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Bell Pepper Bisque with Giant Croutons

October 4 2019 My New Roots 

Bell Pepper Bisque with Giant Croutons Hey friends! Im coming in hot, to drop this stellar soup recipe on you, while the weather is still fine and early fall produce is at its peak. The bell peppers in my region are bountiful and beautiful, and because I am the biggest sucker for roasted pepper anything, I came up with this dish to celebrate a seasonal favourite. But first, can we take a moment and please talk about how I just invented giant croutons? I think it might be my personal opportunity to break the internet. How is this not a thing yet?! Sure, I guess you could look at the cheese toast on French onion soup and say that is a giant crouton, but in my opinion, its merely an open-faced grilled cheese sandwich. Pfff. Not even close to this. My crouton is a cube of sourdough (important shape-distinction), kissed with garlicky oil and seared to toasty, golden perfection. The outsides are caramelized and crisp, while the center is fluffy, creamy and studded with nooks and crannies for the soup to slide in to. Guh. Too good to be true! Honestly guys, Im pretty proud of this. But I also need you to know that this soup is darn good too, even without the crouton. The recipe is loosely based on the North African Sun-dried Tomato Soup in my second cookbook, except I left out many of the warming spices, which felt prematurely winter-y. Its still t-shirt weather here, so the ginger and cinnamon had to go. Plus, I doubled the pepper count, added a teeny splash of balsamic (to round out the flavor), and made it bisque-y without the cream. Guess what I used?! Lentils!! Mic drop. But instead of bulking it up and putting the soup on legume-overload, I was conservative in my approach and just used half a cup. This made the soup rich and creamy without the cream, but in a very hush, hush way, so that you literally have no idea that theyre there. But their presence can be felt, because this soup is the real meal deal, not just a bowl of blended up veggies that will leave you hungry again in 20 minutes. With the bonus lentils, youre getting way more protein and fiber that youd normally expect from a pepper soup, and they will fill you up, and keep you energized for hours. This suddenly feels very infomercial-y. Did I mention there is a giant crouton? Moving on! Lets talk about peppers because they are in the nightshade family and that is a hot topic, if I ever heard one. Nightshade vegetables are a part of the Solanaceae family, and include tomatoes, peppers (and chilies), eggplant /­­ aubergine, and all potatoes except for sweet potatoes and yams. Originally cultivated in South America, nightshade vegetables were brought to Europe and Asia by Spanish explorers. Their name supposedly comes from the fact that they grow at night (as opposed to mushrooms, which grow in the shade). You may have heard rumors that Nightshade vegetables are toxic, that they can cause inflammation or that theyre linked to autoimmune disorders. While it is true that edible nightshades contain high levels of glycoalkaloids, specifically solanine, which at very high levels is toxic, it only seems to trigger reactions in individuals who are sensitive to it. Those with pre-existing inflammatory conditions may experience worsening of their symptoms when they consume these foods, but an elimination diet would be the only way to determine if nightshades are in fact, causing the issues. For people who do not suffer from chronic inflammatory ailments, enjoying ratatouille, a pizza, or a baked potato is likely just fine, and certainly not going to cause you to get these conditions. As far as autoimmunity is concerned, alkaloids from edible nightshades have been shown to irritate the gut, since solanine is effectively natural insecticide produced by this plant family. Gut irritation can contribute to intestinal permeability, which can set off an autoimmune reaction when proteins that should remain in the digestive tract leak into the bloodstream. The level of irritation depends on the amount consumed, and how sensitive the individual is. The highest amounts of solanine are found in green potatoes, and sprouted potatoes, but we should avoid eating those anyway.   Lets review: if you have an autoimmune disorder, leaky gut, or you exhibit symptoms of discomfort (digestive or otherwise) after consuming nightshades, try eliminating them from your diet for at least 6 weeks and see if you notice a difference. Then, re-introduce them one at a time and be aware of how you feel within a 24-hour period after eating them. If you dont have these issues, dont worry about it! There is absolutely no reason to limit your intake of these highly nutritious vegetables if they seem to do your body good. Bell peppers contain an astounding amount of vitamin C, high levels of A, and B6, with very good levels of folate, fiber, and vitamin E. They also provide flavonoids, and carotenoids. Remember to buy bell peppers that have fully ripened - anything other than the greens ones, which are typically unripe red, orange, yellow, or purple peppers. Their nutrient profile will be at its peak, and the natural sugars will be fully developed, easing their digestion. Let’s get to the recipe! If youre really pressed for time, skip roasting the peppers in the oven, and just dice them up, and add them to the pot along with the garlic in step 3. The overall flavour will be less rich, but still incredibly delicious. When Im in a crunch, Ill pull this move and have dinner on the table in 30 minutes. If you want to change things up, try orange or yellow peppers instead of the red ones. As far as sun-dried tomatoes go, I like organic, dried ones, instead of the oil-packed ones, but either would work here. With the canned tomatoes, go for whole, since they tend to be of higher quality than the diced ones. Lets talk bread. If you have access to a bakery where they make the real thing (sourdough), please use that. If you dont, find an unsliced loaf at your supermarket; bonus points if its made with wholegrain flour, organic, yeast-free, or all of the above. The bread should be cut into cubes with the serving bowl size in mind (youll want to see some of the soup around it), but if you have a huge bowl, go crazy and make that crouton as gargantuan as you want! And dont throw the offcuts away - I put them in the toaster and slathered them with hummus for my son. He was stoked about the oddly-shaped chunks.       Print recipe     Bell Pepper Bisque with Giant Croutons Makes 8 cups /­­ 2 litres /­­ Serves 4 Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee, divided 2 medium yellow onions, diced 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 3 large garlic cloves, minced 2 tsp. ground cumin 2 tsp. ground coriander 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. hot smoked paprika (depending on how spicy you like it) 4 large red bell peppers (stems, seeds, and ribs removed) 5 - 7 cups /­­ 1 1/­­4 – 1 3/­­4 liters vegetable broth 1 14.5-oz. /­­ 400ml can whole tomatoes 1/­­2 cup /­­ 45g sun-dried tomatoes, roughly chopped 1/­­2 cup /­­ 100g dried red lentils, soaked for 1 – 8 hours, if possible 2 tsp. balsamic vinegar Directions: 1. If you have time, soak the lentils in water overnight, or for up to 8 hours. Drain and rinse very well. If youre starting from dried, that is okay too, just give them a very good wash and drain before using. 2. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Prepare the peppers by cutting each of them in half, scooping out the seeds, and rubbing with a little coconut oil. Place peppers cut-side down on a parchment-lined baking sheet and place in the oven. Roast for 25-30 minutes until the skins are totally wrinkled and charred in places. 3. In a large stockpot, melt the remaining coconut oil over medium heat. Add the onions and salt and stir to coat. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions soften and begin to slightly caramelize, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic, cumin, coriander, and smoked paprika, and cook until fragrant, about 2 minutes. Add a little broth to the pot if the mixture becomes dry. 4. Add the whole tomatoes and their juices along with the sun-dried tomatoes, lentils, and the rest of the broth. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to low, and break up the whole tomatoes with your spoon. Simmer, covered for 15 minutes. Stir once or twice during cooking to prevent sticking. 5. The peppers should be done by now, so take them out of the oven, transfer all of them to a bowl with a lid or plate over the opening, making sure there are no gaps (this technique steams the peppers so that the skins will just slip right off, without using plastic wrap). Once cool enough to handle, remove the skins from the peppers, and place the peeled peppers in a blender. 6. Remove the soup from the heat and take off the lid to let cool just for a minute. Transfer to the blender, and blend on high until completely smooth. Add balsamic vinegar, and broth or water to thin, until your desired consistency is reached. Season to taste. Transfer back to the pot and keep warm. 7. Make the croutons (recipe below). 8. To serve, ladle the soup into bowls, top with fresh herbs, edible flowers, a drizzle of good olive oil, and of course place one giant crouton in the middle of each bowl. Enjoy! Giant Croutons Make as many as you want! Ingredients: 1 loaf of good bread (wholegrain sourdough is preferred) 2 Tbsp. expeller-pressed coconut oil (the unscented kind - very important!) or ghee, divided 1 clove of garlic, finely minced flaky salt, to taste Directions: 1. Cut the bread into 2 1/­­2 (6cm) slices - mine weighed 1.25 oz /­­ 35g per piece. Cut off the edges and make a cube (save the off-cuts for snacks). 2. Spread a little coconut oil on each side. 3. Heat remaining coconut oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic and sauté for a few minutes, just until the garlic is starting to turn golden. 4. Lower the heat to medium-low, and add the bread cube. Rub each side in the oil to coat with some of the garlic and sprinkle lightly with salt. Let cook on each of the six sides for a couple of minutes until golden brown. Remove from heat and enjoy immediately. I hope that wherever you are on this earth, youre enjoying the seasons shifting and embracing the changes that come with that. When I started writing this post, it was a very hot day, and now, just 48 hours later, I can feel a significant shift in temperature and weather. Here we go, fall! Im happy youre here. Big thanks to my friends at Foragers Farms for letting me crash the greenhouse at the crack of dawn to get these pics. Love to all, happy fall! Sarah B The post Bell Pepper Bisque with Giant Croutons appeared first on My New Roots.

Meet the Winner of the 2019 Meatless Monday Rapid Fire Challenge in Orlando, Florida

September 30 2019 Meatless Monday 

Meet the Winner of the 2019 Meatless Monday Rapid Fire Challenge in Orlando, FloridaOn Monday, September 16, three finalists competed to be crowned the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show Meatless Monday Rapid Fire Champion. Finalists were chosen from a pool of chefs who submitted original meatless recipes and videos. The competition was judged by a panel of experts including (from left to right) Hari Pulapaka, Ph.D., C.E.C., Executive Chef & Co-Owner, Cress Restaurant; Kristine Palkowetz, Chief Wellness Officer, Joyful Goodness; Kendra Lott, Publisher, Edible Orlando; and Dana Smith, Campaign Director, Meatless Monday. The three competing finalists were: Carly Paige, Founder, FitLiving Eats ; Author, “Simply Swapped Everyday” Chris Dancesia, Owner/­­Chef, Nick’s Bistro Anne Hernandez, Founder, Our Urban Homestead Chefs had 20 minutes to prepare their dishes while discussing the ingredients, flavors, and health benefits. Each chef prepared their favorite meatless dish for the panel of judges. Carly Paige kicked off the competition by preparing her Lentil Walnut Tacos , which she said she knows are good because even her meat and potato loving brother enjoys them. Lentil Walnut Tacos with Cashew Sour Cream & Pineapple Avocado Salsa Anne Hernandez then prepared her Vegan Shephards Pie , a recipe that isnt giving up anything by going plant-based, as it allows you to enjoy a lighter version of a traditional comfort food. Vegan Shepherds Pie Finally, Chef Chris Dancesia prepared Summer Squash and Rice Noodles with Caribbean Gremolata and Coconut Oil , a favorite vegetarian dish at his restaurant. Rice Stick Noodle with Caribbean Gremolata Although a tough decision, the judges awarded Chef Chris as the winner of the Meatless Monday Rapid Fire Challenge. Judges enjoyed the variety of flavors in his dish, as well as the presentation. Growing up in a Slovak Ukrainian family, Chris learned how to cook from a young age. Starting at age 15 as a dishwasher, Chris has spent his career working in restaurants, learning all aspects - from bar back to waiting tables to eventually moving into the kitchen. From 2008 to 2012, Chris worked in a restaurant in Belize before returning to Florida. Earlier this year, his lifelong dream came true as he and a business partner opened Nicks Bistro. Congratulations to Chef Chris! Try all the chefs’ recipes this Meatless Monday and let us know how they came out on Facebook , Instagram , and Twitter . The post Meet the Winner of the 2019 Meatless Monday Rapid Fire Challenge in Orlando, Florida appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Shepherd’s Pie

September 30 2019 Meatless Monday 

Theres nothing more comforting on a cool autumn day than a heaping scoopful of shepherds pie. This recipe is a blessing for those who want to recreate the decadent taste and texture of this classic dish without using any animal products. A layer of creamy mashed potatoes sits atop a rich filling of diced cremini or baby Portobello mushrooms, lentils, and vegetables. This recipe comes from Anne Hernandez, co-founder of Urban Homestead, an online magazine that focuses on holistic remedies and healthy eating, and one of the finalists of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show Meatless Monday Rapid Fire Challenge. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 8 - Mashed Potato Topping - 5 Pounds Russet Potatoes peeled & cut into 1-inch cubes - 1/­­2 Tablespoon Salt - 2-4 Tablespoons Vegan Butter - 1 teaspoon Dry Mustard Powder - 1/­­2 teaspoon Pepper or to taste - 1 1/­­2 teaspoons Salt to taste   - Filling - 2 1/­­2 Tablespoons Extra Virgin Olive Oil - 1 Medium Onion diced - 3 Cloves Garlic minced - 1 Cup Baby Portobello/­­Crimini Mushrooms diced small - 2 Tablespoons Flour - 1 teaspoon Parsley dried - 1 teaspoon Thyme dried - 1/­­2 teaspoon Rosemary dried - 1 Bay Leaf - 1 Cup Red Wine - 2 1/­­2 Tablespoons Tomato Paste - 1 1/­­2 Cups Vegetable Broth or Stock - 1 Pound Lentils cooked - 28 Ounce Frozen Mixed Vegetables - Salt & Pepper to taste   Instructions Mashed Potato Topping Cover the peeled & cubed potatoes with cold water in a large saucepan. Sprinkle with 1/­­2 Tablespoon of salt and turn the heat to high. Once the water starts to boil, partially cover with the lid, reduce the heat to low and simmer for about 10 minutes or until the potatoes are soft. Put a colander over a heat-proof bowl and drain the potatoes, reserving the potato water. Return the potatoes to the saucepan and mash with a potato masher. Stir in the dry mustard, salt, pepper, and vegan butter. Add the potato water 1/­­2 cup at a time, mixing thoroughly with each addition, until the mashed potatoes have a slightly loose consistency (but not runny). Set aside. Filling Preheat oven to 400 F. In a large oven-proof skillet, heat olive oil until shimmering over medium heat. Add the onions and cook for 2 minutes. Add the garlic and cook for a minute longer. Add the mushrooms, season all with salt & pepper, and cook for 2 more minutes. Stir the flour, parsley, thyme, and rosemary into the mushroom mixture until evenly coated for at least a minute to cook the flour. Add the wine and cooked lentils (I used Trader Joes). Cook until most of the wine is reduced and absorbed. Whisk the tomato sauce into the vegetable broth and add with the frozen vegetables and bay leaf, stirring to combine. Simmer for 5 minutes then remove from the heat. Discard the bay leaf. If youre feeding a large crowd, leave the mixture in the skillet. If youd rather split the recipe into 2 pie plates, now is the time to do it. Follow the recipe but only bake one of the pies and freeze the other for another day. Top the filling with the mashed potatoes. You can spoon it on and spread carefully as to not mix in the filling or gravy, or use a piping bag to get fancy. Bake in the pre-heated oven for 15 minutes or until the potatoes are lightly browned. Remove the pie from the oven and let it rest for 15 minutes before serving. The post Vegan Shepherd’s Pie appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Cheesy Broccoli Mac Soup

September 26 2019 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Cheesy Broccoli Mac Soup By now, many of you have dug into your copy of Vegan Mac & Cheese and have begun making recipes from the book.  I hope you’ll share pics on social media so I can see what everyone is making! Today I’d like to share a recipe from Vegan Mac & Cheese from the final chapter of the book called “Fun with Mac & Cheese.”  This chapter is loaded with recipes for using up leftover mac & cheese (or you can whip up a quick batch just to use in the recipes if you don’t have leftovers.) Among the recipes in that chapter are: Cheesy Mac Mug, Mac UnCheese Omelet, Waffled Mac UnCheese, Mac UnCheese Balls (above), Cheesy Mac Muffins (below), Mac UnCheese Quesadillas, and Mac UnCheese Pizza.  There are even two dessert recipes: Sweet Noodle Kugel and Indian Vermicelli Pudding. The recipe I want to share is for Cheesy Broccoli Mac Soup.  It’s ideal for the fall weather that is bound to be just around the corner!  I hope you enjoy it. BTW… If you haven’t gotten your copy of Vegan Mac & Cheese, I hope you will.  And if you already have the book, I hope you’ll do me a HUGE favor and write a brief review of the book on Amazon.  It only takes a minute and will really help spread the word.  THANK YOU!!! Cheesy Broccoli Mac Soup Cheesy broccoli soup is a cold weather favorite in our house, so it was a no-brainer to try it made with leftover mac uncheese. The results were so good, this is now our go-to way to make it. We especially like that the broth isnt too thick (which it often is in cheesy soups). If you prefer a thicker broth, simply use less vegetable broth. To make this recipe without leftovers, I suggest using the quick and easy recipe for One-Pot Cheesy Mac from Vegan Mac & Cheese. - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 small yellow onion, minced - 2 garlic cloves, minced - 4 cups vegetable broth - 3 cups (weight varies) leftover or homemade mac uncheese - 11/­­2 cups Cheddary Sauce (recipe follows) - 1/­­2 cup plain unsweetened nondairy milk - 1/­­4 teaspoon smoked paprika - Salt, to taste - Ground black pepper, to taste - 2 cups steamed small broccoli florets - 1/­­4 cup Nut Parm (recipe follows) - In a large saucepan over medium heat, heat the olive oil. - Add the onion and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Stir in the garlic and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. - Add the vegetable broth and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low, cover the pan, and simmer for 15 minutes. - Stir in the mac uncheese and then add the Cheddary Sauce, stirring until thoroughly combined. - Add the milk and paprika and season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring, until hot. - Stir in the broccoli and serve hot, sprinkled with the Nut Parm. Makes 4 to 6 servings   Cheddary Sauce - 1 cup unsalted raw cashews - 1 large russet potato, peeled and diced - 1 small carrot, chopped - 1/­­2 of a small yellow onion, chopped - 1 garlic clove, chopped - 1 teaspoon salt - 1/­­3 cup nutritional yeast, plus more as needed - 2 tablespoons vegan butter - 1 tablespoon rice vinegar - 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice - 11/­­2 teaspoons white miso paste - 1/­­2 teaspoon prepared yellow mustard - 1/­­2 teaspoon onion powder - 1/­­2 teaspoon smoked paprika - 1/­­4 teaspoon ground turmeric - 1 cup plain unsweetened nondairy milk, or water - In a saucepan, combine the cashews, potato, carrot, onion, garlic, and salt with enough water to cover. Place the pan over high heat and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to maintain a simmer and cook until the vegetables are soft, 10 to 15 minutes. - Using a slotted spoon, transfer the cooked vegetables and cashews to a high-speed blender, reserving the cooking water. - Add the remaining ingredients and blend until smooth and creamy, stopping to scrape down the sides, as needed. Add as much of the reserved cooking water as needed to achieve the consistency you prefer for the sauce. Taste and adjust the seasoning, as needed. The sauce is now ready to use. Makes about 4 cups   Nut Parm - 1 cup unsalted blanched almonds, or unsalted raw cashews - 1/­­3 cup nutritional yeast - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1/­­4 teaspoon onion powder Combine all the ingredients in a food processor and pulse until the mixture has a fine crumbly texture, stopping to scrape down the sides, as needed. Transfer to a shaker jar or other container with a tight lid. Store in the refrigerator. Makes about 11/­­3 cups   The post Cheesy Broccoli Mac Soup appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Pumpkin Soup with Millet

September 23 2019 Meatless Monday 

Easy pumpkin soup with millet served in pumpkin bowls is nourishing and comforting while being gluten-free and vegan! This recipe doesnt require a blender! This recipe comes to us from Happy Kitchen Rocks . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox!   Serves 4 4  small baking pumpkins (such as sweet dumpling) to use as bowls  optional 1  medium-sized sweet dumpling or small Hokkaido pumpkin 1/­­2  spaghetti squash 1/­­2  butternut squash 2  tablespoons  olive oil  divided salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste 1  shallot  finely chopped 1  clove  garlic  minced 1  tablespoons  fresh sage  chopped 1  teaspoon  turmeric 1/­­2   teaspoon  ground paprika 1,5  l or 6 cups  water or vegetable broth 5-6  tablespoons  millet pumpkin oil, fresh sage, pumpkin seeds to garnish   Directions: If you plan to use sweet dumpling pumpkins (or any other medium-sized pumpkins) as serving bowls, you’ll need one pumpkin per serving. Cut the tops off and scrap the seeds with a measuring spoon. Skip this step if you dont plan to use pumpkins as bowls. Preheat the oven to 200 C or 400 F. Cut the medium-sized sweet dumpling (or small Hokkaido pumpkin), spaghetti squash and butternut squash in halves and scrap out the seeds with a measuring spoon. Arrange your pumpkin bowls (if using), 1/­­2 of a spaghetti squash, 1/­­2 of a butternut squash and a sweet dumpling (or Hokkaido) halves on a baking tray lined with parchment paper. Sprinkle with a little salt and black pepper, drizzle with 1 tablespoon olive oil and roast for about 30 minutes. Take the butternut squash out of the oven after 20 minutes, let it cool a bit, then peel and chop it. Heat the remaining tablespoon of olive oil in a medium-large heavy-bottomed pot and sauté finely chopped shallot, minced garlic, chopped sage and butternut squash chunks for a few minutes. Add turmeric, ground paprika and water and bring to a boil. Add the millet, reduce the heat, cover and cook for 12-15 minutes. Once the other pumpkins are ready, scrape the flesh of the spaghetti squash into strands using a fork. Scrap the sweet dumpling or whatever pumpkin you are using for the puree with a spoon and mash it with a fork. Add to the soup. Serve the soup in roasted pumpkin bowls (optional). Season with salt and black pepper to taste and garnish with pumpkin oil, fresh sage and pumpkin seeds. The post Pumpkin Soup with Millet appeared first on Meatless Monday.

How to Make Frozen Pesto Cubes

August 2 2019 Oh My Veggies 

Making pesto with the remainder of the summer’s basil has become a tradition in our household. I love pesto because of its versatility–not only is it great with pasta, but it makes a tasty topping for pizza and can even be used as a sandwich spread. Freezing pesto is the perfect way to enjoy a little bit of summer for at least a few months into fall and it’s a good timesaver when you need a quick dinner. My basil was determined to start flowering, no matter how many times I clipped the buds off of it, so I decided last weekend it was time to make our annual ginormous batch of pesto. In the past, I’ve frozen it in bags, Tupperware, and ice cube trays. The ice cube trays worked well, but they didn’t really match the serving size we’d typically use. This year I did something different and used mini muffin tins. I’ve used regular sized muffin tins for freezing sauces and broth and the mini muffin tins hold just the right amount of pesto for one or two people (depending on what you’re using it for, of course!). Start by putting your pesto into the mini muffin […]

Summer Pesto Pasta

July 13 2019 VegKitchen 

Summer Pesto Pasta This is the simple pasta dish you need for busy weekday dinners.   Save Print Summer Pesto Pasta Serves: 2   Ingredients 250 g spaghetti 1 tbsp olive oil 2 French shallots 1/­­2 cup cherry tomatoes, halved 2 cloves garlic 1/­­2 cup vegetable broth 4 tbsp pesto salt and pepper, to taste fresh basil Instructions Boil water for the pasta. The post Summer Pesto Pasta appeared first on VegKitchen.

How to Make Cashew Mayonnaise

June 7 2019 Oh My Veggies 

I feel like I need to clarify the title of this post a little bit. Maybe it would be better if I called it “How I Make Cashew Mayo.” I don’t make cashew mayo the traditional way, so this isn’t THE definitive cashew mayo recipe. It’s MY cashew mayo recipe. It’s a little bit different from others because: 1) A lot of cashew mayo recipes are raw. Mine is not. 2) My recipe isn’t raw because I use vegetable broth in it. This adds a little boost of extra flavor. 3) I don’t add anything to sweeten my cashew mayo. See? It’s different. And I can’t promise you that it tastes exactly like real mayo (because it was the 80s when I last had real mayo), but it makes a mean sandwich spread and it’s great on crackers or as a dip for veggies too. Are you ready to get started? Here’s how to make cashew mayo! Put one cup of raw cashews in a bowl and cover them with water. Let them sit for a few hours–about two to four is a good amount. Drain and rinse the cashews, then pop them in your blender or food processor with […]

Self-Care Interview Series: Rachelle Robinett

May 5 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Rachelle Robinett Rachelle Robinett is an Herbalist, Holistic Health Practitioner, and founder of Supernatural, a company dedicated to real-world plant-based wellness. Rachelle has been studying the relationship between plants and people her entire life – be that on a farm in the Pacific Northwest (where she grew up) to time with healers, specialists, and shaman in farther-away places. She now provides functional plant-based wellness services, products, and education to empower people to understand their health, and lean into it, naturally. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? This has changed a lot for me since launching my company and having total control of my schedule. I do schedule every thing, but also move through life very intuitively. For example, on a day off Ill plan to ride my bike but once Im on it, it doesnt matter to me where I go. There are things I do routinely (meal preparation, exercise, rituals, sleep) but I never ignore instincts or anything my body is telling me. I love to be surprised but also care so much about how I spend every moment that planning is a big part of my life. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. No more alarm clock! Or, infrequently, which isnt something I would have predicted for my life. Ill wake up to open windows and the sounds of birds on a breeze. A glass of water with a tincture and probiotics. If its a day off, Ill skip caffeine and head out for a run while Im still sleepy. I love waking up while I run. A work day means a small cup of cold-brew with MCT oil and (currently, though it changes as I work with different herbs) mucuna pruriens and L-theanine. I practice intermittent fasting daily so dont typically eat until 11am or later but in the morning Ill make a broth or giant green juice and also a smoothie, which becomes brunch. A meditation ritual with some South American plants Ive come to love and then its off to the races. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Getting away from blue light! If Im near screens, they have physical filters and apps (like flux) installed to reduce the effect. Dimmed lights, incense, my Zen Spa Stuff playlist, and something to drink. There are always herbs at night as my energy tends to run very high, naturally. I cycle between kava kava, skullcap, valerian, poppy, lavender, and more. Also very in love with a relaxing face-washing routine. :) -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  Im working diligently at becoming a more regular meditator. Its most days now, but Id like to deepen it. Otherwise, yoga, running and long bike rides silence my mind. I can practice yoga (ashtanga) for hours a day and be thrilled. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – A giant smoothie made with fresh tropical fruits and fats, ideally picked from a jungle farm that morning. Lunch – All the vegetables, fresh and raw and local. Amazing olive oil, avocado, or coconut. Maybe some seeds. Seaweed too. Every color of the rainbow. Snack – 100% cacao. Local. Dinner - See lunch. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Currently I have about 1/­­2 cup of cold-brew coffee that we make at home. Im so high energy naturally that I often dont finish it. Green juice is my favorite energy support. Otherwise I use water, food, sunlight and breath to adjust my energy. -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? Dark chocolate – often homemade but if bought its 92 – 100%. Ill eat that for breakfast, honestly. My sugar intake is so low that sweets cravings are rare but if they get aggressive Ill have extra cacao in smoothies or elixirs, or eat more fruit, sweet potatoes/­­yams, etc. Chocolate chip cookies are dear to my heart though. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? This evolves as I learn and grow too but ... – An excellent probiotic – Personalized herbs. For me those are mood-supportive and nervous-system soothing. I use a combination of herbal teas (infused overnight), tinctures (HerbPharm are my favorite!) and well-sourced powders. – Supplements depending on bloodwork, body composition and lifestyle. – Im seeing the greatest overall health changes in my clients who are working on gut health. It just affects so much! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I live to move. Every single day if possible! If I skip more than two days, I get really restless. Running and yoga are my favorite, but I need both. I joke that running is my church; I treasure it and find it extremely cathartic. Yoga keeps everything balanced and I hope to have the practice for life. Weather permitting, Ill ride my bike for hours but that just feels like play. Im also into strength training (aka lifting weights at the gym, which surprises people). Overall, I consider exercise as essential as good food, water, and sleep. My preference for high-intensity exhaustive stuff comes from my high-energy personality but isnt necessary for everyone. Ive seen some of the fastest changes in my body with a daily yoga practice, some walking, and an excellent diet. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? Absolutely heavenly. Excellent playlists are essential! Also, just do it. ;) Beauty -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I think people doubt me when I say greens, and especially green juice, are responsible for the glow but I really mean it. Veggies veggies veggies, healthy fat, tons of water, and sweat! -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Aside from food, water, rest, and sweat, I find that a consistent routine of gentle exfoliation and good quality rehydration (topically, that is) work best for me. Continually renewing the surface, allowing skin to breathe, and keeping it nourished with really simple ingredients (I love Egyptian Magic and fruit enzyme or honey-based masks) gives really great face. That said, Im not an esthetician and have increasingly more respect for what I dont know about skincare (thanks to spending more time with the professionals at CAP Beauty, especially) and it will differ for everyone. What wont differ is the value of a right diet to help reduce inflammation, increase circulation, maintain hydration, and provide enough energy for both exercising and rest. :) Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Exercise and sleep have always been stress-reliefs for me. Ive recently integrated more meditation, and herbs of course (especially nervines). Whats making the greatest difference, though, is - as with most things - addressing the root cause or source of the stress. Rather than just trying to breathe between emails, Im looking at how to reduce email overall. Setting timers, limits on the number of meetings Ill take each day, inbox pausing, and scheduling (and sticking to) more time truly offline. Personal days, screen-free evenings or weekends, etc. If doing this, its important to prepare for there to be more to address when you return to it, so another part of the practice may be letting go of how much we want to engage with and choosing quality over quantity. Much harder said than done. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Heat and spice! I completely eliminate all sugar including fruit and yes, honey too. I put on three extra layers to get warm and stay warm. Garlic, ginger, and all sorts of spice. And rest. Essentially, Im aiming to help my body reach a sort of break-point with the cold/­­flu, or to sweat it out before it even reaches a peak, which Ive had a lot of success with. Medicinal mushrooms can also be great for cold/­­flu season. -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? Im working on this. (See above regarding stress avoidance!) My work is my play is my passion is my love so whats not work is sometimes very hard to determine. My hypnotherapist friend suggests that if it makes me happy, perhaps its not important to distinguish. My partner has inspired me to take in information from sources entirely outside of my usual bubble, which is great for play, and avoiding a filtered or algorithmic existence. This is a new practice for me. I grew up in a home that didnt allow for play so its something Im creating space for and learning how to do as an adult. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Ive found that its just impossible to be my best self when Im not taking care. Its really priority number one (and two, and maybe three) at this point. That said, there are times when life when its worth compromising different things. Like, in my twenties when I worked my ass off (and loved it) in order to achieve certain things. Now, I feel freer to play and rest. These bodies are our only homes in this life. I am so grateful to have one; I really think of it like my best friend and partner in existence. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Learning how to eat entirely plant-based, and well. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Thankfully, I dont have these. But, the opposite side of that spectrum is overworking, under-socializing, or burnout. And, existential crises which seem to strike when things are best. Rest and changes of scenery can do wonders. (Lately, I have been exploring procrastination from the perspective of mindfulness, though. This is an enlightening talk on it.) -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Instead Ill choose a couple of people: My mom, who as a Dietician gave me the greatest start in understanding nutrition, but more importantly taught me how to listen to my body. Rather than bandaging symptoms, she showed us how to ask why and follow the clues to root causes. My dad, an Anaesthesiologist who - much the opposite of Mom - taught us about medicine yes, but of more value he gave me the travel bug and experiences with wild nature that started and perpetuate my relationship with earth. And, Wendy Green, who I met at the perfect time in my journey. She helped direct my then multitudinous health practices into a more singular approach, which Ive honed and deepened since we met years ago. She also showed me how much I love ashtanga yoga, which is the gift of a lifetime. Ill be back to her retreat for the third time this summer. Knowledge -- Do you have any recommendations for those thinking of taking their career in a similar direction? Where does one start, where to find the education, how important is certification, etc. This is one of the most common questions I receive! I appreciate Mountain Rose Herbs list of resources for those looking into schools, teachers, or even just books. Its worth knowing which certifications are recognized by The American Herbalists Guild, though many people disregard the value of that and choose to study from great herbalists or schools that exist outside of the system. Id recommend as much exploration and direct experience as possible in the form of classes, workshops, and apprenticeships before then committing to a longer-term study. Find someone whose approach you respect and identify with and learn from them in whatever ways are available. -- Tell us about HRBLS, your beautiful herb infused chew line! Woo, HRBLS! These are my babies! Long story short, I wanted to give people an easy, delicious, beautiful but still very effective form of herbs. The HRBLS are gummies, or chews, that are equivalent to a dose of a tincture, a strong cup of herbal tea, or some capsules. Theyre a marriage between functional food and herbal remedies. A snack medicine or treat with benefits. Nerve Less is the first flavor (honeyed lavender tarragon) and includes my favorite herbs for daytime stress and anxiety relief, which so many folks come to me for help resolving. In the near future, well announce the next flavor – okay flavor s. :) -- And a last, fun one: what are your three favorite plants for the spring season and why? – Nettle! Because its my bff (we grew up together) and the coolest combination of edible green, super-green plant medicine, and a natural antihistamine. – Dandelion: I love the multi-taskers and like nettle, dandelion is an edible flower and bitter green (great for digestion), and medicinal top to root. – Mimosa. The tree of happiness which blooms more in the summer than spring, but close enough. Aside from looking magical, its full of medicine – everything from antioxidants to DMT. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Deep massages – two hours with the strongest hands I can find please! Acupuncture. Running, yoga, riding. TRAVEL. The post Self-Care Interview Series: Rachelle Robinett appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Chickpea Rice Soup

April 27 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Chickpea Rice SoupComforting and Healing Vegan Chickpea Rice Soup with Veggies. A glutenfree variation of Vegan Chicken Noodle Soup. Easy 1 Pot 30 minute meal. Gluten-free Nut-free Recipe. Soyfree option Jump to Recipe Spring sometimes brings sniffles and a warm comforting brothy soup is what gets me through it! This Chickpea Rice soup is the answer to the chikin noodle soup that cures all.  Garlic and veggies cooked to golden, then herbs, flavors and broth simmered with cooked chickpeas and rice! Use noodles, vegan chikin subs for variation. This Soup is delicious, healing and satisfying. It needs 1 Pot and less than 30 minutes! Change up the herbs to preference. Add more veggies for a hearty soup.Continue reading: Vegan Chickpea Rice SoupThe post Vegan Chickpea Rice Soup appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Asparagus Corn Chowder

April 18 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Asparagus Corn Chowder We sent out this simple asparagus chowder recipe as a little bonus in our newsletter a few years ago. Since then, it’s become a total spring staple for us, and we cook it almost every time there’s good asparagus around. It also turned out to be a crowd pleaser, since we heard back from a lot of people who made and loved it (those are the best emails to get, always). This spring, while making the chowder yet again, we realized that we should probably publish it here and make it readily accessible to everyone at all times :) This delicate chowder is a great dish for showcasing asparagus – there’s few ingredients, so the tender, green qualities of asparagus can really shine. The recipe comes together so quickly, too (you can watch the whole process in our Instagram stories later today)! The key here is not to overcook the asparagus, since it’s at its best when bright green and snappy. Otherwise, it turns into something brown, mushy, and generally unappealing. It’s barely cooked in this recipe – just quickly sautéed with some lemon juice and flash blanched in broth and coconut milk. This recipe definitely allows for all kinds of improvisation with spring produce. You can use any tender spring greens that you can find this time of year, as well as herbs – chives with their pretty blossoms, basil, and mint all work great here. You can swap in peas or fava beans for some of the corn or ramps for some of the onion. Have fun with the toppings, too. An assertive flavored oil like chili oil would be great, but a drizzle of good quality olive oil is always delicious as well. Something crunchy like toasted pumpkin seeds or croutons would be heavenly on top, and lots of herbs, always. Hope you’ll give this one a try :) Asparagus Corn Chowder   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 tablespoon olive oil or other cooking oil of choice 1 teaspoon cumin - freshly ground 1 teaspoon coriander - freshly ground 1 large yellow onion - chopped sea salt - to taste kernels from 2 ears of sweet corn or about 2 cups frozen and thawed corn freshly ground black pepper 1 bunch asparagus - tough ends cut off, sliced into bite-size pieces 3 cloves garlic - minced juice of 1 lemon 1 13.5 oz can unsweetened canned coconut milk 1½ cups vegetable broth or water 4 cups spring greens, such as spinach, arugula, watercress, etc. handful of fresh basil or mint leaves (optional) chives/­­chive blossoms - for garnish (optional) chili oil, basil oil or olive oil - for garnish (optional) Instructions Heat the oil in a medium soup pot over medium heat. Add the cumin, coriander, onion and a few pinches of salt, sauté for 5 minutes. Add the corn, a pinch of salt and black pepper, and cook, stirring, for another 5 minutes. Add the asparagus and garlic and sauté until the asparagus is bright green, for about 2-3 minutes. Add the lemon juice and let it absorb for a minute. Add the coconut milk and vegetable broth/­­water and bring to a boil. Remove the pot from the heat and stir in the greens to wilt them. Transfer about half of the soup to an upright blender along with the basil/­­mint, if using, and blend until creamy. Return the blended mixture back to the soup pot and stir to combine. Taste and adjust the seasonings if needed. Serve garnished with chives and chive blossoms, a drizzle of oil or any other desired toppings. 3.5.3226 The post Asparagus Corn Chowder appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Dumpling Ramen Bowls

March 29 2019 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Dumpling Ramen Bowls In our house, were crazy about ramen bowls.  Theyre one-dish meals that are healthful, versatile, and easy-to-make. What’s not to love? The cheapest and easiest noodles to use in ramen bowls are the eponymous ramen noodle bricks that you can find in any grocery store for about 20 cents each. (Just be sure to throw away the seasoning packet — nasty stuff in there!) When I have rice noodles on hand, I use them instead of the ramen noodles, and Ive also been known to use leftover linguine or angel hair pasta. For the broth, you can go with adding a regular vegetable soup base (I like Better than Bouillon brand) or even miso paste to water.  Were tom yum soup fanatics, so more often I will season my broth with a great tom yum soup base I found that contains no animal products. The vegetables and other ingredients you add to your bowls are only limited by your imagination (or, more accurately, whats in your fridge).  Usually I add some diced extra-firm tofu (sautéed when I have the time, or just simmered with everything else when Im in a hurry).  Ive also been known to add pieces of vegan sausage (as I did here) as well as meatballs when I have them on hand. I add whatever veggies I have on hand, whether fresh or frozen. These bowls are also a great way to use up small amounts of leftover vegetables. One of my favorite additions to ramen bowls are Asian dumplings.  I live in a rural area, so until recently, if I wanted Asian dumplings, Id have to take a road trip to a city with an Asian market. But the nice people at Nasoya sent me samples of their organic Nasoya Vegan Dumplings to try for this post. I’m also happy to report that my local Food Lion now carries these dumplings (they’re in the fresh produce section next to the tofu), so I can now enjoy organic vegan dumplings anytime!  Click here for coupons to give them a try — they’re available in two flavors - Tofu Vegetable and Thai Basil Vegetable. Below is my recipe for Dumpling Ramen Bowls.   They can be made super-quickly if you use the simmer-everything-together method, or you can take a few extra minutes to saute some of the ingredients separately (such as the dumplings) and add more flavor to the final result. I especially like to use my electric wok when I make these bowls because I find that it makes it easier, whichever method I use.   Heres a recipe using my preferred method in which I saute a few of the components first:  Dumpling Ramen Bowls 2 teaspoons neutral vegetable oil 1 package Nasoya Vegan Dumplings 1 1/­­2 cups sliced shiitake mushrooms 2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce 3 cups water 2 teaspoons vegetable soup base or tom yum soup base 2 packages ramen noodles or rice noodles 1/­­2 cup shredded carrots 2 cups fresh baby spinach or baby bok choy 1 cup cooked broccoli florets (or other cooked vegetable, optional 2 diced vegan sausage links or 1 cup diced extra-firm tofu, optional Sriracha, to taste, optional Thai basil leaves or cilantro, optional garnish Black sesame seeds, optional garnish Heat the oil in a wok or large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the dumplings and stir-fry until nicely browned on both sides, about 2 minutes per side.  Add a splash of water, if needed to keep the dumplings from sticking. Remove the dumplings from the wok, and set aside. Reheat the wok or skillet over medium-high heat.  Add the mushrooms and a splash of soy sauce and stir-fry for 1 to 2 minutes to brown nicely and soften.  Remove the mushrooms from the wok and set aside.  Bring the the water to a boil in the wok or medium saucepan. Stir in the soup base until blended. Add the ramen noodles, carrot, and remaining soy sauce and reduce the heat to a simmer. Cook until the noodles are tender, about 2 minutes. Add the spinach and stir gently until the spinach is wilted. Divide the noodle mixture into large soup bowls, arranging the carrots and spinach on top of the noodles.  Return the dumplings and mushrooms to the wok and heat until hot.  Arrange the dumplings and mushrooms on top of the noodles, next to the spinach and carrots.  Add the cooked broccoli and vegan sausage and stir-fry for a minute to heat through.  To serve, drizzle each bowl with sriracha, if using.  Taste and adjust the seasonings, if needed. Garnish with basil or cilantro and a sprinkle of sesame seeds, if using. Makes 2 to 4 servings   NOTE: For the quick, no-oil, Simmer-Everything-Together Method, use the above ingredients (except the oil) and proceed as follows: Heat the water in a large saucepan.  Add the soy sauce and vegetable soup base or tom yum soup base and bring to a boil.  Add the Nasoya Vegan Dumplings and return the water to a boil for 2 to 3 minutes. Add the ramen noodles, mushrooms, and reduce the heat to a simmer. Cook until the noodles and dumplings are tender, about 2 minutes. Add the carrots, and spinach and stir gently until the spinach is wilted. Taste and adjust the seasonings, if needed. Stir in any additional cooked veggies, tofu, or other ingredients, as desired. Divide the soup into bowls, arranging a few of the dumplings on top of each serving.  Drizzle with a little sriracha, if desired. Garnish with a few Thai basil or cilantro leaves and a sprinkle of sesame seeds, if using. The post Dumpling Ramen Bowls appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Golden Potato, Cabbage, and White Bean Stew – Abruzzo Inspired

March 7 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Golden Potato, Cabbage, and White Bean Stew – Abruzzo Inspired We’re continuing with our series of Abruzzo-inspired, plant-based meals today (all our previous recipes are linked below). We love this style of cooking, because it’s focused on an elegant kind of simplicity that really lets every single ingredient shine. Italians tend to take the integrity of their ingredients really seriously, which we experienced first-hand everywhere we ate and cooked in Abruzzo. That obsession with quality ingredients really comes through in the amazing flavor of seemingly very basic dishes. This golden, warming stew was inspired by a seriously unforgettable cabbage and potato stew we tried in Abruzzo. We added our own spin to it – white beans and mushrooms – but the core stayed the same. It’s got just the type of soul-warming energy that we want in our kitchens and on our stoves during a decidedly un-spring like, snowy March. There are still spots open for our retreat in Abruzzo this coming October! You can read all about our past retreat here, complete with photos and testimonials. This time around, we will be focusing on re-centering and relaxation, together with exploring beautiful Abruzzo. We are super excited to have an on-site yoga/­­meditation instructor and an on-site acupuncture physician, both offering daily services. We’ll be hosting a bunch of fun workshops like medicinal jams, vegan cheese, meal planning, and homemade skincare (wink wink Magic Moisturizer). Also: visits to an olive grove, winery, and a family truffle plantation. You can see our whole sample itinerary here, and book here! Click Here to book our Abruzzo Retreat! This stew is all about the combination of the fragrant, golden broth and the rustic, chunky pieces of variously textured veg. There’s tender, silky cabbage, carby goodness from the potatoes, and meatiness from the mushrooms and white beans. Onion, carrots and garlic establish a solid flavor base, and the addition of nutritional yeast, mustard, red pepper flakes, and lemon brings even more depth and a kick of zing and spice. We are crazy about this recipe. You can also watch us making this stew step-by-step later today on our Instagram Stories (it will be saved to our highlights as well). Hope you give it a try! For more of our Abruzzo-inspired recipes, check these out: Pasta e Ceci, The Simplest Lentil Soup, Ciabotta, Rhubarb Jam Cookies. And all scenery photos in this post are from our past retreat in Abruzzo this fall. Click Here to book our Abruzzo Retreat! Having the opportunity to explore a lesser known region of Italy to find its hidden gems in the Culinary arts was such an enriching experience! Getting to see first hand how the people in these areas live, visiting locals in their homes... From truffle hunting to tasting oil from 600 year old olive groves... Wild foraging for greens & making pasta in an Italian womans kitchen.... Not the typical trip to Italy. It was a delightful & delicious experience! - Rachel, Alabama I loved the retreat. It was well managed, we had the best food, awesome accommodation, great people, perfectly sized travel group and great tour guides. I had looked very much forward to this retreat and it was even better than I imagined. You created an amazing experience, with wonderful and very unique accommodations, the best meals I have ever had, set in a beautiful landscape, off the beaten path. The silence was palpable and so welcome to step out of the noisy and hectic lifestyle most of us have these days. I seriously consider joining you again, so I can have more of those meals, go back to the medieval village of Santo Stefano and the unique scattered hotel. We also had an awesome group, which made it even more special! - Claudia, Massachusetts It was a trip of a lifetime. Abruzzo could not have been more beautiful! I loved the diversity of the land, the hiking, cooking and loved loved loved the food. I also was glad that it was not a large group...I liked the intimacy of the smaller number of participants. It truly was a remarkable 6 days and you all were so kind, knowledgeable and pleasant to be with. - Helen, Michigan Thank you for the wonderful trip. It was so much more than I thought it would be. A deep dive into the food, culture and people of Abruzzo. I had experiences that I could never have on my own. I thought we were a good mix of ages, interests and countries. Diversity makes things so interesting. - Maudia, Michigan Ive been to Italy before but never like this! We visited magical places that Id never know about on my own: Santo Stefano with its fairytale charm, the beautiful truffle plantation, ancient olive grove, a winery located right in a family homes basement... Every single one was a unique, unforgettable experience. Thank you! - Katya, Sochi Golden Potato, Cabbage, and White Bean Stew   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients olive oil 1 medium onion - diced 2 large carrots - finely cubed sea salt 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast generous pinch of red pepper flakes 3 cloves of garlic - minced 4 oz shiitake mushrooms - stems removed, sliced 1 lb any starchy potatoes of choice - cut into 1 chunks freshly ground black pepper 1½ tablespoons Dijon or grainy mustard 2 bay leaves 7 cups water or veggie broth/­­broth from cooking the white beans 1 small Nappa or white cabbage - cored and cut into 1 chunks 2½-3 cups cooked white beans juice from 1 lemon handful of parsley - chopped, for serving Instructions Heat up a soup pot over medium heat and add some olive oil for sautéing. Add the onion and carrots, along with some salt and pepper, and sauté for about 8-10 minutes, until the onion and carrots are soft. Add the nutritional yeast, red pepper flakes, garlic, shiitake, and another pinch of salt. Stir and cook for another 8 minutes, or until the mushrooms are cooked through and any liquid that they release is evaporated. Add the potatoes, black pepper, mustard, and another pinch of salt, and give everything a stir. Add the bay leaves and water/­­broth and bring up to a simmer. Be mindful to use less salt if you are using a salted broth or more salt if using water. Using a wooden spoon or spatula, deglaze any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Simmer, partially covered, for 20-25 minutes, until the potatoes are tender. Add the cabbage and white beans, and bring the stew back up to a simmer. Simmer, partially covered, for another 15 minutes, until the cabbage is silky and tender. Turn off the heat. Add the lemon juice and stir it in. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Serve the stew, garnished with parsley and a drizzle of olive oil. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... Vegan Caesar Salad with Tempeh Croutons, Roasted Peaches and Corn Black Sesame and Ginger Ice Cream Roasted Pepper Lasagna Simple Mango Gazpacho .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Golden Potato, Cabbage, and White Bean Stew – Abruzzo Inspired appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

7 Meatless Monday Soup Recipes to Keep You Warm Until Spring

February 25 2019 Meatless Monday 

7 Meatless Monday Soup Recipes to Keep You Warm Until SpringSpring is still a month away so theres plenty of time to enjoy hearty winter soups that make this season delicious. To help you celebrate the last few weeks of winter, weve gathered some of our favorite winter soup recipes that include seasonal vegetables, such as root vegetables, squash and parsnips. Enjoy these tasty plant-based recipes from our Meatless Monday recipe gallery as we count down the days until spring arrives. Sweet Potato and White Bean Soup from Healthy with Nedi Oven-Roasted Pea Soup with Mint and Mascarpone Dressing from Fabio Viviani Curried Butternut Velvet Soup from She’s Cooking Mediterranean Vegetable Noodle Soup from Tofu ‘n Sproutz Carrot Soup with Parsnip Chips from MyRecipes.com Red Onion Soup with Shiitake Broth from Jackie Newgent, RDN Hearty White Bean & Millet Soup from Bean A Foodie Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram! The post 7 Meatless Monday Soup Recipes to Keep You Warm Until Spring appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Pumpkin Soup (Instant Pot)

September 23 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Pumpkin Soup (Instant Pot)Creamy Vegan Pumpkin Soup made in Instant Pot Pressure cooker. This pumpkin apple soup is quick and easy and perfect for fall. Stove top option. 8 Ingredients! Gluten-free Soy-free Recipe, Can be nut-free Jump to Recipe  It’s raining and cold and I just want to sit inside a comforter with a warm bowl of this soup. A creamy, savory, pumpkiny, spiced bowl of comfort. Aromatics are sauteed, then the pumpkin puree and apple is cooked with ginger, chili, cashews and broth. Then blended and served hot. Garnish with pepper, pumpkin seeds, roasted pumpkin or croutons! Make a double batch because this soup is going to disappear! Stove-top instructions, nut-free options and other questions mentioned in the recipe and the post.Continue reading: Vegan Pumpkin Soup (Instant Pot)The post Vegan Pumpkin Soup (Instant Pot) appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Easy Chilled Beet Soup

August 2 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Easy Chilled Beet Soup This soup tastes like you’re eating the garden in the best possible way. In Russia, we call it svekolnik, but similar recipes can be found in other Eastern European countries like Lithuania, Poland, etc. It tastes incredibly refreshing and life-giving, and the preparation couldn’t be simpler, with only 7 core ingredients. For beet skeptics, this chilled approach might be your key to enjoying beets, since their flavor is quite mild here. The mandatory dollop of yogurt or sour cream (we love coconut yogurt here) takes everything to the next level, so make sure not to skip it :) The cool thing about this soup is that it uses the entire beet, tops and greens included. You don’t have to have the tops to make it, but if your beets come with bushy tops, don’t throw them away. It’s no secret that beet tops are incredibly nutritious, so that contributes to the whole life-giving, garden feel of this dish. Typically, svekolnik recipes call for eggs, but since we keep things plant-based around here, we’ve come up with two delicious alternatives. I’ve been making this soup with white beans all summer long, and they fit in perfectly, so that’s one of them. And then recently, it occurred to me that silken tofu has a similar texture to egg whites and could be delicious in this recipe, like it usually is in Japanese cold tofu dishes. It worked – tofu is totally tasty and texturally perfect here, and, like the beans, it adds extra protein and makes the soup more satiating. We hope you’ll give this beet soup a try sometime this summer. Wishing you a beautiful weekend :) Easy Chilled Beet Soup   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 5 medium beets, tops included if present sea salt freshly ground black pepper 16 oz silken tofu or white beans juice from 2 small lemons 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar 4-6 small cucumbers, like Persian - cubed dill/­­parsley/­­green onion - chopped yogurt or cashew sour cream/­­other sour cream of choice - for serving Instructions Separate the beets from their tops, if present. Wash and scrub the beets clean and place them in a soup pot. Separate the beet stems from the leaves, setting the leaves aside until ready to serve the soup. Finely chop the stems and place them in the soup pot. Cover the beets and stems with water by about 2. Season with salt and pepper - this water will become your broth. Bring up to a boil and boil for 20-25 minutes, until the beets are tender throughout. Carefully remove the beets from the broth with a slotted spoon or tongs, leaving the stems in the pot. Let the beets cool or run them under cold water, then peel off the skins. Grate the beets on a box grater or with the grater attachment of a food processor. Return the grated beets back to the pot with the broth. Add the tofu or beans to the pot, along with the lemon juice, vinegar, and another pinch of salt if needed. Put the pot in the refrigerator to chill completely for 2-4 hours or overnight. Once chilled, taste for salt, pepper, and vinegar, and adjust if needed. To serve, place about 1 small cubed cucumber in each bowl. Finely chop the beet greens and add a handful to each bowl. Pour the soup over the vegetables, making to sure to catch plenty of the grated beets and tofu/­­white beans. Garnish with lots of herbs and a mandatory dollop of yogurt or cashew sour cream. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 The post Easy Chilled Beet Soup appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

bonda soup recipe | urad dal fritters in a moong dal soup

July 17 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

bonda soup recipe | urad dal fritters in a moong dal soupbonda soup recipe | urad dal fritters in a moong dal soup with step by step photo and video recipe. the traditional soup recipes are generally made with a vegetable or with broth of veggies or meat. these are generally served as appetizer just before the meal which eventually improve the appetite. but there are other innovative soup recipe and bonda soup recipe is one such innovation made by urad dal fritter and moong dal soup. The post bonda soup recipe | urad dal fritters in a moong dal soup appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Celebrate National Mac and Cheese Day!

July 10 2019 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Celebrate National Mac and Cheese Day! Did you know July 14 is National Mac and Cheese Day? I cant think of a better way to celebrate this classic comfort food that to enjoy some delicious vegan mac and cheese. In honor of this special day, Im sharing one of my favorite recipes from my upcoming book, Vegan Mac & Cheese. In the coming weeks, Ill be providing sneak peeks of whats inside the book.  For now, enjoy this recipe for Buffalo Cauliflower Mac and celebrate National Mac and Cheese Day. And, in case you missed it....when you pre-order Vegan Mac & Cheese on Amazon, my publisher will send you free bonus recipes. Buffalo Cauliflower Mac Buffalo cauliflower has been making the rounds, so it should come as no surprise that it turns up in a mac uncheese. The cheesy, saucy macaroni is a perfect foil for the spicy hot cauliflower. Sauce: 1 large russet potato, cut into 1-inch (2.5 cm) chunks 1 large carrot, cut into 1-inch (2.5 cm) chunks 21/­­2 cups (600 ml) vegetable broth 2/­­3 cup (40 g) nutritional yeast 2 tablespoons (30 ml) tamari 1/­­2 teaspoon onion powder 1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder 1/­­4 teaspoon salt Cauliflower: 1 head cauliflower, cored and cut into bite-size pieces Olive oil cooking spray 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1/­­4 teaspoon salt 1/­­3 cup (80 ml) hot pepper sauce, preferably Frank’s RedHot 4 tablespoons (56 g) vegan butter, melted 1 tablespoon (15 ml) apple cider vinegar 1 teaspoon paprika Macaroni: 16 ounces (454 g) elbow macaroni, or other small pasta shape   Sauce: In a medium saucepan over medium-high heat, combine the potato, carrot, and vegetable broth. Bring to a boil and cook for 15 minutes, or until the vegetables are tender when pierced with a fork. Carefully transfer the mixture to a blender or food processor. Add the nutritional yeast, tamari, onion powder, and garlic powder, and salt. Blend until the sauce is smooth. Tasste and add more salt if needed. Set aside. Cauliflower: Preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C). Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Arrange the cauliflower in a single layer on the prepared pan. Spray the cauliflower with cooking spray, then and sprinkle with the garlic powder and salt. Roast for 20 minutes, then transfer to a large bowl and add the hot sauce, butter, vinegar, and paprika. Stir well to coat. Return the cauliflower to the baking sheet and arrange it in a single layer. Bake for 10 minutes longer. Macaroni: Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Add the pasta and cook according to the package directions until al dente. Cook the macaroni in a pot of boiling salted water until it is al dente. Drain well and return it to the pot. Stir in the reserved sauce and place the pot over low heat. Cook over low heat for a few minutes to heat through. Stir in the buffalo cauliflower and gently stir to combine. Serve hot. The post Celebrate National Mac and Cheese Day! appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Pea Alfredo Pasta

May 15 2019 VegKitchen 

Pea Alfredo Pasta Discover this fully vegan recipe for fettuccine with alfredo sauce and peas without delay. You will be surprised to discover that the cheese is replaced here by nutritional yeast. As for the creamy alfredo sauce, it is made with vegetable broth and plant based milk. The post Pea Alfredo Pasta appeared first on VegKitchen.

Italian Style Quinoa Salad

May 1 2019 VegKitchen 

Italian Style Quinoa Salad This salad can be serve cold or warm, and children love it! Its super important to rinse the quinoa before cooking. Then cook it in water or broth, not forgetting the bay leaf. The post Italian Style Quinoa Salad appeared first on VegKitchen.

General Tso’s Cauliflower from Healthier Together

April 25 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

General Tso’s Cauliflower from Healthier Together Today we’re sharing a serious crowd pleaser of a recipe from Liz Moody’s beautiful new cookbook Healthier Together. Liz’s book is all about falling in love – with food, with her husband, and with the way that cooking and eating brings people together. It provides gentle encouragement for getting into the kitchen with someone else, whether a friend, a partner, or family, and for getting healthier together by nurturing relationships through sharing considered and tasty, home-cooked food. I’ve never actually tried General Tso’s chicken, but was immediately attracted to this cauliflower version in the book. I think that the appeal of glossy, sticky, sweet and sour goodness served over a mound of fluffy white rice is pretty universal! Liz’s recipe hits all of the aforementioned flavor and texture notes and then some. The cauliflower turns out beautifully gingery and garlicky, with an intensity of flavor that you would expect from a restaurant dish. But it’s also made with what I imagine to be way more wholesome ingredients than traditional Chinese takeout. There’s rice flour instead of wheat for anyone avoiding gluten, tamari instead of soy sauce, and coconut sugar instead of white sugar. All of the recipes in Healthier Together serve two, making it a great book for those cooking with a partner or a roommate, or even just for themselves. But as Liz suggests, it would be a great idea to double this General Tso’s Cauliflower recipe and serve it as an app at a party. Other recipes we’re super excited to try: Mexican Street Corn and Quinoa Bowl, Broccoli Rice Tabbouleh with Lemon and Dill, Caramelized Parsnip Steaks with Zesty Chimichurri, Brussels Sprout & Toasted Almond Tacos, Extra Bloody Mary, and Carrot Cake Breakfast Cookies. For all the 100% plant-based friends, it’s worth mentioning that this book is not vegetarian or vegan, but about 80% of the recipes are vegetarian, vegan, or can be made plant-based with suggested substitutions. Hope you’ll check out this stunner! General Tsos Cauliflower   Print Serves: 2 Ingredients 3/­­4 cup rice flour 1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder 1/­­4 teaspoon ground ginger generous pinch fine-grain sea salt 1 medium head cauliflower, cut into florets 1 tablespoon toasted sesame seed oil 1 tablespoon peeled, minced ginger 2 garlic cloves, minced 3 tablespoons tomato paste 1/­­4 cup tamari or soy sauce 3 tablespoons rice vinegar 1/­­4 cup vegetable broth 1/­­2 cup coconut sugar 1 green onion, white and light green parts only, thinly sliced, to garnish Instructions Preheat the oven to 425°F. Line a baking sheet (or 2, if you have them) with parchment paper. In a large bowl, whisk together 1/­­2 cup of rice flour, 1/­­2 cup of water, the garlic powder, ground ginger, and salt. Dust the cauliflower with the remaining 1/­­4 cup rice flour, then dredge the florets in the wet rice flour mixture until well coated, shaking off any excess. Arrange on the prepared baking sheet, spacing them apart. Bake for 25 to 40 minutes, flipping once halfway through, until golden brown all over (the smaller the florets, the faster theyll cook). Transfer to a large bowl. Keep the oven on and the lined baking sheet handy. Heat the sesame oil in a small pot over medium heat. When it shimmers, add the ginger and garlic, and sauté, stirring constantly, until fragrant, 2 to 3 minutes. Add the tomato paste, tamari, rice vinegar, broth, and coconut sugar, whisking to combine. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to low and simmer, stirring occasionally, until reduced by about one-quarter, about 5 minutes Pour the sauce over the cauliflower and toss to coat well. Transfer the cauliflower back to the baking sheet and bake for an additional 10 to 15 minutes, or until the cauliflower is dark brown but not burned. Serve topped with the green onions. 3.5.3226 The post General Tso’s Cauliflower from Healthier Together appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Zucchini, Tempeh and Mushroom Bolognese

April 3 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Zucchini, Tempeh and Mushroom Bolognese This might be our favorite recipe so far this year! We were craving bolognese, but were also mindful of the fact that it’s spring, which generally has people cooking lighter, greener fare. So we compromised and came up with a vegetable-packed bolognese that doesn’t depend on canned tomatoes. Instead, we start with fresh cherry tomatoes, bell pepper, zucchini, and tons of basil. Tempeh and mushrooms bring savoriness and meatiness, while some pantry staples help build the deep flavors that you’d generally expect from bolognese. The result is super flavorful and amazing on pasta, but it also feels lighter and more spring-appropriate than your traditional bolognese. We’ll be showing how to make this recipe step-by-step on our Instagram Stories later today, so check that out if you’re interested in trying it :) If you’re doubtful about including zucchini in bolognese, give it a chance! When roasted, it has a nice, meaty texture that goes perfectly with the mushrooms and tempeh. In addition to that, some of the zucchini gets blended into the sauce, which makes the whole thing super creamy. This recipe is also great for tempeh skeptics. The tempeh just takes on the flavors of the sauce and aromatics here and contributes a meaty bite, without any other foreign flavors. We’re having a bit of a tempeh obsession right now and it’s so good in this dish. That’s pretty much it! Hope you try this one and thanks so much for all your comments on last week’s giveaway. Zucchini, Tempeh and Mushroom Bolognese   Print Serves: 6 Ingredients 8 oz tempeh 2 tablespoons tamari 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar ⅓ cup cashews ⅓ cup sun dried tomatoes (dry, not oil-packed) 10 oz cherry tomatoes - halved 2 zucchini - cut in half lengthwise 1 red bell pepper - cored and quartered 1 lb crimini mushrooms - quartered sea salt freshly ground black pepper avocado oil or other roasting oil of choice 1 yellow onion - chopped 3 cloves of garlic - minced 1 tablespoon tomato paste splash of red wine (optional) ¼ cup nutritional yeast 12 oz pasta or more - for serving 1 bunch of basil - chopped, plus more for garnish Instructions In a bowl, crumble the tempeh and drizzle with the tamari and balsamic, toss to coat. Soak the cashews and sun dried tomatoes in hot water. Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare 2 parchment paper-covered baking trays. Arrange the tomatoes, zucchini, bell pepper, and mushrooms on the trays. Sprinkle everything with salt and pepper, drizzle with oil, and mix to coat. Place the trays in the oven and roast for 35-45 minutes, until all the vegetables are soft and all the liquid thats been released by the mushrooms cooks off. Meanwhile, heat oil to a large pan set over medium heat (if you dont have a large pan, consider using a soup pot here). Add the onion and sauté for 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the marinated tempeh, stir once, and then let sit without stirring for a good 3-4 minutes, so that it thoroughly browns. Stir and sauté for another 3-4 minutes, until completely browned. Stir in the garlic at the end. Add the tomato paste and a splash of wine, if using, and stir to coat. Once the vegetables are done roasting, in an upright blender, combine 1 roasted zucchini half, all of the bell pepper, all the tomatoes, about ⅓ of the amount of the mushrooms, the drained cashews and sun dried tomatoes, nutritional yeast, and about 3 cups of water or broth. Blend until smooth, taste for salt and adjust if needed. Cube the remaining roasted zucchini. Add the sauce to the pan with the tempeh, along with the cubed zucchini and remaining mushrooms and bring up to a simmer. Let the sauce reduce for 10-15 minutes. Meanwhile, cook the pasta. Once the sauce is done cooking, stir in the basil. Serve the bolognese over pasta, garnished with more basil. Notes This bolognese keeps really well, so we suggest cooking as much pasta as youre planning on eating that day and serving it with the sauce bit by bit. That way, you can enjoy properly cooked, al dente pasta every time. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Roasted Cauliflower and Mushroom Chowder

March 23 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Roasted Cauliflower and Mushroom Chowder We’re very ready for spring and all of its tender, green produce, but unfortunately it’s still very much soup weather around here. I think that soups are such lifesavers for busy people. They’re simple to make, hard to mess up, and can be customized millions of ways. You can make a giant soup for the week and have warming, wholesome meals right at your fingertips when you don’t have the energy to cook. They’re easy to bring to go in a mason jar or thermos. It’s also great to freeze some soup, which will always be appreciated later, in the midst hangry emergencies. We had two goals for this chowder – we wanted it to be creamy, filling, and comforting, but also light and a bit different from the squash and root vegetable soups that are always around in the winter. Just a little nod to spring :) The creaminess in this chowder comes from blended roasted cauliflower, mushrooms, and chickpeas. There’s no cashews or any nut-based products, since we wanted to go for a lighter soup. I think that cauliflower works so well in creating both a chowder-like consistency and flavor here, while the roasted mushrooms bring an extra depth of flavor. There are also green peas for more springy vibes, along with a base of mirepoix (onion, carrot, celery), and smoked paprika. When it comes to creamy soups, we still love having some chunky texture present, so we leave some of the cauliflower, mushrooms, and chickpeas whole here. The chowder just tastes more like a meal this way, but it could definitely also serve as a side in smaller portions. We’ll be showing the step-by-step process for preparing this chowder on our Instagram Stories later today, and we’ll also save it in our Highlights. Hope you try this one and have a great weekend :) Roasted Cauliflower and Mushroom Chowder   Print Serves: 6 Ingredients olive oil toasted sesame oil (optional) 1 yellow onion - chopped 1 medium carrot - cubed 1 stick of celery - sliced sea salt 3 cloves of garlic - minced 1 teaspoon smoked paprika 1 teaspoon nutritional yeast (optional) ¾ cup dried chickpeas - soaked overnight or up to 24 hours 8 cups purified water 2 bay leaves 1 large head of cauliflower - cut into bite-sized florets 10 oz crimini mushrooms - cut into quarters or eighths for bigger mushrooms freshly ground black pepper 1 cup frozen peas juice from 1 lemon fresh herbs - for garnish Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Warm a soup pot over medium heat. Add a generous drizzle of olive oil and sesame oil, if using. Add the onion, carrot, and celery to the pot, along with a pinch of salt. Cook the vegetables for about 10 minutes, until soft. Add the garlic, smoked paprika, and nutritional yeast, if using, and stir around for about 30 seconds to 1 minute, until fragrant. Drain and thoroughly rinse the chickpeas and add them to the pot, stirring to coat. Add the water and bay leaves, bring the liquid up to a simmer and cook, with the pot lid askew, for 30 minutes. Taste a few chickpeas after the 30 minutes, they should be cooked and creamy inside. If the chickpeas are not yet done, cook them longer. This process can take up to an hour or even longer with some older chickpeas. Generously salt the chickpea broth towards the end of the chickpea cooking time. While the chickpeas are cooking, prepare two rimmed, parchment paper-covered baking trays. Place the cauliflower on one of the trays and the mushrooms - on the other one. Drizzle both the cauliflower and mushrooms with olive oil (or other roasting oil of choice), sprinkle with salt and pepper, and stir. Place both trays in the preheated oven and roast for 30-40 minutes, stirring halfway, until the cauliflower is soft and caramelized. The mushrooms will release water while roasting, so thats why using a rimmed baking tray helps. Once the chickpeas are cooked and the vegetables are roasted, add the cauliflower and mushrooms to the pot with the chickpeas, stirring to combine. Add about half of the soup to an upright blender, making sure to catch plenty of chickpeas, cauliflower, and mushrooms for creaminess. Blend until smooth and return the blended liquid to the soup pot, mixing everything together. Bring the soup back up to a boil and simmer for 5 more minutes for the flavors to merge. Turn off the heat and stir in the peas, which will thaw immediately in the hot soup. Stir in the lemon juice. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Serve the chowder, garnished with fresh herbs, a drizzle of sesame oil or olive oil, and with a side of toasted sourdough bread or croutons. Enjoy! Notes You can also make this soup with canned chickpeas! Just use one to two 15 ounce cans of chickpeas and less water (start with about 5-6 cups). Since the chickpeas are cooked, you dont have to simmer them for 30 minutes. Otherwise, proceed as written out in the recipe. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Vegan Pasta e Fagioli Soup (and my gardener's lament: winter poison ivy!)

March 3 2019 Vegan Thyme 

Vegan Pasta e Fagioli Soup (and my gardener's lament: winter poison ivy!) Dear Soup, Thank you for always reminding me there are better days ahead. Soups are mainstays around here, especially with snow on the ground and temps hovering in low twenties to single digits tonight, plus more cold on the horizon this week. And poison ivy. (Yup.) I've probably made six batches of this already this winter. It involves a food processor and a soup pot. That's it. Comes together in approximately five minutes and is satisfying, warm and delicious. Here's my take on this soup, which was originally inspired by this. Here's how I made my Vegan Pasta e Fagioli: 4 carrots 1 leek 6 cloves garlic 1 celery stalk 1/­­2 onion sliced thin 2 bay leaves 1/­­2 head of cabbage 1 can of cannellini beans (drained, rinsed) 1 can diced tomatoes 1/­­3 cup ditalini pasta (cooked in separate pot, then added to soup just before serving) 2 T. nutritional yeast 1 qt. veggie stock olive oil thyme oregano red pepper flakes salt & pepper to taste Add chopped veggies--carrots, leeks, garlic to food processor, pulse about ten times. Prep the soup pot with the olive oil over medium heat, add chopped veg. Cook till just tender. Add remaining ingredients and broth and seasonings, salt and pepper. Cover and let simmer two hours over low heat. Serve with a side of your best homemade bread. (Mine is Jim Lahey's --I made the ciabatta version). After a visit with the folks at Urgent Care yesterday for a infernal outbreak of poison ivy, I am now awaiting an agonizing three weeks for this painful mess to clear up. Or longer. Why does Mother Earth require such an evil, toxic plant? What purpose does it serve? I've been struck by this havoc on only a handful of times in my life because I am so gawdawful afraid. Sounds impossible. But trust me when I tell you: only to me, the Master Gardener, and in winter no less. And above is the culprit.  Our home is undergoing a transformation of sorts in a few weeks which will finally rid us of these old railroad timbers and be replaced with a more substantial wall of stone. (That will hopefully outlive us and beyond.)  So I found myself outside on a warm-ish day earlier last week in a bit of a snit over the demise of some cherished plants I couldn't bear to loose. I've spent fifteen years tending and planting, so obviously there are plants I want to keep. Out with the shovel and buckets and pots. Everything's dormant, ground was soft, sun was out: perfect. Until later that night when I woke with what I imagined to be some sort of bug bite. Then to the next afternoon when my arm reached up to scratch my wrist (pulling the long sleeve back and discovering to my horror what really had happened). OMG. WTH? Could this be? . . . is this? Noooooo!  And then began the seven stages of grief: shock, denial, guilt, anger and bargaining, depression and loneliness to reconstruction (the UC visit) and finally acceptance. Yes, I accept that I have the rash of the spring and summertime, of gardeners, campers, hikers and landscapers, the poisonous fury of: Leaves of Three Let it Be! Ah, but what about the roots?  I had come in contact with said dormant plant--through the roots. I had oh-so carefully lifted plants and divided, setting each clump aside. Gloves and long sleeves. I have replayed this moment back through my mind a hundred times: as I reached under one of my plants, I must have accidentally, on an exposed part of my wrist, come in contact with the worst plant root on the planet, unbeknownst to me.  I am more allergic than most and so, this lovely little visitor and its prescribed remedy dosed out (the horrid steroid treatment) is, well. It's hell. The rash has traveled from my left wrist, up my right arm, to my abdomen, and leg. There's a perfect dot-to-dot landscape you can follow if you wanted. I can see the entry at every point. It's like an incredibly cruel irony and one I will face with tears, determination, agitation and regret. As for the remainder of the plants. They'll be destined for demolition. 

Vegan Lentil Soup Instant Pot or Saucepan

February 18 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Lentil Soup Instant Pot or Saucepan1 Pot Vegan Lentil Soup made in Instant Pot or Saucepan. This Easy Lentil Vegetable Soup is warming, comforting and so filling. 30 Minute Freezer friendly, Everyday Ingredients. Gluten-free, Soyfree, Nutfree Recipe.  Jump to Recipe Lentil soups in various forms are pretty much a staple in the house. Whats not to love! A Comforting Bowl of delicious brothy or creamy, veggies and lentils that are cooked just perfect.  Soups make a great 1 Pot meal with any veggies added in. Adjust the cooking time based on lentils used (there are various types of lentils! which might need a few minutes less or more cooking time) and make it brothy/­­stewy, or creamy by blending some of the soup or adding some coconut milk. Simple spices such as cumin, curry powder(which you can change up or omit), garlic and tomatoes adding amazing flavor to the broth, with a good helping black pepper to add warmth and amazing flavor. So much deliciousness in a bowl! Use other spices and herbs for variations. See tips below to make the best lentil soup every time!!Continue reading: Vegan Lentil Soup Instant Pot or SaucepanThe post Vegan Lentil Soup Instant Pot or Saucepan appeared first on Vegan Richa.


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