bio - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Roasted Eggplant Wedges with Herbed Pistachio Millet










bio vegetarian recipes

12 Apple Cider Vinegar Recipes: Pickles, Dressings, & Drinks

September 5 2017 VegKitchen 

12 Apple Cider Vinegar Recipes: Pickles, Dressings, & Drinks A delicious dozen of Apple Cider Vinegar recipes will boost your intake of the most popular vinegar in the natural health community. ACVs health benefits are legion, many of which are backed by research (see 23 of these benefits here). It’s become well known as an aid to weight loss, and due to its probiotic […] The post 12 Apple Cider Vinegar Recipes: Pickles, Dressings, & Drinks appeared first on VegKitchen.

Berry Kombucha Float

July 9 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Berry Kombucha Float A confession – I’ve never actually tried a classic root beer float, but if it’s anything like this kombucha float, I’m all in. It’s a recent discovery for me, and the absolute favorite, quick treat of the season in our household. I’ve been making my own kombucha for years, but took a very long break from the booch production recently, because of all the chaos that came with the kitchen renovations. I finally got the scoby and starter back in shape, and have been infusing my kombucha with strawberries, raspberries and basil for a summery flair. I thought a berry kombucha would make for a nice, probiotic alternative to root beer and decided to drop a few scoops of my favorite vanilla ice cream into a glass of it to see what happens. That first sip was so good that I had to take a quiet moment to myself and take the float down to the pool to enjoy it in the sun. The contrast of the bubbly sharpness of the kombucha and the smooth creaminess of the ice cream is heavenly. The berries and basil contribute their fresh, sunny notes, and I could imagine infusing this treat with all kinds of other fruit and berries. If you aren’t into making your own kombucha, you can just buy it (already flavored) for an express version of the float :) Lots of great weekend links below, enjoy your Sunday! 16 Personalities – this nicely designed personality test was so fun to take and the results were pretty accurate (Anya is a ‘Mediator’ /­­ Masha is an ‘Architect’) The Savvy Cook – Izzy Hossack’s new budget vegetarian cookbook looks amazing Stasher Reusable Food Bags – I use ziplock bags a whole lot, and even though I tend to reuse them a few times, I don’t feel great about storing my food in plastic, not to mention eventually throwing the plastic away. Putting an end to that with these reusable, food grade silicone storage bags that are freezer/­­dishwasher safe. Self Care: Routines for Busy People – an interview with the founders of CAP Beauty The Vegan Argument (Made by a Non-Vegan) Sans Ceuticals Journal – even though I’ve never tried this brand’s products, I love the interviews and recipes over at their journal. Pyramid Crudité – tempted to cut all of my veggies this way from now on :p Raspberry Tomato Yogurt Pops?! – what a great idea Loungewear Dress – I want one in every color A Quick Interview With Me on The Plus Berry Kombucha Float   Print Serves: 2 Ingredients handful of mixed organic strawberries and raspberries, plus more for serving - sliced for strawberries handful of basil leaves - rubbed between your hands to bruise 3-4 cups plain kombucha a few scoops of vanilla ice cream (I used Coconut Bliss non-dairy) Instructions Place the berries and basil in a bottle or jar and muddle with the back of wooden spoon. Add the kombucha, cover and place in the refrigerator for about 24 hours. Distribute the kombucha between two glasses and drop a few ice-cream scoops inside each glass. Add more berries, if desired, and enjoy immediately. If using store-bought flavored kombucha, distribute the berries and basil between two glasses and muddle with the back of a wooden spoon. Add the chilled kombucha to the glasses and drop a few ice-cream scoops inside each glass. Enjoy right away. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Peach and Raspberry Summer Tart and a Guest Post for Scandi Foodie Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans Raw Summer Fruit Samosas and a Guest Post for My Sweet Faery Double Chocolate Layer Cake and a Giveaway .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Berry Kombucha Float appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Terra Madre – Alberobello, Puglia, Italy

June 22 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

If you’ve ever been to Alberobello, you know that this little white town looks like a fairytale with all the trulli houses. In the heart of Alberobello there is a special trulli house where you can have great organic, mostly vegan food. At Terra Madre they had a dream. A dream where man and land rediscovered their old friendship. The concept is simple: sowing, growing and harvesting by using the compost  they produce on site and recycling the biodegradable products from the breakfasts they serve at their hotel Charming Trulli. The compost is used in the organic garden behind the Trattoria, where the first fruits grow, as well as in Terra Madre Country, about 2 hectares of land situated a few km from the city center, which are divided into 3 small plots cultivated 2 months apart one from the other to guarantee the crop rotation. At Terra Madre they want to celebrate vegetables. And they do. Instead of using the freezer, fruits remain on the tree until they reach maturity, to ensure that they are as fresh and flavorsome as nature intended. Isnt that the best? The cuisine is simple, with strong and intense flavors and they only use organic ingredients. […] The post Terra Madre – Alberobello, Puglia, Italy appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright

June 14 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright We’re so excited to introduce this new interview series today! It’s something that we’ve had in the works for a while, and we’re really happy to be kicking it off with such a special guest. Self-care has been a very prevalent topic in the wellness sphere lately, and it’s something that we’re both very passionate about, as evidenced by our love for nourishing foods :) We do, however, find that many articles on the subject can be quite generalized and anxiety-inducing, often leaving us with a feeling of not doing it right, or not doing enough. We became interested in digging a little deeper, in order to see what self-care looks like applied to real life, by real people we admire. We are fascinated by the quiet elegance of everyday routine and always searching for day-to-day inspiration, which we’ll strive to discover plenty of in the series. We hope you enjoy these in-depth conversations, and feel free to reach out with suggestions for future interview guests! Today’s dialogue is with Laura Wright, blogger and author of The First Mess Cookbook. Laura is a magician when it comes to approachable, plant-based cooking, and we look to her blog and cookbook almost every day for reliable, delicious recipes, as well as beautiful photography and an overall feeling of warmth and lightness. In this interview, Laura talks about her approach to self-nourishment, exercise, beauty, stress, fun, and much more. As expected, her self-care routine is full of wisdom and inspiration. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I get in moods where both are equally important. I stick to a certain rhythm with my early mornings and evenings though because I find it makes for better sleep and more productive days. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I wake up with the sun and take our dog out. Then, I drink a huge glass of water and make coffee, tea, matcha, or some sort of elixir. It’s usually coffee though. I read for a bit while I have my first morning beverage, or I’ll do a bit of journaling. After my partner leaves for work, I head out for a walk/­­run or do some form of exercise. Then, I fix up breakfast (usually a smoothie) and plan out what I’d like to accomplish that day. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? This time of year, I do most of my gardening after dinner, and I find that really helps me wind down. Just being out there as the sun’s going down seems to send a good message to my brain that it’s time to relax. Also, limited screen exposure after dinner is key. I use the Saje Natural Wellness Sleep Well roller on the soles of my feet, too. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Either a smoothie with greens and healthy fats (avocado, almond butter, coconut etc) or steel-cut oatmeal with tons of toppings in the winter. Lunch – Usually whatever I’m working on suffices as lunch, but ideally a salad with a little bit of grains tossed in and some legumes/­­nuts/­­seeds for protein. Stuff on toast is a go-to lunch for me as well. Snack – Right now I’m really into plantain chips with guacamole. Dinner – This time of year, we grill almost all of our vegetables and serve them with a big salad or slaw, whatever protein we’ve got, and a little heap of fermented vegetables or sauerkraut. I’ve been making these amazing grilled veggie tacos with cassava flour tortillas lately too. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Yes! Coffee, matcha, black tea, green tea–I love it all in moderation. I can be sensitive to caffeine sometimes, so I try to limit myself to 2 caffeinated beverages a day, and always before 2 pm . -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I try to never skip breakfast because when I do, I need something sweet by the time 3 o’clock  hits. I find that consuming a good amount of healthy fat in the mornings helps me curb those cravings. Sometimes you just need a treat though. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? So many! I have this tray on my counter with all of these powders and tinctures that I sprinkle into my coffee/­­tea or other elixirs. For supplements, I take a probiotic, Vitamin D3, B12, and Omega 3 daily. With superfoods/­­powders etc: I like all of the mushroom powders these days (reishi, chaga, lion’s mane and cordyceps) because they help soothe my nerves as well as provide a focused mental energy of sorts. I put spirulina in every smoothie I make because it has so much going on nutritionally. I take ashwagandha and mucuna pruriens to help with stress management. I love all the Moon Juice Dusts, too (Spirit Dust is my go-to). -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I could count a hundred personal influences in the realm of self-care, but I think Jason Wachob’s Wellth is a good place to start for a lot of people thinking about the subject. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I do! I’m always changing it up because I like variety. I like to run, hike, do weight and resistance routines, swim in the summertime, and yoga here and there too. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I really like it, but I find I need some convincing to get started. Getting to it early in the morning is the safest bet for me personally, just to have it ticked off the list before the day really starts. And thinking about the delicious smoothie I’m going to drink after always helps :) -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Getting a step tracker! I know that sounds weird. I work from home and sometimes I spend way too much time puttering on the computer or standing still in my kitchen. Now I head out for at least 13,000 steps a day in addition to my workouts. I sleep deeper and have so much more energy during the day. Plus our dog loves all the extra walks :) Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Feeling clear-minded, open, and confident in any situation. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? My skin is so sensitive so I have my routine down to a science. I love to dry brush before I hop in the shower. From there, I use this special oil-based soap from France, and then while my skin is still damp, I moisturize with coconut oil. For my face, I use a similar oil-based cleanser, rosewater and witch hazel toner, the Cell Serum from Living Libations and Tata Harper’s Clarifying Moisturizer. I’ve also been using Cocokind’s Chia Facial Oil at night along with their Full Brow Balm. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Tocotrienols! They make smoothies/­­hot drinks super creamy and my skin loves all that Vitamin E. Plus all the usuals like greens, proper hydration, and omega-rich foods like flax seeds. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? The only tip I have is to pay attention to what you’re eating and drinking! Your skin/­­hair/­­overall appearance is a direct reflection of what’s happening on the inside. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? I’m a lot better at knowing my limits these days. I can sense when I’m bordering on overcommitment, and I just shut it down and start saying no to stuff. I try to nourish my body well and carve out frequent pockets of time for quiet and stillness. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Going outside, meditating, reading a good book, cooking a beautiful meal with no intention of posting it to Instagram :) -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I’ll eat lots of citrus and ginger and make a pot of vegetable broth with thyme, garlic, and shiitake mushrooms. I do immune tonics with mushroom powders too, drink lots of fluids, and take extra care to get a good night’s sleep and think positive. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? Like I mentioned before, I’m a lot better at sensing when a project may not serve me/­­my career than I used to be. I think the work/­­life balance comes a lot more naturally now. When I was making my cookbook, it felt like I lived in that world, and I was eating a lot of takeout and just not looking after myself because I put that work first. When I start turning to certain shortcuts or I’m habitually depending on caffeine or working on the computer past my bedtime, I know it’s time to reset my outward glance. A reset usually means a day off with some gardening, intentionally simple meal prep, and creative pursuits that aren’t food related. Knowledge -- Your way of coming up with healthful, plant-based recipes that are unique and modern, but also doable and approachable is unprecedented in the food blog world. What is your process when it comes to developing recipes? That is very generous of you to say! I have a professional cooking background, but I also appreciate the comfort of ease and efficiency. Ultimately I want my recipes to bring some kind of enjoyment or sense of ease/­­relief in someone’s life. Those two goals are front of mind when I get to work on a certain recipe concept. The recipe will usually start out slightly chef-y (lots of ingredients, multiple cooking methods, longer prep time), and then slowly I edit it down to streamline and make it do-able for most lightly experienced cooks. I also read every food magazine/­­food media website I can to stay up to date on new cooking methods and ingredients. Fun & Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I work on my house! I like tinkering with the layout and picking up new pieces, plants, rugs etc. My favourite/­­ultimate “treat yourself” strategy though is booking a weekend (or longer) away somewhere with my partner. -- A book/­­song/­­movie to feed the soul: Book – Invincible Living by Guru Jagat Song/­­Album – The Master of None Season 2 soundtrack on Spotify. Italian disco, classic New Edition etc.! Movie – Win It All on Netflix (such a feel good movie, seriously) -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? –  A rosewater sprayer in TSA-approved size for a fresh/­­hydrating face mist –  Snacks (raw nuts, bars etc) –  Amazing Grass packets for when I need greens fast. –  Moisturizer –  Large scarf that doubles as a blanket –  A smoky quartz that I don’t leave home without. –  A hemp cloth and tiny container of oil-based soap because I always want to wash my face immediately after a flight, even a short one. –  Minimal clothing–usually neutral coloured basics that work well for a variety of situations. I tend to always buy clothing at my destination so I go light on it when I’m packing. –  Saje Peppermint Halo: I get back pain here and there and use this as a pain killer of sorts, both at home and away. It’s like rolling ice right onto the problem area! –  Bamboo utensils and metal straw for minimizing waste on the go. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Renee Bird! Based on this amazing post, I think she may be just the person for this series ;) All photos courtesy of Laura Wright The post Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Italian-Style Lentil and Mushroom (Not)Meatballs from Pantry to Plate

May 31 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Italian-Style Lentil and Mushroom (Not)Meatballs from Pantry to Plate I’m so excited to talk bit about Heather Crosby’s new cookbook Pantry to Plate today. When I received my copy and took a scan from cover to cover, I was immediately blown away by the way this book kindly invites the reader to be both spontaneous and practical in the kitchen by working with the ingredients that are already on hand. With thirty clever recipe templates, Heather demonstrates how to improvise your way to delicious, plant-based meals. For example, Dense Veggies + Protein + Herbs + Binder + Spices = Vegan Meatballs (or Veggie Burgers)! The templates specify the required amount for each component, as well as which components are a must and which ones can be skipped altogether. In addition to the templates, the book is full of other useful tools that help make intuitive cooking a breeze: besides a regular recipe index, there is a cook by ingredient index, as well as mini-templates for creating flavor with aromatics, a whole bit on pairing spices, and a dressing and sauce section that has pretty much every staple sauce recipe you’ll ever need. If you don’t have a particular ingredient for a recipe, chances are you have something on hand that could act as a substitute, and there is a whole chart of interchangeable mix-and-match ingredients in the book to help you work through that. I’m quite terrible at sticking to recipes myself, since I always want to play, add, subtract and find alternative ingredients, so it’s as if this book was made for me. How Heather managed to define freestyle cooking in such clear, comprehensive terms, will remain a mystery to me :) Some more sections/­­recipes I’m most excited about: Coconut Yogurt, Dairy-Free Milks, Probiotic Cream Cheese, Veggie Fries, Cheesy Comfort Food, Hand Pies, Sneaky Brownies, Nice Cream. YUM! Onto the (not) meatballs. These Italian-style veggie meatballs come from the Veggie Burger section of the book and can be easily shaped into burgers or sliders, as Heather points out. They get their substance and ‘meatiness’ from lentils and portobello mushrooms, and a bit of sweetness from carrots and onions, while herbs like oregano, parsley and thyme, and spices like fennel and pepper give them that characteristic Italian flare. We enjoyed them two ways, the first day with zucchini noodles and pesto (pictured here), and the second day, a bit more traditionally, with real pasta and tomato sauce. Both were equally delicious. Heather also suggests to serve the meatballs in a sub roll, or even as an appetizer, along with some tasty sauce. Whether you live and breathe freestyle cooking, or you want to learn a bit more about being intuitive in the kitchen, check out Pantry to Plate, I have a feeling it will earn an important place on your bookshelf :) Italian Style Lentil and Mushroom (Not)Meatballs from Pantry to Plate   Print Serves: 20 to 24 Meatballs or 5 to 6 Full-Sized Burgers Ingredients 2 tablespoons unrefined coconut oil, grapeseed oil, or avocado oil 2 cups (260 g) diced carrots 1 cup (70 g) chopped portobello mushrooms 1 cup (160 g) diced yellow onion 2 cups (400 g) cooked green, brown, or French green lentils (roughly 3/­­4 cup/­­140 g dry) 2 tablespoons water 1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil 1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley 1 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano 1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme 3 garlic cloves, minced 2 teaspoons ground psyllium husk 2 teaspoons rough-chopped fennel seed 1 teaspoon fresh-cracked black pepper 1 teaspoon sea salt, plus more to taste 1/­­2 teaspoon red pepper flakes 1/­­2 teaspoon smoked paprika Instructions In a skillet heated to medium, add 1 tablespoon of the oil and sauté the carrots for 20 minutes, until easily pierced with a fork but firm, not mushy. Add the mushrooms and onion and sauté over medium heat for 5 to 10 minutes, until softened and browning a bit. Transfer to a food processor with the remaining ingredients. Pulse together 30 to 35 times, until just broken up and sticky with texture and bits of color intact. Taste--if needed, season with more salt or seasonings. Pulse or stir to incorporate. Form 1 1/­­2 -inch (4 cm) meatballs with your hands. Heat a skillet to medium and add the remaining oil. Slow-cook the meatballs, rotating often, for 10 to 15 minutes, until browned on all sides. Serve warm. Notes Recipe from YumUniverse Pantry to Plate (C) Heather Crosby, 2017. Photographs copyright (C) Heather Crosby, 2017. Reprinted by permission of the publisher, The Experiment. Available wherever books are sold. theexperimentpublishing.com 3.5.3226 You might also like... A Salad for the Weekdays Roasted Pepper Lasagna Melon Basil Summer Rolls Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Italian-Style Lentil and Mushroom (Not)Meatballs from Pantry to Plate appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Can The Apple Cider Vinegar Diet Help You Lose Weight?

May 9 2017 VegKitchen 

Can The Apple Cider Vinegar Diet Help You Lose Weight? Many of you have already heard that raw, organic, and unfiltered apple cider vinegar can assist in weight loss and overall well-being. The apple cider vinegar diet is probiotic, and has many additional health benefits. Here we explore how the apple cider vinegar diet as part of a healthy lifestyle can help you lose weight while at the […] The post Can The Apple Cider Vinegar Diet Help You Lose Weight? appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegan Turmeric Lassi – Golden Yogurt Drink

April 20 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Turmeric Lassi – Golden Yogurt DrinkTurmeric Lassi – Golden Yogurt Drink. Lassi is a yogurt based drink served as a beverage in India. This version uses non dairy yogurt, turmeric, black pepper and ginger for a cooling Lassi. Vegan Gluten-free Recipe. Lassi is a favorite drink in many Indian (north Indian) homes during the hot months. It is starting to get sunny and warm finally in the Pacific Northwest, and evening tea is getting replaced by various lassis.  Lassi traditionally is made with fresh yogurt and chilled water. Yogurt, water, and sweetener are whisked with a Mathani (Indian whisk which works like an Immersion blender), until the mixture is very frothy. It is served in tall glasses with ice cubes. Flavors such as cardamom, saffron, chai masala, mint, ripe mango puree, rose water etc can be added. Probiotics, cooling and filling.  For this Turmeric Lassi, I use a regular blender and plain non dairy yogurt(I like almond milk yogurt). The yogurt is blended with turmeric, black pepper, ginger and frozen almond milk cubes. The resulting lassi has a texture between a smooth yogurt lassi and crushed ice shake. Add whatever flavors you like or blend with just non dairy milk for variations. Make the golden Lassi!Continue reading: Vegan Turmeric Lassi – Golden Yogurt DrinkThe post Vegan Turmeric Lassi – Golden Yogurt Drink appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Savory Superfood Sprinkle

April 9 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Savory Superfood Sprinkle I love having a jar of this meal-saver sprinkle in my refrigerator, because it always comes in handy when a quick savory meal or snack is missing a bit of sparkle. The inspiration here comes from sesame salt (gomashio), which is a Japanese condiment made up of a mix of toasted sesame seeds and salt. It’s a genius thing, because there is generally much less salt in proportion to the amount of sesame seeds, but the flavor is still satisfyingly salty, plus toasty from all the sesame. Gomashio is also highly regarded in the macrobiotic diet as a healthier salt alternative. So, sesame salt is my inspiration here, but I mix in a few other healthful, sprinkle-appropriate ingredients – dulse seaweed (iodine = thyroid love), nutritional yeast (B12) and hemp hearts (protein!). I depend on dulse and nutritional yeast for their naturally salty properties, so the amount of actual salt is minimal in this recipe. I like to toast half of the dulse and leave the other half raw, which gives another dimension to its flavor. The whole mix is perfectly salty, toasty, with hints of the sea from the dulse and umami from the nutritional yeast. Most importantly, so many meals and snacks can be saved from being boring with this stuff – salads, veggie bowls, avocado halves, savory porridge, etc. etc. Give it a try! There are some links below, Sunday hugs :) S-Town – you’ve probably already heard of this podcast a million times and possibly already binge-listened to the whole thing. But if you haven’t, we highly recommend this amazing series from creators of This American Life/­­Serial. Georgia O’Keeffe’s Powerful Personal Style + This Interview with Wanda Corn, Curator of Georgia OKeeffe: Living Modern New Zealand Road Trip with a Toddler Heidi Swanson’s Youtube Channel De Maria – this restaurant’s beautiful Instagram Hannah Henderson (owner of the General Store) on Garance Dore Savory Superfood Sprinkle   Print Serves: around ¾ cup Ingredients ½ cup sesame seeds (I used a combination of regular and black) 2 tablespoons dulse flakes 2 tablespoons hemp hearts 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast ½-1 teaspoon sea salt (preferably flaky) Instructions Warm a dry pan over medium heat and add the sesame seeds. Toast, tossing frequently, for 1-2 minutes, until the seeds begin to pop and become fragrant. Be careful, the seeds can burn quickly. Transfer the seeds to a medium bowl. Coarsely grind half of the toasted sesame seeds in a mortar and pestle or a dedicated coffee grinder, and put them back into the bowl. In the same dry pan, toast 1 tablespoon of dulse for 1-2 minutes until fragrant. Stir frequently and take care not to burn. Mix the toasted dulse into the bowl with the sesame seeds, along with the remaining 1 tablespoon of the raw dulse. Mix in the hemp hearts and nutritional yeast. If using flaky salt, massage it into the mixture with your hands to break it down a bit. If using regular salt, just mix it in with a spoon. Keep the mixture refrigerated in an air-tight glass container to preserve the freshness of the raw dulse and to keep the seeds from going stale. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage Temaki-zushi Beet Mille-Feuille from the La Tartine Gourmande Cookbook Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Savory Superfood Sprinkle appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways

March 22 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Quick Blender Pancakes, Three WaysThis post was created in partnership with Revol. So excited to share this recent discovery with you today. If you follow us on instagram, you may have seen me posting an abnormal number of pancake photos recently. That would be because Ive been cooking some variation of blender pancakes almost every morning for the past couple of weeks. Seriously obsessed. Blender pancakes start out with whole grains instead of flour, which get soaked overnight in purified water. Soaking not only softens the grains and makes them more blend-able, but also awakens the life within each individual grain and rids them of phytic acid, making them more bioavailable and easier to digest. You could use a number of grains here, but I find raw buckwheat to be the perfect neutral base. Buckwheat is also incredibly nutritious, and is actually not a grain at all, but a fruit/­­berry of the buckwheat plant (related to rhubarb!). In the morning, simply combine your soaked grains with a liquid and other add-ins in a blender, whirl everything into a smooth batter and you are ready to fry up your pancakes. Its all super quick, easy and so tasty, and there is a lot of room to get creative, too. The whole process kind of reminds me of making a smoothie because the flavor combo possibilities are endless, and because you can just throw a bunch of ingredients into the blender and expect totally delicious results (almost) every time. I offer three of my favorite flavor combinations here, two sweet and one savory. The orange, sweet potato pancakes are subtly sweetened with maple syrup and jazzed up with spices. They are hearty, warming, and very kid-friendly. The green ones are flavored with matcha and studded with sesame seeds that add tiny pops of crunch throughout. Matcha is the star in this variation, youll be able to taste its lovely, grassy and sweet notes very well. The pink, savory pancakes, combine beet with spices, ginger and greens, making them a great option for those who favor a non-sugary breakfast. I love them with our avocado mayo, but you can employ pretty much any one of your favorite, creamy sauces as an accompaniment. Whichever variation you try, you will love how easily they come together and how forgiving the recipes are in terms of add-ins. I know by now youve noticed the beautiful plates/­­cups /­­enamel board in the photos. They are from Revol, a French cookware and bakeware brand with a newly launched website. They sent me a few items of my choice from their Color Lab and Crumple collections, and I was blown away by the quality of their wares. The half-glazed dinner plates are handmade in France and feel incredibly sturdy. They stack up perfectly when you store them in the cupboard and are just a true pleasure to eat off of. I couldnt resist the pink crumple cups because they are adorable, and because I was missing vessels of that size in my kitchen. They are the ideal size for espresso or cappuccino, if thats your thing, but I will be using them for my occasional morning ginger-turmeric shots. The little cheese plate/­­presentation board is hand-dipped in enamel, and will make for a perfect snack board at any get-together. All the pieces are refined and minimal, yet they still feel warm and welcoming, and you can definitely sense the hand in all of them. Everything is oven and dishwasher safe, too, so there’s a perfect balance of beauty and utility. Spiced Sweet Potato Blender Pancakes   Print Serves: about 12 pancakes Ingredients 1 medium sweet potato coconut oil for roasting sweet potato and frying ¾ cup raw buckwheat groats - soaked in purified water overnight 1 tablespoon sesame tahini or other nut/­­seed butter 1 cup almond milk or water 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar ½ teaspoon baking powder pinch of sea salt 1 teaspoon cinnamon ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg 4 cardamom pods - green shells removed (optional) ½ teaspoon ground ginger (optional) 1 tablespoon maple syrup, plus more for serving 1 tablespoon ground flax or chia seeds (optional) 2 tablespoons hemp seeds (optional) Instructions Preheat oven to 400°F (200° C). Prick the sweet potato with a fork several times and place it on a parchment paper-covered baking tray. Roast for 40-50 minutes or until tender throughout. Let cool, then peel. Alternatively, peel the sweet potato and roughly chop it into cubes. Place onto a parchment paper-covered baking tray and roast for 30-40 minutes, until tender. Mash the sweet potato pieces a bit with a fork when you are measuring out 1 cup of the flesh in the next step. Drain the buckwheat over a colander and rinse very well. Combine it with 1 cup sweet potato flesh, sesame tahini, almond milk/­­water, apple cider vinegar, baking powder, salt, spices and maple syrup in an upright blender, and blend until smooth. Add flax/­­chia and hemp seeds, if using, pulse to combine. Warm ½ tablespoon of coconut oil in a medium non-stick frying pan over medium heat. The pan should be very hot, but not smoking. Pour ¼ cup of the batter per pancake into the pan and spread each one out slightly with the back of a spoon, into roughly a 4-inch pancake. Fry as many pancakes as the pan can hold, I did 3 at a time. Fry until the edges turn dry and bubbly, for at least 2 minutes, flip and cook for 1-2 minutes, until the underside is golden brown. Continue with the rest of the batter, keeping the cooked pancakes covered and warm. You should not need to add any more oil, and you may need to lower the heat a bit once youve fried up your first batch to keep the pan from smoking. Enjoy right away with fresh fruit, maple syrup/­­honey, yogurt and/­­or cacao nibs. These pancakes are best eaten fresh, but you can also reheat them on low temperature in the oven or toaster, in case you have leftovers. 3.5.3226 Matcha Sesame Blender Pancakes   Print Serves: about 8 pancakes Ingredients ½ cup raw buckwheat groats - soaked in purified water overnight ½ cup almond milk or water 1 teaspoon matcha powder 1-2 tablespoons maple syrup, plus more for serving 1 tablespoon sesame seeds (I used black) Instructions Drain the buckwheat over a colander and rinse very well. Combine it with almond milk/­­water, matcha, and maple syrup in an upright blender, and blend until smooth. Add sesame seeds and pulse on low to mix the seeds into the batter. Warm ½ tablespoon of coconut oil in a medium non-stick frying pan over medium heat. The pan should be very hot, but not smoking. Pour ¼ cup of the batter per pancake into the pan. Fry as many pancakes as the pan can hold, I did 3 at a time. Fry until the edges turn dry and bubbly, for at least 2 minutes, flip and cook for 1-2 more minutes, until the underside is golden brown. Continue with the rest of the batter, keeping the cooked pancakes covered and warm. You should not need to add any more oil, and you may need to lower the heat a bit once youve fried up your first batch to keep the pan from smoking. Enjoy right away with more sesame seeds, coconut flakes, fresh fruit, maple syrup/­­honey, yogurt, etc. These pancakes are best eaten fresh, but you can also reheat them on low temperature in the oven or toaster, in case you have leftovers. 3.5.3226 Savory Beet Blender Pancakes   Print Serves: about 9 pancakes Ingredients ½ cup raw buckwheat groats - soaked in purified water overnight ½ cup whole sorghum groats or more buckwheat/­­barley/­­quinoa etc. - soaked in purified water overnight ½ small cooked beet 1 tablespoon sesame tahini ½ cup water 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar 1 teaspoon tamari or more to taste ½-inch piece ginger ¼ teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon smoked paprika ½ teaspoon cumin ⅛ teaspoon red pepper flakes 1 tablespoon chia or flax seeds (optional) 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast (optional) 1 tablespoon dulse (optional) large handful chopped spinach/­­kale leaves or small handful sliced scallions avocado mayo - for serving (optional) Instructions Drain and rinse the buckwheat and sorghum very well. Combine the grains with the beet, sesame tahini, water, apple cider vinegar, tamari, ginger, baking powder, smoked paprika, cumin, red pepper flakes, and chia/­­flax, nutritional yeast, dulse, if using, in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Add chopped spinach/­­kale/­­scallions and pulse to mix in. Warm ½ tablespoon of coconut oil in a medium non-stick frying pan over medium heat. The pan should be very hot, but not smoking. Pour ¼ cup of the batter per pancake into the pan and spread each one out slightly with the back of a spoon, into roughly a 4-inch pancake. Fry as many pancakes as the pan can hold, I did 3 at a time. Fry until the edges turn dry and bubbly, for at least 2 minutes, flip and cook for 1-2 minutes, until the underside is golden brown. Continue with the rest of the batter, keeping the cooked pancakes covered and warm. You should not need to add any more oil, and you may need to lower the heat a bit once youve fried up your first batch to keep the pan from smoking. Enjoy right away with avocado mayo/­­plain yogurt/­­any sauce of choice and more sliced scallions. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache Raw Summer Fruit Samosas and a Guest Post for My Sweet Faery Raw Greenylicious Herb Soup and BBQ Grissini by Earthsprout Kaffir Lime Mango Ice-Cream .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Nut Milk and Quinoa Cereal, 3 Ways

February 3 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Nut Milk and Quinoa Cereal, 3 Ways This post was created in partnership with Quinoa Queen. I’m pretty convinced that I’ll be on team homemade nut milk forever. I do buy bottled almond milk from time to time, and there are great brands out on the market that I feel lucky to have access to. But every time I make a batch at home and taste my first, bright-white sip, I make a mental note to never purchase the store-bought kind again. It’s that good. If you’ve never made nut milk at home, you’ll be surprised by how easy and satisfying the process is. It does take more effort than buying a bottle at the store, but the superior flavor and heavenly texture make it well worth it. Nut milk is made by blending nuts in water – the nuts break down and yield their creaminess and fattiness to the water, coloring it an opaque white. All you need for whipping up a batch of nut milk is a blender and something for straining out the nut pulp, once the nuts are blended up. I’ve heard of people using multiple layers of cheesecloth and fine-mesh strainers, but I’ve found the nut milk bag to be the most effective tool for the job. Run your blended mixture through the bag, give it a squeeze, and you have your milk. Easy! Another advantage to making nut milk at home is the amount of control you have over the process. Many nut milk brands add stabilizers, sweeteners and natural flavors to their mix, and by making your own, you are taking all that unwanted stuff out of the equation. You can soak your nuts/­­seeds, too, which I highly recommend. Soaking gets rid of enzyme inhibitors, which in turn makes the nuts easier to digest and improves their nutrient bioavailability. I’m pretty sure none of the nut milk brands out there are taking care to soak their nuts, so there’s another reason to make your own. You can have all sorts of fun with the kind of milk you make. Use any nuts you like, following the basic proportion, from the more common almonds and cashews, to hazelnuts, pecans and Brazil nuts. Seeds work really well, too! Pumpkin, sesame and sunflower seeds all yield delicious milk and make the endeavor more affordable. You can also make nut/­­seed blends and flavor your milk all kinds of ways. I give you a few luscious flavoring ideas here, including Chocolate-Orange Hazelnut Milk, Matcha-Mint Pumpkinseed Milk and Spiced Pecan Milk. We’ll have more on what to do with the leftover pulp soon, too. I didn’t try my first bite of cereal until the early 90s, when American goods were finally allowed to be imported into Russia after the fall of the iron curtain. Back then, we looked at cornflakes, Snickers, McDonalds and chewing gum with wide and hungry eyes, taking in their then exotic flavors with all kinds of enthusiasm. Nowadays, I find most cereal brands out there to be much too sweet and full of too many unwanted ingredients. Still, a single bite of something crunchy and porous floating in (nut) milk sends me back to those times, when I coveted cornflakes like I now covet coconut butter. I’ve been loving Quinoa Queen, the gluten-free, 100% quinoa cereal brand that uses a minimal amount of wholesome, natural ingredients. The creator of Quinoa Queen is a food scientist and comes from the Andean mountains of Ecuador, where she works with her native community to harvest the quinoa used in her product. QQ cereal is not too sweet, and there is even an unsweetened, single ingredient option which I love, especially when combined with one of these flavored nut milks. The rest of the flavor offerings are subtle and well-considered, there is a lightly sweetened one, as well as a citrusy one, which my eight year old has been eating for breakfast with the Chocolate Orange Hazelnut milk (so it’s kid approved, too). Quinoa works so well as a cereal ingredient, it’s neutral in flavor and contains a wealth of protein and fiber, among other vitamins and minerals that help with starting the morning off right. I’m pretty thrilled to have found a wholesome cereal I can enjoy with all my homemade nut milks, and if you are looking for something similar, consider giving Quinoa Queen a try. Note: You can use raw almonds, cashews or any other nuts or seeds of choice for any of these milk variations. Cashews are especially convenient, as they don’t need to be strained – their pulp breaks down enough in the blender. Chocolate-Orange Hazelnut Milk   Print Serves: 3-3½ cups Ingredients 1 cup raw hazelnuts - soaked overnight in purified water 3 large, soft Medjool dates, or more to taste 2 tablespoons raw cacao powder, or more to taste 1 teaspoon maca powder (optional) zest of 1-2 organic oranges Instructions Drain and rinse the hazelnuts. Combine them with 3 cups of purified water in an upright blender (high speed works best here). Strain through a nut bag, discard the pulp or save it for future use. Pour the hazelnut milk back into the blender, add dates, cacao and maca, if using, and blend until smooth. Add the orange zest and pulse several times to combine. Keep refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 3 days. 3.5.3226   Spiced Pecan Milk   Print Serves: 3-3½ cups Ingredients 1 heaping cup raw pecans or walnuts - soaked in purified water for 4 hours or overnight 5 green cardamom pods - green shells removed 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg or a few shaves/­­slices of whole nutmeg 2-3 soft Medjool dates - optional (I like it unsweetened) Instructions Drain and rinse the pecans/­­walnuts. Combine them with 3 cups of purified water in an upright blender (high speed works best here). Strain through a nut bag, discard the pulp or save it for the future use. Pour the walnut milk back into the blender, add the rest of the ingredients and blend until smooth. Keep refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 3 days. 3.5.3226   Matcha-Mint Pumpkinseed Milk   Print Serves: 3-3½ cups Ingredients 1 cup raw pumpkin seeds - soaked in purified water for 4 hours or overnight 2 teaspoons matcha powder or more to taste handful fresh mint leaves - to taste sweetener of choice - to taste (optional, I like it unsweetened) Instructions Drain and rinse the pumpkin seeds. Combine them with 3 cups of purified water in an upright blender (high speed works best here). Strain through a nut bag, discard the pulp or save it for future use. Pour the pumpkinseed milk back into the blender, add the rest of the ingredients and blend until smooth. Keep refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 3 days. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Rose and Lavender Parfait and a Breakfast with Friends Sweet Potato Nachos with Cheesy Chipotle Sauce and All the Fixings Pink Peppercorn Cookies from Small Plates and Sweet Treats Creamy Steel Cut Oats with Spring Vegetables .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Nut Milk and Quinoa Cereal, 3 Ways appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy

January 8 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy It’s interesting how motivating the tiniest tips from people you care about or respect can be. I was recently on a short flight and read the autobiography of a certain Soviet-era singer, whose music I grew up with. It was a thin, throwaway paperback that I read back to back during the flight, but something about her positivity really made an impression on me. This singer is almost eighty years old, but looks great and has stayed incredibly active, and the book is studded with small, often old-school tips of how she believes she’s managed to keep up her health. She walks everywhere she goes, covering large distances on foot in Saint Petersburg, Russia, and her two drinks of choice are carrot juice in the morning and chamomile tea at night. Sure enough, I’ve been noticing myself drinking both of those with more frequency and taking longer walks whenever possible. And it doesn’t matter to me how silly of a motivation that was, if it helps me get from point A to point B in taking more care of myself, I’m all in. So here’s the carrot-based tonic I’ve been inspired to drink more often. Since I don’t love pure carrot juice, I doctor it up with ginger, turmeric, lemon and honey, which makes it a true remedy and a preventative for winter colds and flu. It’s delicious – potent, refreshing, spicy and sinus-clearing, and a little goes a long way – I like having a shot or a small glass at a time. Some weekend links after the jump, stay warm this Sunday :)   Yvon Chouinard of Patagonia on the How I Built This Podcast (scroll down a few) Mark Bittman on Changing the Food Industry and Living Dangerously – on Tim Ferriss’s podcast Ron Finley, Gangsta Gardener Amy Revier, Weaving Worlds Beyond Words   Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy   Print Serves: 1 large glass Ingredients 8-10 large carrots - peeled if not organic 1 piece ginger or more - peeled if not organic 1 piece fresh turmeric root - peeled if not organic 1 lemon 1 teaspoon raw honey Instructions Run the carrots, ginger, turmeric and lemon through a juicer. Pour juice into a blender, add the honey and blend until the honey is incorporated. Enjoy. Notes 1. I like to use organic lemons for this juice, so that I can run the peel through the juicer and get its oils and benefits into the tonic. 2. I generally use a bit more than 1 of ginger for this amount of juice, but I like things really fiery. If you are the same way, add some more ginger. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Jujube Ginger Tea Quinoa Collard Wraps from the Sprouted Kitchen Cookbook Root Vegetabe Chickpea Flour Quiche Late Summer Oat Milk Smoothie with Figs and Grapes .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Plant-Powered Sloppy Joes

November 28 2016 My New Roots 

Plant-Powered Sloppy Joes When I was in elementary school I ate in the cafeteria. It was the cool thing to do after all, since homemade brown bag lunches were sooo kindergarten. At the time, I thought that the highly processed offerings behind the sneeze guard were a dream come true: pizza, burgers, chicken fingers, fish sticks, mac n cheese. But the very best thing of all in my first-grader opinion? Sloppy Joes. For those of you who dont know what Im talking about (ahem, mostly everyone outside North America), a Sloppy Joe is like a stew-y, wet hamburger. Ive also heard it been called a loose meat sandwich. Stay with me, people – I realize how riduclously unappetizing this sounds. As a kid, eating a Sloppy Joe was like getting permission to make a mess - a rare, sanctioned moment to smear sauce all over your face, drip on your plate, and have your whole meal basically deteriorate into a pile of savoury, saucy, deliciousness that you were allowed to eat with your hands?! Isn’t this every kid’s dream? Because eating a Sloppy Joe is just that: its sloppy. And that is why its awesome. Sloppy Joes are definitely not on top of the sophisticated food list, but that does not mean that they should be discriminated against. When made with plant-based, whole food ingredients, they are in fact quite the respectable meal. Perfect for chilly autumn and winter nights when all you want to do is tuck into something super cozy and comforting, Sloppy Joes are a one-way ticket to the land of savoury satisfaction. Since the temperatures have dropped here in Copenhagen, Ive been craving this kind of meal like crazy, so Im more than happy to have a healthy solution at hand, and of course to share it with you. The classic Sloppy Joe recipe includes ground beef cooked with onions and garlic, crushed tomatoes, ketchup, sugar and some spices. Sometimes there are some token carrots and celery tossed in, sometimes vinegar, mustard, or chilies, but the basic idea is a moist mixture that you pile on top of a bun. But! In my vegan Plant-Powered version, Ive replace the ground beef with black lentils and mushrooms. I suggest using this type of lentil for this recipe since they are very small, and they maintain their shape and texture while cooking. And if you care about appearances, or perhaps fooling someone, they look the most like ground beef. Just sayin. The flavouring elements of the Plant-Powered Sloppy Joe mix are diverse and potentially strange-sounding, but trust me, altogether just right. Balsamic for a sweet hit of acidity, Sriracha for a little heat, and cumin and paprika add smoky complexity. I also tossed in some walnuts because I am a firm believer in texture, and all that mushiness needed buffering! I toasted them lightly before giving them a rough chop and a stir through the thick lentil mixture. I love how their nuttiness comes through the rich sauce and adds even more deliciousness. I also made a simple slaw from red cabbage to add more crunch and freshness, plus some token sprouts. These items are optional, but I really love the bright contrast they provide against the rich lentil filling. Fill up on Folate Lentils are one of the yummiest sources of folate. Just one cup of cooked lentils provides you with almost 90% of your daily recommended intake! And why is folate so important? Youve probably heard about this vital B-vitamin in regards to pregnancy, as it is critical in the prevention of birth defects, but folate also functions to support red blood cell production and help prevent anemia, allows nerves to function properly, helps prevent osteoporosis-related bone fractures, and helps prevent dementias including Alzheimers disease. Folate received its name from the Latin word folium, meaning foliage, so its not wonder that other excellent sources of folate are dark leafy greens (yum, your favorite!) - kale, romaine lettuce, spinach, asparagus, turnip greens, beet greens, mustard greens, parsley, and collards to name a few. This may explain why North American diets seem to be on the deficient end of things when it comes to this B-vitamin, as folate is available from fresh, unprocessed food. The good news is it is easily absorbed, used, and stored by the body. Folate is also manufactured by intestinal bacteria (remember those probiotics?), so if colon flora is healthy, we have another good source of this important vitamin. Find the most high-vibe buns or bread you can get your hands on for this recipe. I used wholegrain sourdough buns from my local organic bakery, then toasted them lightly before drowning them in vegan sloppy goodness. You can also eat these open-faced if youd like to cut back on the bread. Or pull an alt-bread move and wrap it in socca, a cabbage leaf, or use it to top a crispbread (although, lets be honest: the bun rules). I should also mention that the sloppy joe filling was totally delicious on its own as a stew, and thinned with a little water to make soup! Bonus.     Print recipe     Plant-Powered Sloppy Joes Makes 6-8 sandwiches Ingredients: 6-8 wholegrain sourdough buns 1 batch Simple Cabbage Slaw (recipe follows) 1/­­2 small red onion, thinly sliced sprouts for topping, if desired 1 cup /­­ 230g black lentils 1 Tbsp. coconut oil 1 medium onion, diced 1 tsp. fine grain sea salt 3 cloves garlic, minced 135g brown button mushrooms, chopped 1 red bell pepper, diced 2 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­4 tsp. smoked paprika (hot or sweet, your choice) 1/­­2 tsp. freshly ground black pepper 2 Tbsp. Sriracha 1 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar 1 14oz. /­­ 400ml can crushed organic tomatoes 1/­­2 cup /­­ 60g walnuts, roughly chopped Simple Cabbage Slaw 2 cups shredded red cabbage 2 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1/­­2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup a couple pinches sea salt Directions: 1. Soak lentils overnight if possible. Drain, rinse, and place in a medium saucepan. Cover with about 3 cups /­­ 750ml water, bring to a boil and reduce to simmer until tender, about 15-20 minutes (cook time will depend on whether or not youve soaked them). 2. While the lentils are cooking, melt the coconut oil in a large skillet. Add the onions and salt, stir to coat, and cook for about 15 minutes until starting to caramelize. Add the garlic, mushrooms and red pepper and cook for about 5 minutes or so until fragrant. Next add the cumin, paprika, black pepper and stir to coat. Stir in the Sriracha, balsamic, and can of tomatoes. 3. Drain and rinse the lentils, add them to the pan with the veggies and spices. Give it all a stir and let simmer for a few minutes for the flavours to meld. 4. In a separate skillet over medium heat, lightly toast the walnuts until golden in places and fragrant. Give them a rough chop and add them to the lentil mixture. 5. Have a taste and adjust the seasoning to suit you. Add more salt if necessary, more balsamic for sweet-tartness, or Sriracha for heat. 6. Toast your buns and ladle and a generous amount of the sloppy joe filling over the top of one half. Top with the red cabbage slaw, red onion and some sprouts, if desired. Top with the other half of the bun, and tuck in! Show me your Sloppy Joes on Instagram: #MNRsloppyjoes The post Plant-Powered Sloppy Joes appeared first on My New Roots.

From Garden to Grill: The Tasty AND Socially Conscious Way to BBQ

September 5 2016 Meatless Monday 

From Garden to Grill: The Tasty AND Socially Conscious Way to BBQWhen it comes to turning your grill green, you have a smorgasbord of issues to choose from. Youve probably heard that gorging on meat filled with hormones and antibiotics is not good for your health. Or, that you can save a lot of carbon emissions by going meatless at least one day a week. Then there are the land sustainability and the water security issues. Throwing a barbecued fruit-and-veggie party is not only fun and inventive; it could change the course of a lot of peoples lives. But what you may not realize is that greening your grill sacrifices no flavor at all. In fact, the sweet, smoky notes that barbecuing brings out in fruits and vegetables will speak for themselves--once you get the hang of green grilling. Ready to take on the meatless grilling challenge? Share your pictures with Meatless Monday and Slow food USA using the hashtag #GrillChallenge on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter!   Tips to Help Get You Started Go firm, go fresh. When it comes to grilling, shop the freshest fruits and vegetables at your local farmers market. The firmer the vegetable, the less it will crumble when grilled. Court the usual suspects. Traditional candidates for the grill are peppers, carrots, beets, turnips, zucchini, corn, green beans, asparagus, tomato (firm ones), onion, eggplant, garlic (whole cloves), potato, squash, peppers, broccoli, cauliflower, and turnips. For fruits, consider peaches, apples, pineapple, and figs. But also try the unusual. Avocado, artichoke, romaine lettuce, portobello mushroom, and watermelon are just some of the new grillees that are becoming trendy. Oil down first. Many vegetables need just a light brushing of olive oil before grilling. For extra kick, add spices and marinate overnight, Arrange the perfect meatless match-up. Kabobs are a BBQ staple, but you can make them entirely with veggies: think tofu cubes mixed with cherry tomatoes, mushrooms, roasted potatoes or just about any other vegetable that strikes your fancy. Support guilt-free burgers. Make your own veggie burgers packed with hearty ingredients like black beans, lentils, quinoa, or chickpeas. You can also find healthy pre-made patties at supermarkets and natural food stores. Make a burger trade. Swap a meat pattie for a portobello mushroom or eggplant slices. Use your same bun and add your favorite toppings, like avocados, caramelized onions, roasted red peppers, or an olive spread. Smoke out your pizzas. Turn up the creativity and make delicious veggie pizzas right on the grill. All you need is pizza dough, sauce, and your favorite vegetables thinly sliced or pre-grilled. For dessert, consider a fruit pizza with grilled peaches drizzled with vanilla icing. Cross party lines. Dressing your grilled veggies in taco form will garner you a lot of new fans. Be prepared to make extras. Keep up the cubes. Tofu can be bland so enlist your favorite marinade recipe to add flavor. Grill the cubes up and add them to a salad, serve them with veggies, or enjoy them as appetizer served with a dip. Give your salads a good grilling. Garnish grilled romaine lettuce with a bit of fruit, feta cheese, and extra virgin olive oil, or simply drizzle with balsamic vinaigrette. Enlist your favorite sides. When planning a meatless BBQ, pasta salads, raw vegetables, and hummus dip are great ways to turn your plant-based dishes into a full meal. Grill-Worthy Recipes to Download and Share   The post From Garden to Grill: The Tasty AND Socially Conscious Way to BBQ appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Brew your own Kombucha!

July 20 2016 My New Roots 

Brew your own Kombucha! This post has literally been years in the making. After countless requests for a kombucha brewing method and recipe, I finally feel confident enough to write about such a HUGE topic. Considering the fact that there are entire books about this one subject, Ill start off by saying that I do not consider myself a kombucha-brewing expert. Although Ive brewed hundreds of liters of the stuff by now, I am still learning and just happy to share my processes and experiences with you so far. Everyone has a slightly different way of brewing and this is mine - it works perfectly for me and I hope for you too! Making kombucha, like any kitchen project seems pretty daunting until you actually do it. Once you take the first step and brew your own batch, you wont believe how simple and easy it is to make your own kombucha and be able to drink it every day of your life! Youll also wonder why you waited so long to start. With just a 20-minute time investment every 7-10 days youll have access to the most delicious, high-vibe kombucha youve ever tasted at a faction of the cost of buying from the store. Plus, if you make it yourself, it will be 100% raw and full of those precious, digestion-supporting enzymes that our diets are typically lacking, whereas commercial kombucha has often been pasteurized – a process that destroys enzymes. You can ferment it to suit your taste, make it as fizzy as you desire, and even add flavourings. How rad is that? What is Kombucha? Although kombucha is experiencing a major surge in popularity, it has actually been around for thousands of years. It is essentially sweetened tea, fermented with the help of a SCOBY, transformed into a fizzy, effervescent drink. SCOBY is an acronym, which stands for Symbiotic Culture Of Bacteria and Yeast. Its an odd-looking thing - often compared to an organ, a slippery mushroom, or a rubbery pancake - but its the essential ingredient in making the miracle beverage that is kombucha. Its flavours can range from pleasantly vinegar-y to champagne-like, with sweetness varying according to the original brew and second fermentations. Where can I get a SCOBY? Since the SCOBY duplicates every time you make kombucha, there are plenty out there in the world for free! I recommend asking at your local health food store - in my experience it seems like the place to either purchase one, or connect with someone who brews and enjoys spreading the kombucha gospel and giving their extra SCOBYs away. Alternatively, try your local Craigstlist to find a culture. You can even buy them online. Here is a worldwide source: www.kombu.de What about sugar? Yes, you need sugar to brew kombucha but that doesnt mean that youll be consuming it - its only food for the SCOBY! What starts off as very sweet tea completely transforms through the fermentation process, and that SCOBY turns all of that food into a delightful mixture of beneficial organic acids, B-vitamins, and enzymes. If its something you are concerned about, just let your kombucha ferment for the full 10 days, or longer. The longer the tea ferments the less sugar it contains. Usually by day 10 there isnt a trace left - but your tea will be rather acidic-tasting just so you know! There are a few types of sugar you can use for feeding the SCOBY, but cane sugar is the most recommended by seasoned brewers. I use the least processed form of cane sugar I can find - organic evaporated cane juice - but even the most sugar-avoiding, health-conscious people I know brew with refined white sugar. Remember: the sugar feeds the SCOBY, not you! What about caffeine? The caffeine range in kombucha is extremely broad, and is mostly dependent on the type of tea used to brew it. Black tea contains substantially more caffeine than green tea for instance, and since I am sensitive to caffeine, I always brew with green tea. In general, brewed kombucha will contain approximately 1/­­3 of the caffeine of the original tea. If black tea contains 30-80mg of caffeine per cup, the same sized up of kombucha would contain 10-25mg. Green tea kombucha may have just 2-3mg per cup. Whatever you do, do NOT use decaffeinated tea to brew kombucha. Instead, blend the black tea with green tea or simply use green tea alone. What about alcohol? Fermenting anything sweet with yeasts is going to produce booze, that is just nature! With kombucha youre looking at an average of 0.5 – 1% alcohol by volume. With home-brewing, there is always a risk of more alcohol forming since it is in an uncontrolled environment, so keep that in mind if that is a concern for you or someone you are serving it to. What are the health benefits of Kombucha? First, kombucha is a probiotic drink, so it is an excellent beverage for improving digestion, and supporting healthy bacteria in the gut. Its high enzyme content also promotes healthy digestion and nutrient assimilation. Lab tests show that kombucha has antiviral, antibacterial, and antifungal properties, and the ability to improve liver function and reduce oxidative stress in the body. Many people report success in relieving their symptoms of arthritis, allergies, chronic fatigue, hypertension, metabolic disorders, and digestive issues. What I think is very exciting and promising about kombucha however, are the acids formed during fermentation. These acids have incredible detoxifying and antioxidant capabilities. Glucuronic acid, for example, is the bodys most important detoxifier and made by the oxidation of glucose. Glucuronic acid binds to toxins in the liver and flushes them out through the kidneys. It also works in conjunction with gluconic acid, which binds with heavy metals and ushers them out of our systems. Acetic acid inhibits the action of harmful bacteria. Usnic acid protects against viruses through its antibiotic properties. Malic acid helps detoxify the liver. Butyric acid is produced by the beneficial yeasts in kombucha and protects cellular membranes and combines with gluconic acid to strengthen the walls of the gut to combat harmful yeasts such as candida albicans. Of all the healthy habits Ive adopted in my life, Id say that drinking kombucha has actually made a difference in how I feel. Every time I take a sip it feels like every cell of my body is screaming YAAAAAHHHHHSSSSSS! Really and truly. To me, it is life elixir, and a fabulous drink to add to your healthy lifestyle. But I will also say that kombucha is not a panacea. The hype around this beverage has reached astronomical heights and I believe its important to consume kombucha without the expectation that its going to change your life. What works for me, may work for you and it may not. At the end of the day, kombucha is purely delicious and I think its best to enjoy it for that reason alone. Can I drink too much kombucha? Kombucha, like anything, should be enjoyed responsibly. Just as you wouldnt eat a pound of chia seeds in a sitting, nor should you drown yourself in kombucha (although it would be a delicious way to go). If you have never had kombucha before, start out with about half a cup (125ml) and work your way up over the course of a few weeks or months. I probably drink around 1-2 cups a day (250 - 500ml) but my body is used to it and I too eased into this amount. Remember: food is medicine! You never know how your body will react, so its best to take things slow with such powerful potions. Second fermentation – flavouring your brew and making your kombucha fizzy Although kombucha straight after the first fermentation is delish, I love to flvour it and make it really fizzy through a second fermentation. This involves adding a sweet substance, like fresh fruit or juice (I use unfiltered apple juice), to the bottles of brewed kombucha and letting it sit, sealed at room temperature for another couple of days instead of refrigerating it right away. This extra dose of sugar will feed the kombucha further and produce gas, which builds up inside the sealed bottle. This step is optional, but will make your kombucha really special and sparkly! Its essential that you use flip-top bottles with good seals for this step, since you want the gas to build inside the bottles at this stage. But because the pressure can be quite strong, I always recommend burping your bottles once a day until they have reached the amount of fizz youre after. Simply flip the top on the bottles and you should hear the gas escaping, which is just enough to take the pressure off - there will still be plenty of sparkle in the kombucha. If you fail to burp your bottles, you may end up with an explosion on your hands! Needless to say this is quite dangerous, so set a timer for once  day if youre a forgetful person. Taking a break from fermenting There will come a time when youll have to pause your kombucha brewing cycle – perhaps if youre traveling for a period of time, or simply feel like stopping - in which case, you need to know how to take a break. Remove the SCOBY from the jar, separate the mother and the baby and put them into the same or separate glass jars (separate if youre giving one away) with enough brewed kombucha to cover it, and seal with a plastic lid (remember that kombucha can not come into contact with metal, so stay on the safe side and use plastic). Keep this in the fridge where the temperature will slow down fermentation, and it will keep for many months. When you want to brew your new batch, remove the SCOBY from the fridge and let it come to room temperature before adding it to the sweetened and cooled tea, along with kombucha from your last batch, the SCOBY and the liquid it was stored in. If you can time it properly, its a nice to be able to bottle your last batch right before you leave so that you can put your SCOBY away at the end of a cycle. I time it so that my second fermentation ends on my travel day so that I can store my bottles in the fridge while Im gone. If it doesnt exactly line up, you can do this by increasing the first or second fermentations by a few days. Remember that if you bottle early, it will be sweeter, and if you leave it longer it will be more acidic. Some people will leave their kombucha brewing for up to a month and that may suit you, but I personally wouldnt leave mine for more than 2 weeks. If you are flexible on the taste and dont mind these flavour variations, it will be a lot easier to time your break. Whatever you do, dont start a brew right before you leave for more than a couple weeks (unless you like very vinegar-y kombucha), and definitely dont leave your second fermentation bottles out at room temperature! Youll come home to an epic mess or worse.     Print recipe     Homebrewed Kombucha Makes 1 gallon /­­ 4 liters Equipment: something to brew tea in (very large teapot or stockpot) 1 five-quart /­­ five-liter glass jar 4 one-quart /­­ one-liter flip-top glass bottles tightly woven cloth (a clean tea towel, paper towel, or many layers of cheesecloth) rubber band wooden spoon Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 210g organic, evaporated cane juice or raw sugar (you can also use refined white sugar) 2 Tbsp. loose black or green tea OR 8 tea bags (I prefer green) 4 quarts /­­ liters water 2 cups /­­ 500ml kombucha tea (from your last batch or acquired) 1 SCOBY (from your last batch or acquired) Second fermentation (optional): 3 cups /­­ 750ml fruit juice of your choice OR 1 cup chopped fresh or dried fruit Optional flavourings: fresh or dried fruit fresh ginger /­­ ginger juice fresh or dried herbs and spices honey or maple syrup food-grade essential oils Method: 1. Brew the tea. Use unchlorinated /­­ unflouridated water. Bring to the boil and pour over the tea of your choice and let steep for 20-30 minutes (you want it to be very strong). If using a small tea pot, brew two pots and pour brewed tea into your kombucha container. 2. Sweeten the tea. Add the 1 cup /­­ 210g of sugar and still well to dissolve. 3. Cool the tea. This step is important since the SCOBY does not tolerate heat and has the potential to die if added to hot liquid. To speed up the cooling process, I brew 8 cups /­­ 2 liters of strong tea, then add 8 cups /­­ 2 liters of cold water. This way, it usually takes only an hour or two to reach room temperature. 4. Add 2 cups /­­ 500ml pre-made kombucha and the SCOBY. Add the pre-brewed kombucha, which raises the acidity level of the tea. This aids the fermentation process, but also protects the SCOBY from harmful bacteria during the initial fermentation phase. If it is your first time brewing kombucha, simply purchase 2 cups /­­ 500ml of kombucha to add to the cooled tea, along with whatever liquid your SCOBY came with. If you are bottling your own kombucha, simply add 2 cups /­­ 500ml from your last batch. Remove all of your jewelry and wash your hands thoroughly. Gently slip the SCOBY into the tea. 5. Cover. Use a piece of fabric that is tightly woven (a clean tea towel works well) or several layers of cheesecloth, secured with a rubber band. You can even use a piece of paper towel or a coffee filter. The point here is to allow air to flow in and out of the brewing container, while keeping pests like fruit flies out - they love this stuff! 6. Give your kombucha a home. Place the kombucha container in a place where it will not be disturbed or jostled, out of direct sunlight, but where it will get enough airflow (a small cupboard is therefore not the best place). I leave mine out on the counter where I can keep an eye on it, but I do not move it until day 7 when I start tasting. 7. Let ferment for 7-10 days. During the fermentation time, you may see a lot of activity in the brewing container. Bubbles, film-y bits, and the mother SCOBY floating and around and changing positions are all normal occurrences. After a few days youll notice the surface of the tea changing and becoming cloudy or opaque-looking. This is the new SCOBY forming and is a great sign that you have a healthy brew on the way! As the days The fermentation time depends on a few factors, such as the temperature of the environment (warmer temperatures speed fermentation), but also your preferences. If you like a sweeter kombucha, one week may be enough time. If you like a less sweet, more vinegar-y kombucha then allowing the brew to ferment for 10 days or more may be what youre into. I recommend tasting the kombucha every day from day 7 onwards and bottle it once its reached a taste that you enjoy. Its totally subjective and totally up to you! Thats one reason its so great to brew your own. 8. Remove SCOBY and 2 cups /­­ 500ml kombucha. Once your kombucha tea tastes just the way you want it to, prepare to bottle it. Take off all your jewelry and wash your hand thoroughly. Remove the SCOBY 9a. Bottle kombucha and repeat the process. I like to pour the kombucha tea from the large brewing jar into a container with a spout to avoid spills. You can also use a funnel for this process. Seal the bottles and place in the fridge. And now it’s time to brew a fresh batch! Start up at step 1 and complete the cycle. Now you’re a kombucha brewer! 9b. Second fermentation – optional. If you want to carry out the second fermentation, divide the juice or fruit among the bottles first, then add the brewed kombucha on top. Seal the bottles and let at room temperature for 2-3 days until it is carbonated to your liking, then store in the fridge. Very important: remember to release the pressure in the bottles every day that they sit at room temperature - this is called burping - open the lid briefly to let any excess gas out, which will prevent an explosion (I am totally not kidding). 10. Enjoy! It’s finally time to enjoy your kombucha! Drink it as is, or flavour it further as you like. I like to add sliced seasonal fruit to my glass before serving, a few slices of ginger, essential oils, superfoods like spirulina or more fresh juice. Important things to note: 1. Kombucha survives and thrives on cane sugar. You can use raw cane sugar like I do, instead of bleached white sugar, but both work fine. Honey, maple syrup, coconut sugar etc. and other healthier alternatives have very mixed results. I realize its hard for any health-conscious person to use sugar, but remember that the SCOBY is fed, not sweetened with sugar. 2. Always use unchlorinated /­­ unflouridated water for brewing the tea. 3. Do not use herbal tea or any tea that contains flavourings or oils, Earl Grey tea for instance. Stick with organic, pure black or green tea leaves /­­ bags. 4. Do not allow the SCOBY to come into contact with metal at any time (remember to remove your jewelry before handling the SCOBY). 5. Wash your hands and your equipment extremely thoroughly every time. Vinegar is better for cleaning than soap as it does not leave any residue that can harm the SCOBY. 6. Keep the critters out! Use very tightly woven fabric to cover your brewing container. 7. The SCOBY is very sensitive to air contaminants, so dont burn incense or smoke near the brewing container. 8. If mold forms, or if you see any worms /­­ flies in the kombucha or on the SCOBY, toss the entire batch including the SCOBY and start over. Do not be discouraged - it happens! I know that this seems like a lot of information, but I wanted this post to be thorough so that you could have all the information you need to start brewing! If you have another variation on brewing, or tips and tricks that you think others would find helpful, please let me know in the comments! And because I know you’re going to have a lot of questions, I’ll try to check in on this post more often to answer them. Here are some great online resources for those who want more information on brewing kombucha: - The most in-depth kombucha brewing info and how-to videos: Cultures for Health - Step-by-step photos: The Kitchn - Excellent troubleshooting resource: Bestweb Remember that it may take a few batches (and a few SCOBYs) to get your kombucha just the way you like it, but its a really fun, empowering and delicious project that will make you feel like you can do anything in the kitchen! Did I mention youll get to drink kombucha every day for the rest of your life? Yes, theres that too. All love and happy brewing, Sarah B. Show me your kombucha on Instagram: #MNRkombucha *   *   *   *   *   * More news! The My New Roots recipe app now has an updated iPad design and it synchronizes your favorites, shopping list and recipe notes between your iPhone and iPad. In other words: make your shopping list on the iPad, and you’ll have it right on the phone when you’re in the store. Neat! If you already have the app, just update it. If not, click here to go to the App Store. The post Brew your own Kombucha! appeared first on My New Roots.

Strawberry-Watermelon Slush (with ACV option)

June 12 2017 VegKitchen 

Strawberry-Watermelon Slush (with ACV option) There are few beverages more hydrating for summers hottest days than a fresh watermelon slush. With added strawberries, this semi-frozen sweet drink will keep you cool and refreshed. If youd like, give it a probiotic boost with a little raw organic apple cider vinegar -- its benefits are legion, and youll hardly taste it! Makes: 2 […] The post Strawberry-Watermelon Slush (with ACV option) appeared first on VegKitchen.

Top Three Takeaways from the Peanut Institute’s 21st Annual Media Retreat

May 29 2017 Meatless Monday 

Top Three Takeaways from the Peanut Institute’s 21st Annual Media Retreat From left: Greg Lofts, Martha Stewart Living Magazine; Joan Zimmer, Premium Peanut; Xiaoran Liu, Harvard School of Public Health; Karl Zimmer, Premium Peanut;  Cherry Dumaul, Meatless Monday; Karen Weisberg, National Culinary Review & Culinology The 21st Peanut Institute Annual Media Retreat in Napa Valley brought together nutrition and food science experts from the Harvard School of Public Health, Brigham & Womens Hospital, and University of Georgia. They shared the latest research about peanuts with attending media from 17 print and online publications. In addition to the latest peanut research findings, the attendees learned about the global growth of Meatless Monday and examples of how some of the 40-plus countries in the movement are using peanuts in their cuisines. Attendees also tried out their culinary skills at the kitchens of the Culinary Institute of America at Greystone. Peanut Institute members joined the media representatives in teams to cook up various meatless recipes with a variety of peanut flavorings. In terms of the top three takeaways from the Peanut Institute Retreat, they are: 1. Peanuts have more protein than any other nut, which helps keep you satisfied between meals. They also have 19 vitamins and minerals, and an abundance of bioactive compounds. Research shows that the unique package of nutrients found in peanuts helps reduce the risk of heart disease, and even the risk of death. 2. There are 100,000 miles of blood vessels in the body and research shows that eating peanuts can help keep them healthy. A study performed by Penn State shows that the bioactives, protein and arginine in peanuts helps keep arteries flexible after a high fat meal. Peanuts are particularly high in arginine, an amino acid that helps keep blood vessels flexible and healthy. This is important for all age groups and especially athletes. 3. Nancy Clark, MS, RD, CSSD, an internationally recognized sports nutritionist and author discussed the benefits of peanuts and peanut butter for athletic performance. Peanut butter is one of the best sports foods around; it is a great pre- or post-workout snack, and is loved by the NBA and other athletes. The high protein content in peanuts helps repair muscles while the arginine helps keep blood vessels open. All participants of The Peanut Institute’s annual nutrition and culinary retreat  at The Culinary Institute of America at Greystone in Napa Valley, CA The post Top Three Takeaways from the Peanut Institute’s 21st Annual Media Retreat appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Coconut Yogurt

April 26 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Making delicious, healthy, dairy-free yogurt is a lot easier than you think! All you need are a few simple ingredients like coconuts (which are rich in iron and potassium) and probiotics. Rawvana created […] The post Vegan Coconut Yogurt appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Foods That Support a Healthy Microbiome

April 14 2017 VegKitchen 

Foods That Support a Healthy Microbiome Lets take a closer look at what a microbiome is exactly, why it matters, and which foods support its health. The post Foods That Support a Healthy Microbiome appeared first on VegKitchen.

Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus

April 7 2017 My New Roots 

Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus The first job I landed after moving to Copenhagen, was working as a chef in a little cafe. After a few weeks of consistently not burning lasagna and under seasoning everything, I was asked if I was interested in cooking on a few episodes on a local, public TV station. The producers suggested I choose a few dishes that I love, and filmed me in a friends kitchen, since mine was too small. My husband gently warned me beforehand that Danes dont respond well to overly-enthusiastic, hyperbolic Americans, so I faked it and was awkwardly not myself as I spoke lukewarmly about whole grains and beans, fermented things and dark leafy greens. The first recipe I made on the show was sprouted hummus, and although the recipe turned out well, I felt like a fraud. Because above all things, sprouts were, and still are, my true love. The show was on at 2 or 3 in the morning, and because I didnt have a television, I never actually saw it on air. Instead, I watched it on my computer on a borrowed CD, long after it had been on TV. Much to my dismay, the producers titled the show Cooking with Sareh, which still baffles me considering the fact that my name is spelled the exact same way in Danish. The program was poorly edited, badly lit, awkward in every sense, and in my attempts to come off as cool and nonchalant, I seemed utterly bored as I fondled chickpea sprouts - something that otherwise would get me pretty riled up. On the whole, this experience was totally mortifying, except for one small, redeeming factor. I was suddenly being recognized at work in the café, and on the bike paths of Christiania: hey sprout girl! theyd call at me. Its you! I didnt make your hummus, but your show is great, sprout girl, theyd say. If there was any consolation, this was it. I was Sprout Girl. So in case you missed my break out performance on Cooking with Sareh, and my reined-in, lackluster pitch about sprouts, here it is again. Because I am Sprout Girl forever and always. Sprouting is like any other kitchen endeavour: it seems pretty daunting until you actually do it, then youre left wondering what took you so long to try – a real facepalm moment. With simple equipment that you most likely have in your cupboard, and seeds that you already have in your pantry, its a fun and empowering practice that brings you one step closer to your food. Sprouts are so nutritious because they are life potential, ignited. When we soak a seed, we end its dormancy, and awaken the nutrition inside it needed to grow a plant which will in turn make more seeds and more plants. When we eat a sprout, we eat this potential! Pound for pound, sprouts have the largest amount of nutrients of any food. Did you get that? This is a big deal! And its all because sprouting increases vitamin content significantly, especially vitamin A, Bs, C and E, along with boosting calcium, iron, selenium, and zinc. The quality of protein and carbohydrates improves, as the sprouting process begins to break down the complex proteins and starches into amino acids, peptides, and simple carbohydrates needed by the seed to grow. At the same time, anti-nutrients such as phytic acid, protease and amylase inhibitors are neutralized. This makes a sprout very easy to digest with highly absorbable nutrients. Who is responsible for this influx of awesomeness? Its enzymes! Enzymes are compounds found in raw plants that are needed for nearly every biochemical process that takes place in our body, and something many of our modern diets are lacking. Sprouts are virtually loaded with them. There are up to 100 times more enzymes in sprouts than uncooked fruits and veggies! Enzymes are also what sets living food apart from raw food. Yes, raw foods still offer us enzymes, but eating a food that is alive guantees more enzymes, and in fact more nutrients altogether. As soon as a food is picked, it begins losing its nutrients. Imagine how much vitamin C is left in that orange, which has traveled hundreds, if not thousands of kilometers to get to your plate, and spent weeks, if not months in a storage facility before being dropped off at your local grocer. Sprouts are the remedy to this, pulsating with life and life-giving nutrients, and pretty much the freshest food you can eat outside of a garden. Sprouts are also incredibly low in calories, yet deliciously filling due to their high fiber and water content. A fantastic food to binge on, especially if youre trying to elbow out some of the other stuff from your diet. I love the versatility of sprouts, not only are there so many varieties, but they can be used in so many ways. Like this hummus for example! You can also go classic and top your sandwiches with sprouts, or fold them into grain salads, puree them into soups and even smoothies. I also love freshening up cooked dishes, like stir-fries, curries and pizzas with sprouts. Their crunch and earthy brightness are a welcoming balance to heavier, richer meals. If youre on a budget, sprouts are a sweet deal. Because the amount of food you sprout triples or quadruples in size, youll end up with way more to eat than you started with for the same price. Its kind of magical. Whats more, is that properly stored sprouts can last over a month, and some varieties up to 70 days. If youre prone to tossing away spoiled produce, sprouts will save you money, big time. Sprouting can take place anywhere you have access to fresh, clean water twice a day. Ive sprouted on road trips, beach holidays, visiting the in-laws...all over the place! And the groovy thing about taking your show on the road is that you can convince other people to get sprouting too. And sprouts are not just great for our health, but also the planet. Consider the fact that youre growing a garden right in your kitchen, using your own energy to make the magic happen. Its hyper-local food at its best! No chemicals or pesticides during the growing process, or fossil fuels for transportation. Could sprouts be the perfect food?! The answer is yes. But I may be a little biased. I am the Sprout Girl, after all. If you are concerned about mold or bacteria contamination, please understand that commercially-grown sprouts are propagated in an ideal environment for pathogens to proliferate. Just one more reason to grow your own sprouts at home where you can be sure of proper hygiene and care. Make sure that your jar or sprouting container is thoroughly clean, that youre rinsing your sprouts with cool water twice daily, and that your sprouts have plenty of airflow. After I drain my sprouts, I make sure that the seeds /­­ sprouts arent blocking the entire opening of the jar (see photo). If you follow these tips, you shouldnt have any problems. Scoring Seeds You can sprout just about anything, but the cheapest and easiest things are found in the bulk bin of your health food store! Lentils, beans, chickpeas, rice, buckwheat, wheat are all widely available and inexpensive. Its imperative that you choose organically-grown ingredients, as conventionally grown seeds are often irradiated, making them difficult, or even impossible to germinate. You can also purchase seeds online, especially the more specialty ones, like alfalfa, radish, onion, broccoli etc. Finding Equipment There are plenty of sprouting apparatuses that you can buy, but if youre just starting out, use a jar! I bet you already have one. – 1 sterilized, large-mouth, quart-sized glass jar with an airtight lid – small piece of cheesecloth – rubber band – a bowl or dish rack How to Sprout There are countless resources on this topic online, and even whole books written about sprouting, so I am presenting you with a very simple, yet rather foolproof technique. If you want to learn more (which I encourage you to do!) here’s a great place to learn about different methods, applications, as well as help and advice: Sprout People     Print recipe     Simple Sprouting Day 1 1. Prep (night) Take a quick glance at the seeds as you put them into the sterilized soaking container. Remove any stones, cracked /­­ damaged seeds, and rinse well. 2. Soak (night) A general rule is covering the seeds with 2-3 times the amount of water (e.g. 1 cup seeds : 2-3 cups water). Use pure, filtered, unchlorinated water. Skim off any seeds that are floating. Let sit for 8-12 hours. Day 2 1. Drain (morning) Put a piece of cheesecloth over the mouth of the jar and secure it with a rubber band. Drain the seeds letting all the water run out. 2. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 3. Rinse + drain again (night) Day 3 1. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 2. Rinse + drain again (night) Day 4 1. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 2. Rinse + drain again (night) 3. Enjoy (night) Your sprouts are ready! The tail should be at least the length of the seed itself (if it is not quite there yet, continue with the rinsing and draining process until it is. Some seeds take a couple more days). If youre not going to eat all the sprouts right away, make sure you let the sprouts drain for at least 8 hours after their last rinse before you put them in the fridge. Never store wet sprouts, as they will spoil quickly. Store sprouts in the sprouting jar with an airtight lid for one month, or more.     Print recipe     Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus Makes 4 cups Ingredients: 2 cloves garlic 1/­­3 cup /­­ 85ml tahini 1/­­2 tsp. fine salt, to taste 2 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­4 tsp. smoked paprika (optional) zest of 1 lemon 4 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 4 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 4 cups /­­ 500g sprouted chickpeas (start with 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 300g dried chickpeas) Directions: 1. Pulse the garlic in the food processor until minced. Add all other ingredients, except for the sprouted chickpea and blend until you have a paste. Add the chickpeas and blend on high until as smooth as possible. Season to taste and adjust more salt /­­ spice if desired. To achieve an even smoother consistency, scoop hummus into a high-speed blender and blend on high for an additional 10-15 seconds. Serve immediately and store leftovers in an airtight container for up to five days. I hope that this process seems simple enough for you to try. I promise that once you start sprouting, you won’t be able to stop! It’s so easy, fun, and connecting – not to mention delicious. Good luck and happy sprouting, dear friends! xo, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   * Hey Copenhagen! I am thrilled to announce my first two cookbook events in CPH this Spring. The first will be an intimate talk and demonstration at SLOW Copenhagen, and the second will be a magical, celebratory dinner in collaboration with the local, organic grocer and kitchen, Kost. Click on the images for more info and tickets! Can’t wait to see you there.    The post It’s Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus appeared first on My New Roots.

Millet Patty with Pumpkin Ketchup

February 27 2017 Veganpassion 

Millet Patty with Pumpkin Ketchup Millet is one of my favorite cereal species. All-round talent, delicious and clean I could eat it all the time. From my morning muesli until my evening patty. I really love millet. And that's why millet is my favorite veggie of the month. Enjoy! Makes 4 portions. Ingredients: 1 cup millet 1 3/­­4 cup vegetable broth 1 black Spanish radish or 1 kohlrabi 2 carrots 1 onion 1/­­4 cup + 1 tsp. chickpea flour 2 tbsp. dairy-free milk salt, pepper nutmeg, cumin mustard seed olive oil Cook millet in vegetable broth for about 15 minutes. Shred carrots and radish and cut onions into cubes. In a mixing bowl, mix together millet, veggies, chickpea flour and dairy-free milk and spice everything. Form 12 pattys and roast them in olive oil on each side. Additionally: 2 romaine lettuce 1/­­2 cucumber Pumpkin Ketchup 4 tbsp. vegan parmesan 1 garlic clove salt, pepper 1 tsp. agave syrup 1 tbsp. white wine vinegar 1/­­3 cup + 1 tbsp. water 1 tbsp. olive oil Was lettuce and cucumber and cut into pieces. Blend parmesan, garlic, spices, agave syrup, vinegar, water and oil in a mixer. Best dressing ever! Serve some lettuce and dressing on four plates and serve everything with 3 millet pattys. Serve with pumpkin ketchup.

Need a beauty boost?

January 20 2017 Vegetarian Times 

Getting enough rest is one key to looking your best--but what you eat is, of course, essential too. Our friends at BioSil explain what vegetarians need for optimal health--and beauty. Click here to find out more.

100 Vegan Christmas Recipes Glutenfree options

December 17 2016 Vegan Richa 

100 Vegan Christmas Recipes Glutenfree optionsVegan Christmas Recipes, Christmas Cookies, Dinners Ideas, Christmas Desserts and more. Plan you holiday menu and gifts. Gluten-free Soy-free options Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays Everyone. December is a favorite time of the year in terms of meeting family and friends and loads of amazing food. I am not a fan of the grey winter in the PNW. Cold and snow is ok with a bit of sunshine every now and then. If you are shopping for gifts this season, do drop by my gift guide from last year that includes biodegreadable toothbrushes made of bamboo, other everyday items as clothing shoes, Vegan cookbooks and Amazing People and Organizations we support. We alre also praying for and trying to find ways to help the people in Aleppo. Onwards into 2017 with hope, love, and good food.  Gluten-free (GF) and Soy-free (SF) options are marked.  Continue reading: 100 Vegan Christmas Recipes Glutenfree optionsThe post 100 Vegan Christmas Recipes Glutenfree options appeared first on Vegan Richa.

1 Dough - 5 Cookies

November 18 2016 Veganpassion 

1 Dough - 5 Cookies Welcome to the Christmas elves. Where clouds are made out of cotton candy and winter storms smell like cocoa, the hands sink into dough and the noses are smeared with chocolate. I love XMAS time!!! Can´t start early enough thinking about the wildest cookie recipes. It takes a lot of diversity if you want to get your vegan cookie can to dance this year. I don't need many cookies for christmas but at least I need 5 different kinds - to have a choice ;-) for that I have created a quick and special dough this year, with which you can make an exciting variety of cookies. In the blink of an eye you'll have 5 of the most popular kinds of christmas cookies ready to enjoy, while you lean back and relax. The cookies are great to bake with children because the baking tray looks so colorful. By the way every cookie is baked in the same amount of time, so you can pop them all at once in the oven. Have a lot of fun with your christmas bakery! Basic dough Makes aprox. 60 cookies. For the cookie dough: 220 g spelt flour 120 g almonds, blanched and grounded 100 g powdered sugar (raw sugar) one vanilla pod 150 g vegan butter, at room temperature 3 tbsp oat cream or another plantbased cream Mix flour and almonds, sift powdered sugar and vanilla together. Build a little hollow and add cream and butter. With a fork mix the dough until you can form a homogeneous ball. Wrap the dough into clear film and put it in the fridge for at least one hour. Vanilla-Kipferl Makes aprox. 60 cookies. Additional ingredients: 20 g powdered sugar to dust Devide the dough into 3 pieces and work on each part separately. While working on one piece of dough you can put the other pieces back into the fridge. Form dough into 2,5 cm thick roll and cut aprox. 1 cm wide pieces. Now form the piece to a roll with spiky ends and place them like a moon. Put them on a sheet with baking paper and bake about 12 minutes at 180° Celcius (356°F) two-sided heat. Dust powder sugar on the Kipferl while they're still hot. Store them in a metal box at a cool place and they're durable for 2-3 weeks. Chocolate-Angeleyes Makes aprox. 60 cookies. Additional ingredients: 1 tbsp cocoa 1 tsp dairy-free milk (soy-milk) 200 g vegan Chocolate spread (Bionella) Knead 1/­­3 of the dough with cocoa and dairy-free milk. Form 60 balls out of it and push your thumb in the middle of the balls. Put them in some distance on a sheet with baking paper and backe about 12 minutes at 180° Celcius (356°F) two-sided heat. Jelly-Stars Makes aprox. 60 cookies Additional ingredients: 1 tbsp flour 200 g berry jelly Knead flour into the dough for more stability. Cut dough into 3 pieces and work on each dough separately. While working on one piece of dough you can put the other pieces back into the fridge. Form little squares and fill them with a tiny bit of jelly. Then push the ends together. Put them in some distance on a sheet with baking paper and backe sheet about 12 minutes at 180° Celcius (356°F) two-sided heat. Blossom-Cookies Makes aprox. 60 cookies. Additional ingredients: 1 tbsp blossom herbs (Flower Power) Cut dough into 3 pieces and work on each dough separately. While working on one piece of dough you can put the other pieces back into the fridge. Form dough into a roll with a 3 cm diameter. Spread 1/­­3 of blossom herbs on your working area and roll the dough in it. Cut off 1 cm thick pieces on a sheet with baking paper and backe sheet about 12 minutes at 180° Celcius (356°F) two-sided heat. Walnut-Gingerbread-Cookies Makes aprox. 50 small cookies. Additional ingredients: 120 g grounded walnuts instead of grounded almonds 2 tbsp cocoa 1 tbsp gingerbread spice 80 g chocolate chips, delicate Use walnuts instead of almonds for the basic recipe. Knead dough with cocoa, gingerbread spice and chocolate chips. Form dough to balls and push them flat on to a sheet with baking paper and backe sheet about 12 minutes at 180° Celcius (356°F) two-sided heat. If you like, add some walnuts and chocolate chips on top of your cookies before putting them in the oven. Find more wonderful baking ideas for Christmas, cookies and cakes in my book  "Veganpassion - Lieblingsrezepte zum Backen" (awarded by Vebu). Have lots of fun with your Christmas bakery!

Ginger Turmeric Root Tea

July 29 2016 Vegan Richa 

Ginger Turmeric Root TeaGinger Turmeric Root Tea. Fresh Turmeric Root and ginger simmered with black pepper. Add sweetener of choice. Serve hot or chilled. Vegan Gluten-free Recipe. Pin this Recipe! Fresh Turmeric root used to be hard to find in regular and even Indian stores. I have been seeing fresh Turmeric Root often in regular grocery stores in the past year. Fresh Turmeric has a much stronger flavor profile, is bitter and will stain everything from your hands to the wood boards. You can use fresh turmeric instead of ground dried turmeric in some recipes. Peel, grate and use as you would ginger. Use smaller amounts to keep the bitter profile from overpowering the dish.  Whenever I get some fresh turmeric root, I make a jar of this tea. Simmer the turmeric root and ginger root with black pepper for a few minutes. Add sweetener of choice. Add other flavors like cinnamon or add some tulsi leaves (Indian holy Basil). Serve as hot tea or chill and serve as iced tea. Black pepper increases the bioavailbility of curcumin, so definitely add some. What’s your favorite way to use fresh turmeric! Continue reading: Ginger Turmeric Root TeaThe post Ginger Turmeric Root Tea appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Men’s Health Month Hero: Joe Bastianich, Restaurateur, TV Personality, Author

June 27 2016 Meatless Monday 

Men’s Health Month Hero: Joe Bastianich, Restaurateur, TV Personality, Author Photo Credit: DSG Fotografi If you havent eaten his food (he owns 30 restaurants and markets worldwide), you probably know his face. Hes been a judge on the reality TV shows Master Chef and Master Junior Chef and the host of Restaurant Startup. He partners with famed chef Mario Batali and has written two award-winning books on Italian wine as well as Restaurant Man, a saucy, no-holds-barred look at the restaurant industry. But most importantly, Joe Bastianich is a hero for us at Meatless Monday. Surrounded by rich Italian food all his life (his mother is famed chef Lidia Bastianich), Joe experienced a wakeup call a decade ago that inspired him to change his ideas about eating meat and create a healthy new lifestyle for himself. In our exclusive interview with Joe below, find out how he did it. Joe, you are a real New York City boy born into an esteemed culinary family. What are some of your earliest food memories from your home and the streets of New York? From a very young age I was enamored by the everyday NYC classics that most kids enjoyed regularly during the 70s. I didnt have the constant access to them that my friends did, as we ate very ethnic foods at home like tripe. I used to daydream of McDonalds hamburgers and dirty water dogs. Of course, what I was learning from my family, both at home and abroad during our summers spent in Italy, was real Italian food sensibility, regional cuisine, the art of winemaking, etc. You were just a little bambino when your Italian mama Lidia Bastianich became famous for her many cookbooks and cooking show. Whats the best thing she instilled in you about food and serving others? In our house, cooking and serving food was seen as an act of love. It is how you showed that you cared for one another. The importance of being a good host is definitely something I got from my mother. It never leaves you. Get Joe’s recipe for Spaghetti Pomodoro. As you were developing your restaurants around the world, your days and nights were jam-packed with activity. What happened to your health that inspired you to change your lifestyle? Its easy to overindulge when you have access to great food and wine 24/­­7. But eventually it catches up with you. About 10 years ago, I took my doctors advice and started running. I ended up falling in love with it and the intense runners high and energy it brings. It changed my life. My first marathon was the 2008 New York City Marathon and it was unforgettable. I run it every year. Marathons turned into triathlons, and in 2011 I was fortunate enough to compete in the Iron World Championships in Kona, Hawaii. It was the most physically intense experience of my life and very emotionally rewarding. What changes did you make in your diet? And how do you stay on track when youre surrounded by delicious temptations all day? Do you have an on-off philosophy? I dont believe in diets. Deprivation is not sustainable for most. You have to find a balance. Its really about using common sense and being realistic about what will work for you. I modified the foods that I was already eating--smaller portions, olive oil instead of butter, more vegetables, less red meat. I love cheese and pasta, so instead of heavy butter-fat cheeses, I choose Grana Padano, which is lower in fat than many cheeses and has more protein per ounce than most meats. Fettucine Alfredo became Spaghetti Pomodoro, made with the best pasta di gragnano, San Marzano tomatoes, and extra virgin olive oil. High-quality ingredients prepared simply make the most gratifying meals. “A love of food doesnt mean sacrificing ones health, you just have to be smart about the choices you are making.” Why did you become a partner to Meatless Monday and how have you incorporated the program into your restaurants? Meatless Monday is a good way to bring attention to the health crisis we face in this country while simultaneously helping the environment. The focus is also on moderation, which is easier for people to integrate into their behavior. Whats your best advice for making vegetables mouth-watering? First and foremost, it begins in your grocery cart. Look for quality products. If you buy the best produce you can afford, then you really shouldnt have to do much to them. Take the time to check out the produce at your area markets and spend a little more for the best vegetables. A pantry staple that you can almost use on anything is extra virgin olive oil, and again, quality is key. Take the most expensive bottle you can afford, add $20, and buy that one. It is worth it.  Not all olive oil is created equal. The best ones will have the harvest date on the packaging and are at their freshest when consumed 6 months after this date. A plate of raw or steamed vegetables drizzled with a great olive oil and a little kosher salt can be extremely satisfying. Since youre someone who can cook anything and knows food inside out, please share with us two of your most favorite dishes. First, whats your best pre-marathon meal? A simple Pasta Primavera (pasta with vegetables) or Pasta Scoglio (pasta with seafood). Second, whats the meal youd love to eat on your last day on earth? There are so many options, but why not go out with gusto?! Maybe White Truffles over Agnolotti dal Plin (pasta filled with a lush mixture of veal, pork, and cheese), paired with a great Barolo (considered one of Italys greatest red wines, made from the Nebbiolo grape). The post Men’s Health Month Hero: Joe Bastianich, Restaurateur, TV Personality, Author appeared first on Meatless Monday.


You will enjoy these as well ...

Found an error?
Help to fix it! Tell it us!



Our sites missing something? Suggest new content or features!



Have you any comments?
Send it us!