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Tomato sev recipe | tomato sev namkeen | khasta tamatar namkeen sev










brilliant vegetarian recipes

Strawberry Rhubarb Hemp Breakfast Bites

August 15 2019 My New Roots 

Strawberry Rhubarb Hemp Breakfast Bites This post is a long time coming! And Im so excited to finally be sharing my bedroom with you all. Weve now been in our home for a year and a bit, and although its (still!) not complete, were enjoying working on the finishing details here and there. Honestly, I dont think we will ever be done, and that is okay. This entire experience has made me way more patient, realistic, and Ive learned to set my expectations super low on every project so that instead of being disappointed, Im often positively surprised! We moved with just boxes, zero furniture, and essentially had to start over in that department. That meant a new bed, a new mattress and all new linens, since we decided to make the jump from a queen size mattress to a king (literally one of the best life decisions, ever). My husband and I are both DIY-ers, and serious thrift store shoppers, and we knew that we wanted to build a bed ourselves, then find the rest of bedroom furniture second-hand. The one place where we knew we wanted to really take our time considering was a mattress and the bedding. If you read this blog, you probably care about your health to some degree. Like me, you may prioritize buying organic produce, splurge on environmentally-conscious clothing, and look to sustainable skincare and beauty products. But have you ever thought about your bedroom environment? We spend a third of our life in bed (at least we should), so its just as important to consider the things that we interact with in our homes, not just what goes in and on our bodies. In fact, the greatest exposure to chemicals you can have in a day, could be while youre sleeping. When I started looking into buying a mattress, I found the options were totally overwhelming. And with so many retailers moving to online platforms and selling directly to consumers, prices have been slashed considerably, and the deals are tempting. Mattresses are one of those things that seem pretty innocuous, and maybe even a place to save a few bucks. But dig a little deeper and youll see that the thing you spend so much time on, is not the thing you should spending less money on, as youll be paying for cheaper materials with your health. Modern, conventional mattresses are made with a laundry list of harmful substances that can be affecting you and your family. One of the most offensive ingredients found in conventional mattresses is memory foam made from polyurethane; a highly flammable, petroleum-based material. Polyurethane foam emits Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) that can cause eye, nose and throat irritation, headaches, nausea, and can also damage the liver, kidneys and central nervous system, according to the Environmental Protection Agency and the Occupational Health and Safety Administration. Un-ironically referred to as solid gasoline, polyurethane foam is typically wrapped in or treated with fire retardant chemicals to meet the Federal and State flammability standards in the US, otherwise it would be totally unsafe. Which brings me to the second thing to watch out for in mattresses, and that is chemical fire-retardants (CFRs). These are compounds added to the materials in a mattress to protect you, and they are an inexpensive way to meet safety standards. The issue is that CFRs do not fully bind to materials, and are released into the air through the mattress, then build up in the body causing some people lifelong health issues.   Formaldehyde, antimony, boric acid, and halogenated flame retardants are some of the most damaging CFRs found in modern mattresses, and the frustrating thing is that companies are not required to disclose which ones they are using. Unless a mattress company is explicitly eliminating these chemicals from their production and using a natural material alternative, they are likely using one of the harmful chemicals listed above. I looked at a number of organic /­­ natural mattress companies in my research, and the one that stood out to me was Naturepedic. They are made with certified organic cotton, wool, and latex. For heavy-duty support without any health or allergy concerns, Naturepedic only uses the highest quality innersprings available made from recycled steel.. , and steel, with Naturepedic ensured  the purity of every material used, along with fair labour practices. I reached out to Naturepedic, to see if they would be open to me trying a mattress out and blogging about it. They agreed, and sent me their EOS  (Ergonomic Organic Sleep) mattress that allows for fully customized layers for finding the exact right amount of firmness (you can even choose different support styles from your sleep partner, or swap out the layers down the line in case your preferences change). Id never heard of anything like that before, and though it was so brilliant! I went to the showroom in Toronto to try out the mattress in person, which was very helpful, but you can also just order online if you know what kind of consistency you like. The mattress components were delivered to my door, and it was easy to assemble, as everything gets zipped into a giant, certified organic cotton casing. After spending the last twelve months on this bed, I can confirm that its been the best year of sleep in my entire life (even post-child, haha!). Besides the fact that I love going to bed knowing that I am breathing completely clean air, and that the materials that went into the mattress were made with a deep commitment to protecting the environment, its simply the most supportive and comfortable mattress Ive ever tried. Period. I cannot recommend this mattress enough! The other thing to consider when outfitting your bedroom is the bedding itself. Because we come into direct, skin-to-product contact with these textiles, its essential to choose something non-toxic. Most bedding on the market is made with cotton, one of the most chemical-laden crops grown. According to Pesticide Action Network North America, Conventionally grown cotton uses more insecticides than any other single crop and epitomizes the worst effects of chemically dependent agriculture. Each year cotton producers around the world use nearly $2.6 billion worth of pesticides -- more than 10 per cent of the worlds pesticides and nearly 25 per cent of the worlds insecticides. If youre going to sleep in cotton, choose organic whenever you can. Linen is a great alternative material because it is a much lower impact material on the environment, and requires very little intervention to be grown. Coyuchi is a brand recommended to me by my dear friend Elenore, who has the highest standards I know of Coyuchis textile line is not only 100% organic, but also consciously processed, meaning that they use low-impact dyes for colour that is kind to the planet and our sensitive skin. Coyuchi offered to send me some bedding to try out and I was instantly obsessed. Their textiles are beyond delicious, super soft, and incredibly comfortable. For a duvet cover, I chose the Crystal Cove pattern in white. I loved this choice since its reversible - a textured weave that looks cozy in the winter, and a crinkled cotton underside, which I like to face up in the summer. I also love their Topanga Matelasse blanket, shown here in warm stripe, which is also reversible (super convenient if you want to change up the look of your bedding with a quick flip!). For winter, their Cloud Brushed flannel sheets are super luxurious, and especially enjoyable its very hard to find organic flannel! Words cannot describe the feeling of slipping into these on a chilly night. The giant back pillows in the bed are also from Coyuchi, and are perfect if you have an open-frame bed without a headboard. I like to sit up and read in bed, and these pillows are firm enough to act as a headboard itself. When youre shopping for any kind of textile (bedding, furniture, or clothing), the most important mark to look for is the Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) certification. GOTS is recognized as the world’s leading processing standard for textiles made from organic fibers. It defines high-level environmental criteria along the entire organic textiles supply chain and requires compliance with social criteria as well. Unlike most textile and mattress companies, both Coyuchi and Naturepedic are GOTS certified and adhere to their strict standards for agriculture and labour. Okay, lets get to the recipe! I experimented with these breakfast bites for a long time. At first, I was blending up cashews to make flour, but that got expensive, and ultimately I wanted the recipe to be allergen-free (so the nuts had to go!). As an alternative, I opted for hemp seeds, which worked beautifully. Its easy to make your own hemp flour in a food processor in a few seconds. Ive been using it baked goods lately and love how moist and tender the results are! I used strawberries and rhubarb for these nuggets of joy, but since were moving into stone fruit season, Ill soon be switching it up and using peaches, plums, pluots, apricots, and cherries in their place. Any fruit will work as long as its not super moist (like melons). Raspberries, blueberries, and blackberries would be lovely here too. Simply use 1 cup of chopped fresh fruit in any combination that tickles your fancy. To change up the flavour even more, add orange zest, warm spices like cinnamon and cardamom, or even some cacao powder for a chocolate version. Yum! I really wanted to make a successful vegan version of these, so I tried using banana in place of the egg. The results were decent, but a little too moist. If I made these again, I would use the banana plus a tablespoon of ground flax seeds. If any of you do that, please let me know in the comments!     Print recipe     Strawberry Rhubarb Hemp Breakfast Bites Makes 12 Ingredients: 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 215g hemp seeds 1/­­4 cup /­­ 35g arrowroot 1/­­4 tsp. flaky salt, plus more for garnish, if desired 1 tsp. baking powder 1 egg (or 1 ripe banana, mashed) 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml pure maple syrup 2 tsp. vanilla extract (or 1/­­2 tsp. vanilla powder) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 85g chopped strawberries 1/­­2 cup /­­ 60g chopped rhubarb (2-3 slim stalks) expeller-pressed coconut oil for greasing (or use muffin liners Directions: 1. Lightly grease a 12-cup muffin tin with coconut oil. Preheat oven to 350°F /­­ 175°C. 2. Wash the strawberries and rhubarb well. Slice the rhubarb into small discs, and cut the strawberries into small chunks. Reserve 3 strawberries for topping the breakfast bites, if desired (remove greens, then slice them top to bottom). Set fruit aside.  3. In a food processor, blend hemp seeds until theyre a fine powder (dont go too far or youll end up with hemp seed butter!). Add the arrowroot, salt and baking powder and pulse a few times to combine. 4. In a medium bowl, whisk the egg or banana, maple syrup, and vanilla extract together. Add the hemp seed flour blend, and stir to combine. Fold in the rhubarb and strawberries. 5.  Spoon a heaping tablespoon of the batter into each prepared muffin tin. If desired, place a slice of strawberry on top of each bite. Set in the oven and bake for 25-30 minutes, until lightly golden. 6. Remove from the oven and let cool completely. 7. Enjoy! Store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for five days. Aside from getting the chemicals out of your space, here are five other ways to improve the health of your bedroom, and your sleep! Add plants - having a couple of living things in your sleeping space keeps the air clean and fresh. Snake plants, areca palms, aloe vera and orchids are especially helpful, since they absorb CO2 at night, even when they are not photosynthesizing.  Consider airflow - keeping a window cracked at night is a good way to get some fresh air while you sleep. If its noisy outside, keep your window open during the day to ensure full air exchange, and close it right before bed. It’s very important to keep the air in your space fresh and moving. Salt rock lamps - these are said to purify the air by omitting negative ions. I cannot confirm this in any way, but I can confirm that the light they give off is incredibly soothing and helps me wind down at the end of the day. Overhead lighting is very stimulating (and let’s be honest, not overly sexy). Keep the devices out - dont work in bed, and avoid using your phone before snoozing. Blue light from screens inhibits our bodys ability to make melatonin, our sleep-wake hormone. If you choose to keep your phone in your room overnight, set it to airplane mode while you sleep so youre not exposing yourself to radiation from EMFs (Electromagnetic Field).  Beeswax candles - yes, its cozy to burn candles before bed, but paraffin candles pollute the air, full stop. Soy is a better alternative, but beeswax is my favourite since it actually helps purify the air by omitting negative ions, and removing dust and dander. Show me your Hemp Breakfast Bites on Instagram: #mnrbreakfastbites Special thanks to my dear friend Sara for taking these photos of me (and putting up with my awkwardness for at least two hours!). http:/­­/­­matandsara.com/­­ The post Strawberry Rhubarb Hemp Breakfast Bites appeared first on My New Roots.

20 Secret Ingredient Cauliflower Recipes

March 29 2019 Oh My Veggies 

You know the old saying… if life gives you cauliflower, make pizza crust. What, that’s not a saying?! Well, I propose right here and now that it should be. We all know cauliflower is a pretty great vegetable, sure. But do you know just how versatile it is? Did you know you can take a head of the stuff and make, yes, a pizza crust? Or a lightened-up version of mashed potatoes? How about hummus? Rice?! Popcorn! Buffalo wings!! This incredible cruciferous vegetable isn’t only low in carbohydrates (perfect for those eating lower-carb diets); it’s utterly packed with nutrients. So the fact that you can transform it into a myriad of other things--usually as as substitute for something that would have been far more calorie-dense--it’s a very good thing. Here are 20 brilliant cauliflower recipes from around the web that touch upon the infinite possibilities for this one remarkable vegetable. Recipe Title: Buffalo Cauliflower Bites Description: Spicy cauliflower “wings” dipped in cool ranch sauce? Yes, please. McKel at Nutrition Stripped shares this recipe for game day or any day. Get Recipe Now!

Self-Care Interview Series: Cortney Herrera

January 27 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Cortney Herrera Cortney Herrera is the artisan distiller and founder of the holistic skincare company Wildcare, located in the Pacific Northwest. We’ve been crushing hard on Cortney’s creations, like her expertly distilled hydrosols and face masks full of the most unique, glow-promoting ingredients, and we’re so excited to share this wisdom-packed interview. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Structure of certain things like eating & sleeping times has always made me feel the most supported. I am a triple virgo so by nature I crave a solid routine around the everyday basics. With that said, its freeing to just rehash it all and recreate a functional flow if I feel like Im too caught up in our pattern. Now that I have a baby (hes 1!) as much as I want things to be regimented for us all to thrive,  its necessary to play with flexibility for the unexpected too, so Ive shifted a bit more towards that direction. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. We sleep with our curtains open so that each morning we wake up to natural light. We just moved back to Oregon from sunny CA, so this is especially crucial for me here in the Pacific Northwest to feel more stable during the darker winter months. Our baby almost always wakes us up around 7am and usually starts babbling, so well take him out of his crib and have a little cuddle time. If hes not out on a job, my husband Alex will get him ready for the day and then Ill make us a morning beverage (usually tea with mushroom powder and coconut manna, and honey) and either one of us will cook a simple breakfast for the family (tortilla with an egg, handful of parsley or cilantro and a fermented veggie). We both work from home so we each hop on our computers shortly after while switching off with who is playing with baby Oso. One thing I am firm on is giving myself a facial massage for 5-10 minutes after I wash up. My skin loves it, but more importantly its a nice form of meditation to have that little moment of space to zen out a bit. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I opt for a magnesium bath, face mask (I like our creamy Soft Focus Mask at night), sometimes a chocolate and always a cup of tea – lately its a blend of lemon balm, chamomile, oatstraw and raspberry leaf. If time gets the best of me, Ill have a mug of hot water with magnesium powder to relax before bed. Im also really big on lists (virgo) so I usually write a new one before bed every night for all different things like shopping lists, distillation lists, who I need to email back more urgently, recipes I want to make.... everything thats been floating around in my mind that day so Im more freed up before bed. I watch a little Netflix and laugh, and then get in bed around 11. I like the Headspace app as a guided 5-10 minute meditation to center my breathing when I lay down. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  Outdoor explorations! We aim to weave one day trip into each week, usually within an hour of home, and drive to a mountain, forest, or river to breathe clean air & explore without much of a plan or direction in mind. Having this free-flowing space contrary to our routines during the week creates lots of room for spontaneity…and sometimes we hit a dead-end, but thats all part of the fun of experimenting and not having a plan! Balance is key. If we dont have time to physically drive to a big open landscape that weekend because of work, well take walks in the neighborhood or a smaller visit to a nearby park (there are parks everywhere in Portland!). I like to be present and check in with myself as I move…how does the sun or mist feel on my skin, what scents are in the air, what does this leaf feel like in my hand.... All of these little check-ins help me feel more grounded and connected. Sustenance -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I stopped drinking coffee and caffeinated tea about 8 or so years ago to curb my anxiety – its helped tremendously! My favorite go-to drinks for energy & focus are roasted dandelion tea, fresh juice we make at home (the greener, the better), or chocolate milk with walnut milk and raw cacao! For the most part good quality chocolate has always mellowed me out actually – I think its the magnesium. -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? I like to opt for something that will satisfy a sweet tooth without the crash or sugar spike like incorporating dates, honey or maple with healthy fats that sustain my energy. Lately Ive been making these very simple almond butter cookies. The recipe is: 1 cup almond butter (any nut butter will do!), 1 egg, 1/­­2 Tbs of virgin coconut oil, a couple spoons of coconut sugar, a pinch of himalayan salt and any spices that appeal (cinnamon, nutmeg, vanilla bean etc). Roll into balls, smoosh with a fork and bake for 10 minutes! -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? My sister Ash (Black Sage Botanicals) makes delicious oxymels – vinegar based tinctures with infused organic and foraged herbs and honey. Im in love with her Tulsi Oxymel made with rose and pomegranate vinegar. It feels heart-opening and nurturing! Im pretty regimented on taking Vitamin D, a DHA fish oil, and iron with nettles along with various flower essences dependent on what my emotional state is calling for. Water is the main tool for me I need to remember, all day every day!!!!! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I aim to get out at least a couple times a week on an adventure and walk, usually finding a new forest to explore here in the northwest. Its been the single best thing for me in releasing any anxiety or stress from the week. I also am just getting back into yoga, focusing on the balance between movement + stillness. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I see beauty in nourishing and embracing every facet of our unique selves so much that the joy and loving energy we hold for our own bodies and spirit inherently radiates to those around us. I think when we allow ourselves to really connect with others, be vulnerable, be authentic, be blissful, be curious, beauty is an energy thats more magnetic than visually stimulating. I find a lot of rocks beautiful because I take time to notice their expressive nature. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? My approach is all about balance supported by nature and ancient rituals. Cold-pressed oils, raw honey, herb infusions, powdered herbs....focusing on the balance between humans and the natural world – how we care for botanicals and how they may care for us. I like to look at skincare the same way I look at the food I eat; when I feel happy about the ingredients I apply on my skin, my skin feels happy too. Its all about respecting and caring for ingredients so we create more harmony as we utilize them. My favorite tools are oil + water, in the form of our face oil and hydrosols. It may sound counterintuitive for those two to go hand in hand yet its what our skin is essentially made of and vital for nourished skin + optimal function. After cleansing, Ill mist a hydrosol (during winter I choose Empress Cypress or Rosemary Bay) and follow with SunRoot Solar Serum. Ill take about 5-10 minutes for a facial massage and then follow with another generous mist of Hydrosol. My skin glows!! -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Water mainly. Eating lots of healthy fats like coconut oil/­­manna, ghee, avocado. The fish oil and vitamin d every day along with eating a lot of fermented foods and drinking the roasted dandelion tea I mentioned earlier (hormone balancing = skin balancing). The more we can do to support the gut and liver especially, the happier our skin is! I love incorporating raw honey and bee pollen in my rituals. Our Bee Rosy Mask actually has ground bee pollen in it and makes my skin feel like a spring flower. As for my hair, I like to use our skin soother Rosemary Bay Hydrosol to keep my scalp healthy. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? As a mama & business owner, there is always stress – good stress and real earth-shaking stress. The beauty/­­wellness business is pretty idealized – its HARD work and creating boundaries to minimize stress and prioritize your own personal wellness can be easily misplaced. Some things that usually help me release are talking it out with my sisters, breathing deep with a tall glass of water, embracing quietness, saying no when I need to, saying yes when I want to, putting my hands in dirt to work in the garden, and going on a walk. The past year I also started writing more regularly. Oddly enough a lot of it started flowing on my instagram which has led me to a beautiful community of friends that Ill message with on and off. On some more wild days, my husband and I will just run to the living room, turn up the music and just go crazy dancing for 10 minutes and then go back to work. This often helps the most with little stressors, especially seeing baby Oso laughing at us. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I make elderberry syrup every winter and take a spoon everyday when Im run down. Magnesium baths, herbal steams, foot soaks, rest, water, raw honey, and garlic. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Something that always helps me is doing something for myself first thing in the morning, so I dont end up too busy and putting it off later. That usually takes shape as a face massage. At the end of the day when Im laying in bed, I almost always do a self-check in and think of one nice thing I did for myself that day. If I forgot to physically do something, Ill say a few affirmations to myself. Im also quite excited to be starting therapy again and EMDR this month. I honestly am really eager to get back into it and work through some heavy triggers and blockages. I think thats one of the nicest things I could do for myself right now. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Allowing myself space to slow down & connect. Wildcare has been buzzing since conception. We were featured in Vogue the first month we opened, and from there it just became an everyday hustle to stay caught up – a challenge Im incredibly grateful for. Last year I had my first baby, and he arrived to our surprise 2 months early via an emergency cesarean. He remained in the NICU for a month while my husband and I went home as baby and I each had to separately heal. I felt broken, and at first, I jumped right back into work as soon as I had more movement to distract from much of the emotional pain I had experienced. A few months later when he was home, business was great but there was this moment I knew I needed to stop everything, reflect and be present with what I was feeling and with our baby. I closed the shop for a few weeks, and decided to stop taking on new retail partners for pretty much the remainder of 2018. Being transparent and open with those around me – even our customers about what I was going through, has been the biggest change Ive made. Slowing down, bridging that connection of my voice + products, being present and prioritizing the same amount of care for myself that I give others has allowed me to feel more honest with myself. Still a huge work in progress yet this practice continues to reveal a community of supporters that wouldnt have been there unless I was vulnerable. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I feel like inspiration finds me within the energy of the landscapes I’m immersed in. Right now its walking on the soft mossy forest floor in Oregon, hypnotized by rushing rivers and gazing up at towering Fir trees and dancing leaves. I really trust in the natural relationship of quiet down time vs the times Im energized with new ideas, and think its important to allow things to reveal themselves naturally as a connection is made. These visuals, scent memories, and feelings from nature always wind their way into my dreams even years later and lead me to formulas and product names so its best for me to just to go with the flow. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming a distiller and starting Wildcare? My sisters and I grew up strongly influenced with our moms skin care rituals who worked as a makeup artist for film & tv, amongst other things. As kids, we would concoct foot soaks using pine needles and flowers we would collect on afternoon walks, and hair masks with eggs and mayonnaise! These DIY projects have always stayed with me. My formal schooling was both in Culinary and Herbal disciplines – a foundation that propelled my special focus on care – internal & external. There was an afternoon in particular where I had focused all my energy on exploring a better remedy to comfort my eczema flare-ups. When I noticed all the Rosemary that was growing in our yard near a little Bay tree I intuitively crafted my first Wildcare product, The Skin Soother Rosemary + Bay Hydrosol using a makeshift distillation system out of kitchen pots & pans. I remember I actually cried at the moment I saw the first hydrosol emerge…I really felt lucky to be in the presence of such an ancient form of alchemy. After obsessively spraying this camphorous green-smelling mist for a few weeks & seeing my skins improved health, this artful practice of distilling was something I fully got behind. I spent a year doing playful and careful experimentations, making hydrosols for family and friends. There was one night I even dreamt about filling a table full of tiny amber bottles with aromatic liquid and then a month or so later, I sprung up from a dream and shouted Wildcare! to my husband. Wildcare was born shortly after that in the end of 2015. -- At Wildcare, you make your own hydrosols and advocate their healing properties. Can you tell us a little bit about what they are and why they are so effective? Hydrosols are the subtly aromatic waters from distilled plant material. A copper still is placed over fire, holding spring water (we hand-collect from a local Oregon spring!) & fresh plant material. Inside the still, steam rises & passes through the plant in the form of vapor, carrying vital nutrients, plant acids & suspended particles of the plants essential oils. As the vapor cools, it condenses back into a liquid state and emerges in the form of aromatic water (now a Hydrosol) along with its essential oil counterpart. Our distillations have about an 8 hour duration depending on the plant utilized, a very slow & thoughtful process that requires a focused presence from the distiller. The majority of the essential oil will rise to the top, leaving the Hydrosol with about 0.1% micro-particles of essential oil, making it a very gentle mist without the same safety concerns that essential oils carry. When you purchase a pure Hydrosol, note that it will read as 100% distillate or floral water – without the addition of other ingredients or essential oils. More on the distillation process here. -- What are some of your best-sellers? 100% SunRoot Solar Serum, but more on that below! Our best selling Hydrosols of the season have been the skin soother Rosemary Bay, awakening Palo Santo, and Empress Cypress (a personal favorite!). From our face and body line, Soft Focus Mask has been flying off the shelves. Its a gentle and creamy clay based mask with brightening pearl powder, soothing organic coconut milk, and pineapple extract to even out lackluster skin. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? SunRoot Solar Serum is a product Ive worked on for 2+ years and was just released! After working so long on this formula, its been the most rewarding experience to see so many glowing reviews pour in. Im overwhelmed in the best possible way. It features a 4-week infusion of organic artichoke leaf in this incredibly beautiful Jojoba oil that Im sourcing directly from a farmer here in the US. He is self-taught and does all his cold-pressing by hand! Artichoke leaf is a powerhouse in healing sun damage, scarring and repairing tissue. Its combined with warming turmeric root, and juicy fruit oils like Sea buckthorn, Rose hip and Raspberry Seed. To extend even more beauty and peace of mind, its a 90+% certified organic formula! I am also in the middle of a complete rebrand, designed by artist Morgan Ritter (my younger sister!), with SunRoot as the first look of Wildcares new visual identity. The bottles are entirely covered with my actual tiny handwriting thats been screen-printed, echoing my commitment to being a maker – literally being a conduit, like water. Its a bold gesture to avoid a standardized typeface and is unlike what is commonly seen in the market, as we intend for this design to be a personal, embodied approach to commerce. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Its been a challenge as a nurturer however Ive been practicing treating myself more, creating stronger boundaries around my own personal time so that I can give more too. My affirmations since going through what I did last year have been The nurturer deserves to be nourished. I am deserving of nourishment. I am deserving of my own care. Simple pleasures like tinkering around in the kitchen and baking something experimental, even a chiropractic care visit from my favorite Luna Wellness practitioner, Megan makes me feel extra supported. Every so often Ive been treating myself to a facial from any one of a few dear friends here in Portland too. Allowing myself this space has been crucial to be able to lovingly care for child and have peace of mind. -- Standout book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art: Book - Aromatic Medicine by Patrice de Bonneval & Cathy Skipper Song/­­Album -Papa Celestin ragtime music, bought it at Mississippi Records :-) Movie - Stargate (I just saw Hackers for the 1st time and that was cool, ha ha ha) Piece of Art - STOOL WITH WHEELS (ALL THE WORLD’S PAIN, YET THERE ARE MOVEMENTS) by Morgan Ritter from her show The Cat House Settlements -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Dena Nakhle Birch – She is my friend/­­angel/­­naturopathic doctor based out of Santa Barbara, CA. A brilliant healer with one of the biggest hearts I know. Erica Chidi Cohen – her friendship and book Nurture was incredibly supportive to me after my birthing experience. Neva Osterloh – the sweetest woman offering loving forms of care through her Portland skincare studio. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Gabrielle Russomagno Self-Care Interview Series: Rocio Graves Self-Care Interview Series: Satsuki Shibuya Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Cortney Herrera appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Roasted Broccoli with Meyer Lemon and Garlic

December 7 2018 Oh My Veggies 

Sometimes I have an idea so brilliant that I need to stop whatever it is I’m doing and start working on that idea right away. This week, I had one of those ideas--I would Photoshop my cats into the Kardashian Christmas card. YES. And I did it, but it didn’t quite work out as I had planned because I have surprisingly few pictures of my cats standing straight up, so I couldn’t replace the Kardashians with cats. And then I thought that maybe I would Photoshop my cats’ heads onto the Kardashians’ bodies, but that would take this project from “Ha ha, cats!” to “I think Kiersten is having some kind of mental break and needs help.” So in the end, I just had to Photoshop my cats around the Kardashians, which wasn’t nearly as awesome as my original idea. Isn’t it the worst when you have an idea that sounds so great and then it doesn’t work out? But then sometimes you have ideas you’re not sure about and they end up being even better than expected. Like this Roasted Broccoli with Meyer Lemon & Garlic! I wasn’t sure if it would work, but it did and we loved […]

Grain-free Holiday Tahini Cookies, 2-ways + A Gift Guide

November 23 2018 My New Roots 

Grain-free Holiday Tahini Cookies, 2-ways + A Gift Guide You know the feeling: its twenty minutes after dinner. Youre full and seemingly suffonsified, when it hits you. I NEED A TREAT. Raisins will not help. Granola won’t cut it. Coconut chips? Pfff. That teeny square of dark chocolate you were keeping as a fallback has mysteriously gone missing (blame the kid!) and youre desperate for an indulgence without anything in sight...sound the alarm! Thats what happened to me recently, which lead me to frenetically probe the internet for something that could satisfy me in a hurry, which lead me to a 5-ingredient Almond Tahini cookie recipe from Cook Republic. The cookies looked really tasty, super simple to make, and I had everything I needed to get baking right away. Within 20 minutes I was eating said cookies, and I hadn’t even panicked. That much. This recipe turned out to be so brilliant that I made the cookies again a few nights later. Then about a week after that. Each time, adjusting and adding ingredients for more flavour and texture each time until they were perfect. And now, I really feel like these cookies are my go-to, since theyre grain-and-gluten-free, high in protein and good fats, naturally sweetened, and endlessly customizable! The best thing about these cookies however, is their dream texture: crispy outsides, and super chewy insides. And they are so satisfyingly dense that they really feel like food - not just a treat to curb a craving.  They are also deliciously not-too-sweet, especially with the flaky salt on top that comes at you like firework flavour sparks.     For this post, Ive made two variations for those who can’t decide on which festive flavours they love most: sweet and warming Orange-Spice to put us all in the holiday mood, and a rich and piquant Ginger-Molasses that is delightfully reminiscent of classic gingerbread. I used maple syrup to sweeten both cookies, but cut the amount in half for the Ginger-Molasses to make room for the blackstrap goodness! If youd like to keep this version even lower on the glycemic index, you can replace all the maple syrup with molasses, just know that they will be very intense, and for molasses-lovers only. If youd like to learn more about the health benefits of blackstrap molasses, how to purchase the right kind, and how to store it, check out my blog post here. Youll notice down below that I specify runny tahini in the recipe. This is because the tahini acts as part of the liquid component here, along with the maple syrup and molasses. If you only have thicker tahini, I suggest warming it together with the syrup(s) on the stove over low heat to achieve the runniness you need for the recipe to work. I got my tahini at a local grocery store that has a pretty decent ethnic food section. Its perfect for baking since its inexpensive, and because the flavour of it gets overwhelmed by the other ingredients anyway. Save your expensive tahini for toast!       Print recipe     Grain-free Orange-Spice Tahini Cookies Makes 20 cookies Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 220g almond flour (not almond meal) 1 tsp. ground cinnamon 1/­­4 tsp. ground cardamom 1/­­4 tsp. ground star anise 1/­­2 tsp. flaky sea salt, plus more for garnish pinch black pepper, optional 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml tahini 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml pure maple syrup 2 tsp. vanilla extract zest of 1 orange (preferably organic) 2 Tbsp. crushed cacao nibs to garnish Directions: Preheat oven to 325°F /­­ 170°C. Lightly grease, or line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. In a large bowl, combine the almond flour, cinnamon, cardamom, star anise, black pepper and salt. Set aside. Whisk tahini, maple syrup, vanilla, and orange zest together in a small bowl. If it is too thick, warm it in a small saucepan over medium heat until runny. Pour over dry ingredients and stir well to combine. The dough will be thick and you may need to use your hands to finish mixing. Roll about a tablespoon and a half worth of the dough in the palm of your hands, into a ball. Flatten slightly, then place on the prepared tray, sprinkle with cacao nibs and a pinch of flaky salt. Lightly press the toppings into the dough. Bake for 10-12 minutes until the bottom is golden brown. Remove from oven and let cool completely. Store in air tight containers at room temperature for up to a week. Grain-Free Ginger-Molasses Tahini Cookies Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 225g almond flour (not almond meal) 1 Tbsp. ground ginger 1/­­2 Tbsp. ground cinnamon 1/­­4 tsp. ground cloves 1/­­4 tsp. freshly grated nutmeg 1/­­2 tsp. flakey sea salt, plus more for garnish 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml runny tahini 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml unsulphured blackstrap molasses 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml pure maple syrup 2 tsp. vanilla extract 2-3 Tbsp. chopped pistachios to garnish Directions: Preheat oven to 325°F /­­ 170°C. Lightly grease, or line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. In a large bowl, combine the almond flour, ginger, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, and salt. Set aside. - Whisk tahini, molasses, maple syrup, and vanilla together in a small bowl. If it is too thick, warm it in a small saucepan over medium heat until runny. Pour over dry ingredients and stir well to combine. The dough will be thick and you may need to use your hands to finish mixing. - Roll about a tablespoon and a half worth of the dough in the palm of your hands, into a ball. Flatten slightly, then place on the prepared tray, sprinkle with chopped pistachios and a pinch of flaky salt. Lightly press the toppings into the dough. - Bake for 10-12 minutes until the bottom is golden brown. Remove from oven and let cool completely. - Store in air tight containers at room temperature for up to a week.   If cookies arent your thing (are you a robot?), then check out the list below for a bunch of edible presents from My New Roots that are the perfect make-ahead gift to bring to all of those holiday parties, family get-togethers, and work socials. Some are sweet, some are savoury, but they all can be made in large batches and have a long-ish shelf life. I will also mention that were taking holiday orders for the Life-Changing Loaf Subscription Box up until this Sunday, November 25th. That means if you order your box for yourself (or someone else to send as a gift!), it will arrive before the holidays. If you decide to order after November 25th, the box will come in the New Year. Remember that each box contains the ingredients for two loaves of Life-Changing Loaf! Thank you to everyone who has already ordered - your box is on the way!    My New Roots Homemade Edible Gifts   Drink mixes Big Batch Golden Milk Superfood Haute Chocolate Masala Chai Things in jars Infused Syrup Gift Jars Party Nut Butter Simple Gourmet Granola Chunky Chocolate Buckwheat Granola Maple Cinnamon Grain-Free Granola   Spice blends Zaatar Spice Blend  Everything Bagel Spice Blend Dukkah Spice Blend   The post Grain-free Holiday Tahini Cookies, 2-ways + A Gift Guide appeared first on My New Roots.

Blackberry and Currant Clafoutis

September 14 2018 My New Roots 

Blackberry and Currant Clafoutis The first time I heard the word, I knew I would love it. Clafoutis. Clah. Foo. Tee. It felt so good just to say it, like a laughing cloud floating off my tongue, I was certain it would taste even better. I was right. Clafoutis is a classic French dessert; a custard tart of sorts but without a crust. It is traditionally made with flour, milk, sugar, and eggs, and a fruit, the most popular being black cherries. Arranged in a buttered dish, the fruit is bathed in rich batter and baked, then served lukewarm with a dusting of powdered sugar and sometimes cream. The concept is brilliantly simple and I knew that with a few adjustments, the clafoutis of my dreams could become a reality. For my first cookbook, I took the plunge and came up with an easy, grain-free and dairy-free foolproof recipe that I can honestly say I make more than any other dessert in my repertoire. I always have the batter ingredients on hand, and I always have seasonal fruit, so when I need something sweet on short notice, this dish often makes a delicious appearance. The only teeny issue with my original version, is that it required a food processor to blend up toasted almond flour. When I set out to make a clafoutis a couple weeks ago, we were living pretty simply at the family cottage in Denmark without any kitchen equipment to speak of, and I was left scratching my head. I knew I could simplify the calfoutis even more, so I endeavoured to make it an equipment-free recipe, and edited a couple of steps so that there wasnt even a bowl to wash. Instead of roasting the almonds in the oven, I purchased almond flour, then toasted it in a large skillet over medium heat until golden brown. Then, once the pan had been removed from the heat and cooled a bit, I mixed the remaining ingredients right there in the skillet! The last step was to simply pour the batter into the prepared baking dish with the fruit, and place it in the oven. So easy! The final results were just as good - if not better - than the more complicated version of the recipe. Since blackberries and red currants were absolutely dripping from the bushes around the island, I knew that these two berries, as untraditional as they were, would be delicious in this context. The sweet batter in contrast against the sour-tart, juicy jewels worked so perfectly. Some notes on the recipe: the reason that I measure the fruit out by volume may seem unusual, but its because the physical space that the fruit takes up in the clafoutis is more important than the weight of it. The goal is to fill the bottom almost entirely with few gaps, so that every bite contains tons of juicy fruit pieces.  You are welcome to use any fruit that is available to you, with the exception of anything with a very high water content - melon, citrus, and pineapple make the tart too soggy. I love rhubarb in the spring, cherries in the early summer, stone fruits in the late summer, and figs in the autumn. You can also add spices to the batter, such as cinnamon and cardamom, and even dried fruit like raisins, cranberries, apricots, figs or dates. I have not tried making a clafoutis without eggs. The vegan versions Ive seen online rely on either tofu or aqufaba for body and binding, and Im not overly enthusiastic about either one of those ingredients. Plus, I really love eggs. It may be groovy to try with a coconut milk + chia + arrowroot combo, but I cannot reliably say it would work since Ive never tried it before - this is just a hunch!     Print recipe     Blackberry and Currant Clafoutis Serves 6-8 Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 100g almond flour 3 large organic, free-range eggs 3/­­4 cup /­­ 100g coconut sugar 1 vanilla bean, seeds scraped or 1 tsp. vanilla extract 1 cup /­­ 250ml full-fat coconut milk 1/­­4 tsp. flaky sea salt 4 cups /­­ 1 litre fresh blackberries and currants coconut oil for greasing coconut yogurt or other cool, creamy thing to serve with (optional) Directions: - In a large skillet over medium heat, toast the almond flour, stirring often until golden. Remove pan from stove and let cool. - While the almond flour is cooling, preheat the oven to 350°F /­­ 180°C. Wash the fruit and remove any stems or debris. Rub just a little coconut oil on the bottoms of a 9 /­­ 23cm tart pan or any ovenproof dish. Scatter the fruit in the pan. - Crack eggs into a small bowl and whisk well. - To the skillet with the almond flour, add the eggs, coconut sugar, vanilla, coconut milk and salt and stir until smooth and fully combined. - Pour the batter mixture over the fruits and bake for 45 minutes on the middle rack until risen slightly and golden brown. Serve warm with a dollop of coconut yogurt and more fresh fruit, if desired. Store leftovers in the fridge for up to four days.   I’m sure you’ve noticed that look of the blog has changed a little bit. I felt that it was time for a freshen up, and I hope you take a moment to visit my homepage and have a look around. And for this first post since the redesign, I decided to make a small photo essay to convey the gorgeousness of our village on Bornholm. Bornholm is a small, Danish island in the Baltic sea off the southern tip of Sweden. My husbands family have a cottage there, in an old fish smokery right on the ocean. The light on the island is particularly special, the colour of the sea an unique shade of blue, and the air is soaked with the scent of rose hips, sun-baked rocks, salt water, and elderflower. Its one of my favourite places on earth, and I always leave feeling so inspired, and connected to nature. I hope you enjoy.     *   *   *   *   *   *   Something exciting on the way! Hi friends! I have some very exciting news to share…we are releasing the first official My New Roots Subscription Box! Each box will be filled with ingredients to make one of my vegan and gluten-free recipes, a beautifully designed recipe card, and a few products Ive personally selected that will compliment your cooking experience. And everything about this box – from the packaged products inside right down to the packing tape – was scrupulously selected and designed to have as little environmental impact as possible. Subscriptions will officially open up Friday Oct 5th. Since we only have a limited supply of boxes available, I want to give you the chance to be notified when we launch before I make the announcement across my social platforms. To stay in the loop, visit the this link and enter your email. Everyone who provides their email will also be entered for a chance to receive their first My New Roots box free of charge! 3 emails will be selected from the list at random. Weve been working on this project for a long time and Im so thrilled that its almost here! Thank you in advance for your support and ongoing love for all things MNR. xo, Sarah B   The post Blackberry and Currant Clafoutis appeared first on My New Roots.

An Easy Way to Reduce Plastic in the Bathroom…

July 18 2017 Vegie Head 

How are you tracking with your #plasticfreejuly?! Last year was a brilliant success and many of you loved the tips found in these blogs here and here. However one thing many people have struggled with is one of the simplest things that we all need, and use, multiple times a day. No matter where you ... The post An Easy Way to Reduce Plastic in the Bathroom… appeared first on Vegie Head.

Coffee Chocolate Protein Cookies

June 16 2017 Vegie Head 

Sometimes you just need a mid-afternoon pick-me-up! These cookies are brilliant for snacks on the go, and are easy to add into your meal prep for the week. I used Clean Lean Protein powder from NuZest in their delicious coffee flavour! It’s made of Golden Pea Protein, is smooth and not overly ... The post Coffee Chocolate Protein Cookies appeared first on Vegie Head.

Maya Kaimal Indian Simmer Sauces & More

February 9 2017 VegKitchen 

Maya Kaimal Indian Simmer Sauces & More I can whip up decent Asian-style dishes, but I never got the hang of making authentic-flavored Indian dishes at home. Its not all that difficult, as demonstrated by the brilliant

Hibiscus Ginger Latte

January 29 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Hibiscus Ginger Latte Hibiscus is a powerful tropical flower with a long list of health benefits (anti-inflammatory, digestive aid, metabolism-boosting, helps with cholesterol level and blood pressure maintenance). It also happens to produce the most brilliant, ruby red-colored tea with a prominent tart flavor. I’ve always found pure hibiscus tea to be a little too sour for my taste, but came up with this latte in a recent attempt to get more of its stunning color into my morning routine, and now I’m completely hooked. The creaminess of the almond milk helps offset the harshness of the hibiscus, and the ginger adds a nice note of warmth and complexity, making this latte a great winter drink. The green tea is optional here, but a great addition when you need a little help waking up in the morning or as a mid-afternoon boost. And I swear I feel like I’m getting color therapy when drinking this latte – the fluffy, pink foam is so soothing to look at, I’m in a complete state of peace by the time I’ve taken my last sip. We have some weekend links for you after the jump, have a great Sunday :) - The Cookbook Deal – I’ve been so excited for this podcast, in which Jessica Murnane documents a whole year of her life while making her first cookbook. I loved the first two episodes, and although that might have something to do with the fact that I’ve now gone through the book-making process twice, I think anyone can enjoy it because Jessica is such a great and charming storyteller. And if you are thinking of writing a cookbook, you should definitely give this one a listen. - This Hibiscus Mask from S.W. Basics - Andrea Gentl’s Photo Essay From Her Time in the Andes – breathtaking - Feedback, NY, Down the Aisle – interesting people interviewed about their grocery shopping routines. So far I’ve enjoyed interviews with Julia Turshen, Hannah and Landon Metz, Kenny Anderson. - The Matriarch Behind Beyoncé and Solange - On The Rocks – crystals explained on Garance Doré Hibiscus Ginger Latte   Print Serves: 2 Ingredients 1 tablespoon dried hibiscus flowers 1 piece ginger - shredded 1 green tea bag 1½ cups hot water 1½ cup unsweetened almond milk or other milk of choice 1 tablespoon honey/­­any other sweetener of choice, or to taste (optional) Instructions Combine hibiscus, ginger, green tea and water in a teapot or a large mug, keep covered while steeping. Remove the green tea bag after 2-4 minutes of steeping. Let the hibiscus steep for another 15-20 minutes. Warm up the milk if you prefer a hot latte. Pour the tea into a blender through a strainer. Add the milk and honey to the blender and blend until frothy and smooth. This latte also tastes great iced. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Elderflower Lemonade Black Sesame Cappuccino Spiced Hot Chocolate and a Cookbook of Our Own Quick Persimmon Eggnog .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Hibiscus Ginger Latte appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Purple Kale, Aubergine & Blackberry Salad

September 7 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Purple Kale, Aubergine & Blackberry Salad At first, it was a coincidence. When we looked at the vegetables we had brought home from the market this weekend, many of them just happened to have purple, violet and dark lavender tones. We talked about how that huge bunch of purple kale could make a beautiful salad base together with the rainbow chard, mint flowers and purple sugar snaps. It was at that point my obsessive side took over. “Let’s ONLY DO purple ingredients!” I shouted into Luise’s ear. She turned her head towards me with that hesitant look she always has when I get one of my “brilliant” ideas: “Ok, slow down now, let’s talk about the flavours first”. Of course I didn’t hear her as I was already writing a list with all the purplish ingredients I could think of: “aubergine, purple cauliflower, plums, figs, olives, blackberries, grapes, beetroot, red onion, …”. Some recipes are born out of genius flavour combinations or new preparation methods, this one simply started out as a colour. Luise did however quickly gain back control and started shifting focus to the flavour and combination of vegetables as well. In the end, I think we managed to combine both flavour, colour and texture in a great way. We roasted aubergine and purple spring onion in warm spices until soft and sweet. Massaged the kale with a flavourful dill, mint, lemon and honey dressing to round off its flavour and make it less sturdy. Cooked black lentils were added as a filler, along with rich and creamy avocado (even though it’s more black than purple - and green inside!). Hazelnuts are not purple at all but they added a nice crunch to the texture. Juicy blackberries made a perfect topping. The result was beautiful, a true harvest salad. Maybe not as purple as I originally imagined it (basically because most vegetables loose their colour when they are cut/­­baked/­­cooked), but still with lovely deep hues and so many interesting flavours - a mix of herby, sweet and tangy. When the salad was assembled it still felt like we missed a creamy element, so we tried the honey roasted feta that we had seen on New York Times Cooking last week. It was perfect. Burnt and caramelised on the outside and almost melted on the inside. It completely ruined the dark purple theme but flavour- and texture wise, it was worth the sacrifice. You’ll notice that I smudged it in mashed blackberries as a poor attempt to camouflage it.   We should perhaps add that this wasn’t our kids favourite dish. They picked out the blackberries, avocado and feta cheese from the salad, leaving the raw kale to us. I guess purple isn’t their colour… Purple Kale & Blackberry Salad with Roasted Honey Feta Vegans can just skip the feta cheese or replace it with hummus. And replace honey with maple syrup. Baked vegetables 1 aubergine /­­ eggplant 4 spring onions or 2 red onions 2-4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil 1/­­2 tsp ground cinnamon 1/­­4 tsp ground cumin 1 pinch ground cayenne 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 1 handful hazelnuts Cooked lentils 1/­­2 cup uncooked lentils (we used black lentils) 1 1/­­2 cup water 1 pinch sea salt Dressing 1/­­3 cup extra virgin olive oil 1/­­2 lemon, juice 2 tsp honey or more to taste sea salt & pepper 1 large handful mixed fresh dill, parsley and mint Other salad ingredients 4 stalks curly kale, green or purple 4 stalks rainbow chard or spinach 2 avocadoes 1 small handful snap peas 1 punnet fresh blackberries, halved Roasted feta with honey (from NYT) 1 block feta cheese, patted dry 2 tbsp olive oil 1 tbsp honey Start by preparing the baked vegetables. Preheat the oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Wash and cut the aubergine into large cubes and trim and slice the onions, then place in a mixing bowl. Stir together oil and spices in a small bowl, pour the oil mixture over the aubergine and onions and toss to combine. Transfer to a baking tray covered with baking paper. Bake in the oven for about 20 minutes or until very soft and golden, check every now and then to prevent from burning, the baking time depends on the size of the vegetables. Add the hazelnuts halfway through. Meanwhile, cook the lentils in a saucepan with the water for 15 minutes or until tender and can be mashed easily between two fingers. Add sea salt towards the end of the cooking time. Drain any excess water and leave to cool. Prepare the dressing by mixing oil, lemon juice, honey, salt and pepper in a small bowl. Chop the herbs finely and add to the oil mixture. Taste and adjust to your liking. Remove the stems from the kale and coarsely chop the leaves. Finely slice the chard. Place all in a large mixing bowl, add 2 tbsp of the dressing and massage for a couple of minutes until soft. Transfer to a large serving bowl. Mix the lentils with the remaining dressing and pour them over the kale and chard mixture. Cut the avocado into cubes, slice the snap peas and roughly chop the hazelnuts. Add to the salad bowl together with the roasted  aubergine, onions and hazelnuts. Toss slightly to combine and then scatter blackberries on top. If you like to serve the salad with the baked feta cheese, follow the instructions below. Keep the oven at 400°F /­­ 200°C. Place the feta cheese in a small ovenproof dish covered with baking paper and cover with oil. Bake in the oven for about 8 minutes, until soft but not melted. Melt the honey. Remove the cheese from the oven and turn the heat to broiler. With a baking brush, paint the cheese with the melted honey. Place back in the oven and broil until the top starts to brown. Use a spatula to immediately and carefully transfer the cheese to the salad, or serve it on the side.

Reading Between the Lines

June 26 2016 Vegan Thyme 

Reading Between the Lines I opened the door to walk out and get the paper in this godforsaken heat at seven in the morning, and this fellow was staring at me. First of all, it must have taken him all day to get up the gigantic hill in our back yard to our FRONT door. Omg. Poor creature.  Then, working in the book biz continues (to my utter shock and dismay). At times, my intermittent dealing with the public slowly erodes my faith in the future of humanity. Not that all book lovers are dealing a blow to my sensibility of our plight, but let's say if I have one more seventy year old woman ask me to look up five erotic-romance titles for her while she steadies herself on her walker, well, I think I might just leave the whole entire job behind with utterances of "WTF?!" I cannot make this up. I wish I could. But nope. When I come home and share these stories with DH, he laughs hysterically, shaking his head in disbelief. On a good note: working around books, I find my personal love of reading has been put to the test as I work with some really brilliant folks who, for probably the same reason I landed in a book store, are there as well: the books. (And maybe not so much the "people".) There are speed readers who devour books like I devour pints of Ben & Jerry's vegan ice cream. I have great conversations about books. It's like having my own personal book club around me forty hours a week. I love it.  Right now I'm reading: Before The Fall by Noah Hawley. Let's just say I speed read my way through the first hundred pages yesterday. There's a private plane that crashes. Two survivors. The book is written in quick-paced prose with plenty of questions raised as you begin to learn the past of each of the passengers on board--which may or may not lead to who or why or how the plane went down. Keeping me interested, on my toes and will finish it today--well, I'll try. Then there was the book, Dodgers by Bill Beverly. This book became a store Must Read as one of our resident readers one day shared as I was perusing titles: LOTS of buzz about this book. Read it and let me know what YOU think. Hmm. Well, I thought it both gripping and I could not put it down. (Even mailed it to my sister.)  It's about two young brothers East and his brother Ty and two others who are from the "drug-infested" inner-city of LA who are instructed to travel with each other to Wisconsin on a "mission" given to them by a leader of the clan to kill a witness in an upcoming trial. If there is ever a movie made of this book (and I'm sure there will be)--I know exactly who I'd root for to play East. You read this book and see what a Road Trip is really like from the eyes of four young men who navigate the Midwest highways and landscape, but at the same time navigate surviving each other.     Sometimes I look at Frankie and am so damn happy with her, I want to cry.  These are Eastern Phoebes who decided to make a nest in our breezeway.  This bird is part of the flycatcher family of birds. So they seek out areas high and protected, for raising their brood. The birds feed on bugs and insects brought to them by mama bird, who is catching them mid-flight at times and returning to the nest with bugs sometimes as big as her head, it's wonder she can even fly. This behavior is called "hawking" according to the Bird Book. She's a protective mama bird. Though I will say, she's all business with these kids she's raising. One morning we lost one. It broke my heart. But they are very close to flying the coop now. Any day. It's also said that they may "return" the following year to the same nest.  Our fingers are crossed. Knitting up a Reverse Psychology shawl, with Vice hombre yarn I got at my LYS.  The color makes me happy. So did the trip to the yarn store. Got a much needed break yesterday as I ran on a trail nearby. I heard the whistle and thought I'd make the crossing. But then approached the tracks only to see the train had arrived. I thought it'd make for a nice screen capture of a happy woman who had to make a hard stop on a three-miler during the morning's ninety-degree temps. I finished the run. But barely.

Emmas Tahini, Orange + Coconut Muesli

April 29 2016 My New Roots 

Emmas Tahini, Orange + Coconut Muesli I cant recall the exact day that I stumbled into Emma Galloways world, but I do remember being completely and utterly awe-struck, inspired, and grateful. Her blog, My Darling Lemon Thyme has been on my highly edited list of sites that I actually read, and her delicious, innovative recipes have been making regular appearances in my kitchen ever since. Joy of joys, Emma released a cookbook, and just like the blog, it is a true gem. Flipping through this book is kind of like shopping in a store where everything fits you perfectly, is the exact colour you want, and strikes the perfect balance between need and want. For instance, I need a recipe for gluten-free sourdough bread, and, I want another recipe for granola. She takes familiar ingredients and genius-ly transforms them into something unique and special that makes you ask: why didnt I think of that?! Sweet Potato and Kale Latkes, Mung Bean Pancakes, Buckwheat Tabouli – the list goes on. Emma uses exclusively plant-based, gluten-free, whole food ingredients, and taste comes first! I want to tuck into every single one of her meals and treats. Although it was nearly impossible to choose just one to share here, the recipe I settled on was Tahini, Orange + Coconut Toasted Muesli, as it sounded like the best and most exciting new way of enjoying granola, and the perfect way to bid farewell to those last winter oranges in the market. The idea of adding tahini to granola was totally brilliant (thanks again, Emma), along with the flavours of toasted coconut and oranges. Yum. After baking, the additions of dried fruit are really special and deliver bright, juicy hits throughout the toasty nuts, seeds and grains. Its incredibly balanced and tasty, and makes a stupendous topping for yogurt, porridge - even as snack eaten right out of the jar. A bag of this on a recent trip halfway across the world proved to be a real lifesaver! The next time I make this recipe, I am going to try it with rolled oats instead of the quinoa flakes. Although it was a nice change to use a different grain, I find the texture of quinoa flakes a little too light and powdery - I prefer the heft and crunch that oats give to granola. Ive even wondered about using buckwheat groats, which I love in cereal. I will keep you guys posted when I try something new!     Print recipe     Tahini, orange + coconut toasted muesli Makes 1.5kg /­­ 2 pounds Ingredients: 5 cups /­­ 500g quinoa flakes 2 cups /­­ 180g unsweetened shredded or flaked coconut 1/­­2 cup /­­ 65g cashews, roughly chopped 1/­­2 cup /­­ 75g whole raw almonds, roughly chopped 1/­­2 cup /­­ 65g pumpkin (pepita) seeds 1/­­2 cup /­­ 60g sunflower seeds 1/­­4 cup /­­ 35g sesame seeds 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml virgin coconut oil 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml un-hulled tahini 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml honey, pure maple or brown rice syrup (I used maple syrup) 1 tsp. pure vanilla extract the finely grated zest of 2 oranges 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1 cup /­­ 200g natural raisins or sultanas 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 165g dried cranberries 1 cup /­­ 95g firmly packed dried apple slices, roughly chopped 1/­­2 cup /­­ 80g pitted dried dates, roughly chopped Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 350°F /­­ 180°C. Combine quinoa flakes, coconut, cashews, almonds, pumpkin seeds, sunflower and sesame seeds in a large bowl using your hands to combine thoroughly. Combine coconut oil, honey or syrup, tahini, vanilla, orange zest and sea salt in a small pan and bring slowly to the boil, stirring constantly until melted and combined. Pour over dry ingredients and mix well. 2. Transfer to a large deep baking sheet and bake for 25-30 minutes, stirring every 10 minutes, until toasty and golden brown. Watch those edges like a hawk as they have a tendency to burn. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool. Stir in the dried fruit and transfer to a large glass jar or airtight container. Will keep for 2-3 weeks as long as airtight.   Thank you, Emma, for sharing your gifts with the world. We love granola, and we love you. xo, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   * I’m also really excited to share some (hopefully) helpful information for you in the new Resources section here on the blog. Since I get many, many emails with similar questions about the practicalities of running My New Roots, I have decided to write a few pieces on the inner workings of this food blog – and where I don’t have the answer I have asked my team to kindly chip in… you know, about hosting and coding and technical stuff that makes my brain hurt Have a look and let me know if there is anything else, you’d like a writeup about! xo, Sarah B. The post Emma’s Tahini, Orange + Coconut Muesli appeared first on My New Roots.

Swedish Pancake Cake

February 9 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Swedish Pancake Cake I started counting how many pancake recipes we have posted since we started the blog and it’s surprisingly few. At least if you divide that number with the number of times we have made pancakes since we started the blog, which is embarrassingly many. We like pancakes in our family and I think we need to blog more about it. We have pancakes for breakfast, lunch or dinner at least once a week. So with a few hours left on Shrove Tuesday aka Pancake Tuesday, we wanted to throw in a little collection with some of our favourite pancake recipes from the past years - both sweet and savoury. We are also sharing the ultimate way to eat pancakes, in the form of a cake! If not for tonight, it’s an unbeatable breakfast (or dessert) for your loved ones on Valentine’s Day. The recipe is from our first book, The Green Kitchen, which btw is coming out on Portuguese this Spring (the 11th language it is being translated to, crazy!). We love American style pancakes that are stacked up high and topped with a drizzle of syrup and fruit. These Flour-free Banana, Blueberry & Coconut Pancakes are made simply with egg, banana, blueberries and desiccated coconut and they are much lighter than common American pancakes. The recipe is from The Green Kitchen but can also be found on Cooked.com. All our book recipes are actually available on the Cooked website, it’s a subscription based site but they have a 30-day free trial. Spinach Crepes with Chickpea, Apple & Tahini Filling. We have been making green pancakes for years and it’s simply achieved by mixing pancake batter in a blender with the addition of spinach (or beetroot). We serve these with a savoury filling for dinner but they also taste great on their own. Click here for the full recipe. And here is a video with us making them. Masala Dosa filled with Sweet Potato & Peas, Mango & Raisin Chutney and Raita. We loved eating dosa for breakfast in India and all the different fillings add so much flavour with both sweet and savoury tones. The dosa batter is made without eggs so these are perfect for vegans. This recipe is from Green Kitchen Travels and is available on Cooked.com. Coconut & Quinoa Pancakes with Clementine Marmalade. These vegan pancakes are from Amy Chaplin’s brilliant book that we blogged about last year. Here is the recipe. Buckwheat cr?pes with passion and mango syrup. Our version of French dessert cr?pes are topped with an addictive Mango & Passionfruit Syrup and a dollop of mascarpone. The recipe is from Green Kitchen Travels and can also be found on Cooked.com. Summer Berry Pancake Cake I have made different versions of this cake since I was a child, and I never get tired of it. I think it is so beautiful with all those stacks of pancakes, and the berries and cream squishing out from the sides. Traditionally you put jam between the layers, but we stick to fresh fruit, nut butter and date syrup. The pancakes should be very thin, so we always use a non-stick frying pan when we make these. You can prepare the pancakes one day in advance and assemble the cake just before serving. If fresh berries aren’t in season, you can use frozen instead./­­David Pancake Batter 200 g /­­ 1 3/­­4 cup buckwheat flour 3 large eggs (or 4 medium) 500 ml /­­ 2 cups soy milk or milk of your choice 1 tbsp butter, plus extra for frying pinch sea salt Layers 3 ripe bananas, sliced thin 225 g /­­ 1 1/­­2 cup raspberries, mashed with a fork 225 g /­­ 1 1/­­2 cup blackberries, mashed with a fork 125 g nut butter 120 ml raw date syrup (soft dates mixed with a splash of water in a blender) 500 ml /­­ 2 cups thick cream, chilled Topping 150 g /­­ 1 cup raspberries 125 g /­­ 1 cup blackberries 2 tbsp pistachio nuts, chopped To make the batter, add all the ingredients, plus 250 ml /­­ 1 cup  water to a large mixing bowl and whisk vigorously until you have a smooth batter. Make sure that there are no lumps of flour left. Refrigerate for 20 minutes. Give it a good whisk after you have removed it from the fridge, as the flour tends to sink to the bottom. Heat a 20 cm /­­ 8, preferably non-stick, frying pan on medium-high heat. When the pan is hot, add a few drops of oil and about 75 ml of the batter. Tilt the pan until the batter is evenly distributed. Fry for 45-60 seconds on each side, until the pancakes are golden and can be flipped easily with a spatula. Fry all of the pancakes - the batter should make about 15 - and place on baking paper to cool off. You can layer with baking paper between the pancakes to stop them sticking together. To assemble, pour the cold cream into a large chilled bowl. Use an electric hand mixer or a whisk to whip it until soft peaks form. Set aside. Put the cold first pancake on a cake stand. Spread a layer of thin slices of banana evenly over the top. Add another pancake and top it with about a third of the mashed raspberries. Then continue with next pancake and a third of the mashed blackberries. Continue with another pancake and carefully spread a thin layer of nut butter and date syrup on it. Add another pancake and spread with a layer of whipped cream. Then start all over with the banana layer. Continue until all the pancakes are covered. Top with whipped cream, fresh fruit and finely chopped pistachios. All photos from our first book by Johanna Frenkel.

Simply Vibrant, Our New Cookbook + Free Drinks Ebook

December 1 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Simply Vibrant, Our New Cookbook + Free Drinks Ebook It’s been around three years since we started working on this cookbook, so finally telling you about it today feels monumental, exhilarating, and terrifying all at the same time. Our new cookbook is called Simply Vibrant: All-Day Vegetarian Recipes for Colorful Plant-Based Cooking, and it’s available now! It’s written by me, Anya, and photographed by Masha – the same mother/­­daughter team that’s behind this blog. Today, we are sharing some key details about the book, accompanied by a book trailer (above), sneak peak photos and ways to order. We’ll also be talking about the free ebook that we created for anyone who buys the book and leaves a review. SO excited to share all of this with you :) About the Book -- Simply Vibrant comes out on February 6th, 2018. Anyone who orders the book and writes a review will also have access to a free drinks ebook that we made as a little thank you gift. More on that below. -- There are 129 recipes in the book, all of which are vegetarian, 124 of them are vegan, and 109 of them are gluten-free or gluten-free adaptable. My goal was to create healthful, everyday recipes that require accessible, whole food ingredients – mainly vegetables, fruit, herbs, spices, grains, and legumes. The recipes are very much influenced by the seasons, too. Our hope is that you’ll be able to find whatever good-looking produce you picked up at your market or store in the index of the book, and get some ideas on preparing it. -- I used comfort food classics from around the world as inspiration for the recipes in the book, which also influenced the book’s organization. The chapters are as follows: Morning Porridges and Pancakes – this chapter contains breakfast recipes for every season, both savory and sweet. Salads and Bowls – this one has a grain bowl recipe for every season, as well as plenty of vibrant salads for every occasion. Wraps and Rolls – this chapter celebrates the wrapping techniques seen in cuisines all around the world. There are recipes for summer rolls, enchiladas, burritos, maki (sushi), collard green wraps, and more. Soups and Stews – the recipes in this chapter range from hearty winter stews to refreshing and light summer soups. Risotto, Paella and Pilaf – for this chapter, I took the format of well-loved rice dishes from around the world, and reinvented them with the use of different vegetables and grains (there are even a couple of completely grain-free risottos!). Noodles, Pasta and Pizza – this one is all about the coziest foods out there, reimagined to be more vegetable-forward – there are recipes for homemade pasta and dumplings, but also for noodles and pizza crusts made with vegetables. Fritters and Veggie Burgers – this chapter has a veggie burger recipe for every season, as well as plenty of lacy, plant-packed fritters. Just Veggies – this chapter is here to prove that seasonal vegetables only need a simple nudge to taste amazing – there are techniques for marinating, pickling, braising, stewing, and glazing that will take your produce to the next level. Sweets for Every Season – the title of this chapter speaks for itself – there are brownies, galettes, pies, cakes, and pots de creme, made with unrefined sweeteners, fruit, and even some vegetables. Basics and Sauces – a foundational chapter, which will supply you with ammunition for creating vibrant meals quickly – from mind-blowing sauces to broth that will cost you $0 in extra groceries. -- I’ve been thinking a lot about the amount of waste we produce as humans, and I’ve been working on developing techniques for using up all parts of the produce I buy. I present some of these ideas in this book, from the aforementioned veggie scrap broth, to a watermelon rind marmalade, broccoli stem risotto, and more. -- The introduction has a story about my shoemaker grandfather, which has basically become folklore in our family. I was very excited to immortalize it in a book. -- If you have our first cookbook, The Vibrant Table, this book is a follow-up to that. While The Vibrant Table focused on creativity in plant-based cooking, Simply Vibrant is much more focused on the everyday. It’s all about putting breakfast, lunch and dinner on the table. -- The book is 328 pages long, hardcover, and 7.5″ x 10″ in size. Every recipe is accompanied by a beautiful photograph, with the exception of a few sauces. Praise Here are some kind words we’ve heard about the book from people and publications we greatly admire. “Simply Vibrant captures the kind of accidentally-vegetarian food we want to eat right now.” --Bon Appetit Simply Vibrant is intuitively organized and brilliantly executed. It illustrates how many of us are striving to eat these days: crave-able, template-style recipes with seasonal touches, simple techniques, and an underlying nourishing essence that reads as encouraging, rather than prescriptive. Anyas approach starts with a deep-rooted reverence for what nature provides in all of its seasons--and in all of its sometimes neglected or wasted forms. The thoughtful uses for carrot tops, chickpea soaking liquid, and barley cooking water--like the rest of the books delicious plant-based recipes--speak to both virtue and pure enjoyment. This book inspires me to cook (and live!) with a deeper sense of care and appreciation. --Laura Wright, author of The First Mess Cookbook Anyas approach to food and the seasons always stands out as creative, inventive, and colorful. Simply Vibrant contains an abundance of inspiring recipes and clever tricks to add more nourishment and adventure to your everyday meals. --Amy Chaplin, James Beard award-winning author of At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen Anya has the incredible ability to inspire her readers to cook, but more importantly, she helps them tap into their own intuition to create delicious meals in a more relaxed way. I love her emphasis on seasonality, and her creative approach to leaf-to-root cooking, using every ingredient to its fullest potential without wasting a single seed! This recipe collection is bursting with global flavors, unique ingredient combinations, and of course, vibrancy on the highest level. --Sarah Britton, holistic nutritionist and author of My New Roots and Naturally Nourished   We are longtime fans of Golubka Kitchen and Anyas creative and beautiful plant-based recipes. Her new book is jam-packed with healthy, flavorful, and simple recipes and lots of interesting suggestions on how to cook with the odds and ends of produce that usually are discarded--like making marmalade from watermelon rinds and risotto using broccoli stems. So clever! --David Frenkiel and Luise Vindahl, creators of the blog Green Kitchen Stories “Exciting, vegetable led food.” -- Anna Jones, author of A Modern Way to Cook, A Modern Way to Eat and columnist for The Guardian “What made me want to cook from Simply Vibrant is its more relaxed approach to plant-based cooking” --Toronto Star Order Here’s where you can order Simply Vibrant. Many of these outlets are selling the book at a discounted price. Amazon Barnes & Noble Roost Powell’s IndieBound Book Depository (ships worldwide for free) Amazon Canada Indigo Free Ebook: Simply Vibrant Drinks To show our immense gratitude to anyone who orders the book and leaves a review, we made a little thank you gift in the form of a free drinks ebook. It’s sort of like a mini e-cookbook, complete with our favorite, lush drink recipes that won’t be published anywhere else. Click here for instructions on how to claim your ebook and see a preview of the recipes within. Thank You This book only exists because of this blog, and this blog exists because of you – your support, kindness, and curiosity in visiting this space, cooking from our recipes, and reading our stories. Seriously, none of this would be here without YOU. So thank you! Truly, from the bottom of our hearts. – Anya and Masha The post Simply Vibrant, Our New Cookbook + Free Drinks Ebook appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Simply Vibrant, Our New Cookbook!

September 18 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Simply Vibrant, Our New Cookbook! It’s been around three years since we started working on this cookbook, so finally telling you about it today feels monumental, exhilarating, and terrifying all at the same time. Our new cookbook is called Simply Vibrant: All-Day Vegetarian Recipes for Colorful Plant-Based Cooking, and it’s available for pre-order now! It’s written by me, Anya, and photographed by Masha – the same mother/­­daughter team that’s behind this blog. Today, we are sharing some key details about the book, accompanied by a book trailer (above), sneak peak photos and ways to pre-order. We’ll also be talking about the pre-order bonus recipe bundle, which is a free gift that we created for anyone who pre-orders the book. SO excited to share all of this with you :) About the Book -- Simply Vibrant will be released on February 6th, 2018, but it’s available for pre-order now. Anyone who pre-orders the book will have access to a free bonus recipe bundle, consisting of 10 brand new, plant-based recipes, which won’t be published anywhere else. Just save your receipt! This is our way of thanking you for your support :) More on the bonus below. -- There are 129 recipes in the book, all of which are vegetarian, 124 of them are vegan, and 109 of them are gluten-free or gluten-free adaptable. My goal was to create healthful, everyday recipes that require accessible, whole food ingredients – mainly vegetables, fruit, herbs, spices, grains, and legumes. The recipes are very much influenced by the seasons, too. Our hope is that you’ll be able to find whatever good-looking produce you picked up at your market or store in the index of the book, and get some ideas on preparing it. -- I used comfort food classics from around the world as inspiration for the recipes in the book, which also influenced the book’s organization. The chapters are as follows: Morning Porridges and Pancakes – this chapter contains breakfast recipes for every season, both savory and sweet. Salads and Bowls – this one has a grain bowl recipe for every season, as well as plenty of vibrant salads for every occasion. Wraps and Rolls – this chapter celebrates the wrapping techniques seen in cuisines all around the world. There are recipes for summer rolls, enchiladas, burritos, maki (sushi), collard green wraps, and more. Soups and Stews – the recipes in this chapter range from hearty winter stews to refreshing and light summer soups. Risotto, Paella and Pilaf – for this chapter, I took the format of well-loved rice dishes from around the world, and reinvented them with the use of different vegetables and grains (there are even a couple of completely grain-free risottos!). Noodles, Pasta and Pizza – this one is all about the coziest foods out there, reimagined to be more vegetable-forward – there are recipes for homemade pasta and dumplings, but also for noodles and pizza crusts made with vegetables. Fritters and Veggie Burgers – this chapter has a veggie burger recipe for every season, as well as plenty of lacy, plant-packed fritters. Just Veggies – this chapter is here to prove that seasonal vegetables only need a simple nudge to taste amazing – there are techniques for marinating, pickling, braising, stewing, and glazing that will take your produce to the next level. Sweets for Every Season – the title of this chapter speaks for itself – there are brownies, galettes, pies, cakes, and pots de creme, made with unrefined sweeteners, fruit, and even some vegetables. Basics and Sauces – a foundational chapter, which will supply you with ammunition for creating vibrant meals quickly – from mind-blowing sauces to broth that will cost you $0 in extra groceries. -- I’ve been thinking a lot about the amount of waste we produce as humans, and I’ve been working on developing techniques for using up all parts of the produce I buy. I present some of these ideas in this book, from the aforementioned veggie scrap broth, to a watermelon rind marmalade, broccoli stem risotto, and more. -- The introduction has a story about my shoemaker grandfather, which has basically become folklore in our family. I was very excited to immortalize it in a book. -- If you have our first cookbook, The Vibrant Table, this book is a follow-up to that. While The Vibrant Table focused on creativity in plant-based cooking, Simply Vibrant is much more focused on the everyday. It’s all about putting breakfast, lunch and dinner on the table. -- The book is 328 pages long, hardcover, and 7.5″ x 10″ in size. Every recipe is accompanied by a beautiful photograph, with the exception of a few sauces. Praise Here are some kind words we’ve heard about the book from people and publications we greatly admire. “Simply Vibrant captures the kind of accidentally-vegetarian food we want to eat right now.” --Bon Appetit Simply Vibrant is intuitively organized and brilliantly executed. It illustrates how many of us are striving to eat these days: crave-able, template-style recipes with seasonal touches, simple techniques, and an underlying nourishing essence that reads as encouraging, rather than prescriptive. Anyas approach starts with a deep-rooted reverence for what nature provides in all of its seasons--and in all of its sometimes neglected or wasted forms. The thoughtful uses for carrot tops, chickpea soaking liquid, and barley cooking water--like the rest of the books delicious plant-based recipes--speak to both virtue and pure enjoyment. This book inspires me to cook (and live!) with a deeper sense of care and appreciation. --Laura Wright, author of The First Mess Cookbook Anyas approach to food and the seasons always stands out as creative, inventive, and colorful. Simply Vibrant contains an abundance of inspiring recipes and clever tricks to add more nourishment and adventure to your everyday meals. --Amy Chaplin, James Beard award-winning author of At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen Anya has the incredible ability to inspire her readers to cook, but more importantly, she helps them tap into their own intuition to create delicious meals in a more relaxed way. I love her emphasis on seasonality, and her creative approach to leaf-to-root cooking, using every ingredient to its fullest potential without wasting a single seed! This recipe collection is bursting with global flavors, unique ingredient combinations, and of course, vibrancy on the highest level. --Sarah Britton, holistic nutritionist and author of My New Roots and Naturally Nourished   We are longtime fans of Golubka Kitchen and Anyas creative and beautiful plant-based recipes. Her new book is jam-packed with healthy, flavorful, and simple recipes and lots of interesting suggestions on how to cook with the odds and ends of produce that usually are discarded--like making marmalade from watermelon rinds and risotto using broccoli stems. So clever! --David Frenkiel and Luise Vindahl, creators of the blog Green Kitchen Stories “Exciting, vegetable led food.” -- Anna Jones, author of A Modern Way to Cook, A Modern Way to Eat and columnist for The Guardian “What made me want to cook from Simply Vibrant is its more relaxed approach to plant-based cooking” --Toronto Star Pre-Order Here’s where you can pre-order Simply Vibrant. Many of these outlets are selling the book at a discounted price while it’s still in the pre-order stages. Amazon Barnes & Noble Roost Powell’s IndieBound Book Depository (ships worldwide for free) Amazon Canada Indigo Pre-Order Bonus Recipe Bundle To show our immense gratitude to anyone who pre-orders the book, we made a little thank you gift in the form of a free Bonus Recipe Bundle PDF. It’s sort of like a mini e-cookbook, complete with 10 brand-new, plant-based recipes that won’t be published anywhere else. The style of the recipes is very similar to that of the recipes in the actual book – everyday meals to make your home cooking more delicious and vibrant. Click here for instructions on how to claim your pre-order bonus and see a preview of the recipes within. Thank You This book only exists because of this blog, and this blog exists because of you – your support, kindness, and curiosity in visiting this space, cooking from our recipes, and reading our stories. Seriously, none of this would be here without YOU. So thank you! Truly, from the bottom of our hearts. – Anya and Masha The post Simply Vibrant, Our New Cookbook! appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Watermelon & Halloumi Salad with Magic Sauce

August 9 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Watermelon & Halloumi Salad with Magic Sauce Hello! This is David & Luise. Remember us? During our almost eight years of blogging we have never left it silent for two months before. We’re going to do what we always do in these situations and blame the kids. Wether we miss a dentist appointment, forget to answer a text message, get a parking ticket or are two months late with a blog post, it’s always our kid’s fault. In this case however it’s actually somewhat true. We simply underestimated how much time and attention three kids on summer holiday takes. They have sooo much energy. I (David) have been thinking of ways to connect them (and with them I mean Isac) to the power grid so that they (he) could replace a nuclear power plant or two. And I could perhaps cash in a Nobel price for saving the world. Anyway, after a couple of weeks of feeling bad about not having a single second over to blog new recipes, we instead decided to give ourselves a summer break from it all. So we have been trying to keep up with our children’s pace (obviously impossible) and play on their rules (also impossible because they ignore rules) this summer. It’s been fun and much needed. But we are here now with plenty of new recipe ideas and projects. Lots of other things have happened during the summer. We almost bought ourselves a tiny smoothie bar in a park, we burnt pancakes from Green Kitchen at Home inside a jam-packed little book store in Bath and we have planned the release of the European languages next month, but we’ll find time to talk more about all that. For now, let’s just talk food. Before the summer and watermelon season is all over. This recipe has been going on repeat all summer. It’s actually a combination of two recipes which we recently realized work brilliantly together. A simple watermelon and halloumi salad and our Magic Green Sauce. We first got the idea to combine watermelon with halloumi from a recipe photo in a supermarket pamflett and from that combo, we’ve added some chickpeas, cherry toms and pumpkin seeds to make it less of a side and more of a meal. It’s a really nice combination. Rich and chewy halloumi, sweet and fresh watermelon, crunchy pumpkin seeds and a tangy, flavorful and slightly spicy sauce. If I wasn’t such a humble guy, I would say that it’s probably one of the best watermelon salads you’ll try this summer. Luckily, I’m super humble and will just say that it’s pretty good. A simple vegan option would be to replace the halloumi with marinated tofu. Just make sure to squeeze out the liquid before marinating it, so it soaks up all the flavor. Quinoa, black lentils or rice could also be a great addition if you want to make this salad more substantial. Here is a little salad assembling action by Luise. Technically, the Magic Green Sauce is just our take on Chimichuri with a more hippie name. We use lime juice instead of vinegar and have added a little avocado to give it the right balance between creamy and chunky and also a few drips maple syrup to round off the sharpness from the other flavors. The magic lies in its ability to transfer any simple dish into something flavorful. Apart from this salad, we also use it on scrambled eggs, as a dip for raw crudités, inside rye sandwiches and on top of shakshuka. We have made it with a number of different herb combinations and found that anything goes (but parsley, cilantro/­­coriander and mint is still a fav). Watermelon & Halloumi Salad with Magic Green Sauce Serves 4 Watermelon & Halloumi Salad 1 kg /­­ 2 lb watermelon 200 g /­­ 7 oz halloumi 150 g /­­ 1 cup good quality cherry tomatoes  1 can /­­ 200 g /­­ 1 cup cooked chickpeas  60 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup pumpkin seeds /­­ pepitas 2 large handfuls Mâche lettuce (or any tender lettuce) 2 tbsp olive oil 1 lime Salt Magic Green Sauce 1 large handful (30 g /­­ 1 tightly packed cup) mixed fresh herbs (we used parsley, cilantro and mint) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 120 ml olive oil Juice from 1 lime 1 tbsp capers 1 tsp maple syrup 1 clove garlic 1 small chili 1/­­2 avocado 1/­­2 tsp sea salt flakes Start by preparing the sauce. Add all sauce ingredients to a food processor and pulse a few times until coarsely mixed, check the flavor and consistency and add more salt, herbs or oil if needed. If you don’t have a food processor, finely chops herbs, capers, garlic and chili, mash the avocado and mix everything in a bowl together with olive oil, lime juice and maple syrup. Add salt to taste. Then set aside. Dice the watermelon and halloumi, quarter the tomatoes and rinse the chickpeas. Toast the pumpkin seeds on medium heat in a dry pan with a little salt until they begin to pop, then transfer them to a chopping board and chop coarsely. Add a little oil to the pan and fry the halloumi for a couple of minutes until golden on all sides. Arrange the lettuce in a bowl or on a serving platter. Add chickpeas, tomatoes, watermelon and halloumi. Squeeze over a little lime juice and drizzle with oil and toss until mixed. Top with pumpkin seeds and Magic Green Sauce, with extra in the side. Enjoy! ***************** PS! We are off to Rome now to celebrate that it was 10 years ago that my drunk feet tried to seduce dance Luise on a club by the Tiber while simultaneously using ALL my Italian pick up lines on her (took me approx 1 hour before I realized that she was Danish and not Italian!). We’re bringing all the kids this time and we’d really appreciate a comment if you know any good places to eat, fun playgrounds, outdoor pools or your favorite gelato bars. Grazie!

Frozen Chocolate Banana Ice Cream Swirl

June 20 2017 VegKitchen 

Frozen Chocolate Banana Ice Cream Swirl When summer delivers ice cream weather, we turn to this brilliant three-ingredient recipe: chocolate banana ice cream -- naturally vegan and low-fat. Just cut up the bananas, freeze and swirl with your favorite flavors. We have some real chocoholics under our roof, but you could use anything--frozen strawberries, blueberries or a little vanilla extract. Bonus […] The post Frozen Chocolate Banana Ice Cream Swirl appeared first on VegKitchen.

The Kitchen Renovation

February 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

The Kitchen Renovation Vintage European bistro chairs found on Craigslist, kitchen table passed down to my husband from his grandmother. We’ve been living in our home for fifteen years now and up until this fall, we had never put a hammer or paintbrush to anything in the house except for Paloma’s baby room, right before she was born. We inherited some classic 90s Florida detailing from the previous owners – dust-attracting, shaggy red and white carpeting, stucco walls, green laminate countertops and a low-hanging ceiling in the kitchen. Just like many other families I know, we are quite food-oriented and tend to crowd in the kitchen, since that’s where most of the action happens. It’s also where I work, where I come up with recipes for this site and for my cookbooks, so it’s fair to say that I spend most of my life in this space. We recently completed a long, laborious kitchen renovation that spilled out into the living room, and I cannot describe how much my heart sings when I come downstairs every morning and see this kitchen that finally feels so entirely mine. It took us a decade and a half to gather up the courage and the funds to do this, and these past few months have brought some of the most trying times for us as a family, but it finally feels like it was worth it and I’m so excited to share some snaps of Golubka Kitchen HQ with you. We took a documentary approach to these photos, and instead of shooting everything in one day, the photos were taken over a week, on cloudy days and on sunny days, in the morning and in the evening. There are different aspects of the kitchen that shine on different days, and we really wanted to capture that. ‘Farmhouse’ kitchen sink from Ikea, faucet from Ebay. Our house has three stories – garage on the first floor, open kitchen and living room on the second, and bedrooms on the third. We renovated the kitchen, the living room floor, ceiling, and fireplace (yes, we have a fireplace in Florida and we use it, too), and both staircases leading up and down to the kitchen and living room. The most expensive part of the whole renovation was the removal of the old hanging ceiling in the kitchen, together with all the electrical work involved. We decided on the cabinets and countertops quickly, but the easy decisions ended there. It took me so incredibly long to settle on a cohesive look for the kitchen. As a notoriously undecisive Libra, I endlessly kept changing my mind about the wall treatment, the tile, the light fixtures, the shelves, the faucet, cabinet pulls, etc. I do love those clean, white kitchens with minimal everything, but in the end I decided that in order to stay true to my heart, I had to go with something a little more feminine and detail-oriented, with a hint of the Downton Abbey kitchen. The old kitchen had endless cabinets on the walls, some of which always ended up a mess, while others weren’t utilized at all, so I knew I wanted exposed shelves. I’m super happy with that decision – I love having my dishes and jars within arm’s reach and at eye level, since it allows me to be more organized and minimal. Many people wonder whether dust is an issue with open shelves, and I’ve found that it’s not any more of an issue than anywhere else in the house. I also use all the objects on the shelves quite frequently, which doesn’t allow too much dust to accumulate. The shelves are made of very beautiful and sturdy wood reclaimed from an old barn in Kentucky, which we found at Barn Works. I finished the wood myself without the use of a wood stain. The floating shelf arrangement was made possible with the heavy duty brackets from Shelfology, which secure the shelves to the wall very safely and seamlessly. Tadelakt Moroccan Plaster with Benjamin Moore ‘White Stone’ color pigment Industrial brass rod with copper hooks from Etsy, vintage Brazilian copper utensils with wooden handles found on Craigslist. During the initial planning stage, I was certain that I wanted a subway tile backsplash, but was simultaneously seeing and liking backsplashes made with Moroccan, Spanish and Mexican patterned tiles. I agonized over my choice between the two until I discovered Tadelakt, the Moroccan plaster, and there was no turning back. I knew I wanted grey shaker kitchen cabinets, but the plaster treatment also presented the possibility of grey walls. I’ve always been attracted to grey rooms, to me they just speak of serenity, so I was pretty happy with this opportunity. Finding someone who would apply the plaster masterfully but for a fair price, and getting the job completed was probably one of the most nerve-racking parts of the renovation. We did find someone brilliant, and it ended up worth the stress, because I am completely in love with my new walls. The material is so warm, textural and interesting, and it totally ties the whole kitchen together. As much as I loved the idea of a patterned tile floor, I was still torn between its beauty/­­practicality and the homey feel of hardwood floors, which I wanted to have in the living room. I finally settled on the idea of combining the two, and as a result, the tile follows the line of the kitchen cabinets in the shape of an inverted ‘Z,’ while we can still enjoy the warmth of the hardwood floors in the sitting area and into the living room. The tile is from the Cement Tile Shop, which offers an overwhelming array of the most beautiful, authentic patterns. Of course I found settling on one to be a near impossible task. I went from multicolored to black and white, to pastel, to monochrome tiles dozens of times before landing on the Fountaine Antique pattern with a custom border. As for the hardwood floor, I’d always dreamt of an old-fashioned herringbone pattern in real wood, which proved to be really difficult to find within the United States. The one company that carried thick oak planks in a herringbone pattern didn’t have enough to cover our floor at first, but they later ended up finding one extra box tucked away in a different warehouse. I’m so glad that they did because I’m completely over the moon about how the floors turned out. It’s worth mentioning that the old kitchen floor was white tile that showed off every spec of dust that landed on it, and the living room floors had white plush carpeting, and I am so happy to finally be rid of both. We found the best contractor, Don, who left us endlessly impressed, together with his talented and considerate team. He truly cared about every step of the process and saved us so many times with his expert advice and creative input. The most standout showcase of the team’s work is the spacious drawer pantry they built out of vintage fruit crates from Schiller’s Salvage. My idea was realized even better than I had envisioned – the crates were originally too long and the crew manually disassembled, shortened and rebuilt them, then positioned them on smoothly sliding tracks. The countertop over the crates is made of old barn oak and finished by me in the same way as the floating shelves. The whole piece, on top of being unique and beautiful, is the most functional and spacious storage space in the whole kitchen. Quartz countertops from the Home Depot in ‘Snowy Ibiza’ Antique Spanish hutch from the 1800s, a lucky Craigslist find, brought to the U.S. from Madrid Vintage ceramic and brass cabinet pulls from Ebay and Etsy Vintage ceramic door knob from eBay, ‘Pink Shadow’ Sherwin Williams paint on the door. Custom built computer shelf made by Algis from old barn wood. My favorite thing about the vintage French chandelier that I found on Etsy are the rainbows it sends onto the walls in the evenings. Fireplace brick wall made with 100 year old sliced brick from Craigslist, arranged beautifully by Algis. Stairs leading up to the third floor with the bedrooms. Since both of the staircases connect to the kitchen and living room, we realized that we had to redo them as well, so that they wouldn’t be an eyesore within the new renovation. My husband and I set out to do the whole thing ourselves to save some cash, but in hindsight, I wouldn’t wish this type of adventure upon my worst enemy. All the stairs were covered with red carpeting, and the railings were painted an ugly orange-ish brown. The original plan was to remove the old carpet and to cover the existing stairs with new wood planks. To our surprise, however, we discovered a beautiful pine under the carpeting and decided to restore the original stairs along with stripping and re-finishing the railing. It took me two and a half months to complete this part of the project alone. Stairs leading up to the kitchen/­­living room from the garage. Ceramic tile from Spain with weathered grey hues, uneven borders, satin finish. This kitchen renovation wouldn’t have been possible without the help and generosity of Cement Tile Shop, Shelfology, Barn Works, Schiller’s Salvage, and Floor and Decor. My eternal gratitude goes out to Don and the team for your incredible care and craftsmanship in everything you do, Algis for the amazing job with the tile, plaster, fireplace and shelf, Vadim for the impeccable hardwood installation, and Dale for the immense help with the tile and stairs. Resources Contractor – Don Violette at V & P Construction and Maintenance Kitchen Tile – Cement Tile Shop Shelves – Shelfology for the floating shelf brackets, Barn Works for the reclaimed lumber Vintage Fruit Crates – Schiller’s Architectural and Design Salvage Hardwood Floors – Floor and Decor Kitchen Cabinets – Floor and Decor Countertops – Home Depot, quartz in ‘Snowy Ibiza’ Accessory Resources – in photo captions If you happen to be looking for some incredibly talented craftsmen for your renovation in the Tampa Bay area, please reach out to me and I will be happy to connect you. The post The Kitchen Renovation appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Sarah Bs Balinese Gado Gado

February 5 2017 My New Roots 

Sarah Bs Balinese Gado Gado First of all, hello you. Its been a while. I can hardly believe that the holidays are behind us and even the whole of January. What happened?! Well, before I launch into the recipe, I just wanted to update you all on a couple things. I need to start by saying that the Wild Heart High Spirit Bali Retreat was, without a doubt, one of the coolest projects Ive ever had the pleasure to work on. Mikkala Marilyn Kissi and I welcomed and held space for 16 women to totally transform, and come out on the other side of seven days, new humans. We all landed back into our physical bodies, rediscovering the euphoria of movement and breath, the taste of real food, the feeling of laughter in our cells, sun on our skin, smiles in our hearts. I could go on forever about how deeply moved I feel about the whole thing, but I will just say thank you to everyone who came, and that we are going to do another one very, very soon. There are a few photos from the retreat at the bottom of this post - I hope you enjoy, and join us next time. Also. Cookbook tour. Its happening. Naturally Nourished officially lands in North America February 14th and I am close behind. Ill be visiting New York, Toronto, Vancouver, Seattle, Portland, San Francisco and Los Angeles. There are more details at the bottom of this post and on my Events page, so please have a look. For all other countries, please stay tuned! Now, its recipe time. If youre a vegetarian traveling through Indonesia, gado gado will save your life. Its the dish that is on every single menu, a veggie-loaded, protein-rich salad drenched in the most flavourful, luscious peanut sauce that youve ever tasted. Combining raw and slightly steamed or blanched vegetables and bean sprouts, it is typically served with fried tofu or boiled eggs and prawn crackers, but so easily made vegan. The first time I traveled to this part of the world, I ate gado gado so often, that I almost grew tired of it. Almost. What was my initial meal to celebrate the return to the magical island of Bali this time? Naturally, gado gado, and it did not disappoint. There is something incredibly satisfying about the dish, something that grabs a hold and makes you coming back for more - I believe it is the exquisite balancing act of flavours and textures. The veggies are light and tender (never mushy!), the sprouts are crunchy and fresh, but the true magic lies da sauce. It hits all the notes with its creamy, rich, salty, sweet, acidic, toasty and spiciness. While eating it youre coming up with ways to justify pouring it on everything (Rice? Yes! Spring rolls? Obviously! Roasted veggies? Of course! Bean salad? Why not?!). Of all the dishes I taught during my retreat cooking classes in Bali, this is the one that the ladies really went wild for. Because sauce. I will mention that I am taking major liberties with the traditional recipe, keeping my version vegan and soy-free, and switching out the peanuts for more health-supportive almonds. I realize that this is akin to making pasta out of vegetables (i.e. not at all pasta), but we often and readily make allowances for the promise of something healthier, so just roll with me on this one, okay? Thanks. But Sarah, whats wrong with peanuts? You may recall me tackling this subject before, but for those of you who are hearing just learning that peanuts and the things made with it are less-than-awesome, lets recap! Although there are a lot worse things you could be eating, there are also plenty of healthier choices than peanuts, and heres why. First of all, peanuts are a bit of an odd duck plant. Not a true nut, but a bean in fact, peanuts grow underground in their thin-skinned pods, which come into direct contact with the surrounding soil. Because this soil is often moist and warm, it presents the ideal environment for fungus to proliferate. Now, its not the fungus that is the issue in this case, but the poison it releases, called alflatoxin, which is a cancer-causing agent that attacks the liver. What is the most shocking news, is that the highest levels of alflatoxin arent found in big brand peanut butters, but in the peanut butter ground fresh in health food stores. Second of all, conventionally-grown peanuts are sprayed with very high levels of pesticides and are one of the most contaminated crops in the North America. They are also often genetically modified. Thirdly, peanuts contain very high levels of Omega-6 fatty acids, an essential fat that we consume too much of in general. Ideally, Omega-6 and Omega-3 fats should be consumed in a 3:1 ratio (like the ratio found in hemp seeds!), otherwise inflammation erupts in the body. If youre a serious peanut and peanut butter lover, there are a few things you can do. For starters, find a brand of peanuts that have been grown organically in a dry environment (New Mexico for instance). Dry environments mean drier soils, which means less fungus. Make sure the nuts you are buying are very fresh and raw, since the word roasted cruelly translates to deep fried. Dry-roasted are okay since they dont use oil in the cooking process, but these nuts are typically old. But the best alternative of all? Other nuts! Like almonds. Almonds are high in vitamin E, a potent antioxidant that makes our skin look radiant, and helps protect again heart disease. Almonds have been proven to help lower cholesterol, the risk of weight gain and diabetes. They have about half the amount of Omega-6 fats that peanuts do, along with fewer calories. I snack on almonds and almond butter whenever I can, and have successfully replaced peanuts with this healthier option. I hope youre inspired to do the same! The cool thing about this dish is that you can make it any time of year with seasonal veggies and prepare them the way that suits you and the outdoor temperature, while keeping the sauce exactly the same. I like to eat veggies almost entirely raw in the summer, and include things like cucumber, green beans, radish, and lettuces. In the winter however, gado gado is truly the prefect cold-weather salad since everything can be slightly cooked and enjoyed warm. For this version, I chose two kinds of cabbage, kale, carrots, sweet potato, and freshly sprouted mung beans. An improvement Ive made since teaching this recipe at the retreat was tossing the still-warm vegetables in virgin coconut oil - best decision. This adds a whole other layer of flavour and creaminess, plus adds even more richness, which need this time of year. Did I mention theres also sauce?! There are a couple ways of making my version of gado gado sauce. The best method, for sure, is roasting your own almonds and making your own fresh nut butter. The flavour will truly blow your mind if you go in this direction. But! If you are pressed for time and /­­ or dont feel like going through the rigmarole, you can totally use store-bought almond butter. Just make sure that it is unsweetened and made from roasted almonds, not raw. We want the full depth of flavour here - raw almond butter is too mild and will be overwhelmed by the other sauce ingredients.     Print recipe     Sarah B’s Balinese Gado Gado Serves 6-8 Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. cold-pressed coconut oil 1/­­2 small head savoy cabbage, shredded 1/­­2 small head red cabbage, shredded 6-7 lacinato kale leaves, ribbed and sliced into ribbons 2 medium sweet potato 4 carrots, julienned or spiralized 2 cups packed /­­ 180g mung bean sprouts (or any sprouts!) 2 shallots, sliced into rings 1 small bunch cilantro, roughly chopped a few pinches flaky sea salt limes for serving, optional Almond Gado Gado Sauce 350g almonds = 1 cup /­­ 250ml almond butter 1 small chili, to taste (use as much or as little as you like) 1 clove garlic 2 Tbsp. tamari juice of 1/­­2 lime 2 Tbsp. coconut sugar 1/­­3 cup /­­ 85ml full-fat coconut milk 1/­­3 cup /­­ 85ml water, to thin as needed Directions: 1. Make the almond gado gado: preheat oven to 350°F /­­ 175°C. Spread almonds out evenly on a cookie sheet and roast until fragrant and golden, about 10-15 minutes. Check often - they burn quickly! Remove from oven and let cool. 2.  Place the almonds in a food processor and pulse to chop them up, then remove a good handful for garnish. Blend the remaining almonds on high, scraping down the sides every so often, until the mixture becomes smooth and liquid. Depending on your food processor, this may take up to 10 minutes - be patient, it will work! 3. Roughly chop the chili and garlic, add them to a food processor, along with the tamari, lime juice, coconut sugar and coconut milk. Blend on high and add water to achieve the correct the consistency: the sauce should be thin enough to pour, but not water-y. Taste and adjust seasoning as needed. Store in a glass jar with an airtight lid (keep leftovers in the fridge). 4. Wash and prepare the vegetables: cut the sweet potato into wedges, spiralize or julienne the carrots, shred the cabbage and kale. Set a steamer over boiling water and place the sweet potato inside first, cover, and set a timer for 6 minutes. If the sweet potatoes are tender at this point, remove them from the steamer and set aside and toss with a little of the coconut oil, then cover to keep warm (if they are still raw, continue to steam until tender). Next place the carrots and cabbage in the steamer and cook for 2-4 minutes until tender-crisp, then toss with remaining coconut oil. In a large bowl combine all the steamed veggies with sprouts, shallots and cilantro. Sprinkle with salt and toss. 5. To serve, spoon a generous portion of sauce onto each plate. Lay the salad on top (or arrange it neatly as I have), sprinkle with chopped, toasted almonds, more cilantro and shallots, as desired. Top with more sauce, if desired. Dig in.   Here are some shots I took during the retreat in Bali. It was beyond magical. If you’d like to stay updated about the next one, please sign up for our newsletter and be the first to know once we announce! And now for the book tour! I am so insanely excited to get on the road with my latest cookbook, Naturally Nourished, which you can preorder here. I’ll be in New York City and Toronto first, and tickets for the events in those cities are now available. Check the Events page, Instagram and Facebook for the remaining cities, Vancouver, Seattle, Portland, San Francisco and Los Angeles. See you soon! February 20th My New Roots x The Aerie Collective: WisdomShare “Turning Your Creativity Into a Career” Spend an evening with Sarah for an inspiring presentation about how she has grown her food blogging passion into a thriving career. Her book is available for purchase & signing. Click here for tickets and more details February 21st My New Roots + Food52 Livestream Tune in to Food52’s Facebook at 3pm EST, for a live broadcast of Sarah Britton demonstrating two of her favourite recipes from her new cookbook Naturally Nourished. Live event link: www.facebook.com/­­food52 February 21st My New Roots + Jessica Murnane + Julia Turshen A very special night of inspiring conversation + a celebration + great women in food! Join us for the launch party of two beautiful & brilliant new cookbooks: Sarah Britton’s Naturally Nourished and Jessica Murnane’s One Part Plant With the conversation led by the highly acclaimed author & chef, Julia Turshen. Come for the bites, drinks, and book signings by all three women – stay for the good times & (selfies)! Click here for tickets and more details February 22nd My New Roots + Amy Chaplin + The Finch: Plant-based Dinner Celebration We’re thrilled to invite you to a very special dinner collaboration at Michelin-starred restaurant The Finch, celebrating two fantastic women in food. Join us for this inspired & intimate gathering. Click here for tickets and more details TORONTO February 24th My New Roots x The Aerie Collective: WisdomShare “Turning Your Creativity Into a Career” Spend an evening with Sarah for an inspiring presentation about how she has grown her food blogging passion into a thriving career. Her book is available for purchase & signing. Click here for tickets and more details February 25th Naturally Nourished Book Launch at Appetito! We’re very happy to welcome you to join us for an excting interview with Sarah, Q&A, recipe tasting from the cookbook, book purchasing & signing. Click here for tickets and more details February 26th My New Roots + The First Mess: Cookbook Celebration Gathering Together with Sarah, Laura and an incredible community we would love to invite you to meet, feast & celebrate in their cookbook launch! Click here for tickets and more details The post Sarah B’s Balinese Gado Gado appeared first on My New Roots.

Mint Chocolate Power Bars

January 3 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Mint Chocolate Power Bars By placing two pillows under my left elbow, I can hold sleeping baby Gabriel with one arm and type this text on the laptop that is balancing on my right leg with the other hand. It’s brilliant! I can even reach that bowl of soaked oats with raisins, apple and crunchy peanut butter that stands there on the sofa table. Okay, maybe not brilliant. This balancing act is pretty tricky actually. And I suspect that my left arm will starting to go numb soon. I should probably focus on my son and just wait for Luise to get back from the shower. But I did promise 192 people on instagram that I would post this recipe today and I’ve already spent an hour tucking the other two kids to bed so I feel like I really need to do this now or I’ll be starting the year by breaking a promise. Therefore I am currently writing this post one-handed - sitting in a patchwork plaided sofa in a cute little airbnb apartment in Copenhagen that we’re renting for a few days - chewing on a peanut butter covered apple with a chubby little cherub snoring in my other hand. And Luise thinks I’m bad at multi tasking. Ha! Before we left, I prepared a batch of power bars for the car-ride down. When they don’t serve as car snacks, we use them as quick energy fuel at home whenever we or the kids are in need of a treat. A chocolate bar (or two) in my gym bag also makes a pretty compelling argument for dragging my tired daddy-of-three body to the gym. The bars rarely last long in our freezer. Lately, I have been completely hooked on this chocolate and mint combo. Combining fresh mint flavour with rich chocolate always seemed weird to me, but all of a sudden I have changed my mind. It’s brilliant and for some reason extra perfect as workout fuel. This recipe is based on the Hemp Bars in our first book but a little simpler and fresher in flavour. We top them with cacao nibs which not only make them look great but also adds a nice crunch to their texture. I asked Isac to assist me when I made these but he was pretty useless. When asked to pit the dates, he placed the dates in his mouth and the stones in the food processor (which nearly ruined the food processor). He also kept insisting that the cacao nibs were bombs that exploded into the bars, leaving giant craters after them. So if you think the bars look uneven, this little hooligan is to blame. By the way, I’m not writing one-handed anymore. Halfway along this post, I spilled some oats on Gabriel’s head so he woke up. Luise is nursing him now (and most probably also piercing an imaginary voodoo doll with my face on it with a thousand needles). I am not saying that I spilled on him on purpose, but it did make it a whole lot easier to write this text. Yup that was it. First post of the year. Giant craters, crying babies, voodoo dolls and eating chocolate at the gym. And I’m only 44 minutes late for my deadline. Not a bad start. Mint Chocolate Power Bars Makes approx. 18 bars  You can add a few tablespoons protein powder of choice (instead of the desiccated coconut) if you are making them as workout bars. Nuts can of course also be used instead of the seeds, if preferred. 150 g /­­ 1 cup mixed pumpkin seeds and sunflower seeds, toasted if preferred 50 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup desiccated coconut, unsweetened 4 tbsp chia seeds 3 tbsp cacao powder 50 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup rolled oats 2 pinches sea salt 4 tbsp virgin coconut oil 200 g soft fresh dates (roughly 16 dates /­­ 1 packed cup), pitted 5 tbsp nut butter of choice (we love using a combination of tahini and cashew butter but peanut butter also works great) a few drops peppermint oil (or 2-3 tsp dried mint leaves, crushed) Topping 60 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup raw cacao nibs Line a 16 x 22 cm baking tin with parchment paper. Add the seeds, coconut, chia seeds, cacao powder, oats and salt to a food processor and pulse on high speed until coarsely crumbly. Pour into a bowl and add coconut oil, dates, nut butter, mint (oil or dried leaves) to the food processor. Run on high speed until entirely smooth and sticky. Add the seed and cacao crumbles and pulse quickly until mixed together. Help out with a spatula in case the mixture isnt combined. Taste and add more mint flavour or salt if needed, then pulse a few more times. Transfer to the baking tin and, using the palm of your hand or the back of a spoon (coated in coconut oil), press the mixture down very firmly to create an even and compact bar (roughly 2 cm high). Scatter the cacao nibs on top and use a spatula to press them down slightly into the mixture. Let set in the freezer for approx. 15-30 minutes before cutting into approx. 18 bars. Store the bars in an airtight container in the freezer and they will keep for a few months. You can wrap them in baking paper to make them more portable. Thaw them ever so slightly before serving. NB: For a nut-free alternative, replace the nut butter with a seed butter of choice.

Roasted Carrots & Dukkah + Meaning

July 8 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Roasted Carrots & Dukkah + Meaning I started writing a text about summer food. About being offline and trying to unwind. A happy text about nothing of importance, really. With too many sad reports on the news recently, finding meaning in these short texts can sometimes be difficult. Millions of refugees keep filling up camps in countries around Syria. Or climb onto small boats in Libya hoping that they will make it across the Mediterranean sea. Meanwhile, prejudices, hate and racism are on the rise both in the US and here in Europe. So how can we make a blog post about summer food feeling meaningful at all? Luise and I often talk about this. I am sure everyone does. This feeling of wanting to do more but not being sure what, or how to do it. A recipe can seem so irrelevant in the midst of it all. It looks like we might get involved in some voluntary work in relation the refugee situation in Syria within the next couple of months. But until then, we are trying to see meaningfulness around us. The truth is of course that food does matter. It is important, in many more ways than just for our physical survival. Food is memories, heritage, happiness, family and food is love. Food gathers people around a table and makes us talk. Many of our best memories are connected with food. We solve problems over food. We celebrate. We become friends. So maybe a food blog isn’t that meaningless. Food is after all more than just a recipe. And talking about meaning. Another truth that Luise and I try to live by, is that the most responsible thing we can do at the moment is infusing our children with kindness. Talking to them about how it never will matter how much money you have, the colour of your skin, if you are a man or a woman, where you are born or who you choose to love. We are all humans. And we are all equal. If we can all just pass that on to our children, they will hopefully grow old in a world with less hate and fear and more love than the one we are currently living in. By writing this text, I have also passed that simple message on to you. Prepare the recipe in today’s blog post, share the meal with your friends or family and talk about the importance of kindness. It might be a cliche, but we believe it is one worth sharing. This is a simple summer dinner that we did the other day after we had prepared a large batch of the Egyptian spice blend Dukkah. Calling the meal simple might be a slight exaggeration as you actually have to prepare the spice blend as well as making the rest of the dinner. But it will be worth it. You will find that Dukkah can be added to an infinite amount of meals this summer. It carries a lot of flavour and adds both richness and crunch to whatever you pair it with. There are lots of Dukkah recipes to be found online so instead of adding yet another to the mix, we are simply sharing a slightly adapted version of Yotam and Sami’s brilliant Dukkah from their Jerusalem book. In this recipe the Dukkah is generously sprinkled over roasted summer carrots and onions that rest on a bed of herby quinoa with a creamy feta cheese and yogurt spread on the side. Any roasted vegetables can of course be added to this meal and they can just as well be grilled on a bbq. It’s a summery, creamy, very flavourful and absolutely delicious dish. And hopefully more than that. Enjoy! Much love and happy summer! David, Luise, Elsa & Isac Roasted Carrots with Dukkah, Quinoa & Feta Yogurt Cream Serves 4 Oven roasted summer carrots & onions 1 lb /­­ 500 g (approx. 8 large) carrots 4 onions, shallots or red onions 2 tbsp olive oil 1 tbsp maple syrup sea salt and black pepper Preheat the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F. Scrub the carrots under water and trim off the top greens. Cut the carrots lengthwise if they are thick (and keep thin carrots whole). Place on a baking tray. Peel off the outer layer of the onion and trim the top off. Cut into large chunks. Place on the baking tray next to the carrots. Stir together oil, maple, salt and pepper and drizzle over the vegetables, toss to cover. Bake in the oven for 15-20 minutes or until tender. Herby Quinoa 1 cup /­­ 170 g uncooked quinoa (or 2 1/­­2 cups pre-cooked) 1 large handful flat leave parsley a generous drizzle of olive oil 2 tbsp lemon juice sea salt & black pepper Place rinsed quinoa in a saucepan, add water and salt and bring to a boil. Lower the heat immediately and let simmer for about 10-15 minutes, set aside and let cool. Chop parsley and stir through the quinoa together with olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper. Feta & Yogurt Cream 5 oz /­­ 150 g feta cheese 1 cup /­­ 250 ml plain yogurt sea salt & black pepper Place feta cheese in a mixing bowl and mash with a fork, add yogurt and combine until creamy. Add salt and pepper to taste, set aside. Dukkah spice blend (adapted from Jerusalem by Yotam Ottolenghi & Sami Tamimi) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 70 g hazelnuts 2 tbsp sunflower seeds 3 tbsp coriander seeds 1 tbsp fennel seeds 1 tbsp cumin seeds 2 tbsp sesame seeds 1 tsp nigella seeds 1/­­2 tsp sea salt Preheat the oven to 160°C /­­ 320°F. Spread the hazelnuts on a baking tray and place in the oven for 15-20 minutes or until cracked and golden. Meanwhile heat a skillet or frying pan to medium heat. Add sunflower seeds, coriander seeds, fennel seeds and cumin and dry roast for no more than a minutes while stirring. Now add sesame seeds and nigella seeds and keep stirring until the sesame seeds turns light brown, it takes about 30 seconds. Set aside and add salt. Rub the hazelnuts between the palms of your hands (or a towel) to remove and discard some of the skin. Place all ingredients in a pestle and mortar and coarsely crush the spice blend. Store in an airtight container for up to a month. Assembling: Spread the quinoa in a serving dish or on a large platter. Arrange the oven roasted carrots and onions on top. Spoon the feta and yogurt cream into a small bowl and place in the dish. Sprinkle the vegetables with a generous amount of Dukkah. Serve.

Sensational Sweet and Spicy Sambols

May 13 2016 My New Roots 

Sensational Sweet and Spicy Sambols Being someone who loves a meal with many elements, Sri Lankan food was pretty much my dream come true. Every meal is served with plenty of sides: sauces, chutneys, relishes, and pickles, to make each bite unique and surprising. Sambol is the word for this seemingly endless collection of condiments, and I lost count trying to sample them all in a week. I believe I mentioned in my previous post about Sri Lanka, how spicy the food is there. Like, blow-your-head-off spicy. And as if the curries themselves werent hot enough, the chili-based sambols on the side will certainly commit your taste buds to perplexing levels of pain. Pol sambol is the ubiquitous, fiery condiment served at breakfast, lunch, and dinner. It is probably one of the simplest dishes to make, consisting mainly of chili, shredded coconut, chili, lime, and chili - did I mention the chili? Yea. This mix ranges from very spicy to volcanically hot depending on whose table youre sitting at. On the second day of the trip, my tongue seeking refuge in something, dare I say it, borderline bland, I discovered one of the most delicious things I have ever tasted - and it wasnt bland to say the least, just not sweat-inducing. Seeni sambol, a fragrant, Sri Lankan caramelized onion jam, turned out to be incredible on everything from hoppers to curries, and could turn a pretty plain bowl of red rice into something remarkably special. I became totally obsessed with this sambol and it was the very first thing I attempted to make when I came home. I really cannot tell you enough how awesome this stuff is. Do yourself a favour and make a batch soon! The most memorable experience I had in Sri Lanka was learning to cook traditional recipes with two women in the local village. It was likely one of the most eye-opening culinary experiences Ive ever had - not only learning from such passionate and experienced cooks, but seeing their traditional kitchen, tools, and techniques really inspired me. Take their stove, for example. A large clay bench with large mounds molded into it held the earthenware pots in place, and the heat underneath was adjusted by adding more sticks to the fire, or taking them away. Genius. Above the stove was a large wooden wrack to hang beans, seeds, and herbs for fast drying, which I thought was a brilliant way to take advantage of the residual heat. Ingredients were prepped on the floor, since its cooler down there, and also nice to sit while youre working. The knife to cut veggies was actually attached to a stool, and instead of holding the blade, you hold the vegetables and basically drop them on top, slicing them in the air to fall onto a grass mat. The sambol was made by grinding all the ingredients together on a huge flat stone designed specifically for this task, and as such took all of ten seconds to prepare. Spoons were made from dried coconut shells. The plates were made of woven grass, topped with fresh lotus leaves from the nearby creek. The leaves protected the plates from the saucy curries, and when you were finished your meal, youd discard the leaf into the compost, so that there was literally nothing to wash! I mean. This day made me take a long hard look at how much stuff I use in the kitchen. Water, electricity, appliances - these women were literally using nothing but things from the earth around them and it made me wonder how weve come so far from that connection. Cooking has become so overblown, and it was this experience that reminded me to cook simpler and eat simpler. Get closer to the earth. I dont have some grand solution, but its food for thought. I’ll share a few notes on the recipes… You will likely think Ive lost my mind when you begin the task of slicing two pounds of onions (#worthit), but I promise you it is the correct amount, and youll see that it cooks down to nearly nothing. I tried half this amount my first time and it just simply wasnt enough. If youre going to go for this, you may as well make a batch that will last you at least a few meals, right? Fresh curry leaves are a definite preference for this recipe, but Ive never been able to find them here in Copenhagen so I used dried. Theyre not great, but better than nothing. If you dont want to gnaw on whole spices or curry leaves you can remove them after the seeni sambol is cooked, but it can be a bit of a treasure hunt situation, just sayin. Once Ive smashed the cardamom pods, I like to remove the outer skin and just add the inner seeds to the spics mix. I tend to leaves the cloves and curry leaves in since I like those bursts of flavour. The pol sambol recipe Ive written here is admittedly, a wimps version. Ill admit that I can only tolerate spice until it begins to overwhelm the other flavours in the food, so mine is strong but still edible on its own. I invite you to go with your instincts on this one and dial up the heat to suit your tastes. If you can find freshly grated coconut (or a fresh coconut that you can grate yourself) by all means use that instead of the desiccated variety! Some versions of pol sambol include curry leaves, but because I only had dried I left them out. If you can find fresh ones, add about a sprig for this recipe, and crush them well before incorporating. As far as serving these two sensational sambols go, they are pretty much great with All. The. Things. Rice dishes, curries, stews, soups, wraps, sandwiches, salads...I mean it! Once you taste them Im confident youll find infinite uses for them. The first photo is of steamed brown rice and the Kale Mallung recipe that I wrote from the last Sri Lankan post - still a major fav around here. I love this meal for breakfast with a poached egg, lots of seeni sambol and, ahem, lightly sprinkled with the pol sambol.     Print recipe     Seeni Sambol Makes 1 heaping cup /­­ 300ml Ingredients: 2 lb. /­­ 900g red onions 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml coconut oil 10 green cardamom pods 8 cloves 3 Tbsp. dried curry leaves (or 2 sprigs fresh curry leaves if you can find them!) 1 cinnamon stick 2 tsp. fine sea salt 2 tsp. coconut sugar Directions: 1. Peel and slice the onions. 2. Pound the cardamom pods in a mortar and pestle until they have split open. You can remove the outer skin and just save the seeds inside, but its only if you dont like eating the exterior. 3. Place a large, heavy-bottomed pot over medium-high heat and melt the coconut oil. Add the cardamom pods, cloves, curry leaves, and cinnamon stick. Stir and cook until fragrant, about 3-4 minutes. Add the onions, salt and sugar, stir very well to coat and cook uncovered, stirring every couple minutes until the onions have completely melted down - this can take anywhere from 30-45 minutes. Be patient and enjoy the process! 4. Transfer seeni sambol to a glass jar and store in the fridge for up to one month. Remove from fridge at least half an hour before serving, as the coconut oil will cause the sambol to solidify in the fridge.   Pol Sambol Makes 4 cups /­­ 1 liter Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 180g desiccated coconut 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml warm water or coconut water 1 clove garlic 2 shallots or small red onions 1-3 red chilies (or as many as you think you can handle!) I used fresh Thai chilies 1 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. chili powder (or as much as you think you can handle!) juice of 1 lime Directions: 1. Combine the desiccated coconut with the water and stir thoroughly to combine. Let sit for 15-30 minutes until softened. 2. Place the garlic in a food processor and blend to finely mince. Roughly slice shallots and chili, and place them in the food processor with the garlic and blend to mince.  Add the softened coconut, salt, chili powder and lime juice. Blend on high to fully incorporate. Taste and adjust seasoning if desired.   A huge thanks to Cinnamon Hotels and Resorts  and Sri Lankan Airlines for making this incredible trip possible! Show me your sambols on Instagram: #MNRsambol The post Sensational Sweet and Spicy Sambols appeared first on My New Roots.

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