to all of you who have stood by me all of these years and continue to do so. It feels pretty amazing to have you, and to be getting better all together. In light and gratitude, Sarah B.   ***** Also… There’s one spot left for the upcoming retreat in Ibiza, click here to join me for a week of total inspiration and rejuvenation! The post Cinnamon Crunch Cereal and Hemp Milk appeared first on My New Roots.

Secret Ingredient Frozen Hot Chocolate

June 11 2017 My New Roots 

Secret Ingredient Frozen Hot Chocolate When I was in high school, the cool thing to do at lunch was eschew the basement cafeteria (obvi), leave the grounds altogether, and go to the local coffee shop. This made us feel like adults or something, sitting on plush velvet sofas, gossiping about so-and-sos new haircut, and whose older brother wed make out with while sipping a beverage that cost at least an hours worth of babysitting. Of course none of us really liked coffee, so we would blow our money on Italian sodas, fruity teas, and smoothies. When the warmer months rolled around, sandwich boards everywhere would announce that our very favourite, coffee-free drink was back in town: the Frozen Hot Chocolate. Now, if you have never lived in North America, the name and entire concept of this beverage Im sure eludes you. Isnt it an oxymoron, frozen hot chocolate? Yes, I suppose it is, but then I also suppose that is the point - to confuse you enough that you want to buy one. There is a famous restaurant in New York City that first came up with this drink, and although Ive never had the original, plenty of franchised cafes have made their own versions of what it essentially, a frothy chocolate milkshake. In the past few weeks the weather here in Copenhagen has warmed up and Ive finally been in the mood for cool, blended drinks again. But instead of using frozen bananas and other blood sugar-spiking fruits, Ive been experimenting more and more with frozen veggies instead. The results are surprisingly delicious and Im thrilled to have a few new veg-centric smoothies on lock. This is just one of them. The surprise ingredient in my frozen hot chocolate is...wait for it...cauliflower. Now this may sound totally weird, but please trust me, its delicious. Not even in a compromising way. The first sips are pure chocolate paradise, followed by a slight cruciferous waft, which then disappears again, conveniently, for those of us who perhaps dont like vegetables at all (Im looking specifically at my three-year-old son right now). All in all, this is one frosty, chocolate-y miracle of a drink for summer and Im making it every morning to celebrate liquid vegetables tasting like candy. Cauliflower Power Did you know that a cauliflower is actually a little head of thousands of compact flowers? Call me a hippie, but I like the idea of mowing down on a meadow. It makes me smile. Cauliflowers are white because they do not contain any carotene, the pigment found in things like carrots and broccoli, but what it lacks in vitamin A, it makes up for in potassium, folic acid, and vitamin C. And it may surprise you to learn that cauliflower is 25% protein and among the cancer-fighting cruciferous family that includes Brussels sprouts, cabbage and kale. Since this recipe calls for frozen cauliflower, I know some of you will be wondering if that changes the nutritional content in any way. Im happy to report that a recent study done on the freezing of cauliflower has shown its nutrients to be fairly stable after one-year freezer storage. Cauliflower in the study was blanched in near-boiling water for three minutes prior to freezing for one year. Numerous phytonutrients were evaluated in the study, including cauliflower’s sulfur-containing compounds. While nutrients levels were typically reduced after this year of freezer storage, loss of nutrients averaged about 15-35%. Although I always recommend eating fresh vegetables, there are some (fun!) applications that benefit from using the freezer. And its great to know that it doesnt pose too much a treat to those precious nutrients. Plus, frozen veggies (and fruits) can be lower cost, especially when the fresh version is out of season. If youre on a budget, frozen produce is a respectable way to get your plants in! The important part of this recipe is that you use frozen cauliflower, either purchased that way, or a head of cauliflower prepared ahead of time - washed, chopped into florets and frozen overnight. Similarly to how a frozen banana behaves in a blender, cauliflower too takes on a creamy-frothy consistency that works extremely well in this context. I also like to freeze the milk into cubes since this helps to keep the drink very cold and light. Dates sweeten the mixture, and you can scale these up or down depending on how hardcore you are. The cacao powder Ive used is raw, but you can also use regular cocoa powder in a pinch, or if youre on a budget. This recipe is a mere 4 ingredients, but if you feel like gettin fancy, by all means top that frozen hot chocolate with coconut cream (from a can of coconut milk, chilled in the fridge overnight) and some cacao nibs. You can also add some ingredients to the blend itself, like a handful of soaked cashews for extra richness, a scoop of protein powder (I like sprouted pea, sprouted brown rice or hemp), vanilla, or even fresh greens (spinach is very good at hiding in this too). The point of all this is to have fun and enjoy something that tastes like its pretty indulgent, but secretly good for you. Secret Ingredient Frozen Hot Chocolate Serves 2-3 Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 250g frozen cauliflower florets 1/­­3 cup /­­ 100g pitted dates 6 Tbsp. raw cacao powder approx. 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 350ml plant-based milk (I used oat milk) handful of ice cubes (made from either plant-milk ice or water) Optional ingredients: Pinch of vanilla powder coconut cream (from the top of a can of coconut milk)?cacao nibs handful soaked cashews protein powder Directions: 1. Place all ingredients in a blender and blend on high until smooth. Add more liquid if necessary (mixture should be relatively thick). 2. Top with coconut cream and cacao nibs, if desired. Enjoy immediately. *   *   *   *   * You guys!!! I am so pumped to finally announce my upcoming wellness retreats this fall. We are going to two spectacular European locations: Ibiza, Spain and Comporta, Portugal. Both simple and luxurious, we have found the perfect settings to unwind, and press the reset button. Our Wild Heart High Spirit program combines inspiring cooking classes and nutrition workshops (lead by yours truly) with delicious movement classes, yoga, pilates and dance by Living Yolates that will both strengthen your body and open your heart. These seven days will nurture you on all levels of your being, help you realign with your internal guidance system, and ignite you on your journey towards greater health! Join us for this incredibly special, once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, with Golden Circle Retreats. The post Secret Ingredient Frozen Hot Chocolate appeared first on My New Roots.

Portabella Banh Mi Bowls

June 4 2017 Oh My Veggies 

These simple and flavorful vegetarian banh mi bowls are made with marinated mushrooms, quick pickled veggies, and spicy sriracha mayo served over brown rice.

Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats

March 21 2018 My New Roots 

Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats So the big move-in happened, but we are far from moved in. I am writing this from my dirty dining room table, watching and listening to a collection of relative strangers drill, saw, spackle, sand, stain, and paint around me, like a tornado of humans in tool belts. Drywall dust dances in the shafts of light pouring into our new space, as I try to ignore the deafening screech from a floor sander behind a paper-thin plastic partition a few feet away from my head. Ahhh...home renovation. I could go on about the frustrations of living in a construction site, how my filth-tolerance has reached unthinkable heights, and how if I hear someone tell me that it should all be complete in two more weeks I may collapse, but I know that whenever it is done, it will all be worth it. Really and truly. I made these Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats a few days before we relocated from our rental to our home, knowing that I would need to have a stockpile of snacks that didnt require refrigeration, or even cutting, since we would be living without electricity, and I had no idea where to locate a knife in the unpacked boxes stacked high in the basement. Since then, Ive thanked myself every time Ive sunken my teeth into each chewy-crunchy-sticky bite, the cacao releasing its relaxation-inducing alkaloids and minerals into my frazzled bloodstream, the hemp seeds delivering their much-needed anti-inflammatory omega-3s, and the nut butter grounding my nerves with all its protein and healthy fat. In these uncertain times, Ive been certain that a delicious snack was ready to satisfy me at the drop of a hammer. My original inspiration for these bars came from my fellow Canadian health-food blogger and vegan recipe guru Angela Liddon, of Oh She Glows fame. Her Almond Butter Crisp Rice Treats were a fun Sunday afternoon snack project for my four-year old son and I, and since then Ive been making many variations of them. My goal was to add more protein, healthy fats and filling fiber to the bars, so I tossed in heaps of hemp and chia seeds until I found the right balance. Losing their chewy-crisp goodness would have been a real shame, since its the texture of these treats that is so very crave-able! So I tinkered a few times, and found the exact right amount that maintained the satisfying chew. I also wanted to add chocolate. Because chocolate. After nailing the additions, I knew that top needed some flair: not just visually, but something to cut the richness a tad. I had some freeze-dried raspberries kicking around my pantry that I had bought on a whim in the US some months back, and immediately knew that they would be the perfect supplement with their vibrant pink hue and bright acidity. Bingo! Freeze-dried fruit (and vegetables) have been popping up all over the place lately, since they taste incredible, have a long shelf life, and are a nutritiously convenient way of getting another serving of produce a day, especially for kids. However, if you cant find freeze-dried raspberries, or any substitute for that matter, you can easily replace them in this recipe with more traditional dried fruit like goji berries, roughly chopped figs, apricots, or even raisins. You could also top the bars with toasted nuts or seeds, coconut or cacao nibs. Think of these as a blank canvas for your favourite add-on flavours and textures, or keep it as simple as you like. The bars are also delicious as is, and if youre into a dark and rich flavour above all else, simply leave the toppings off. But do not under any circumstance skip the flaky salt – it is key.  Hemp hemp, hooray! Since being back in the homeland and trying to buy as much locally-produced food as possible, Ive been loving on hemp seeds lately - even more than usual! Because of their mild, nutty flavor, they blend so effortlessly with just about any food, sweet or savory. And what they lack in flavor, they make up for in protein and healthy fats, specifically those essential Omegas. Weve all heard about Omega-3s and how important they are for the health of our entire body, helping to prevent cancer asthma, depression, obesity, diabetes and so on. But! There is another star on the block, Omega-6, which seems to be less talked about due to the fact that many of us get enough (or in some cases, too much) of this essential fatty acid. Omega-3 and Omega-6 fasts are essential, meaning that our bodies dont produce them and we need to obtain them from the foods we eat. Sources of Omega-3 fats include flax seeds, pumpkin seeds, walnuts, chia, dark leafy greens, some sea vegetables and cold-water fish. Omega-6 sources include soybean, canola, corn, peanut, sunflower, and sesame oils. You can see from this list that most people in the Western world at least, are getting their fair share of Omega-6 fats, and lacking in Omega-3s. In fact, in North America it is estimated that the population consumes 10 to 20 times more Omega-6 than Omega-3, due to the popularity of processed foods. Although the correct ratio of these fats is still a matter of debate, researchers in this field agree that this ratio is far too high. We should be aiming for an Omega-6 to Omega-3 ratio between 2:1 and 4:1. So why is the balance so important? Because the ratio of Omega-6s to Omega-3s helps determine the flexibility of our cell membranes, meaning that ALL communication throughout the body depends on at least in part on this balance being correct. Coronary heart disease, chronic inflammation, obesity, and healthy genetic processes have all been linked to the delicate equilibrium of essential fatty acids. How can we improve the situation then? Just making simple, small changes to our diets will greatly improve the balance of fats in our bodies. Instead of relying solely on foods high in Omega-6s like peanut butter and foods made with vegetable oils (like corn, sunflower and soybean oil) swap them with foods high in Omega-3s like walnut butter and flaxseed oil, and sprinkle chia seeds on your breakfast bowl or a salad. For omnivores replacing chicken, beef and pork with wild-caught, cold water fish will make a big difference too. But the most ideal food to choose when trying to achieve that perfect balance of these fats then, is hemp! Hemps Omega-6 to Omega-3 ratio is a healthy 3.75:1. You can find hemp in many forms these days: un-hulled and hulled seeds (also known as hemp hearts), hemp oil, hemp flour, hemp protein powder, hemp milk, and hemp seed butter. Remember that choosing hemp in its most natural form (the un-hulled or hulled hemp seeds) is your best bet to ensure a high-quality, whole food product. I like to sprinkle hemp seeds on just about everything, from my breakfast porridge to my salads and sandwiches. They add an amazing creaminess to smoothies, raw custards and cheesecakes. You can even make your own milk from hemp and you dont even need to soak the seeds first! Simply blend 1 part hulled hemp seeds to just under four parts water, with an optional sweetener like maple syrup, dates, or honey, and enjoy. Simple and delicious. You can get the full hemp milk recipe here. The last thing I want to mention is the crisp brown rice. There are a few types of it on the market, and one reason Im happy to be back in Canada, is because they have the right kind. By that I mean really crispy rice crisps. For whatever reason, the ones I found in Europe would always get soggy very quickly, whereas the ones here maintain their crunch even after combining them with wet ingredients like maple syrup and brown rice syrup. Ive also found high-vibe sprouted brown rice crisps over here from a company called One Degree (not sponsored). They work really well too, but cost a fortune. I alternate between those, and the ones Ive found at my local bulk food store that arent sprouted or even organic, but they get the job done when Im renovating a house and feeling strapped for cash. You may need to experiment with a couple kinds before finding the one. In the end, the bars should be relatively crunchy-crisp - not mushy at all (even though they will still be delicious). If you like Rice Crispy Treats, youre going to love these bars. Theyre the grown-up version of your favourite childhood treat, with a mega boost of nourishing superfoods. Its an indulgence you can feel good about feeding both you and your family...but I wont tell anyone if you hide them and eat them all yourself. Ive definitely never done that before. Nope. Never.     Print recipe     Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats Makes about 16 bars Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. virgin coconut oil, plus a little more for greasing 2/­­3 cup /­­ 160ml unsalted nut or seed butter of your choice 2/­­3 cup /­­ 160ml brown rice syrup 2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1 tsp. vanilla extract heaping 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­3 cup /­­ 40g raw cacao powder (or cocoa powder) 4 cups /­­ 200g puffed brown rice crisps 1 cup /­­ 150g hulled hemp seeds 3 Tbsp. chia seeds a few pinches flaky sea salt (Maldon works perfectly) 3-4 Tbsp. freeze-dried raspberries Directions: 1. Rub a little coconut oil in an 7″x11″ (20x30cm) baking pan. 2. Melt the coconut oil in a large saucepan over low heat. Add the nut butter, brown rice syrup, maple syrup, vanilla and fine salt, and stir to combine. Remove from heat. Stir in the cacao powder until thoroughly incorporated. 3. Add the puffed brown rice, hemp seeds, chia, and stir quickly to combine, then pour the mixture into your baking pan and press firmly (using the back of a large spoon or spatula rubbed with a little coconut oil really helps). Once smooth and even, generously sprinkle the top with the freeze-dried raspberries and flaky salt. Place in the fridge or freezer to firm up, then slice into bars or squares and enjoy. Store the bars in a tightly sealed container in the fridge or freezer. Show my your bars on Instagram: #cacaohempcrispytreats *   *   *   *   *   * Hey Toronto! I’ve just launched my first collaborative project since moving back to Canada, with my friends at ELXR Juice Lab: the Activated Power Bowl! This delicious breakfast (or snack!) is made lovingly with activated grains, superfood stir-ins, and tasty toppings. There are three mouthwatering varieties to choose from, or you can build your own bowl. I am so thrilled to offer my fellow Torontonians a vegan, gluten-free, whole food breakfast with activated grains – this is truly the first of its kind! The Activated Power Bowl is available at all four ELXR locations across the city, so if you’re in town go pick one up and enjoy. We had a very successful launch over the weekend – huge thanks to everyone who came out to taste and support! The post Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats appeared first on My New Roots.

Meatless Monday Bloggers Show What They “Can Do” with Goya Products!

January 8 2018 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Bloggers Show What They “Can Do” with Goya Products!Meatless Monday supports Goyas Can Do program, which donates food to Feed America every time someone purchases Goya products in stores. Since so many of Goyas products are vegetarian and packed with protein, food bloggers accepted the challenge to come up with meat-free recipes for Meatless Monday using Goyas featured Can Do products. Here are some of our favorite contributions from last year! Mango & Tomato: Vegan Laska with Zucchini, Peppers and Mushrooms Robin Asbell: Jamaican Rice and Gullah Peas C It Nutritionally: 5-Ingredient Curried Butternut Squash Soup Healing Tomato: Vegan Dumplings Soup with Pigeon Peas MomStart: Coconut Milk Veggie Curry Analidas Ethnic Spoon: Indonesian Coconut Turmeric Rice with Cashews Confessions of a Mother Runner: Spicy Thai Noodle Soup Life Currents: White Bean and Sweet Potato Taco Filling Show Me the Yummy: Roasted Carrot Soup Two Classy Chics: Creamy Cauliflower and Potato Soup Freckled Italian: Coconut Rice and Beans Dini Delivers: Coco Dalal Week99er: Double Chocolate Coconut Cupcakes with Coconut Creme Frosting Jersey Family Fun: Coconut Rice Bowls Food in Jars: Coconut and Cracked Brown Rice Pudding Cooking with Julie: Slow Cooker Red Lentil Coconut Curry Soup Make sure to follow Meatless Monday on social media to find out the next Goya Can Do featured product and to watch our live cooking demos with Goya! The post Meatless Monday Bloggers Show What They “Can Do” with Goya Products! appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Khichdi in a Jar – Mixed Vegetable Kitchari Mix for Instant Pot or Saucepan

December 20 2017 Vegan Richa 

Khichdi in a Jar – Mixed Vegetable Kitchari Mix for Instant Pot or SaucepanKhichdi in a Jar – Mixed Vegetable Kitchari Mix for Instant Pot or Saucepan. Easy Lentil Rice Soup with Veggies.  Gift the jar full of lentils,, rice and spices. Empty into a pot with veggies of choice. Easy Weekday Dinner.  Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Nut-free Recipe. Tis the time to wrap up some fun gifts and this one is a must. When I made this jar, I thought, hey its khichdi, it is a super simple recipe. People can possibly just throw it all together at home within minute. But when its right there in the jar, it is as simple as putting it in the instant pot (pressure cooker) or saucepan with water and just a short wait to a fabulous meal. Khichdi or Kitchari is soup or dal and rice preparation that usually is very lightly spiced and served as light meal when you are sick or just to give the tummy a break.  The basic version is slightly bland with just 1 or 2 spices and kept so to be a light meal. You can add different spices, some vegetables, tomato etc to make it a hearty meal. The basic version is in my first book, green moong and brown rice version on the blog.  This bottled up kitchari makes a great gift. You will want to make and eat lots of kitchari after the big holiday meals and the jar makes it a 5 minute job. Empty contents in an Instant pot which you may have received as a gift or saucepan, add whatever veggies you like or not, add water and done! Serve as is or with some chutneys or papadum/­­crackers. Continue reading: Khichdi in a Jar – Mixed Vegetable Kitchari Mix for Instant Pot or SaucepanThe post Khichdi in a Jar – Mixed Vegetable Kitchari Mix for Instant Pot or Saucepan appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Fill Your Plate with Meatless Sides for Thanksgiving

November 20 2017 Meatless Monday 

Fill Your Plate with Meatless Sides for ThanksgivingEven if youre not going meat-free for Thanksgiving, you can still keep your sides plant-based! Meatless Monday has several recipes for delicious side dishes that are rich with veggies and flavor. If youre tired of the sides you serve every year, put a new, vegetarian spin on some old classics! There are so many great meatless dishes that you can feel free to fill your plate with sides and skip the turkey. Cranberry Balsamic Brussels Sprouts Mushroom Pie Squash and Sunchoke Mac and Cheese Savory Soy-sage Stuffing Arugula Fig Almond Salad   Make sure to tune into Facebook today at 12:00 noon EST to watch Goyas Chef Fernando Desa make Quinoa and Brown Rice Stuffing and Coquito Coconut Eggnog in preparation for the Thanksgiving holiday! We’ll be streaming at https:/­­/­­www.facebook.com/­­GoyaFoods/­­. The post Fill Your Plate with Meatless Sides for Thanksgiving appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Middle Eastern Lentils & Rice

November 13 2017 Meatless Monday 

In this Middle Eastern classic also known as Mujaddara, onions are caramelized until sweet and brown to season the green lentils and hearty brown rice. Cinnamon and cumin complement the caramelized onion to spice this traditional dish which wont break the bank. This recipe comes to us from Anne of Apron Strings. Serves 6 - 1 cup brown rice - 2 cups green lentils, rinsed and sorted - 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided - 3 large onions, sliced - 1 teaspoon cumin - 1/­­2 teaspoon cinnamon - 1 teaspoon salt - freshly ground black pepper, to taste - 1 cup flat-leaf parsley, finely chopped - a sprinkle extra virgin olive oil, for serving Place the rice in a saucepan over medium high heat with 2 cups of water and a dash of salt. Bring the rice to a boil, reduce the heat to a simmer, cover and cook for 45-50 minutes, or until the rice is cooked through. Drain. While the rice is cooking, cover the lentils with 2 inches of water in another pot over medium high heat. Bring the lentils to a boil and continue boiling for about 20-25 minutes, or until the lentils are cooked through, but not yet mushy. Drain. While the lentils and rice are cooking, place the olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the onions, stirring to make sure the slices have separated and are coated in oil. Reduce heat to low and cook for about 25 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the onions have caramelized. When the rice, lentils and onions have completed cooking and caramelizing, toss them together in a large bowl. Season the rice, lentils and onions with the cumin, cinnamon, salt and black pepper to taste. Divide the lentils and rice into 6 equal servings. Sprinkle each serving with the parsley and drizzle with the extra virgin olive oil and enjoy! The post Middle Eastern Lentils & Rice appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 2

November 2 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 2 Here comes Part 2 of our Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, complete with cozy dinner and dessert recipes for the week. There are stellar homemade veggie burgers, a nourishing stew, and beautifully simple roasted plums for dessert. To see the breakfast and lunch recipes, as well as the grocery shopping list for the entire meal plan, head to Part 1. We hope you’ll find this entire thing useful, and we’d love to hear any feedback you have, as always :) Menu (see Part 1 for breakfast and lunch recipes) Breakfast Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins Lunch Grain Bowl with Marinated Delicata Squash, Coconut Kale, and Lentil Hummus Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup Dinner Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers w/­­ Any Fixings of Choice Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew Dessert Rosemary-Roasted Plums with a Cardamom Sprinkle *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free and will make enough for a week, for 2-3 people Day by Day Prep List Monday Night: Make the Veggie Burgers to have for dinner on Monday, Tuesday, and possibly Wednesday nights. This will be fairly quick, since you’ve already cooked the squash, rice, kale and lentils that are called for in the recipe during prep day. Roast the plums for dessert on Monday or Tuesday night, it’s quick and you will have enough for dessert for the rest of the week. - Make the Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers. - Make the Rosemary-Roasted Plums with Cardamom Sprinkle. Wednesday/­­Thursday night: Once you’ve finished eating the Veggie Burgers, prepare the Brussels Sprouts Stew for dinner starting Wednesday or Thursday night and until the end of the week.  - Make the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew.   Recipes 1. These veggie burgers utilize the lentils, brown rice, squash, and kale that you already cooked during prep day. They are nourishing, satisfying, and cooked in the oven, which means that you won’t have to spend any time frying them on the pan. The flavors are earthy and warming, and the burgers develop really nice, crispy edges as they bake. Enjoy them for dinner with any fixings of choice, on burger buns, inside lettuce wraps, or even alongside a green salad. Make sure to try them with the Lentil and Squash Hummus from Part 1 as well. Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers   Print Serves: 9 veggie burgers Ingredients 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped ½ teaspoon red pepper flakes about 2 tablespoons chopped sage, rosemary and thyme (optional) 4 garlic cloves - minced blanched kale (from part 1) - chopped roughly sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1 cup toasted pumpkin seeds 1½ cups cooked brown rice (from part 1) 1½ cups cooked lentils (from part 1) remaining ½ cup roasted butternut squash (from part 1) 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar or apple cider vinegar Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Warm the coconut oil in a medium pan over medium heat. Add the onion, red pepper flakes and herbs, if using, and sauté for 7 minutes, until the onions are translucent. Add the garlic and cook for another minute, then add the kale, salt and pepper, and stir around for another minute. Add the tomato paste and toss to mix well. Remove the pan from heat. Transfer the pumpkin seeds to a food processor and pulse into small pieces. Add the rice, lentils, squash, vinegar, and the sautéed onion and kale mixture to the food processor. Pulse until well-mixed and combined into a chunky mixture. Taste for salt, add more if needed. Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Use a ½ cup measurement to form burger patties and finish shaping each patty with your hands. Arrange the patties on the prepared baking sheet. Bake for 25-35 minutes, until the burgers look nicely toasted. Serve on burger buns, lettuce wraps, or alongside salad with any burger fixings of choice. Store in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. These burgers also freeze very well. 3.5.3226   2. A pot of good stew is such a great solution to the weekday dinner problem, especially during the colder months. It doesn’t take too long to make and lasts a while in the fridge, only getting better with time. This one is made with so many star ingredients of warming fall fare: mushrooms, carrots, garlic and onion, as well as jarred tomatoes, brussels sprouts and lentils. There’s smoked paprika, too, which ensures a bit of piquancy and depth of flavor. Serve this stew with crusty sourdough bread or over any brown rice, left over from the veggie burgers. Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew   Print Ingredients 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 teaspoon whole cumin seeds 1 large yellow onion - chopped sea salt 1 lb crimini mushrooms - sliced freshly ground black pepper 6 garlic cloves - sliced 1 jalape?o - seeded and chopped 2 medium carrots - sliced 1 lb Brussels sprouts - trimmed and halved (quartered for larger ones) 1 teaspoon smoked paprika kale cooking water from part 1, veggie broth or purified water 2-3 bay leaves (optional) remaining cooked lentils from part 1 - about 1½ cups 28 oz box or can crushed tomatoes 4 cups baby spinach Instructions Warm the coconut oil in a medium saucepan. Add the cumin and sauté for about 1 minute, until fragrant. Add the onion and salt and sauté for 5 minutes, until translucent. Add the mushrooms and black pepper and cook for about 8 minutes, until all the liquid thats released by the mushrooms evaporates. Add the garlic, jalapeno, carrots, Brussels sprouts and paprika, and stir to coat for about 2 minutes. Add enough of the reserved kale cooking liquid (from part 1), veggie broth, or purified water to achieve a thick stew consistency (keep in mind that youll also be adding crushed tomatoes). Add the bay leaves at this point too, if using. Bring to a simmer. Cook, partially covered, for 10 minutes. Add the cooked lentils and crushed tomatoes, bring everything back to a simmer and cook for another 10 minutes. Discard the bay leaves, if using. Add the spinach at the end, and stir it in until wilted. Taste for salt and pepper, adjust if needed. Serve over rice or with crusty sourdough bread. 3.5.3226   3. Roasting up a sizable batch of fruit is a great way to ensure that you’ll have beautiful, healthy dessert for the week. Add a little dollop of ice cream or yogurt (have you tried this coconut one?!), and you’re in business. These plums are roasted with coconut sugar, which brings out their sweetness, and rosemary, which contributes its piney, earthy notes. Besides ice cream/­­yogurt, I love serving the plums with a sprinkling of toasted pumpkin seeds, cardamom and cacao nibs. Another idea: try topping the millet porridge from Part 1 with some of the roasted plums for one of your breakfasts. If you can’t find plums, try a similar roasting technique with apples or pears (and include cinnamon in your sprinkle). Rosemary-Roasted Plums with a Cardamom Sprinkle   Print Ingredients 8 ripe plums - sliced in half and pitted 2 tablespoons coconut sugar 2 tablespoons chopped rosemary ¼ cup toasted pumpkin seeds - roughly chopped 2-3 cardamom pods - shells discarded, ground in a mortar and pestle 1 tablespoon cacao nibs (optional) vanilla ice cream or plain yogurt - for serving Instructions Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Place the plums on the baking sheet, cut side up. Generously sprinkle each plum with the coconut sugar and rosemary. Put in the oven and roast for 20-30 minutes, until soft throughout. Meanwhile, combine the pumpkin seeds, cardamom and cacao nibs in a small bowl. Serve the plums with ice cream/­­yogurt, sprinkled with the pumpkin seed cardamom mixture. 3.5.3226   < < .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 2 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Sweet Potato Burritos

September 11 2017 Meatless Monday 

This burrito might surprise you with its sweetness, but the onion and garlic powders offer a savory balance to the cinnamon. Using whole wheat tortillas can complete the wrap the healthy way by keeping you fuller, longer. This recipe comes to us from Lindsay of The Happy Herbivore. Serves 4 - 4-6 soft taco shells, tortillas or wraps - 1 medium sweet potato, boiled until tender and drained - 1 cup brown rice or quinoa, cooked to desired tenderness - 10 oz frozen spinach - 1 cup black beans -  1/­­2 teaspoon cinnamon -  1/­­4 teaspoon cumin -  1/­­4 teaspoon onion powder -  1/­­4 teaspoon garlic powder - hot sauce, to taste Cook spinach according to package directions, pressing out any excess water once the spinach is fully cooked. Put the spinach in a bowl, sprinkle with garlic powder and salt and set aside. Sprinkle cumin, onion powder and garlic powder over black beans, stirring to evenly coat beans with spices and set aside. Peel cooked sweet potato and mash with a potato masher or fork. Sprinkle with cinnamon and stir to combine. Combine sweet potato, spinach, grains and black beans in a large bowl, stirring to evenly combine, and scoop mixture into the center of the wrap. Drizzle with hot sauce to taste. The post Sweet Potato Burritos appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Sweet Potato Bhel Recipe – Indian Snack Salad with Puffed Rice, Mint and Tamarind Chutney

August 30 2017 Vegan Richa 

Sweet Potato Bhel Recipe – Indian Snack Salad with Puffed Rice, Mint and Tamarind ChutneyBhel Recipe – Indian Street Food style Snack Salad with Sweet Potato, Mint and Tamarind Chutney in 20 Mins. Puffed Rice tossed with cooked sweet potato, nuts, onion, cucumber and tomato and dressed in chopped mint and 5 minute Tamarind Chutney. Vegan Bhel Puri Recipe. Can be glutenfree and nutfree.    Bhel /­­Bhel Puri is a popular Indian street snack which has a combination of puffed rice, bhel mix, chopped up tomato, onion, cubed cooked potato, mint and cilantro or mint cilantro chutney, tamarind chutney. Bhel mix is usually some crispy chickpea flour noodles + crackers + toasted nuts mixture that you can find at an indian store. Depending on the area, Bhel can have other veggies, sprouts, or some oil and othr names like Churmuri, Jhalmudi. For this version, I use puffed brown rice. You can use any other puffed or krispie grains such as quinoa, wheat, kamut or millet. Instead of regular potato I use cooked sweet potato in today’s recipe. Sweet Potatoes amazingly well with the sweet sour 5 minute Tamarind chutney and minty flavor profile. Try it! Add sprouted or cooked Mung beans, chickpeas or lentils to the mix to make it a filling snack. Also see video below. Continue reading: Sweet Potato Bhel Recipe – Indian Snack Salad with Puffed Rice, Mint and Tamarind ChutneyThe post Sweet Potato Bhel Recipe – Indian Snack Salad with Puffed Rice, Mint and Tamarind Chutney appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Le Botaniste – New York City

July 3 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

A beauty-salon for you insides. We are a plant-based organic food & natural wine bar. – Le Botaniste The beautiful logo & website caught my attention... So this place was high on my list of places to visit in New York. And the reality was even so much better than I thought. image via Le Botaniste Le Botaniste is a botanical-based, apothecary-inspired restaurant. It is created by Le Pain Quotidiens Founder & Chief Creative Officer, Alain Coumont, and he knows a thing or two about good food and good restaurants. The restaurant looks like a classic apothecary including glass tincture bottles and white lab coats. image via Le Botaniste The menu is 100% organic and entirely botanical, which means there are no animal products used on-site. The seasonally changing menu features chef-designed prescriptions such as the Tibetan Mama: a savory combination of brown rice, peanut curry sauce, steamed greens and spicy kimchi, and the Dirty Noodle Soup: with velvety tofu, steamed leeks, garlic and spicy ginger. Hearty specialty soups and fresh juices rotate daily. image via Le Botaniste The menu also encourages DIY meal-building, allowing guests to design their own hot or cold entree from the many bases, spreads and toppings available. […] The post Le Botaniste – New York City appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Grillable Veggie Burger – Black Bean Sunflower Seed Burger

June 6 2017 Vegan Richa 

Grillable Veggie Burger – Black Bean Sunflower Seed BurgerGrillable Veggie Burger. No Nuts. Easy Sunflower Seed Black Bean Burger with Veggies and spices. Pan fry, Bake or Grill. Serve with BBQ Sauce and other fix ins. Vegan Burger Recipe. Gluten-free option. Nut-free. Soy-free option It is time to fire up the grill and flip some veggie burgers. These hearty burgers are made up of black beans, brown rice, sunflower seeds and amazing seasoning. You can grill or pan fry the patties. Veggie burgers can be overly squishy (too many beans, too much moisture), or too crumbly (not enough binding, big unmashed ingredients such as whole beans or large chunks of onions, peppers, veggies). Both these issues can be solved with vital wheat gluten in the patties. I don’t like the texture of the patty with vital wheat gluten, so in these burgers just the right balance of cooked grains, beans and some breadcrumbs work well to make a sturdy grillable patty. With any veggie burger, mash the ingredients well and pack them well for sturdier results.  Black beans work really well in these burgers. You can also use kidney beans. The toasted sunflower seeds make these hearty. Whole coriander seeds, smoked paprika and lemon add complex flavors. These patties are a must make.  See 35+ Veggie Burger options here, no fake meats! Which beans/­­lentils are your favorite in a veggie burger?Continue reading: Grillable Veggie Burger – Black Bean Sunflower Seed BurgerThe post Grillable Veggie Burger – Black Bean Sunflower Seed Burger appeared first on Vegan Richa.

First-Ever Musical Meatless Monday Event in Baltimore a Great Success

May 29 2017 Meatless Monday 

First-Ever Musical Meatless Monday Event in Baltimore a Great Success Credit: Nellaware Photography  The Black Vegetarian Society of Maryland (BVSM) hosted the first-ever Musical Meatless Monday event in Baltimore at Northwestern High School on Monday, May 1st. The mission of the evening was to expose people to the global Meatless Monday movement in a relaxed and entertaining environment where they could enjoy a meatless meal and learn about the benefits of plant-based eating. Our goal is for people to connect with their inner compassion, their soul, when eating and to understand the important decisions they are making when choosing the foods they eat, said Naijha Wright-Brown, executive director of BVSMD and host of the evening. Credit: Nellaware Photography  The event received a Certificate of Recognition from the City of Baltimores Mayor, Catherine Pugh, and exceeded expectations in terms of number of attendees and receptiveness of the plant-based meal and product samples. Two-hundred-fifty guests enjoyed a delicious plant-centered dinner including brussel sprouts, asparagus, brown rice, quinoa, collards, kidney beans and two versions of kale salad. Musical Meatless Monday entertainment featured special guest eco-hip hop artist and vegan raw food chef, DJ Cavem. DJ 5Starr, the students of Northwestern High School, local artist and soulful songstress, Mova Kween rounded out the festivities. Guests heard firsthand about Meatless Monday and plant-based eating from speakers representing Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, City Weeds, and the Humane Society of the United States. With the rousing success of the event, the Black Vegetarian Society of Maryland is planning another bash for later this year. Stay tuned to find out more! Credit: Nellaware Photography  The post First-Ever Musical Meatless Monday Event in Baltimore a Great Success appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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