bitter - vegetarian recipes

bitter vegetarian recipes

The One Ingredient You Should Be Adding to All Your Plant-Based Recipes

November 4 2019 Meatless Monday 

The One Ingredient You Should Be Adding to All Your Plant-Based RecipesWere all familiar with the four basic tastes -- sweet, salty, sour, and bitter -- but umami, the mysterious fifth taste, remains an enigma. Umami is responsible for giving foods their deep, savory flavor. When used properly, umami adds a pleasant richness to plant-based meals, balances the natural bitterness of nutrient-dense vegetables, and simplifies cooking by reducing the need for salt and other flavor-enhancing ingredients. Umami can be found in everything from corn, tomatoes, and mushrooms to aged cheeses, nori and soy sauce. While its easy to find foods that contain umami, its not always as simple to coax that savory flavor out of them, which is why umami remains an underutilized culinary tool in many home kitchens across America. Thats why the team at Meatless Monday was so thrilled to work with Yondu Vegetable Umami to develop a free, downloadable e-cookbook complete with umami-rich plant-based recipes. When scrolling through the recipes, youll see the breadth and versatility of this one simple ingredient. But tasting is believing. For starters, try this super simple 3-Minute Veggie Soup , which includes aromatic leeks, sugary snap peas, cool slices of fennel, and a couple of tablespoons of vegetable umami. At only 54 calories per serving, its a nice, light way to open a meal. Catering to a crowd? Pulse together a creamy Minted Pea and Walnut Dip in a matter of minutes. Have some leftover cauliflower? A spattering of chili flakes and lemons zest, along with a drizzle of olive oil and umami will transform this simple vegetable into a Quick Roasted Cauliflower worthy of any restaurant menu. To celebrate the cookbook release, Yondu is giving away 50 free bottles of their vegetable umami. All you have to do is click the link HERE and sign up, but move quick -- its first come first serve. And if you missed the giveaway, Yondu is also offering a coupon code for 50% off your order! Use code: 50umamimeals.   Download your free copy of the e-cookbook HERE and click over to Amazon to purchase a bottle of Yondu, $8.99 (lasts quite a while). Thanks to Yondus vegetable umami, you can effortlessly add a richness to any of your Monday meals. Need more inspiration? Check out Yondu.Us for more recipes. Tag @MeatlessMonday and @Yondu.USA in your umami food posts and share the e-cookbook link with friends and family to inspire easy Meatless Monday meal ideas. The post The One Ingredient You Should Be Adding to All Your Plant-Based Recipes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Brussel Sprout, Tempeh & Soba Noodle Skillet

October 25 2019 Oh My Veggies 

Every fall I seem to latch onto a different seasonal ingredient to obsess over. Two years ago, it was sweet potatoes. Last year, it was winter squash. I think this fall, it’s going to be Brussels sprouts. I have so many ideas for them and I want to post them all. Brussels sprouts! Everyday! Every hour! Every minute! While everyone else is enjoying pumpkin and apples, I’ll be over in my corner with a bowl of delicious Brussels sprouts. And I won’t share them either! I wanted to do some kind of Brussels sprout stir fry and I remembered a recipe I pinned a while back from In Pursuit of More–a 15 Minute Brussels Sprout & Tempeh Stir Fry. I built upon that combination, adapting the stir fry sauce (which doubles as a marinade for the tempeh) and adding soba noodles at the end. It’s a one-bowl meal, which is always my favorite kinds of meal because who really wants to cook 2-3 things for dinner?! Roasting will always be my favorite way of cooking Brussels sprouts, but making them in a skillet is a close second. They’ll still get a little bit caramelized and the bitterness that so many […]

methi chutney recipe | menthya chutney | fenugreek chutney

October 21 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

methi chutney recipe | menthya chutney | fenugreek chutneymethi chutney recipe | menthya chutney | fenugreek chutney with step by step photo and video recipe. chutney recipes are essential recipe for many indian households. particularly in south india, it is made for almost any reason and part of most of the meal. obivoulsy it introduces a lot of variation to the simple coconut based chutney. one such simple and flavoured chutney is methi chutney recipe known for its bitterness. The post methi chutney recipe | menthya chutney | fenugreek chutney appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Pear and Toasted Walnut Salad with Cranberry Vinaigrette

September 16 2019 VegKitchen 

Pear and Toasted Walnut Salad with Cranberry Vinaigrette This salad has flavors that speak eloquently of autumn--pears, walnuts, bitter greens, and cranberries. You can substitute other dried fruit if you like. It’s a simple enough salad to serve for every day, yet dressed up enough to serve as a first course for company meals. The post Pear and Toasted Walnut Salad with Cranberry Vinaigrette appeared first on VegKitchen.

Difference between Besan and Chickpea Flour (Garbanzo Bean flour)

August 29 2019 Vegan Richa 

Difference between Besan and Chickpea Flour (Garbanzo Bean flour)Besan and Chickpea flour are Not the same. Besan or gram flour is a flour of chana dal or split brown chickpeas. Chickpea flour or garbanzo flour is ground up white chickpeas. Similar flavors, but not the same flour. Read below for differences and where to use which flour. Besan or gram flour is a flour of chana dal or split brown chickpeas. Chickpea flour or garbanzo flour is ground up white chickpeas. Both have similar flavor and behavior but enough difference that a substitution can sometimes mess up a recipe. Pictured above, the top bowl has chickpea flour which is lighter, coarse and fluffy. Bottom bowl has Besan which is finer, smoother and hence more compact. WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN BESAN AND CHICKPEA FLOUR? Besan and chickpea flour are not the same. Indian Besan, is the flour of brown chickpeas or chana dal (split brown chickpeas), or sometimes a mix of split chickpeas and split peas. It is a flour of a type chickpeas, so it can be labeled as chickpea flour. Chickpea flour is the flour of white chickpeas and is labelled as chickpea flour or garbanzo flour. Besan is usually much finer ground and needs much less water than chickpea flour. Chickpea flour if a coarse flour usually will need more water to make same consistency batter. On usage it will also yield a dryer result. They taste slightly different. Sometimes, you have to take these differences into account, when substituting one for the other in a recipe. In some recipes, subs work out just fine, while others need adjusting. They both taste a bit bitter when raw, so they are not a good candidate in raw flour recipes such as edible cookie dough. More Pictures of pulses, legumes and their names on this Page. As you can see from the pictures, Chana Dal is basically brown chickpeas that have been split and skin removed. This chana dal is made into a flour for besan. When the besan is of brown chickpeas with the skin, then that kala chana besan has a darker hue and earthier flavor. This besan is not used as commonly as regular chana dal besan.Continue reading: Difference between Besan and Chickpea Flour (Garbanzo Bean flour)The post Difference between Besan and Chickpea Flour (Garbanzo Bean flour) appeared first on Vegan Richa.

The Simplest Chocolate-Banana Granola (Oil-Free!)

July 26 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

The Simplest Chocolate-Banana Granola (Oil-Free!) Think of this super minimal granola recipe as a great introduction to the vast and delicious world of homemade granola. It’s a world of endless possibilities and really long ingredient lists, so this 7-ingredient recipe is here to bring everything down to earth for a second. This granola gives off some solid chocolate banana bread vibes, and can easily be customized to meet all your granola needs :) Mashed bananas and maple syrup act as the glue that creates those irresistible granola clusters and eliminates the need for any oil in this recipe. Cacao counteracts the sweetness of the bananas and maple with its earthy bitterness and brings some decadence to the otherwise modest ingredients. The bulk of the granola is made up of two parts rolled oats to one part walnuts, and this is where you can start playing around with whatever ingredients you want to use. Maintaining the ratio of nuts to oats the best you can, add other nuts or seeds instead of or in addition to the walnuts. You can also add other superfood powders, dried fruit, or desiccated coconut. It’s a great pantry clean out option. Just yesterday, I did a mini clean out using this recipe. I swapped out some of the oats for dried coconut, and added pumpkin and chia seeds along with the walnuts. It came out totally delicious, and I really can’t be trusted around a freshly baked tray of this stuff. Hope you’ll give it a try! And we’d love to hear about your customizations :) The Simplest Chocolate-Banana Granola (Oil-Free!)   Print Serves: about 3½ cups Ingredients 3 very ripe bananas (1 cup banana puree) ¼ cup + 1 tablespoon maple syrup 1 teaspoon vanilla extract ¼ cup cacao powder pinch of sea salt 2 cups rolled oats (gf if needed) 1 cup chopped untoasted walnuts or other nuts/­­seeds (or a mix of a few) Instructions Preheat oven to 350° F (176° C). Prepare a parchment-covered baking sheet. Mash the bananas in a large bowl until smooth. Add the maple syrup, vanilla, cacao, and a generous pinch of sea salt, and mix until smooth. Add the rolled oats and walnuts/­­other nuts to the bowl and mix to coat. Transfer the mixture to the prepared baking sheet, flattening it out with the back of a spoon and spreading it out somewhat evenly over the entire sheet. Place the baking sheet in the oven and bake for 20 minutes. Remove the baking sheet from the oven and flip the granola, breaking it up into smaller clusters (so that the pieces have a chance to dry out). Bake for another 20-25 minutes, mixing periodically, until the granola is dry and crispy. It will crisp up even more once it cools. Let cool and keep in an airtight container. 3.5.3226 The post The Simplest Chocolate-Banana Granola (Oil-Free!) appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Adriana Ayales

April 28 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Adriana Ayales Adriana Ayales is a rainforest herbalist from Costa Rica and the founder of herbal apothecary Anima Mundi. We are in love with Adriana’s world and creations, and so excited to share this interview. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Although I love the grounded power of routine, I’m living in a phase of being open and free. With kids, and a beyond full time devotion to running a business, I just ride the waves as they come. I’ve learned to surrender that not everything has to look the way it should look. Lifes situations and patterning moves around like the seasons. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I love getting up before the kids, and sneaking into the kitchen to make myself a healing cup(s) of medicine. First thing I do is a big ole cup of vitamin C rich goodness, sometimes its mangosteen hibiscus with a lemon squeeze, or fresh picked turmeric from the garden grated with ginger, along with camu camu and lemon water. Then I make a seasonal fruit bowl of sorts, with oatmeal, or homemade granola loaded with mineralizing herbs (like nettle or mesquite powder). Followed by my favorite, and not so healthy friend, Coffee. Ah coffee. I cant tell you how wonderful locally grown heirloom coffee is here, paired with deliciously fresh cacao and medicinal mushrooms and homemade almond. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Massaging the face, forehead and skull with warm oil at night is one of the simplest and most restorative practices we can do to induce deep sleep. I love using a mix I make at home of jojoba oil, with rosehip, infused with clary sage and a fine sandalwood. Another one of my all time favorites for evening relaxation is blue lotus. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  Sipping tea mindfully in nature, witnessing time in silence is one of my favorite things. I tap into my feelings, breath, mind, and begin to clear energy. Sustenance -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I do love caffeine. Growing up in Costa Rica has woven me into loving a good cup of locally roasted coffee. Depending on the day, I love adding reishi, or a mix of medicinal mushrooms, raw cacao with mucuna, along with a homemade plant based milk. I also love having an aged puerh, or traditional matcha with added herbs for nourishment, like moringa. -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? Sometimes I do, especially when I’m tired or running on low energy. When im over-worked, or running on stress I definitely crave more carby and sugary things, and this is usually due to skipping a meal, or needing a quick-fix. Some tips I bare in mind during stressful moments that ignite the sweet tooth (or just in general!) are: always go for fruits before you opt for a sugary dessert, always choose low glycemic sweeteners vs. sugar (some faves are coconut sugar, maple syrup, and real stevia extract -- not the synthetic ones!) For carbs avoid empty carbs and refined flours, and opt for ones that are more easily absorbed, like coconut, almond and cassava flour. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness?  Oh my, so many! I seasonally change my herbal intake, but certainly stick with some favorites. I love having my potent singles (single herb tinctures) on me at all times, like shisandra berries and blue lotus. A Brain tonic while I’m working, usually with herbs like gotu kola, ginkgo, brahmi and lion’s mane mushroom. Two that I dose with very often are the Happiness tonic (st johns wort, mucuna, ashwagandha, etc.) and euphoric/­­mood elevating herbs like catuaba, mucunam muira puama and damiana. I also love our Liver formula for daily cleansing and nourishment, like the moringa, burdock, nettles, chlorella. And of course beauty herbs like He Shou Wu, Mangosteen and more! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Absolutely, I love doing a mix between yoga and pilates. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I love the torture! When I feel a little lazy and not like suffering in an intensive workout, I just remind myself how excellent I feel when I finish it. Not just seeing physical results, but especially the mental peace and happiness after working out. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? A feeling of wholeness. When your mood is high, your gut is vibrant, and you feel confident and beautiful. When there is no sense of lack, imbalance or deficiency. When you feel aligned. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I love making my own body and face oils. I usually infuse collagen boosting herbs, and skin strengthening herbs and lather up. I also like to keep things simple, like using cacao butter with coconut oil, or just a fluffy shea butter for deep moisture.  -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Yes! I’m a big fan of eating herbs and supplements that protect the skin, increase our own collagen receptors and help activate our natural glow. The herbs I designed for the vegan collagen formula have been my go-tos for quite sometime. Horsetail, He Shou Wu, Calendula, Nettle seed + leaf, Comfrey, and others like Mangosteen, Camu Camu and Hibiscus are great for the skin too. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? I love making edible masks. Infusing a high potency extract into a raw clay and avocado, along with an activating source like apple cider vinegar, or more protein like flax, and making a smooth paste to lather all over the face, body and even hair is one of my all time favorites. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Visualization is huge for me. Sitting in silence and tuning in is vital, along with the help of nervines and adaptogenic herbs that assist in de-compression like skullcap, blue lotus and ashwagandha. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I like taking a walk or hike in nature, get in the ocean/­­lake/­­river or any kind of body of water. I completely unplug from work, the phone, or computer. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Before the cold kicks in, I take strong echinacea extracts in a soothing tea, mixing turmeric, lemon, grated ginger, apple cider vinegar, garlic and aloe in warm water. It works every time. I make a large batch and dose all day long --  even my kids love it!  -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? This certainly overlaps for me, which can honestly be a bitter sweet reality. I love everything surrounding plants, and its medicinal uses, as well as teaching, and medicine making. I love that my business is all about honoring ancestral ways, plant medicine, the art of herbalism, righteous cultivation, and medicine making. Yet, like any business owner would understand, there are many tasks to the job that are exhausting and certainly not what made you fall in love in the first place. For me personally, Ive learned to reconcile by doing what I love doing the most, medicine making and wildcrafting. I made a commitment to myself in making space for this no matter what, and not disregarding it by prioritizing business with the things that dont really matter in life. Its vital that we take moments in our free time that refine our focus and intention in life, re-align to what inspired the dream, without getting side swept with busy-ness. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Over the last couple years Ive struggled with this because of having babies. Which Im sure a lot of new moms can relate to this! Every time I get a moment between being a mother, wife and business owner, my priority to feel more self loving (and more human!) is yoga. The simple act of getting oxygen, doing conscious breathing, and distracting the monkey mind from its patterning, you become yourself again.  -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Herbs. Integrating plant medicine into everything has significantly changed my body mind and soul. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Off the top of my head I love these: Healing with Whole Foods with Paul Pitchford, Gabriel Cousens’ Spiritual Nutrition, The Body Ecology Diet by Donna Gates, and of course The Medical Medium by Anthony William. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming an herbalist and starting Anima Mundi? Growing up I learned closely with curanderos on plant medicine and rainforest herbalism overall. I then attended herbal schools in California where I learned a lot of native, northern and european herbalism. Life somehow took me to NYC (a place I NEVER thought I would ever go to) after living in California for quite some years, and I started practicing privately as an herbalist. I kept noticing the common trends, symptomology and imbalances folks that came in had, and started developing mother formulas to be able to make large batches. -- How do you approach sourcing herbs for Anima Mundi?  First and foremost we try to create a direct relationship with the people/­­farmers that cultivate. Although we value certification of prime ingredients, there are many ethical wild crafters and farms that do not have special certifications, yet cultivate sustainable practices and have quality products that we also like to support. We are also adamant of supporting local economies as much as possible, particularly with rainforest herbs sourced directly from indigenous people, supporting their craft as well as ethically crafted botanicals. -- What are some of Anima Mundis best sellers? Our plant-based Collagen Booster, Happiness Tonic, Adaptogenic Immortality Tonics, Curam Beauty Elixir, our 100% Coconut Cream Powder, Mushroom Mocha Milk and more...! Fun and Inspiration -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Women Who Run with Wolves Song/­­Album –  Cuatro Vientos /­­ Danit Movie –  Loving the The OA lately! Piece of Art –  Ayahuasca art by Pablo Amaringo Photos by Renee Byrd and from Anima Mundi’s IG /­­ This post contains Amazon Affiliate links. The post Self-Care Interview Series: Adriana Ayales appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Candied Chocolate Dipped Citron + Video

January 31 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Candied Chocolate Dipped Citron + Video I’m constantly amazed by the fact that nature gives us the exact things we need during each given season. Citrus season might be my favorite fruit season, just because it’s such a ray of sunshine in the midst of winter bleakness. The contrast between the quiet darkness of this time of year and the bright, juicy, sweet citruses that spring up at the stores is especially intense. Our grocery store is exploding with all kinds of citrus varieties, more than I can count on my two hands. I couldn’t resist getting a few citrons, since they smelled amazing, and I had never tried them before. I knew that they have a really thick rind (they are mostly rind really), which is great for candying. After doing some research, I also learned that citron is one of the original citrus fruit, from which a lot of the other household citruses were developed. So, to celebrate this year’s citrus season, I made some candied, chocolate-dipped citron. The process will make your kitchen smell amazing, and the result is such a unique and delicious treat, with a perfect balance of sweetness, bitterness, and citrusy zing. I also made a ‘day of eating’ video, which takes you through the whole candying process, as well as a day of plant-based meals. All the recipes and things mentioned in the video are linked below :) Video links: Magic Moisturizer Gua Sha Routine Shortcut Steel Cut Oats Pasta e Ceci (Chickpea Noodle Soup) Candied Chocolate Dipped Citron   Print adapted from David Lebovitz Serves: about 1½ cups Ingredients 2 citrons 1½ cup maple syrup or a mixture of maple syrup and honey (not vegan) 1 cup water, plus more for blanching the citron pieces ½ - ¾ cup chocolate chips Instructions Wash and dry the citrons. Cut out any flesh and seeds (you can juice the flesh and use the juice in your water, in salad dressing, or as an acidic finish to any savory dish), then cut the rind into strips. Put the rind strips in a medium pot, cover with water, and blanch the citron pieces in simmering water for 30 minutes, until translucent. Drain the citrons and return to the same pot. Add the maple syrup/­­honey (if using) and water. Bring the mixture up to a boil, stirring a few times. Turn the heat down to establish a strong simmer, and simmer until the syrup reduces, almost completely. You should be left with candied citron strips, covered in a thin layer of syrup. This will take about an hour or more. Let cool for about 15 minutes. Transfer the strips to a wire drying rack to let any excess syrup drain off. Meanwhile, melt the chocolate chips on a double boiler. Dip each citron strip into the chocolate, so that its about half way covered. Transfer back to the drying rack. Once youve dipped all the citron strips in the chocolate, transfer the whole rack to the refrigerator to let the chocolate harden. Keep the candied citron refrigerated in an airtight container. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... Rose and Lavender Parfait and a Breakfast with Friends Chocolate Avocado Truffles and Concord Grape Sorbet Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats Clementine Fudge Cake .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Candied Chocolate Dipped Citron + Video appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

bitter gourd curry recipe | karela sabzi | kakarakaya curry

December 26 2018 hebbar's kitchen 

bitter gourd curry recipe | karela sabzi | kakarakaya currybitter gourd curry recipe | karela sabzi | kakarakaya curry with step by step photo and video recipe. indian curries are very essentials for many indians and are made on day to day basis. there are myriad types of it made with different ingredients and for different purposes. one such simple and easy curry recipe is bitter gourd curry which is known for its sweet, sour and spicy taste combinations. The post bitter gourd curry recipe | karela sabzi | kakarakaya curry appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Chocolate Tahini Cookies Grainfree Oilfree

December 7 2018 Vegan Richa 

Chocolate Tahini Cookies Grainfree Oilfree1 Bowl Chocolate Tahini Cookies. Amazing Texture and flavor in these Easy Cookies. 8 Ingredients. 20 Mins. Vegan Oilfree Glutenfree Grainfree Nutfree Recipe  Jump to Recipe These Tahini cookies will blow your mind. Crumbly, chocolately, shortbread like chocolate cookies. Tahini is sesame seed paste which has a pleasing light bitter flavor profile. When baked, it adds amazing cookie like texture. These cookies which are mostly just tahini, have this melt in your mouth texture and unique flavor profile. The flavor can be intriguing and you need to try it!.  These Cookies need 1 Bowl, 8 Ingredients, No nuts, No gluten or grains or oil and are Melt in your mouth chocolatey and surprising. Everyone who tried these commented about not knowing what that flavor was but could not stop eating them! Let me know if you can stop:)Continue reading: Chocolate Tahini Cookies Grainfree OilfreeThe post Chocolate Tahini Cookies Grainfree Oilfree appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Proof that Not All Vegan Food Has To Be Healthy

January 8 2018 Happy Cow veggie blog 

If youre under the impression that vegan food is boring and that all we eat all day are carrots and kale, Vegan Junk Food Bar in Amsterdam is the perfect place to go to get your stereotypes absolutely rocked. Full of punk styling and off the wall flavors, Vegan Junk Food Bar offers the perfect place to go when you need to get your fix of burgers and fries, among many other classic fast food favorites. Theyve got two locations in Amsterdam, so theres always one close by when the craving for a double double with a shake on the side hits. I had the chance to speak with the manager of their newly opened Marie Heinekenplein location, which is hard to miss because the interior is neon pink and bubblegum blue, and he excitedly told me that their new location is doing great and theyre thrilled to be able to offer even more vegan options to an already vegan-hungry crowd of tourists and Amsterdam locals. While there, I got to try the Notorious Sumo Burger, a double patty with melty cheese and all the fixins as well as theyre Amsterdam Bitterballs and Flashy Loaded sweet potato fries. Everything was […] The post Proof that Not All Vegan Food Has To Be Healthy appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Favorite New Year Reset Recipes

January 4 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Favorite New Year Reset Recipes Happy New Year, friends! We wanted to stop by with a round-up of 18 vegan and gluten-free New Year reset-friendly recipes that are vegetable-forward and deeply nourishing, but also satisfying and delicious. We’ve got you covered on healing soups and stews, vibrant mains, energy-boosting breakfasts and snacks, a powerful cold remedy drink, and even a minimally sweetened dessert that still very much tastes like a treat. Wishing you all the health and happiness in 2018 :) No-Recipe Healing Soup (v, gf) One of our most popular recipes of 2017. This is a highly customizable soup, built on a powerful broth made with immunity-friendly ingredients. It’s delicious and warming, but especially helpful to those under the weather or low on energy. Make sure to seek out 100% buckwheat soba noodles to make this recipe gluten-free. Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices (v, gf) A deeply nourishing and simple stew recipe, heavily influenced by South Indian cuisine, with a high potential for customization. Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew (v, gf) The ultimate, cozy stew from our Fall Meal Plan, loaded with so many star ingredients of fall/­­winter fare: mushrooms, carrots, garlic and onion, as well as jarred tomatoes, brussels sprouts and lentils. Check out the whole meal plan, too – it has all kinds of other great ideas for a new year reset menu for a whole week. Bright & Grounding Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale Soup (v, gf) A soup that’s both creamy and chunky, full of grounding, winter-appropriate ingredients. Mango Curry with Fennel and Parsnip (v, gf) Mango season is coming soon, and this curry is the perfect way to celebrate the sunny fruit’s arrival. Besides the mango, it’s loaded with all kinds of other nutritious, health-promoting produce like broccoli and fennel. Make sure to seek out 100% buckwheat soba noodles to make this recipe gluten-free. Mung Bean Falafel (v, gf) Mung beans make for a great alternative falafel base. They are incredibly nutritious and affordable, and their cooking time is a lot shorter than that of chickpeas. This falafel is very simple to prepare, and it makes for a perfect component to complete a bright and flavorful veggie bowl. Creamy Millet Polenta with Rainbow Chard and Chickpeas (v, gf) An incredibly savory, alternative polenta recipe made with millet instead of corn. Simple in looks, but surprisingly complex in flavor. Taco Collard Green Rolls (v, gf) All the flavors of a great veggie taco, contained in a collard green roll. A crowd-pleaser through and through. Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans (v, gf) If you happen to have access to good zucchini this time of year, try out this light, plant-powered dish. One of my favorites to prepare when I’m feeling sluggish and non-vibrant. Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango (v, gf) Another great recipe for ushering in mango season. Cucumber noodles are a life-changing discovery, and the glazed tofu technique is our absolute favorite way to prepare tofu. Quick Marinated Beans (v, gf) A great thing to make on the weekend, to have in the fridge throughout the week. These marinated beans are able to transform any salad or bowl into a complete, satisfying meal. Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut (v, gf) Incorporating more fermented foods into your diet is always a great idea, especially during a new year reset. Gut health is everything! If you are up for a home fermentation project, consider making this colorful sauerkraut. Omit the blueberries if you can’t find any this time of year. Sweet Potato Toast, Two Ways (v, gf) Taking a break from grains or bread? Sweet potato toast might be the perfect thing to curb any toast cravings or withdrawals you may be having. It’s also just a really delicious dish in its own right. Immunity-Boosting Beet and Camu Camu Breakfast Bowl (v, gf) Raw beet, avocado, cranberries, camu camu: these are just some of the ingredients in this powerful, immunity-boosting bowl. Makes for a perfectly vibrant breakfast. Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways (v, gf) These are truly healthy pancakes, made with nutritious, protein-rich, gluten-free grains, and vibrant veggies. The blender technique makes them very easy to put together, too. Sweet and Savory Energy Bites (What to Do with Leftover Nut Milk Pulp) (v, gf) Having healthy snacks on hand is the key to success, in our opinion. These energy bites are one of our favorite things to make with leftover nut milk pulp, and they make healthy snacking easy and delicious. Almost Savory Raw Chocolate (v, gf) We know that a lot of people take a break from sugar after all that holiday indulgence. This chocolate recipe is a life-saver for any true chocoholics having a hard time with that idea (aka us). You can make it with zero sugar, but still feel like you’ve had your chocolate fix after having a square or two of this stuff. It’s gold! Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy (v, gf) If you or anyone around you is thinking of getting sick, MAKE THIS! It’s helped us and countless friends of ours fight off colds in their beginning stages. It’s also an invigorating and firey tonic, perfect for any bitter winter day. You might also like... Mango Curry with Fennel and Parsnip Simple Spicy Strawberry Gazpacho Garlic Onion Veggie Dip from Food Loves Writing Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Favorite New Year Reset Recipes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Big Batch Golden Milk

December 18 2017 My New Roots 

Big Batch Golden Milk So we moved. Across the ocean. Its been a wild ride so far with plenty of excitement and relief coupled with awkward transitioning, and astronomical culture shock (small town Ontario is preeeeeetty different from Copenhagen). Were also renovating a very old home by Canadian standards, and the hidden surprises lurking under every lifted floorboard are creating a project slightly larger and lengthier than predicted. But wouldnt it all be so boring and predictable without those fun discoveries?! Right! Who needs a kitchen anyway? Oh wait. Amongst the self-inflicted chaotic state of affairs, Ive actually found some peace in the simple living weve got going on. Since we dont really have any friends in our little village yet, theres been plenty of time to actually take care of myself and our family. Afternoons are spent building toy train sets, cooking big batch meals, and making snacks for the days ahead. Ive started taking aerial yoga and NIA, going for nature walks every day, and having candlelit baths on the regular. Funny what removing ones social life will make room for! An important part of my self-care routine these past weeks is my simple ritual of making golden milk. Warm, comforting, and satisfying, this drink has everything needed to combat winter blues and movers remorse (I kid, I kid). Usually I make golden milk on the fly, one cup at a time, but recently I realized how handy it would be to just make a huge batch and have it ready to spoon into some hot milk when the mood strikes. Genius. For those of you that arent yet familiar with this wonder drink, Im excited for the vibrant, spicy world that is about to open up to you. Golden milk, or haldi ka doodh, actually dates back thousands of years in Ayurvedic tradition where it has been used to aid digestion and respiration, prevent colds and flu, decongest the liver, ease sprained muscles and joint pain, purify the blood, clear the skin, and aid sleep. The main ingredient in golden milk responsible for all of this awesomeness is the curcumin in turmeric, a compound that is responsible for its vibrant hue. Curcumin has been widely studied for its powerful anti-inflammatory properties, but it is also supports detoxification, helps balance blood sugar, and lowers the overall risk of cancer. How do we get the most out of this powerful phytonutrient? Simply by combining it with black pepper and fat - two important ingredients in golden milk! A compound in black pepper called piperine actually helps the body absorb curcumin, and shows to increase the bioavailability of it by up to 2,000 percent. And the good news is, you only need a very small amount to reap the synergistic benefits. Then melt a little coconut oil in, and the curcumin can be directly absorbed into the bloodstream through the lymphatic system. That’s a cooperative one-two punch of absorption and deliciousness. Once mixed, your Big Batch Golden Milk spice blend will last for up to six months. Keep it in a cool, dry place out of direct light - a closed cupboard is perfect. Do not store it right next to the stove or on top of the fridge, where the warm environment will speed spoilage. We wanna keep our medicine fresh! The Big Batch Golden Milk recipe below makes about 120 servings, so there is plenty to divvy out to your most beloved, and even save some for yourself. Make sure to include the directions so that your lucky recipients can make golden milk themselves. Ive divided them below so that you can print out just the single serving instructions for your friends and family. I’ve also included a recipe if you want to sample just one cup for yourself before committing to an entire jar. My version of golden milk has a few more spices than some blends that Ive tried, but this unique combination just tastes that much better. If youre on a tight budget, or you simply cannot find some of the spices listed, leave them out. The main ingredients you need are the turmeric, ginger, cinnamon and black pepper. The others are there for added health benefits and of course flavour, but the recipe will still be delicious without them. The milk for this recipe is totally flexible. Coconut is classic, but almond, cashew, or hemp are tasty options. You can also do half milk, half water if you like. It will be less creamy, but its great if youre trying to make your milk stretch a little farther! The most important thing to remember when making golden milk is to not overheat the spices, as they will become bitter-tasting and therefore not all that enjoyable. If you choose to use milk in your recipe, warm it gently on the stove, then remove from heat and gently whisk in the golden milk spice blend. If youre going with water, do NOT pour boiling water over the spice blend, but instead pour the recently-boiled water into a cup, let it cool for 30 seconds or so, then whisk in the golden milk spice blend. I also advise you not to add the honey or coconut oil until the spices have been stirred into the liquid youre using, as theyll incorporate easier if the spices have dissolved. If you want to use a vegan sweetener, maple syrup is my favourite choice, but brown rice syrup, coconut palm sugar, and stevia are also good options. I also love adding a sprinkling of vanilla powder right at the end for some extra va-va-voom. I recommend enjoying your golden milk first thing in the morning (right after your lemon water, of course!), or right before bed. If its a particularly cold day outside, this intelligent spice combo will warm your cells up from the inside out. Or, if youre looking for a luxurious way to unwind down after a long day, I find that golden milk is also a very effective sleep tonic. Whatever the time you choose to enjoy this drink, you will absolutely love its warm, and satisfying vibes. Make it a ritual yourself: spoon lovingly, stir consciously and sip gratefully. One more thing I should mention, is that the Big Batch Golden Milk spice blend is not only delicious as a drink, but that it can also be incorporated into a number of your favourite recipes. Toss a teaspoon into a smoothie, stir some into your morning porridge or pancake batter, fold it into a basic cookie dough or cake batter, and even try it in curries, soups and stews. The flavour is warming and pungent, so use it anywhere youd like a burst of sunshiny spice that is as good as gold.     Print recipe     Big Batch Golden Milk Spice Blend Makes approx. 120 servings Ingredients: 1 1/­­2 cup /­­ 200g ground turmeric 2/­­3 cup /­­ 70g ground ginger 1/­­3 cup /­­ 35g ground cinnamon 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. /­­ 20g ground black pepper 2 Tbsp. /­­ 20g ground cardamom scant 3 Tbsp. /­­ 20g ground cloves 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. /­­ 20g ground nutmeg 3 Tbsp. 20g ground star anise 1/­­4 cup 20g ground coriander Directions: 1. Combine all spices in a large bowl. Stir well, then transfer to a large jar or several smaller ones, and seal with an airtight lid. Keeps for up to 6 months.     Print recipe     Golden Milk Ingredients: 1/­­2 Tbsp. golden milk spice blend 1 cup milk of your choice (coconut milk is classic, but I also like cashew milk or hemp milk) 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. virgin coconut oil 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. sweetener of choice (I like raw honey) Directions: 1. In a small saucepan over medium heat, warm milk until just before it simmers. Whisk in golden milk spice blend until smooth. Remove from heat and stir in coconut oil and sweetener, if desired. Enjoy!     Print recipe     If you want to make just one batch of my golden milk, heres the single-serve recipe. Single-serving Golden Milk Ingredients: 1 1/­­2 tsp. turmeric 1/­­2 tsp. ginger 1/­­4 tsp. cinnamon pinch black pepper pinch cardamom pinch cloves pinch nutmeg pinch star anise pinch coriander I wish you all a super sweet holiday with tons of delicious food shared amongst family and friends, and that your 2018 is bursting with health and happiness. Much love to all out there, from my chilly, but cozy, little corner of the world to yours. xo, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   * In wrapping up 2017, I cannot help but look on the Wild Heart High Spirit retreats with deep gratitude and pure joy. I had a strong vision for the endeavor from the beginning: gather women in a beautiful and serene space, teach them how to reconnect to their bodies through food and movement. But I never imagined just how deep these lessons would go, how profound the changes would be, and how much fun we would have! After three this year, I can confidently say these experiences are incredibly special, and I feel very lucky to work with such a talented partner to create them. Thank you to all of the women who have traveled from all corners of the earth to join us. We love you! Here are some highlights from our trips to Bali, Ibiza, and Portugal. Click on the images below to see photos from each of our magical locations. .       We also have some very special community partners who have generously made our experiences even more abundant! Big thanks to: Naturgligolie Coconut Bowls Jukserei Pachamama Raw Bite Four Sigmatic Gourmet Print Shop We are now weaving plans for future retreats. If you are interested in learning more or joining us one day, please sign up to our mailing list to be kept up to date. We hope to see you one day soon! The post Big Batch Golden Milk appeared first on My New Roots.

Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes

November 21 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes It’s been eight years since we started collecting recipes on this website, and over those years we’ve accumulated quite a few holiday recipe ideas. We thought it was finally time to do a big, comprehensive round up of our absolute favorites. We’ve got you covered on mains and hearty sides, as well as lighter sides, soups, salads, dessert, and drinks. Wishing you and your family a happy and healthy holiday season :) v = vegan, gf = gluten-free, veg = vegetarian, vo = vegan option Mains and Hearty Sides Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower (v, gf) There’s something so grand and ritualistic about a holiday table centerpiece that took time, care and anticipation. Since most such centerpieces involve meat, one can feel a little left out during the peak of a celebratory meal if meat is not their jam. In this recipe, we applied this grand, ceremonious approach to braising a head of cauliflower. Someone even made a video outlining the entire braising process. Baked Latkes (v, gf) Latkes are my ultimate weakness, but I’ve always dreaded the long and smoky process of frying them. My love for latkes is so strong though, that I had to come up with an easier path to that crispy, golden potato goodness. These baked latkes are SO much easier to make than the traditional fried kind, since the oven does all the main work for you. The flavor and texture are not compromised one bit, I promise. The recipe also includes a beet salad with an avocado mayo, which is to die for. Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna (v, gf) This healthful but hearty lasagna employs spaghetti squash in place lasagna noodles. There’s mushrooms, mung beans, kale, carrots, tomato sauce, and an easy almond ‘cheese’ as well. Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash (v, gf) If you’ve never tried braising leeks, you are in for a serious surprise. They are amazing, especially served over a hearty cauliflower and white bean mash. If leeks are not your thing, consider making the mash alone and serve it as a side, to up your holiday mash game :) Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin (v, gf) I can’t say enough about this gratin comprised of layers of sweet potato, Brussels sprouts, and caramelized onions, showered with spices and coconut milk. It’s easy to make but so beautiful and satisfying at the same time. Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes, and Black Rice (v, gf) This will forever be my favorite fall/­­winter salad. It’s all about the contrast of flavors: aromatic black rice, nourishing spiced cauliflower, juicy grapes, and a slightly spicy miso dressing full of umami. Sprinkle in some pomegranate seeds for an extra festive look. Sorghum Beet Risotto (v, gf) This vibrant risotto would make for an excellent side dish at a holiday table, especially if you don’t know what to do with that forgotten bag of sorghum in the back of your pantry :) Curried Squash and Kale Riceless Risotto (vo, gf) Another alternative (aka riceless) risotto option. This one uses riced kabocha squash in place of actual rice. It’s luxuriously creamy, warming, and overall impressive. Root Vegetable Chickpea Flour Quiche (v, gf) This vegan quiche comes together quite magically, with no crust, eggs or cream to speak of. Chickpea flour acts similarly to the egg-cream foundation of traditional quiche and solidifies into a sort of custard when baked at a high temperature. Add a studding of silky root vegetables and greens to that, and you’ve got yourself the perfect, healthful and delicious fall/­­winter quiche. Soups and Sides Creamy Butternut Squash, Pear and Cranberry Soup with Crispy Kale (v, gf) This is butternut squash soup elevated. The addition of cranberries and pear is as delicious as it is unexpected. There’s a special ingredient that will help aid digestion during a big meal, too. Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower (v, gf) A soup that’s both grounding and fortifying, and good enough to serve as an unexpected, colorful starter at the holiday table. Pink Soup with Roasted Onion and Broccoli (v, gf) Another stunning, colorful soup option. Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage (v, gf) We love mashed potatoes, but we also love pairing a bowl of mashed potatoes with another, more interesting mash made with underutilized root vegetables. Both celeriac and parsnips are so uniquely flavored and healthful, it’s no wonder that they make for some delicious mash. Serve it with the Braised Holiday Cauliflower for the ultimate plant-based holiday meal. Miso-Date Ghee Brussels Sprouts (veg, gf) This recipe teaches you how to make your own ghee (golden, clarified butter that has a higher smoke point than normal butter and is low in lactose and casein /­­ not vegan), as well as how to make miso-date ghee, which is too delicious for words. It’s great on roasted Brussels sprouts, as well as everything else in this world. Sweet Potato Nachos with Cheesy Chipotle Sauce and All the Fixings (v, gf) A healthful take on nachos, with crispy sweet potatoes taking the place of tortilla chips. Great for self-serve style, snack-heavy parties. If you don’t want to go through the intricate process of making sweet potato chips, roasted sweet potatoes will work perfectly in their place. Kale Salad with Marinated Beets, Lentils and Almond Cheese (v, gf) This salad is simple but effective: visually stunning, healthful and delicious. Plus, you’ll want to sprinkle that almond cheese on everything! Roasted Parsnip and Pomelo Salad (v, gf) Earthy, nourishing parsnips go so well with juicy, bittersweet citrus. The combination is especially irresistible when sprinkled with spiced and toasted walnuts and raisins. Use grapefruit if you can’t find pomelo. Desserts Apple Pecan Pie with Salted Pumpkin Caramel (v) This is three favorite Thanksgiving pies in one: apple, pecan and pumpkin. It’s decadent and impressive, and a definite crowd-pleaser. (Also pictured in slice form at the beginning of this post). Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake (v, gf) Slices of this fruit and nut cake make for a great accompaniment to a cheese plate, as well as an awesome gift basket component. Chocolate Fudge with Fresh Sage and Goji Berries (v, gf) The super-festive appearance of this decadent, frozen fudge basically speaks for itself. Rum and Raisin Bundt with Orange and Miso Glaze (v) The universally loved combination of rum and raisins is elevated by a sweet and subtly salty orange and miso glaze in this vegan bundt recipe we developed for Food & Wine. Sweet Potato Caramel Nougat (v, gf) Oh man, this nougat! Not as sticky or sweet as traditional nougat, this one has a caramel-like complexity from our trademark sweet potato caramel. There is a studding of toasted nuts and cookie crumble throughout each slice, too. Great for homemade gifts or party platters. Upside Down Citrus Polenta Cake (v, gf) This cake is a crowd pleaser through and through. It’s got it all in terms of stunning looks and bright, special flavor. Black and White Chocolate Pudding (v, gf) These elegant, black and white chocolate pudding cups are easy to put together, but very impressive and full of whole food ingredients. Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache (v, gf) If you are looking for a grand and fun cake project, but still want something wholesome and not too sugary, look no further than this stunner of a cake. Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight In this recipe, we’ve updated the old school treat with the use of healthful ingredients, and the beautiful, floral flavors of hibiscus and orange blossom. Serve these Turkish delights alongside tiny tongs at a holiday party for the ultimate, fancy dessert experience :) Banana Toffee Tart (v) This tart is worth making just for the vegan date toffee alone, but combine that with a (vegan) buttery crust and caramelized bananas, and you’ll forever be everyone’s favorite host. Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats (veg, gf) Another crowd favorite from a few years ago, this cake is like carrot cake, but made with parsnips in place of carrots. The parsnips yield their moisture and delicate flavor to the cake dough, which is then layered with a cream cheese frosting and topped with candied kumquats. This recipe can easily be veganized – just use maple syrup in place of honey to candy the kumquats and make the frosting. Honey-Roasted Pears with Vanilla Cashew Cream (veg, gf) All the components of this dessert can be made ahead of time, and assembled later. The cashew cream is not your average cashew cream, either – it’s extra-fluffy with the help of a special ingredient. White Chocolate Blood Orange Mousse Tart (v, gf) This delicate white chocolate mousse tart is flavored and colored with the juice and zest of blood orange. You also have the option of skipping the crust and making the mousse alone. Just distribute it amongst little ramekins for individual servings. Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies (v, gf) These cookies are crunchy on the outside, chewy on the inside, and incredibly buttery throughout. Their unexpected green coloring looks beautiful, contrasted by the red topping of goji berries. Kabocha Squash Ice Cream with Maple Roasted Pecans (veg, gf) Winter squash does beautifully in ice cream, especially the naturally sweet, bright orange kabocha squash. In this recipe, kabocha ice cream is swirled with a simple, tart cranberry sauce and topped with maple pecans. This recipe can easily be vegan – just use maple syrup in place of honey. Miso Caramel Popcorn (v, gf) It’s entirely possible to make really good caramel popcorn at home! This popcorn is sweet, salty, and incredibly addicting – you’ve been warned :) Drinks Rosemary Hot White Chocolate (v, gf) This hot white chocolate is both cozy and decadent, with unexpected, warming notes from rosemary and a perfectly smooth, frothy consistency. Quick Persimmon Eggnog (v, gf) This is eggnog for both the adventurous and the health-conscious. Much lighter than the original, but still perfectly creamy and satisfying. Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules (v, gf) This is the perfect winter cocktail for those of us who don’t drink alcohol, but still want to participate in the celebratory ritual of clinking glasses and toasting with something special and delicious. Pear Cranberry Chai (v, gf) This cozy chai is brewed with the addition of pears and cranberries, which takes the flavor to the next level. Simply put, it’s the best chai we’ve ever had. H A P P Y   H O L I D A Y S  !  !  !   The post Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Gluten free Tahini Oatmeal Cookies

September 14 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Gluten free Tahini Oatmeal CookiesThese 1 Bowl Tahini Oatmeal Cookies have no refined sugar and oil and come together within minutes. No eggs, Vegan, Glutenfree, Nutfree, Soyfree Tahini Oat Cookie Recipe.  Jump to Recipe Simple Oatmeal Cookies are a favorite snack in my house especially in cooler weather. Some nut butter, or sun butter, oats, flour and done. In this variation, I use tahini for the fat and volume. Tahini makes these a salty, sweet, and interesting cookie. Tahini adds a fabulous buttery texture to the cookies without needing any added oil. It also adds a slight bitter profile. Add some dried fruit/­­raisins, chocolate chips or other additions, add some spices of choice. Add an icing,make this cookie your own. If you like tahini, you will also love my Chocolate tahini flourless cookies! What is Tahini? Tahini is just blended up toasted hulled sesame seeds. The seeds are blended/­­processed until smooth and fluffy sesame seed butter. The flavor and texture of tahini varies significantly with brand. Tahini adds a nutty, slightly bitter (but pleasing bitter) profile wherever you use it. However, depending on the brand, it might add a lot more bitter. This bitter especially will show up in sweet things like this cookie. For best results use a brand that you generally like the flavor of. I like Soom and Whole foods brand.Continue reading: Vegan Gluten free Tahini Oatmeal CookiesThe post Vegan Gluten free Tahini Oatmeal Cookies appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Favorite Tomato Recipes

August 28 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Favorite Tomato Recipes Tomatoes are everywhere right now, every color and shape imaginable, and tasting like the most concentrated sunshine. This abundance always feels a little bittersweet, knowing that they will be gone as fast as they came, and that we’ll be moving on to heartier fall fare like squashes and roots soon enough. While they last though, it’s a very good idea to incorporate tomatoes into every meal imaginable. Today we’re sharing a round-up of our favorite tomato-centric recipes that we’ve posted over the years

Self-Care Interview Series: Rachelle Robinett

May 5 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Rachelle Robinett Rachelle Robinett is an Herbalist, Holistic Health Practitioner, and founder of Supernatural, a company dedicated to real-world plant-based wellness. Rachelle has been studying the relationship between plants and people her entire life – be that on a farm in the Pacific Northwest (where she grew up) to time with healers, specialists, and shaman in farther-away places. She now provides functional plant-based wellness services, products, and education to empower people to understand their health, and lean into it, naturally. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? This has changed a lot for me since launching my company and having total control of my schedule. I do schedule every thing, but also move through life very intuitively. For example, on a day off Ill plan to ride my bike but once Im on it, it doesnt matter to me where I go. There are things I do routinely (meal preparation, exercise, rituals, sleep) but I never ignore instincts or anything my body is telling me. I love to be surprised but also care so much about how I spend every moment that planning is a big part of my life. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. No more alarm clock! Or, infrequently, which isnt something I would have predicted for my life. Ill wake up to open windows and the sounds of birds on a breeze. A glass of water with a tincture and probiotics. If its a day off, Ill skip caffeine and head out for a run while Im still sleepy. I love waking up while I run. A work day means a small cup of cold-brew with MCT oil and (currently, though it changes as I work with different herbs) mucuna pruriens and L-theanine. I practice intermittent fasting daily so dont typically eat until 11am or later but in the morning Ill make a broth or giant green juice and also a smoothie, which becomes brunch. A meditation ritual with some South American plants Ive come to love and then its off to the races. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Getting away from blue light! If Im near screens, they have physical filters and apps (like flux) installed to reduce the effect. Dimmed lights, incense, my Zen Spa Stuff playlist, and something to drink. There are always herbs at night as my energy tends to run very high, naturally. I cycle between kava kava, skullcap, valerian, poppy, lavender, and more. Also very in love with a relaxing face-washing routine. :) -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  Im working diligently at becoming a more regular meditator. Its most days now, but Id like to deepen it. Otherwise, yoga, running and long bike rides silence my mind. I can practice yoga (ashtanga) for hours a day and be thrilled. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – A giant smoothie made with fresh tropical fruits and fats, ideally picked from a jungle farm that morning. Lunch – All the vegetables, fresh and raw and local. Amazing olive oil, avocado, or coconut. Maybe some seeds. Seaweed too. Every color of the rainbow. Snack – 100% cacao. Local. Dinner - See lunch. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Currently I have about 1/­­2 cup of cold-brew coffee that we make at home. Im so high energy naturally that I often dont finish it. Green juice is my favorite energy support. Otherwise I use water, food, sunlight and breath to adjust my energy. -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? Dark chocolate – often homemade but if bought its 92 – 100%. Ill eat that for breakfast, honestly. My sugar intake is so low that sweets cravings are rare but if they get aggressive Ill have extra cacao in smoothies or elixirs, or eat more fruit, sweet potatoes/­­yams, etc. Chocolate chip cookies are dear to my heart though. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? This evolves as I learn and grow too but ... – An excellent probiotic – Personalized herbs. For me those are mood-supportive and nervous-system soothing. I use a combination of herbal teas (infused overnight), tinctures (HerbPharm are my favorite!) and well-sourced powders. – Supplements depending on bloodwork, body composition and lifestyle. – Im seeing the greatest overall health changes in my clients who are working on gut health. It just affects so much! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I live to move. Every single day if possible! If I skip more than two days, I get really restless. Running and yoga are my favorite, but I need both. I joke that running is my church; I treasure it and find it extremely cathartic. Yoga keeps everything balanced and I hope to have the practice for life. Weather permitting, Ill ride my bike for hours but that just feels like play. Im also into strength training (aka lifting weights at the gym, which surprises people). Overall, I consider exercise as essential as good food, water, and sleep. My preference for high-intensity exhaustive stuff comes from my high-energy personality but isnt necessary for everyone. Ive seen some of the fastest changes in my body with a daily yoga practice, some walking, and an excellent diet. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? Absolutely heavenly. Excellent playlists are essential! Also, just do it. ;) Beauty -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I think people doubt me when I say greens, and especially green juice, are responsible for the glow but I really mean it. Veggies veggies veggies, healthy fat, tons of water, and sweat! -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Aside from food, water, rest, and sweat, I find that a consistent routine of gentle exfoliation and good quality rehydration (topically, that is) work best for me. Continually renewing the surface, allowing skin to breathe, and keeping it nourished with really simple ingredients (I love Egyptian Magic and fruit enzyme or honey-based masks) gives really great face. That said, Im not an esthetician and have increasingly more respect for what I dont know about skincare (thanks to spending more time with the professionals at CAP Beauty, especially) and it will differ for everyone. What wont differ is the value of a right diet to help reduce inflammation, increase circulation, maintain hydration, and provide enough energy for both exercising and rest. :) Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Exercise and sleep have always been stress-reliefs for me. Ive recently integrated more meditation, and herbs of course (especially nervines). Whats making the greatest difference, though, is - as with most things - addressing the root cause or source of the stress. Rather than just trying to breathe between emails, Im looking at how to reduce email overall. Setting timers, limits on the number of meetings Ill take each day, inbox pausing, and scheduling (and sticking to) more time truly offline. Personal days, screen-free evenings or weekends, etc. If doing this, its important to prepare for there to be more to address when you return to it, so another part of the practice may be letting go of how much we want to engage with and choosing quality over quantity. Much harder said than done. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Heat and spice! I completely eliminate all sugar including fruit and yes, honey too. I put on three extra layers to get warm and stay warm. Garlic, ginger, and all sorts of spice. And rest. Essentially, Im aiming to help my body reach a sort of break-point with the cold/­­flu, or to sweat it out before it even reaches a peak, which Ive had a lot of success with. Medicinal mushrooms can also be great for cold/­­flu season. -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? Im working on this. (See above regarding stress avoidance!) My work is my play is my passion is my love so whats not work is sometimes very hard to determine. My hypnotherapist friend suggests that if it makes me happy, perhaps its not important to distinguish. My partner has inspired me to take in information from sources entirely outside of my usual bubble, which is great for play, and avoiding a filtered or algorithmic existence. This is a new practice for me. I grew up in a home that didnt allow for play so its something Im creating space for and learning how to do as an adult. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Ive found that its just impossible to be my best self when Im not taking care. Its really priority number one (and two, and maybe three) at this point. That said, there are times when life when its worth compromising different things. Like, in my twenties when I worked my ass off (and loved it) in order to achieve certain things. Now, I feel freer to play and rest. These bodies are our only homes in this life. I am so grateful to have one; I really think of it like my best friend and partner in existence. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Learning how to eat entirely plant-based, and well. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Thankfully, I dont have these. But, the opposite side of that spectrum is overworking, under-socializing, or burnout. And, existential crises which seem to strike when things are best. Rest and changes of scenery can do wonders. (Lately, I have been exploring procrastination from the perspective of mindfulness, though. This is an enlightening talk on it.) -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Instead Ill choose a couple of people: My mom, who as a Dietician gave me the greatest start in understanding nutrition, but more importantly taught me how to listen to my body. Rather than bandaging symptoms, she showed us how to ask why and follow the clues to root causes. My dad, an Anaesthesiologist who - much the opposite of Mom - taught us about medicine yes, but of more value he gave me the travel bug and experiences with wild nature that started and perpetuate my relationship with earth. And, Wendy Green, who I met at the perfect time in my journey. She helped direct my then multitudinous health practices into a more singular approach, which Ive honed and deepened since we met years ago. She also showed me how much I love ashtanga yoga, which is the gift of a lifetime. Ill be back to her retreat for the third time this summer. Knowledge -- Do you have any recommendations for those thinking of taking their career in a similar direction? Where does one start, where to find the education, how important is certification, etc. This is one of the most common questions I receive! I appreciate Mountain Rose Herbs list of resources for those looking into schools, teachers, or even just books. Its worth knowing which certifications are recognized by The American Herbalists Guild, though many people disregard the value of that and choose to study from great herbalists or schools that exist outside of the system. Id recommend as much exploration and direct experience as possible in the form of classes, workshops, and apprenticeships before then committing to a longer-term study. Find someone whose approach you respect and identify with and learn from them in whatever ways are available. -- Tell us about HRBLS, your beautiful herb infused chew line! Woo, HRBLS! These are my babies! Long story short, I wanted to give people an easy, delicious, beautiful but still very effective form of herbs. The HRBLS are gummies, or chews, that are equivalent to a dose of a tincture, a strong cup of herbal tea, or some capsules. Theyre a marriage between functional food and herbal remedies. A snack medicine or treat with benefits. Nerve Less is the first flavor (honeyed lavender tarragon) and includes my favorite herbs for daytime stress and anxiety relief, which so many folks come to me for help resolving. In the near future, well announce the next flavor – okay flavor s. :) -- And a last, fun one: what are your three favorite plants for the spring season and why? – Nettle! Because its my bff (we grew up together) and the coolest combination of edible green, super-green plant medicine, and a natural antihistamine. – Dandelion: I love the multi-taskers and like nettle, dandelion is an edible flower and bitter green (great for digestion), and medicinal top to root. – Mimosa. The tree of happiness which blooms more in the summer than spring, but close enough. Aside from looking magical, its full of medicine – everything from antioxidants to DMT. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Deep massages – two hours with the strongest hands I can find please! Acupuncture. Running, yoga, riding. TRAVEL. The post Self-Care Interview Series: Rachelle Robinett appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

stuffed karela recipe | bharwa karela recipe | karela ka bharwa

March 4 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

stuffed karela recipe | bharwa karela recipe | karela ka bharwastuffed karela recipe | bharwa karela recipe | karela ka bharwa with step by step photo and video recipe. indian meals are incomplete without any munching and lip smacking side dish recipes. each cuisine meal has its own variety of side dish which basically gels with the type of meal served. one such simple, healthy and also tasty(controversial) side side dish recipe is stuffed karela recipe or stuffed bitter gourd recipe. The post stuffed karela recipe | bharwa karela recipe | karela ka bharwa appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Vegan Chocolate Gingerbread Cake

December 26 2018 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Chocolate Gingerbread CakeThis Vegan Chocolate Gingerbread Cake has an amazing flavor profile. Ginger, candied ginger, dark chocolate add a pleasing bitter combination with gingerbread spices. 1 Bowl. Vegan Soyfree Nutfree Recipe  GF option Jump to Recipe  Ginger and Chocolate in baked goods work very well together in the cold season. The craving for spice and chocolate gets satisfied with every bite! Warm gooey chocolate, loads of ginger and gingerbread spices. This loaf has cocoa, fresh ginger and gingerbread spices in the wet and candied ginger and chopped up dark or regular chocolate in the dry. It bakes into a slightly dense pound cake like loaf that is best served warm. If storing for longer, warm before serving so that the chocolate can melt a bit and get gooey and delicious. Its almost like a gingerbread brownie! Serve as a snack or top with whipped coconut cream or a chocolate frosting for dessert. Continue reading: Vegan Chocolate Gingerbread CakeThe post Vegan Chocolate Gingerbread Cake appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Chocolate Tahini Cookies Grainfree Oilfree Nutfree

December 7 2018 Vegan Richa 

Chocolate Tahini Cookies Grainfree Oilfree Nutfree1 Bowl Chocolate Tahini Cookies. Amazing Texture and flavor in these Easy Cookies. 8 Ingredients. 20 Mins. Vegan Oilfree Glutenfree Grainfree Nutfree Recipe  Jump to Recipe These Tahini cookies will blow your mind. Crumbly, chocolately, shortbread like chocolate cookies. Tahini is sesame seed paste which has a pleasing light bitter flavor profile. When baked, it adds amazing cookie like texture. These cookies which are mostly just tahini, have this melt in your mouth texture and unique flavor profile. The flavor can be intriguing and you need to try it!.  These Cookies need 1 Bowl, 8 Ingredients, No nuts, No gluten or grains or oil and are Melt in your mouth chocolatey and surprising. Everyone who tried these commented about not knowing what that flavor was but could not stop eating them! Let me know if you can stop:)Continue reading: Chocolate Tahini Cookies Grainfree Oilfree NutfreeThe post Chocolate Tahini Cookies Grainfree Oilfree Nutfree appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Wagon Wheel Cake

April 12 2018 Vegan Dad 

Wagon Wheel Cake This cake is insane. Its massive, probably too sweet, has 5 separate elements, and is totally awesome!  Of course, my health conscious mother never bought us Wagon Wheels when my brothers and I were young, and oh, how we jealously pined for them when other kids brought them to school for lunch! When Vegan Mom and I were dating (and not yet vegan) in university, we used to keep ourselves motivated to study through the positive reinforcement of Viva Puffs. This cake evokes all of those memories, and is simply a lot of fun to make and eat.  INGREDIENTS - about 1 1/­­2 cups raspberry jelly Cake INGREDIENTS - 227g all purpose flour - 65g cocoa - 1 1/­­2 tsp baking soda - 3/­­4 tsp baking powder - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1 1/­­4 cup soy milk - 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar - 1/­­4 cup water - 1 cup sugar - 1/­­2 cup canola oil - 1 tbsp vanilla METHOD Preheat oven to 350 degrees 1. Grease two 10 inch round cake pans.  Cut out two circles of parchment paper to fit in the bottom of the pans.  Put the parchment papers in the bottom of the pans and grease it.  Flour both pans. 2. Sift flour, cocoa, baking powder, baking soda, and salt into a bowl.  In a separate bowl, whisk chocolate soy milk and vinegar together.  Add remaining ingredients and whisk well to blend. 3. Add dry ingredients and gently whisk until blended.  Dont overdo it. 4. Divide batter evenly between the two pans. 5. Bake for 22-24 mins, or until a toothpick comes out clean. 6. Cool on wire racks for 10 mins, then flip the pans over the remove the cake.  Remove the parchment paper.  Let them fully cool. Graham Cookie Layer INGREDIENTS - 3/­­4 cup all purpose flour - 3/­­4 cup whole wheat flour - 2 tbsp dark brown sugar - 1/­­8 tsp salt - 1/­­2 tsp cinnamon - 1/­­2 tsp baking powder - 1/­­4 cup vegetable shortening - 1/­­4 cup maple syrup - 2 tbsp soy milk METHOD 1. Mix together dry ingredients. Cut in vegetable shortening with a pastry cutter to the size of small peas.  2. Add syrup and soy milk and bring together into a ball. Add a tiny splash more soy milk if needed. 3. Divide dough into two equal pieces. Roll and trim each into a 10 circle on a piece of parchment paper, using the cake pan as a guide. Dont worry, you can trim it more after it is baked.  4. Place each piece of parchment/­­dough circle on a baking sheet. Place in the fridge to cool for 30 mins. 5. Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Bake one the middle and upper rack for 10 mins, rotating and switching the racks after 5 mins. Cookies should dry on the top and only very, very lightly brown. Do not over bake. 6. Remove from pans (parchment and all) to a cooling rack. When cooled, trim as needed with a small sharp knife using the cake pan as a guide.  Marshmallow (from Plantified) INGREDIENTS - 3/­­4 cup salt free aquafaba - 1/­­2 tsp xanthan gum - 1 tbsp vanilla extract - 1 1/­­2 cups sugar - 2 tsp agar powder - 2 tbsp glucose syrup - 1/­­3 cup water METHOD 1. In a large bowl, whisk aquafaba and xanthan gum to stiff peaks with a hand mixer. Whisk in vanilla. Set aside. 2. Bring the sugar, agar, glucose, and water to boiling in a small saucepan over medium heat. Bring to 250 F, stirring regularly/­­constantly to keep the mixture from sticking to the bottom of the pan. Be patient. The sugar will quickly jump in temperature, plateau, then rise again. Resist cranking the heat to hurry the process along. 3. Slowly stream the hot sugar mixture into the aquafaba, constantly whipping it in with the hand mixer. When the sugar mixture is fully incorporated, keep whipping the mixture until it returns to room temperature (more or less--the bottom of the bowl should not feel warm). You can do all this with a stand mixer, but I find that the sugar mixture likes to get caught up around the top of the beater, so using a hand mixer is better).  Ganache INGREDIENTS - 1/­­2 cup light coconut milk - 200g bittersweet vegan chocolate chips - 2 tbsp margarine METHOD 1. Heat coconut milk to bubbling in a small saucepan over medium heat.  2. Remove from heat and add chocolate chips and margarine.  Stir until everything is melted and smooth.  Set aside to cool completely.  TO MAKE THE CAKE! 1. Bake and cool the cake. Level the top of the cake, if necessary (i.e. make sure it is flat and not domed).  2. Bake and cool the graham cookie layer. Trim to fit on top of the cake (you can do this while the cookie is still slightly warm if you want).  3. Place one of the cake layers on a serving platter. Spread 3/­­4 cup of raspberry jelly on top. Place one of the graham cookies on top of the jam.  4. Repeat step 3 with the remaining cake, jelly, and graham cookie, and set aside. 5. Make the marshmallow. The marshmallow will set fairly quickly, so be prepared. Spread 7/­­8 of the marshmallow on top of the cake/­­jam/­­cookie layer in your serving platter. Put the second cake/­­jam/­­cookie layer on top of the marshmallow (making sure the cookie side is down and the cake layer on top). Gently press down and use an icing spatula to smooth the sides. Use the remaining 1/­­8 of the marshmallow to aid in this endeavour.  6. Let the marshmallow fully set. I like to put the cake in a cool place for this step because it makes the ganache step easier. 7. Make the ganache and let cool to room temperature. 8. Spread a thin layer of ganache over the entire cake, like you would a crumb coat of butter cream. Set aside in a cool place (the fridge) to set. 9. Use the remaining ganache to cover the cake. Set aside in a cool place to set.

Smoky Chipotle Black Bean & Roasted Sweet Potato Tacos

January 8 2018 Meatless Monday 

Black beans and sweet potatoes are a perfect pair and this taco recipe amps up their flavor with mushrooms, avocados and high-impact seasonings like chipotle powder and bitter orange marinade (often found in the international aisle). This recipe comes to us from Maribel of Food 4 Thought NYC. Serves 4, 2 tacos each - 1 can of black beans, rinsed - 1 medium sweet potato, peeled and diced - 1 cup of diced bella mushrooms - 1 cup shredded cabbage - 1 avocado, sliced - 1/­­2 red bell pepper, chopped - 1 bunch fresh cilantro, cleaned and trimmed - 8 white corn tortillas - 2 tbsp. of olive oil, separated - 2 large cloves of garlic, minced - 1 tbsp. of tomato paste - 1 tbsp. of naranja agria (bitter orange) marinade (substitute lime juice if unavailable) - 2 tsp. of salt, separated - 1/­­2 tsp ground cayenne - 1 tsp ground chipotle powder - 1/­­2 tbsp. dried oregano - 1/­­2 tsp. garlic powder - Freshly ground black pepper Preheat oven to 400°F. Line a small rimmed baking sheet with foil, add sweet potatoes, 1 tbsp. of oil, 1 tsp of salt, cayenne, and freshly ground black pepper; mix well. Place sheet in oven and bake for approximately 20 minutes or until potatoes are golden and tender. While potatoes are baking, heat remaining oil in a skillet over medium flame. Cook the minced garlic for 1-2 minutes, but be careful not to burn them otherwise youll end up with a bitter flavor. Add mushrooms and red peppers, stirring occasionally for 3-5 minutes. Once the veggies have softened, throw in the rinsed beans along with the paste, salt, chipotle, oregano, garlic powder, and black pepper. Mix everything together and allow it to cook for 8-10 minutes. About halfway through, add the bitter orange marinade (or lime juice). Remove from heat. Make sure you have all of your taco toppings ready on the side for easy prep. Turn on a burner to low-medium flame. Working with one tortilla at a time, carefully place it over the flame using tongs. Once you see the edges darken and it puffs up in the center, then flip it over. Cook each side for about 1-2 minutes. Place on serving plate. Spoon about 1 tbsp. of black bean and mushrooms, along with 1 tbsp. of sweet potatoes on each tortilla. Top with sliced cabbage, avocado, and a small handful of cilantro. Squeeze a bit of lime juice on top if you have it, or just enjoy it as is. The post Smoky Chipotle Black Bean & Roasted Sweet Potato Tacos appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Warm Beet Pistachio Salad

January 1 2018 Meatless Monday 

Baby beets are roasted sweet and contrasted with bitter frisee and salty roasted pistachios. Sherry vinegar, honey and grapeseed oil are infused with fresh sage and peppercorns to dress this delicious beet salad. This recipe comes to us from Chef Jason Weiner of Almond Restaurants in New York City and Bridgehampton. Serves 4 - 1 1/­­2 cups baby beets - 3 tablespoons honey - 2 tablespoons sherry vinegar - 2 tablespoons grapeseed or canola oil - 1 teaspoon cracked peppercorns - 3 sprigs sage - 1 head frisee or curly endive, core and dark leaves discarded - 3 tablespoons roasted pistachios, shelled - 5 chives, cut into matchsticks - salt, to taste Preheat an oven to 375 degrees. Place the beets in a baking pan with about 1 cup of water. Cover tightly with foil and transfer to the oven. Roast for about 40 minutes, or until tender when pierced with a fork. The roasting time will depend on the size and age of the beets. When the beets are tender, set aside to cool. Whisk the honey, vinegar, oil, sage and peppercorns together in a mixing bowl. Transfer to a saucepot over high heat for 2-3 minutes, or until the dressing comes to a simmer. As soon as the dressing bubbles, remove it from the heat and pour through a strainer to transfer it back to the mixing bowl, omitting the sage and peppercorns. When the beets have cooled, slip off their skins and dice them roughly. Transfer to a large serving bowl. Add the curly endive and roasted pistachios to the serving bowl.  Season the beets, greens and nuts with salt to taste. Drizzle with the honey-sage vinaigrette, tossing to ensure all ingredients are evenly distributed, until the salad is dressed to preference. You may not need all the vinaigrette. Divide into 4 servings, top each with chive matchsticks and enjoy! The post Warm Beet Pistachio Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Kitchen Creativity

December 12 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Kitchen Creativity In a break from my usual recipe posts, I’d like to share an excerpt from Karen Page’s new book entitled Kitchen Creativity. Beyond a cookbook, Kitchen Creativity is a guide to inventive cooking (without recipes!) that will inspire you to think, improvise, and cook like the world’s best chefs. Great cooking is as much about intuition and imagination as it is about flavor and technique. Kitchen Creativity gives insights into these creative processes from more than 100 top restaurant kitchens, including the Bazaar, Blue Hill, Daniel, and Dirt Candy. Based on four years of research and dozens of in-depth interviews, Kitchen Creativity illuminates the methods of culinary invention. Part I reveals how to learn foundational skills, including how to appreciate, taste, and season classic dishes before reinventing the classics from a new perspective. Part II’s A-to-Z entries are an invaluable culinary idea generator, with exercises to prompt new recipe ideas and combinations. While not a cookbook, nor a vegan book, for that matter (although vegan chefs and ingredients are very well represented), Kitchen Creativity has a lot to offer for cooks looking to broaden their creativity in the kitchen.  The following is an excerpt from Kitchen Creativity on one of my favorite topics, umami… “Umami” from Kitchen Creativity by Karen Page The taste of umami is imparted by glutamate, a type of amino acid discovered in 1908 by Dr. Kikunae Ikeda of Tokyo Imperial University. In studying kombu (kelp), Ikeda managed to isolate glutamate as its own compound, giving it the name of umami, which translates as savoriness. Thus, 5,000 years after the discovery of salt, and 4,000 years after the discovery of sugar, and 3,500 years after the discovery of sour (vinegar), umami is a relatively new taste concept. Japanese cooks had been using umami-rich ingredients intuitively for centuries, long before their scientific properties were discovered to enhance flavor. While we first mentioned umami in our 1996 book Culinary Artistry, it did not begin to gain more widespread acceptance until after 2000 when glutamate receptors were discovered on the tongue. The main sources of umami are those deriving from 1) the amino acid glutamate (found in, e.g., kelp); and those deriving from 2) so-called nucleotides--such as a) adenylate (aka AMP, which is found primarily in fish and shellfish), b) guanylate (aka GMP, which is found primarily in plants and fungi, e.g., shiitake mushrooms, esp. dried), and c) inosinate (aka IMP, which is found primarily in meat and fish, e.g., bonito flakes). The big umami magic happens when one or more nucleotides are combined with glutamate, as there is a synergistic affect--resulting in umami with as much as eight times the potency. Umami Dynamics Umami can enhance a bland dishs appeal with mouth-filling savoriness. Umami can also enhance a dishs perceived sweetness, while tempering its perceived bitterness. If you find yourself with too much of a good thing when it comes to umami, try balancing with salty, sweet, bitter, acidic, or piquant ingredients. Umami is a taste that tends to linger on the palate--something referred to as a long finish in the wine world. Because it contributes to the qualities of deliciousness and satiation, umami is especially prized as a taste in dishes and menus. Note: Certain herbs and spices can also emphasize a dishs savory aspects, such as bay leaf, cumin, oregano, paprika, sage, and thyme. Using Umami Chefs praise black garlic (aka fermented garlic) for its ability to add depth and earthiness to dishes ranging from vegetables to meats. If you doubt umamis importance as one of the five primary tastes, consider the fact that leading chefs like Michael Anthony, Eric Ripert, and Jean-Georges Vongerichten believe dashi to be a key component of their cooking. Some chefs use it to replace liquids in countless preparations, from brines to broths to salad dressings. Chefs have rising enthusiasm for all manner of fermented ingredients (e.g., fermented soybeans, kimchi, miso, pickles, sauerkraut), which bring umami to dishes including vegetables. The corn smut known as huitlacoche is prized as a Mexican delicacy, not only by chefs cooking in the vernacular like Rick Bayless, but also mainstream chefs who find themselves using it in quesadillas, soups, and tacos. Sean Brock declares is insanely delicious and luxurious, like black truffles. Kombu (aka kelp, the sea vegetable) is prized for its umami by Yoshihiro Narisawa. Brad Farmerie is fanatical about miso, which allows him to achieve a rich mouthfeel without butter or cream. Miso is an integral part of Farmeries roasted chile caramel Brussels sprouts, which involve caramelizing sugar (sweet) before adding chiles (hot), cilantro stems (bitter), lime juice (sour), fish sauce (salt/­­umami), and miso (richness). He adds miso to sweet potatoes + brown butter + rosemary to create another dish hes not able to take off the menu. Other chefs will add misos (e.g., white) to salad dressings or soups for an umami boost. From his time in Japan, Michael Anthony picked up a love of sea weeds and pickles. Thomas Henkelmann describes rich, flavorful stocks as essential for cooking in every season. Umeboshi paste is prized by chefs, including Isa Chandra Moskowitz of Omahas and Brooklyns Modern Love, for its umami quality. Moskowitz adds it to her Caesar salad dressing for its anchovy flavor. Even native Brits like Mark Levy fall prey to the charms of white truffles, which he prizes for their mysterious aroma and short availability. Excerpted from Kitchen Creativity: Unlocking Culinary Genius--with Wisdom, Inspiration, and Ideas from the Worlds Most Creative Chefs by Karen Page (Little, Brown, October 31, 2017). Save Save Save Save The post Kitchen Creativity appeared first on Robin Robertson.

methi dal recipe | methi dal fry recipe | how to make dal methi fry

July 19 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

methi dal recipe | methi dal fry recipe | how to make dal methi frymethi dal recipe | methi dal fry recipe | how to make dal methi fry with step by step photo and video recipe. a simple and healthy dal recipe which can be prepared on daily basis for your daily meals. it is typically prepared with just toor dal and fresh methi leaves, but it can be easily extended with combination of moong dal or masoor dal. further methi leaves are bitter in taste by nature, but when cooked with lentil and spices it turns out to be complete package with balanced taste. Continue reading methi dal recipe | methi dal fry recipe | how to make dal methi fry at Hebbar's Kitchen.


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