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Green Peanut Butter Sandwich + Smoothie

before yesterday Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Peanut Butter Sandwich + Smoothie Hey! First of all, thanks for all your cheering words on the news of our marriage. That was fun! Secondly, I promised a lot of persons on instagram that we would share a chocolate recipe which currently goes by the working name Taco Brownies. But all the interest in them made me a little anxious so I’m heading back into the kitchen today to test another round before we’re ready to post them. Here is something to snack on while you wait. A peanut butter sandwich and a green smoothie. Technically, a sandwich hardly qualifies as a recipe. But what we want to say with this point is really just that you should try peanut butter on a savory sandwich. I love all kind of nut butter sandwiches and even if I usually top it with sliced bananas, apples, strawberries or a sweet compote, this savory version is my most recent addiction. Crispy lettuce and cucumber add a nice textural contrast to the sandwich without competing with the peanut butter flavor. The cottage cheese makes it moist and yummy and the chickpeas ... well I don’t know why the chickpeas are there actually. I guess I just like chickpeas inside my sandwiches. This sandwich is yummy, sticky, crunchy, rich and yet fresh somehow. We usually make it with a good quality rye bread but anything goes. I just realized that this is a green sandwich without avocado so we should perhaps call it “the-death-of-avocado-sandwich-sandwich” or something catchy like that. Anyway, it’s good. And it’s not impossible that you already have the ingredients at home. So, try it! For the other recipe, I’ll let Luise do the talking. It was her idea to pair the sandwich with a smoothie and since she is queen Latifah of green smoothies I am sure she has something clever to say. /­­David Here’s something clever for you. Make this smoothie. It’s that good. It has lots of green vegetables and a mild and fresh taste with tones of lemon and ginger. Just the way I like it. Also, using frozen vegetables makes the smoothie creamy and more nutritious and you can skip the ice. It also works really well paired with a sandwich as well because (most of) you have two hands and now you can have a good snack in each hand. We actually wrote a “In The Other Hand” chapter for our smoothie book with lots of great snacks, but we couldn’t fit it in the book. Lots of love! /­­Luise Green Peanut Butter Sandwich Makes 2  Just one note on peanut butter. Read the ingredient list in the supermarket and go for the brands that only list peanuts (and maybe salt). You can of course use other types of nut butters as well, I’d especially recommend cashew butter for this, but it’s usually a lot pricier. 4 slices rye bread 4 tbsp peanut butter a few leaves crispy lettuce 5 cm /­­ 2 inches cucumber 4 tbsp cottage cheese 4 tbsp chickpeas /­­ garbanzo beans 2 tsp olive oil  pea shoots thyme Spread peanut butter on each bread slice. Rinse the lettuce and cucumber. Tear the lettuce into smaller pieces, slice the cucumber thinly and place both on top of each peanut butter sandwich. Top with cottage cheese, chickpeas, a drizzle of olive oil, pea shoots and thyme. Put the sandwich together, wrap with sandwich paper and dig in. Broccoli & Ginger Smoothie 2 normal glasses or 1 very large If you don’t have a super powerful blender, start by mixing all ingredients except broccoli and banana (because they are thicker and will slow down the blender blades). When mixed until smooth, add the last ingredients and mix again. If you like it a little sweeter, you can add a fresh date or more banana. 4-5 florets frozen broccoli (or frozen cauliflower) 1 large banana 1 large handful fresh spinach 1 large handful fresh kale 1 large knob fresh ginger 1 slice lemon, peeled 1-2 cups plant milk, (oat milk /­­ rice milk /­­ almond milk) Add all ingredients to a high speed blender and mix until smooth. Taste and adjust the flavor and consistency if needed. Pour into two glasses or bottles.

Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes

before yesterday Golubka Kitchen 

Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes It’s been eight years since we started collecting recipes on this website, and over those years we’ve accumulated quite a few holiday recipe ideas. We thought it was finally time to do a big, comprehensive round up of our absolute favorites. We’ve got you covered on mains and hearty sides, as well as lighter sides, soups, salads, dessert, and drinks. Wishing you and your family a happy and healthy holiday season :) v = vegan, gf = gluten-free, veg = vegetarian, vo = vegan option Mains and Hearty Sides Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower (v, gf) There’s something so grand and ritualistic about a holiday table centerpiece that took time, care and anticipation. Since most such centerpieces involve meat, one can feel a little left out during the peak of a celebratory meal if meat is not their jam. In this recipe, we applied this grand, ceremonious approach to braising a head of cauliflower. Someone even made a video outlining the entire braising process. Baked Latkes (v, gf) Latkes are my ultimate weakness, but I’ve always dreaded the long and smoky process of frying them. My love for latkes is so strong though, that I had to come up with an easier path to that crispy, golden potato goodness. These baked latkes are SO much easier to make than the traditional fried kind, since the oven does all the main work for you. The flavor and texture are not compromised one bit, I promise. The recipe also includes a beet salad with an avocado mayo, which is to die for. Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna (v, gf) This healthful but hearty lasagna employs spaghetti squash in place lasagna noodles. There’s mushrooms, mung beans, kale, carrots, tomato sauce, and an easy almond ‘cheese’ as well. Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash (v, gf) If you’ve never tried braising leeks, you are in for a serious surprise. They are amazing, especially served over a hearty cauliflower and white bean mash. If leeks are not your thing, consider making the mash alone and serve it as a side, to up your holiday mash game :) Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin (v, gf) I can’t say enough about this gratin comprised of layers of sweet potato, Brussels sprouts, and caramelized onions, showered with spices and coconut milk. It’s easy to make but so beautiful and satisfying at the same time. Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes, and Black Rice (v, gf) This will forever be my favorite fall/­­winter salad. It’s all about the contrast of flavors: aromatic black rice, nourishing spiced cauliflower, juicy grapes, and a slightly spicy miso dressing full of umami. Sprinkle in some pomegranate seeds for an extra festive look. Sorghum Beet Risotto (v, gf) This vibrant risotto would make for an excellent side dish at a holiday table, especially if you don’t know what to do with that forgotten bag of sorghum in the back of your pantry :) Curried Squash and Kale Riceless Risotto (vo, gf) Another alternative (aka riceless) risotto option. This one uses riced kabocha squash in place of actual rice. It’s luxuriously creamy, warming, and overall impressive. Root Vegetable Chickpea Flour Quiche (v, gf) This vegan quiche comes together quite magically, with no crust, eggs or cream to speak of. Chickpea flour acts similarly to the egg-cream foundation of traditional quiche and solidifies into a sort of custard when baked at a high temperature. Add a studding of silky root vegetables and greens to that, and you’ve got yourself the perfect, healthful and delicious fall/­­winter quiche. Soups and Sides Creamy Butternut Squash, Pear and Cranberry Soup with Crispy Kale (v, gf) This is butternut squash soup elevated. The addition of cranberries and pear is as delicious as it is unexpected. There’s a special ingredient that will help aid digestion during a big meal, too. Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower (v, gf) A soup that’s both grounding and fortifying, and good enough to serve as an unexpected, colorful starter at the holiday table. Pink Soup with Roasted Onion and Broccoli (v, gf) Another stunning, colorful soup option. Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage (v, gf) We love mashed potatoes, but we also love pairing a bowl of mashed potatoes with another, more interesting mash made with underutilized root vegetables. Both celeriac and parsnips are so uniquely flavored and healthful, it’s no wonder that they make for some delicious mash. Serve it with the Braised Holiday Cauliflower for the ultimate plant-based holiday meal. Miso-Date Ghee Brussels Sprouts (veg, gf) This recipe teaches you how to make your own ghee (golden, clarified butter that has a higher smoke point than normal butter and is low in lactose and casein /­­ not vegan), as well as how to make miso-date ghee, which is too delicious for words. It’s great on roasted Brussels sprouts, as well as everything else in this world. Sweet Potato Nachos with Cheesy Chipotle Sauce and All the Fixings (v, gf) A healthful take on nachos, with crispy sweet potatoes taking the place of tortilla chips. Great for self-serve style, snack-heavy parties. If you don’t want to go through the intricate process of making sweet potato chips, roasted sweet potatoes will work perfectly in their place. Kale Salad with Marinated Beets, Lentils and Almond Cheese (v, gf) This salad is simple but effective: visually stunning, healthful and delicious. Plus, you’ll want to sprinkle that almond cheese on everything! Roasted Parsnip and Pomelo Salad (v, gf) Earthy, nourishing parsnips go so well with juicy, bittersweet citrus. The combination is especially irresistible when sprinkled with spiced and toasted walnuts and raisins. Use grapefruit if you can’t find pomelo. Desserts Apple Pecan Pie with Salted Pumpkin Caramel (v) This is three favorite Thanksgiving pies in one: apple, pecan and pumpkin. It’s decadent and impressive, and a definite crowd-pleaser. (Also pictured in slice form at the beginning of this post). Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake (v, gf) Slices of this fruit and nut cake make for a great accompaniment to a cheese plate, as well as an awesome gift basket component. Chocolate Fudge with Fresh Sage and Goji Berries (v, gf) The super-festive appearance of this decadent, frozen fudge basically speaks for itself. Rum and Raisin Bundt with Orange and Miso Glaze (v) The universally loved combination of rum and raisins is elevated by a sweet and subtly salty orange and miso glaze in this vegan bundt recipe we developed for Food & Wine. Sweet Potato Caramel Nougat (v, gf) Oh man, this nougat! Not as sticky or sweet as traditional nougat, this one has a caramel-like complexity from our trademark sweet potato caramel. There is a studding of toasted nuts and cookie crumble throughout each slice, too. Great for homemade gifts or party platters. Upside Down Citrus Polenta Cake (v, gf) This cake is a crowd pleaser through and through. It’s got it all in terms of stunning looks and bright, special flavor. Black and White Chocolate Pudding (v, gf) These elegant, black and white chocolate pudding cups are easy to put together, but very impressive and full of whole food ingredients. Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache (v, gf) If you are looking for a grand and fun cake project, but still want something wholesome and not too sugary, look no further than this stunner of a cake. Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight In this recipe, we’ve updated the old school treat with the use of healthful ingredients, and the beautiful, floral flavors of hibiscus and orange blossom. Serve these Turkish delights alongside tiny tongs at a holiday party for the ultimate, fancy dessert experience :) Banana Toffee Tart (v) This tart is worth making just for the vegan date toffee alone, but combine that with a (vegan) buttery crust and caramelized bananas, and you’ll forever be everyone’s favorite host. Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats (veg, gf) Another crowd favorite from a few years ago, this cake is like carrot cake, but made with parsnips in place of carrots. The parsnips yield their moisture and delicate flavor to the cake dough, which is then layered with a cream cheese frosting and topped with candied kumquats. This recipe can easily be veganized – just use maple syrup in place of honey to candy the kumquats and make the frosting. Honey-Roasted Pears with Vanilla Cashew Cream (veg, gf) All the components of this dessert can be made ahead of time, and assembled later. The cashew cream is not your average cashew cream, either – it’s extra-fluffy with the help of a special ingredient. White Chocolate Blood Orange Mousse Tart (v, gf) This delicate white chocolate mousse tart is flavored and colored with the juice and zest of blood orange. You also have the option of skipping the crust and making the mousse alone. Just distribute it amongst little ramekins for individual servings. Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies (v, gf) These cookies are crunchy on the outside, chewy on the inside, and incredibly buttery throughout. Their unexpected green coloring looks beautiful, contrasted by the red topping of goji berries. Kabocha Squash Ice Cream with Maple Roasted Pecans (veg, gf) Winter squash does beautifully in ice cream, especially the naturally sweet, bright orange kabocha squash. In this recipe, kabocha ice cream is swirled with a simple, tart cranberry sauce and topped with maple pecans. This recipe can easily be vegan – just use maple syrup in place of honey. Miso Caramel Popcorn (v, gf) It’s entirely possible to make really good caramel popcorn at home! This popcorn is sweet, salty, and incredibly addicting – you’ve been warned :) Drinks Rosemary Hot White Chocolate (v, gf) This hot white chocolate is both cozy and decadent, with unexpected, warming notes from rosemary and a perfectly smooth, frothy consistency. Quick Persimmon Eggnog (v, gf) This is eggnog for both the adventurous and the health-conscious. Much lighter than the original, but still perfectly creamy and satisfying. Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules (v, gf) This is the perfect winter cocktail for those of us who don’t drink alcohol, but still want to participate in the celebratory ritual of clinking glasses and toasting with something special and delicious. Pear Cranberry Chai (v, gf) This cozy chai is brewed with the addition of pears and cranberries, which takes the flavor to the next level. Simply put, it’s the best chai we’ve ever had. H A P P Y   H O L I D A Y S  !  !  !   The post Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Stuffing Scoops

November 20 2017 Meatless Monday 

No need to cook a whole turkey when a stuffing craving hits. Baking stuffing on its own is easy and delicious. Ice cream scoops make these stuffing servings as adorable as they are flavorful. This recipe comes to us from Donna of Apron Strings. Serves 12 - canola oil spray - 4 cups dry bread cubes - 1 cup vegetable broth - 1 tablespoon butter - 1/­­2 onion, diced - 1 stalk celery, diced - 3 sage leaves, minced - 2 sprigs thyme - 2 tablespoons diced parsley - 1/­­2 cup diced dried sweetened cranberries - 1/­­2 cup diced pecans - 1 large egg Preheat an oven to 400 degrees. Prepare an ice cream scoop with a light layer of the canola oil spray. Toss the bread cubes with the vegetable broth and set aside in a large mixing bowl. Melt the butter in a skillet over medium-high heat. Add the onion and celery to the skillet and cook, stirring intermittently, for 4-6 minutes, or until softened. Transfer to the mixing bowl. Add the sage, thyme, parsley, craisins, pecans and egg to the mixing bowl and mix well, taking care to ensure the ingredients are evenly distributed. Use the prepared ice cream scoop to distribute portions of stuffing onto a baking pan. Transfer the stuffing scoops to the oven. Bake for about 20 minutes, or until lightly browned. The post Stuffing Scoops appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan

November 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan Chi San Wan is a creative consultant, mama, entrepreneur and author based in London. We love Chi’s beautiful cookbook, her aesthetic, and down-to-earth approach to wellness, and we were very excited to get a peak at her everyday routine. In this interview, Chi tells us about her morning and bedtime routines, her ways of dealing with stress, the simple beauty tricks she’s learned from her mother, making space for the occasional cake and wine, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I enjoy routine, especially in the mornings. Before Marloe came along, routine was the only thing keeping me grounded. I have all sorts floating around in my head, and working for myself means one day can be very different to the next, so I need my mornings to be predictable in order to get me in the right mind-set for the rest of the day. However, now that those routines are governed by Marloe, our one year old, things are somewhat less predictable, and I have learnt to let go of the importance of routine a little. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. They vary slightly from day to day, depending on whats on the agenda, but in an ideal and average world my morning would be waking up around 6am, do some stretching, then 20 mins of meditation. Around 6:30am Marloe wakes up and we like to cuddle in bed together as a family (shes really into giving kisses at the moment). We get out of bed around 7am and take turns to shower whilst the other one plays with Marloe, makes lemon hot water and preps breakfast. We sit down together for breakfast between 7:30am-8am and have our mornings chats – most of the time theres food throwing involved. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I like to stop any computer work by 9pm, make myself a small hot drink and climb into bed to do some reading – usually self-help or study. I try to sleep by 10pm latest, but sometimes me and my boyfriend just end up chatting about the day until 11pm or midnight… Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Typically… Breakfast – multi-grain porridge with almond milk, topped with whatever seasonal fruits are around and some nut butter Lunch – quinoa, roast veg, salad, some kraut, some seaweed – usually leftovers Snack – sourdough and avocado, or an apple with cheese /­­ nut butter, whatever I find on my travels Dinner – salmon and veg, or daal /­­ curry with rice, yoghurt and lots of freshly chopped herbs -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? If I have the time, I will make myself a matcha latte in the mornings or for a snack. If we have eggs, maybe I will have an Earl Grey tea or some fresh juice. I only ever drink coffee when I fancy a croissant! Then it would have to be a flat white with fresh almond milk or oat milk.  -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I never used to! But somehow, during pregnancy and since Marloe was born, I have developed a sweet tooth! Maybe its to keep energy up? As the weather is colder now in London, I have been obsessed with searching for the best hot chocolate (always disappointing and not chocolatey enough!). When I get the urge for something sweet, its usually something very specific, not any old sweet thing will suffice, and I will have to go on a hunt for it. Though usually after dinner, I am happy with a piece of raw chocolate from the fridge.  -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I try and have a wide and varied diet to keep things in check, and food is the first thing I look to when trying to manage my general wellness. I try and listen to my body, even if sometimes its asking for wine or cake! Usually, it needs just that and feels much better for it. In terms of taking anything else, since pregnancy and the birth of Marloe I have taken a high DHA Omega 3 supplement and probiotics daily (just in case I dont get the chance to eat it in food form). Once a week I will make some water steeped in goji berries, longan (when my mum visits, she will always leave me some) and any dried herbs I have on hand and sip on that. I have some adaptogenics on hand too – chaga, cordyceps, reishi, ashwaghanda, schisandra – but I dont make a habit of taking them everyday, only when I need to. -- What is your approach to feeding your daughter? Do you try to guard her from all unhealthy/­­processed foods, or are you more relaxed about it all? Do you have any advice for parents who want to raise their kids to be comfortable with real, whole foods? For her first year I was a little precious about what I gave her to eat – everything was made at home and organic produce only. I went with baby led weaning which is so messy, anyone who knows me knows I cannot handle mess so this was, and still is, a learning curve for me. But it gives me great pleasure watching Marloe enjoy her food, and try anything I give her. She has days where she is super picky, but generally she is a happy eater. I am more relaxed and realistic about what she consumes now, because I cant always control where we are – she has predominately home made food, but when we are out she will have bits of whatever we are eating, and its fun to watch her try new things! I really recommend baby led weaning. If you read up on it, it makes a lot of sense to get kids to eat real, whole foods this way – who wants to eat mush? It could be anything! Real food looks and tastes much more exciting and it makes them more adventurous with food, and less fussy. Eating together at the table is important to me as well, and for Marloe to have what we are eating – she knows if we have given her a different meal and will shout until we feed her some of ours.  Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I love to fit yoga in when I can and I walk a lot (at a very fast pace), but other than that, its chasing the baby around. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I dont do any form of exercise that I find torturous, such as spin or anything high adrenaline; it doesnt work for me. I enjoy yoga – dynamic or kundalini, and walking in nature a lot.  Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I think if youre comfortable in your own skin, that is beautiful. But for everyone, that could be down to many different factors and it will chop and change with time. Someone who is confident but grounded with integrity – their beauty will shine through. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Its pretty simple and not that exciting! I try and dry-brush when I can, I use Dr. Bronners Baby soap for the body, and then after a shower, whilst the body is wet, I will rub a concoction of almond oil, sesame oil and essential oils that I fancy, all over. For my face, I take the day off with coconut oil and rose water (I make my own with 3/­­4 organic rose water and 1/­­4 colloidal silver). For my morning shower, I will use a thin flannel to scrub the face and spray with rose water, followed by a tiny bit of Nucifera, The Balm – a recent find in LA. Its been amazing for the change in weather in the UK.  -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Water, water, water. Not eating so much dairy, wheat and sugar, but consuming more good fats like avocado, coconut and ghee. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My mum looks so good and youthful, but she has never drank much, never smoked, never wore make-up...thats her trick! I have never smoked, I drink less now naturally, as I am breastfeeding and I’m too busy to do any make-up, so usually a go at the eyelash curlers will do for the day! Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  I think fitting in meditation everyday greatly reduces stress for me and puts things into perspective. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Acupuncture. Talking it out with my boyfriend and friends. Knowing that ‘this too shall pass’. Treating myself to whatever food and drink I desire (within budget of course).  -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I take Wellness tablets. I make sure to be hydrated and wrap up warm at all times, especially the throat and chest. I make congee or daal, something warming and easy to digest so the body can rest.  -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? At the moment, I am very much governed by my daughters day to day antics, and I try and fit everything else around her. This does stress me out at times, but then I try and remember to enjoy these first years with her. I am lucky to have this time together with her, because I am freelance. I just try and plan my time carefully (shared iCal helps!), but not everything always goes to plan – which I am learning to let go of.  Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Things generally fall better into place when I take time to be kind to myself, so I just keep reminding myself that self-care is important, especially for a working mum. Setting routines like bed times for myself etc helps with this and saying no to some friends, projects, events etc when you just need the time to sort stuff out, so that everything else can run more smoothly. Obviously there is room for spontaneity, thats what keeps me feeling alive!  -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Meditation. Making the time for it. It keeps me feeling focused, rested and puts things into perspective. Its a form of self-care and love for myself, and is incredibly nurturing. I dont always do it every day twice a day, but when I do, it helps immensely. I learnt from Jacqui at The Broad Place in the summer and, hands down, they’re the best teachings of meditation I have come across, because its real and it works.  -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Its easier said than done, but I try not to stress about it, and just trust the process rather than sit and wallow. Ill meet up with friends and my peers and we chat it out – usually its something that is felt by a few people, and I find that it usually reverberates between similar minds, like theres something going on with the energy around us. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I cant pinpoint one thing, its a zeitgeist thing, its in the air...maybe because we are entering a revolution, the age of Aquarius. I am constantly  inspired and influenced by the people I surround myself with, the internet, social media, so books /­­ movies /­­ classes suggested through those mediums are naturally the ones I gravitate to.  Knowledge -- You co-authored A Simple Table, a beautiful cookbook that focuses on fresh and simple meals. What was the key message that you aimed to communicate with the recipes and lifestyle tips in the book? Thank you. The key message was that everyday nourishment neednt be difficult or a chore. It could be simple acts of kindness to yourself, or simple recipes that dont require crazy expensive ingredients. Its to encourage the reader to explore what makes them feel good inside and out, as everyone is different and there is no one formula. Most of all, it was to enjoy the simple pleasures.  -- Tell us a bit about the fresh almond milk company that you co-founded, The Pressery. What inspired you to start it and what did you learn from having that business? I felt a change in me, and the start of a movement back in 2013 when I became a little disillusioned working in fashion, and more excited about food and drink and the effects it has on us. I have always been a food fanatic, so it was natural for me to explore this familiar and yet unknown territory. My business partner had been feeling the same for a while, so it felt like the right time to launch a small business in something we were both passionate about. I was already making almond milk at home, and after some research we settled on focusing on making the one product the best we could. There is a lot to learn through starting a business from nothing (I was a freelance fashion stylist before that), and building a brand from scratch – we started selling at a market and then got into Selfridges, and I grew the social media following from 0 to 22k organically in 2 years. Ive met many people through the business, with whom I am still good friends now and work with today, as a creative consultant. It was a natural progression for me and I wouldnt be where I am now if it wasnt for The Pressery.  Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I like to have a glass of red wine, make dinner with my boyfriend and possibly have a candle lit bath with Epsom salts and essential oils.  -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – salt. by Nayyirah Waheed, there is always a piece that speaks to me at any point in my life Song/­­Album – I will never tire of Your Hand In Mine by Explosions In The Sky Movie – In The Mood For Love has been a long favourite – the soundtrack, the colours, the feelings… Piece of Art – anything by Agnes Martin really does feed and soothe my soul, when the exhibition was at the Tate Modern, I went about 5 times! -- What are your favorite places to eat in London? Leilas  for breakfast, Esters  for brunch, Towpath  for lunch, Granger & Co Kings Cross  for work meetings, Violet  for cake and tea, P. Franco  for wine and small dishes and for dinner – Primeur , Campania and Jones , Uchi , Westerns Laundry , Legs , Luca ...too many!  -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list . What are some essential objects that would be in yours? – comfy t-shirt and shorts for sleep – current book  – Nucifera The Balm – rose water spray – essential oils to mix – Weleda lip balm – Dr. Bronners Baby soap (which doubles up as shaving foam) – x2 pairs of jeans (one boyfriend, one flares) – x1 sunglasses – x1 rucksack, x1 fancy bag, x1 tote bag – x1 black trousers (usually wide culottes) – x3 different style tees – x1 cashmere sweater – x2 white shirts  – x1 jumpsuit /­­ playsuit  – x1 dress for day or evening – x2 sandals (one Birkenstocks, one Isabel Marant) – x1 trainers – x1 smart shoes (for me, its Doc Martens) – x1 jacket or coat (depending on the destinations temperature) – x1 light cashmere scarf -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Id love to hear from Julie from Rudy Jude, Rosa from Cereal Magazine, Serena Mitnik-Miller from General Store and Holly from The Acey. Photos taken by Jessica MacCormick, Emma Lee and Chi San Wan. 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Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Stuffed Squash with Brazil Nuts and Pistachios

November 7 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Stuffed Squash with Brazil Nuts and Pistachios This flavorful and colorful Stuffed Squash with Brazil Nuts and Pistachios makes an attractive entrée for a Thanksgiving dinner. Use a dense, sweet, orange-fleshed squash such as buttercup, acorn, or kabocha for the best results with this recipe. I like to use Brazil nut butter, but you can use any type of nut butter that you prefer. Stuffed Squash with Brazil Nuts and Pistachios  This flavorful and colorful Stuffed Squash makes an attractive entrée for a Thanksgiving dinner.  - 1 tablespoon olive oil or 1/­­4 cup water - 1 yellow onion, minced - 2 cloves garlic, minced - 2 cups cooked brown rice - 1 cup cooked wild rice - 1/­­3 cup Brazil nut butter - 1/­­4 cup sweetened dried cranberries - 2 tablespoons chopped pistachio nuts - 2 tablespoons chopped Brazil nuts - 1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley - 1 teaspoon dried tarragon - Salt and ground black pepper - 1 large winter squash, halved and seeded (such as buttercup, acorn, or kabocha) - 1 1/­­2 cups hot water - Preheat the oven to 350°F. Heat the oil or water in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the onion, cover, and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. - Stir in the rice, wild rice, Brazil nut butter, cranberries, nuts, parsley, tarragon, and salt and pepper to taste. Mix well and spoon the mixture into the squash cavities -  Place the squash halves in a baking dish, stuffing sides up. Add the water to the bottom of the baking dish and cover tightly with a lid or aluminum foil. Bake until the squash is tender, about 1 1/­­2 hours. From The Nut Butter Cookbook by Robin Robertson. (C)2014 Robin Robertson. Used by permission from Vegan Heritage Press. Photo by Lori Maffei. Save Save The post Stuffed Squash with Brazil Nuts and Pistachios appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Berbere Roasted Kabocha Squash with Tahini Dill Dressing

October 28 2017 Vegan Richa 

Berbere Roasted Kabocha Squash with Tahini Dill DressingBerbere Roasted Kabocha Squash with Tahini Dill Dressing. Use ohter spice blends of choice. Festive, spiced winter squash. Add cranberries or other dried fruit. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Recipe I’ve had a dislike, somewhat ok relationship with most squashes. I had a similar not so like with Tofu in the beginning months of my vegan transition. I started cooking with tofu and learnt to make my versions of dishes with it which helped me choose the method of cooking and the spices and flavors that I like and that helped make it more likeable. I started using squashes in baked goods and now if I make them roasted they usually get spiced liberally. So I am still on a berbere run. Berbere blend is an Ethiopian spice blend and adds amazing flavor however you use it. You can make your own or get some online or from spice shops. You do have to try these roasted winter squash slices with berbere or use garam masala or baharat from my book(I am salivating already thinking of baharat on some roasted veggies). You will be surprised how well they work together. Use a dressing of choice like tahini garlic dill or vegan ranch. The whole squash gets roasted! So no work out needed to slice the raw squash.  We are celebrating the UK Book Launch this week! Giveaway on Facebook here. Continue reading: Berbere Roasted Kabocha Squash with Tahini Dill DressingThe post Berbere Roasted Kabocha Squash with Tahini Dill Dressing appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin

October 11 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin Amy Chaplin is an author and chef, whose approach to whole foods and cooking is endlessly inspiring. Her cookbook is nothing short of a kitchen bible to us. We had the pleasure of meeting up with Amy in NYC a few years ago and had the best time chatting about our favorite subjects like sprouted flours, cookbook publishing, and acupuncture. Needless to say, we were excited to get a peak at her self-care routine. In this interview, Amy tells us about the valuable self-care tips she learned from her mother, her favorite meals made with pantry staples, the skincare brand she’s been using since she was a teenager, her approach to exercise, stress, and so much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I like both. I like to have a morning routine and create a work routine for whatever project Im working on but I also like to have time for free thinking and spontaneously connecting with friends. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I get up early, 6 am  is the usual time but sometimes eariler depending on what Im working on. I make warm lemon water, light a candle and mediate for 10 to 15 minutes. In late summer the sun is coming up just as I finish and I usually sit for a bit and often reply to messages from Austrlia (they are going to bed around that time). Then I feed our two dogs (my wife takes them out on a long morning walk) start making breakfast and make sencha tea. Sometimes I skip the sencha and have a matcha latte after breakfast but I try not to have too much caffeine, as much as I love it! If Im working on recipes from home, I quickly shower, dress and get started right away....sometimes before breakfast but it depends on what Im testing :) -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I stop working on the computer before dinner and leave it closed. I leave my phone downstairs so its far from my bedroom. I get into bed and usually read cookbooks or watch an episode of any series Im currently obsessed with :) Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast –  soaked oats + chia (recipe is in my book) or activated grain porridge with homemade nut milk, cardamom and berries. I usually eat grains once a day and its usually in the morning. Lunch – Beans of some kind --depending on recipes Im testing. Kraut or other fermented veg, greens--salad or steamed depending on weather. I usually add some toppings too: hemp seeds, toasted seeds, sunflower sprouts, scallions anything to make it tasty Snack – Seeded crackers and nut butter/­­avocado/­­bean pate or chia pudding or coconut yogurt Dinner – An egg or tempeh, avocado, steamed veg and a dressing of some kind--this is often quite small as Im not always hungry if I have a good lunch or if Im testing and sampling recipes. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Yes. I love green tea. Sencha is my favorite for its fresh, grassy umami taste. Rishi Tea First Flush Sencha is sublime. I also love their ceremonial grade matchas with foamed, homemade almond milk. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to but I havent eaten sugar on a regular basis for years. If Im craving something sweet I eat a few spoons of Anitas coconut yogurt--it has a naturally sweet flavor from coconut with no sweetener. If I have a berry compote around Ill have some of that with it but I never sweeten them as Ive gotten used to just the sweetness of the berries. Of course there are times when Im testing recipes for cakes and muffins and I do enjoy tasting them and the same goes for good raw chocolate. Im not rigid about it as its part of being a chef but I dont seek out sugar on a daily basis. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I change depending on what my acupuncturist recommends in the way of Chinese herbs. I have been taking spirulina to increase protein and greens lately. I take a vitamin D. Ive been adding maca powder to my breakfasts for years so dont really consider it a supplement. I like adding locally grown ashwagandha (from Furnace Creek Farm) and reishi or chaga mushroom powder to hot cacao drinks. I drink nettle tea everyday because I love it, especially when you can get it fresh from the farmers market. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  With my job being so physical, these days I gravitate towards Qi Gong and yoga--the gentler classes. I also tend to exercise by default. Walking everywhere, long dog walks, biking and general schlepping around the city and up and down stairs with heavy bags of veggies! -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I used to push myself with torturous classes and long runs but now I do less and enjoy it more. I know that I am more productive when I make time for movement but it has to be mindful.  I do yoga at home and love it when I have the time for long luxurious classes...especially restorative. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Beauty to me is an inner glow that comes from something beyond what and how we take care of our bodies. Mostly it comes with time and a spiritual sense of oneself, our path, the world and other beings around us. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Ive used Dr. Hauschka since I was a teenager. I have a huge respect for biodynamic growing practices and love the way they preserve their products naturally. I think its one of the most difficult things with natural skin care products--preserving. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Local organic veggies, lots of greens, seeds… -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. I notice a difference in my skin when I use a warm compress of essential oils (Dr. Hauschka calls them bath oils). You put a few drops in warm water and soak a face cloth, squeeze it out and press it into your skin. I use lemongrass in the morning and lavender at night. Then you cleanse and use the same water to wash the cleanser off. They smell so good and your skin feels really clean and enlivened afterwards. Its my mothers beauty secret, she looks amazing! :) Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Mainly daily meditation and breathing. I dont feel as clear or grounded without it. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Hot shower and miso soup :) -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Make miso soup with lots of ginger and scallions and I also take Woodstock C & F Seasonal Support. It always helps with a sore throat or when Im feeling under the weather. Gargling sea salt with warm water. Colloidal silver spray. Hot lemon drink with grated ginger and turmeric. Bath and sleep. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? They definitely overlap. I love what I do and have found comfort in the kitchen for as long as I can remember. Of course there are days when work completely takes over but even when my schedule is jam packed, I try and make time to spend with my partner, cuddle the dogs and see family--it just means well be eating recipes that are being tested and theyre grilled for feed back! Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I aften find myself saying “everything is working out for my highest good and remembering that everything is perfect as it is. I grew up with Louise Hay books. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Over time my lifestyle and diet has improved and I have a much more balanced approach. I used to be quite strict at times and I know that its not the way to great health for me anyway. I think now I have better overall health so I dont get thrown off on a regular basis. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Paul Pitchford’s “Healing with Whole Foods has been in my life for over 20 years and I still consult it. It always gets me in the mood for pure, simple temple-like food. My self care is also influenced by my mother. She has a deep connection to nature and a daily ritual of foot baths, lemon water in the morning and making a nightly hot water bottle (in the cooler months) Ive carried on these rituals...but dont seem to get the foot baths in as often as she does. Knowledge -- Your recipes are so well thought out and always turn out delicious, as well as incredibly nourishing. What is your process when it comes to recipe development? Thank you so much! My recipes all begin with what I crave, which is mostly deeply nourishing food with clean uncomplicated flavors. They have to make sense to me and not only be healthy but also be visually beautiful. Nature and beauty are what inspire me most. When I am developing recipes I want the steps to be clear and thorough. I spend a lot of time with new recipes before they are published. Theyre all tested over and over again by myself, friends, family and recipe testers. I feel a lot of responsibility to readers who spend time and money and a lot of effort making my recipes...they have to work and taste delicious! -- You are a big proponent of keeping a well-stocked pantry. What are some of your favorite meals that you like to throw together with pantry ingredients? Simple wraps with nori, fermented veggies, avocado (not really pantry but I always have a few of varying ripeness around). Barrys tempeh, which is made from white beans and adzuki beans and sold frozen, it tastes amazing just panfried in coconut oil. In Australia you can get fresh fava bean tempeh and Im missing it so much! Red lentil soup with lemon and spinach from my cookbook. That is perfect for right now when the weather is getting cooler and if you dont have much in the way of veg. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Drive to the country with my wife, play with my nephew, drink tea and sit in the morning sun. Have a pedicure. Travel and be in nature. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – “The Power of Intention” by Wayne Dyer Song/­­Album – Blue by Joni Mitchell Movie – I recently saw Lion and was so moved Piece of Art – Yoko Onos simple, whimsical pieces -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in NYC? ABC V, Via Carota, Ilbuco Alimentari, De Maria -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? – Good tea selection + strainer for infusing – Activated or toasted nuts – Spirulina – Pajamas and cosy sox (no matter the season) – Large scarf/­­shawl – Cardigans -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Luise from Green Kitchen Stories, Henrietta Inman, Elenore from Earthsprout, Emma from My Darling Lemon Thyme..... Photos by Amy Chaplin and Stephen Kent Johnson. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Roasted Fennel & Hazelnut Salad

October 3 2017 VegKitchen 

Roasted Fennel & Hazelnut Salad A gorgeous fall themed salad with an epic name but a relatively simple procedure. Roasting fennel lightly caramelizes and brings out the delicate licorice flavor. The crunch of roasted hazelnuts and chewy tang of dried cranberries makes this an ideal salad for winter holidays, but dont wait for Black Friday: make this lovely dish any […] The post Roasted Fennel & Hazelnut Salad appeared first on VegKitchen.

Veggie Tray Extra Everything

October 1 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Veggie Tray Extra Everything We’ve got a small, square shaped wooden table with three chairs + a highchair in our kitchen. I bought the table when I moved to my first 1-bedroom apartment and it was perfect for that tiny space. Back then I only had two chairs and the table mostly carried pasta dishes and red wine glasses. Eighteen years, four apartments and three children later, we still eat most our meals on it. It is honestly not very pretty and its wine stains are now mixed with blueberries, turmeric, coconut and all the stains, smudges and scratches that come from years of feeding babies. Because it is square shaped and we are five in the family, Luise or I end up either eating our meals standing up or snugged on an extra chair on a corner. Its a small but pretty striking symbol that: A) I am too sentimental about my furniture. B) We werent entirely prepared for how life with three children would be. I wrote a little text on Instagram about this. That behind glossy photos of food, travels and a kitchen that on good days looks picture perfect, we are still trying to figure out life. And find somewhere to sit. The plan is to get a round table that hopefully both will fit into the kitchen and have seats for the entire family. But until then, I’ll keep eating standing up. I first shared this recipe/­­method about a week ago on Instagram stories (hence the poor image quality above) and judging from the number of direct messages in my inbox, I thought I’d post an more outlined version here as well. We cannot get enough of tray bake dinners in our family. They are simply one of the easiest and most delicious weekday solutions we know and this recipe represents much of what we love about food. Easy to make, easy to like, easy to adapt. It combines warm and cold and sweet and savory. It is vegetable centered, comforting and leaves a minimum of dishes. And the kids like it too. Our twist is that we add lots of fresh ingredients to the tray once it’s ready in the oven; yogurt, pesto, lettuce, spinach, black beans and pomegranate seeds. They add texture and make it feel more like a proper meal. Some days we act like adults and put plates on the table. Other days we just stick the kids a fork each and we all eat from the same tray (sorry mum!). Weve shared the recipe exactly as we made it last week but weve also included a list of variations below the recipe. So don’t get hung up on any specific ingredients, simply use this more as a starting point. The important thing in this recipe is the combination of roasted ingredients + fresh veggies + fruit + something creamy. I hope you give it a try. All-in-One Veggie Tray We wrote a similar recipe for the September issue of Jamie Magazine. We added raw spiralized vegetables (makes it even prettier!) and halloumi instead of yogurt. We add kale and Brussels sprouts midway through roasting since they need less time. The goal is that they will be perfectly crunchy at the same time as the other vegetables are ready. It can be a little tricky to time it right on your first try but second time around you usually get the hang of it. Warm ingredients 1 kg /­­ 2 lbs potatoes 3-4 carrots, peeled 1 broccoli  250 g /­­ 1/­­2 lb Brussels sprouts 3-4 large kale leaves olive oil Cold ingredients 2 handfuls baby spinach 1 avocado 1 cup cooked black beans yogurt pesto (you can thin it out with a little olive oil) lemon Cut potato, carrots and broccoli into bite-sized pieces. Add to a large tray and drizzle with oil and salt. Bake at 200°C /­­ 400°F for approx. 15-20 minutes. Cut the Brussels sprouts in halves. Trim off the thick stalks from the kale and tear the leaves into smaller pieces. Drizzle with oil and salt, add to the tray and bake for 10-15 minutes more or so. The vegetables are ready when they are golden and tender and the kale chips are crunchy. Scatter baby spinach, sliced (or mashed) avocado, black beans, dollops of yogurt and pesto evenly over the vegetables. Squeeze over a little lemon and drizzle with oil. Dig in! Variations Roasted ingredients: Carrots /­­ Broccoli /­­ Cauliflower /­­ Cabbage /­­ Sweet potato /­­ Bell pepper /­­ Brussels Sprouts /­­ Kale /­­ Potatoes /­­ Parsnip /­­ Beetroot Fresh ingredients: Lettuce /­­ Aragula /­­ Spinach /­­ Avocado /­­ Cucumber /­­ Cherry Tomatoes /­­ Spiralized Carrots, Beetroot or Zucchini Fruit: Apple /­­ Orange /­­ Pear /­­ Pomegranate Seeds /­­ Grapes Sauce: Yogurt /­­ Tahini /­­ Pesto /­­ Romesco /­­ Hummus /­­ Dijon Vinaigrette /­­ Coleslaw Extra: Nuts /­­ Seeds /­­ Beans /­­ Boiled eggs /­­ Halloumi cheese /­­ Feta Cheese /­­ Goat’s Cheese

Celebrate the Best Seasonal Veggies in Your Neighborhood this Meatless Monday

September 25 2017 Meatless Monday 

Celebrate the Best Seasonal Veggies in Your Neighborhood this Meatless MondaySummer is gradually turning into fall, and that means the summer produce season will soon turn into an autumn harvest! If youre eager to do some cooking with fruits and vegetables that are at their peak right now, it helps to do a little research before hitting the farmers market. Make Meatless Monday your first stop! Here are the fruits and veggies that are in season right now: Apples In addition to being a great source of fiber and Vitamin C, apples are loaded with phytonutrients that regulate blood sugar and pectin, which may slow down colon cancer. Cinnamon Ginger Apple Chips Butternut Squash One of several winter squash varieties, butternut squashs thin skin makes it easy to cut and prepare. Butternut Squash Apple Burgers Cranberries Cranberries originated right here in North America and were cultivated by Native Americans for their antibacterial properties, Vitamin C, and ability to fight diseases. Cranberry Balsamic Brussels Sprouts Eggplant The jury is in - salting eggplant does keep it from soaking up too much oil while cooking and becoming spongy. Eggplant Fiesta Ragout Pomegranate When buying the best pomegranate, choose one that seems like its too heavy for its size. Pumpkin and Kale with Creamy Polenta Garlic Garlic provides tons of health benefits with its flavor - its a great source of Vitamins B6 and C, potassium, calcium, and anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative sulfuric compounds that have been studied for treating heart disease and the common cold. Red Pepper Pesto Pâté Smartphone users now have a great option on the go for finding seasonal fruits and vegetables in your area. Download the Seasonal Food Guide - the most comprehensive online database of seasonal food on the internet! You can find the app on the App Store or Google Play by searching Seasonal Food Guide. The post Celebrate the Best Seasonal Veggies in Your Neighborhood this Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Red Cabbage and Sweet Potato Smoothie

September 3 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Red Cabbage and Sweet Potato Smoothie Smoothies are my absolute favorite breakfast. I always get sad once the mornings start getting cooler, because an ice-cold smoothie bowl no longer seems like a very appropriate breakfast option. I continue making them into October anyway :) For years, I’ve had the same smoothie formula that consisted of frozen banana, frozen berries, as well as any greens and super-powders I had on hand. This past year though, I decided to start packing more stuff into my smoothies, specifically more veggies. If you have a blender, especially a high-speed one like a Vitamix, it’s so easy to ‘hide’ all kinds of things in your smoothies. I’ve been favoring steamed and frozen cauliflower, sweet potato, and zucchini in place of frozen banana. I’ve also been adding things like raw beets, red cabbage, and even mung bean sprouts into the blender. At first, eating a barely sweet smoothie was strange, but now I can honestly say that I’ve grown to appreciate and love having a less sugary breakfast. I realized that it’s more important to me to have a smoothie, any smoothie than to have a sweet, dessert-like one in the morning. This red cabbage and sweet potato smoothie has been my favorite variation since I randomly decided to throw some leftover red cabbage into the blender. Its flavor is barely noticeable in the final product, but it adds excellent color and nutrition into the mix. Steamed and frozen sweet potato contributes some sweetness and creaminess, while making the smoothie quite filling and satisfying. Avocado ensures an even silkier smoothie and brings all of its healthy fats to the table. Frozen berries make the whole thing seem and taste like an actual smoothie. I like to add maca, because I swear it gives me all kinds of energy in the morning, as well as puts me in a really great mood. You can also add cacao, medicinal mushroom powder, or any other super-powders you like. I doctor it up quite a bit with nut butter or coconut yogurt, more berries and seed sprinkles, and eat it with a spoon. I love seeing the rainbow of color that all the ingredients create in the blender. To me, it’s the best thing. Would love to hear about your favorite smoothie combos! Have a nice Sunday. Red Cabbage and Sweet Potato Smoothie   Print Serves: 2 big smoothie bowls Ingredients about an eighth of a small head of red cabbage (should be a small wedge, smaller than in the photo) half of an avocado ½ cup cubed, steamed and frozen sweet potato ½ cup frozen blueberries, plus more for garnish ¼ cup frozen strawberries 1-2 teaspoons maca powder (optional) handful of any greens of choice (optional) 1½ - 1¾ cup purified water almond butter or coconut yogurt - for garnish sprinkles like chia seeds, cacao nibs, bee pollen or any other nuts/­­seeds of choice - for garnish Instructions Combine the red cabbage, avocado, sweet potato, blueberries, strawberries, maca, if using, greens, and water in a high-speed blender. Blend until smooth. I like to start out with just 1½ cups of water for a spoonable smoothie consistency and add more water if needed. If you would like the smoothie to be drinkable, add 1¾ - 2 cups of water. Serve right away, garnished with more berries, almond butter/­­coconut yogurt and sprinkles. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Peach and Avocado Overnight Oats with Moringa Powder Grapefruit Smoothie Blueberry Cheesecake Truffles Creamy Steel Cut Oats with Spring Vegetables .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Red Cabbage and Sweet Potato Smoothie appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Watermelon Panzanella

August 9 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Watermelon Panzanella Hey friends, this is Masha checking in with my (now annual) Woodstock, NY trip photos and a really good watermelon panzanella recipe that we cooked while there. My boyfriend and I went to Woodstock for the first time last summer and were completely enamored by its lush nature, chill swimming spots, and friendly small town vibe. We couldn’t wait to repeat the experience this year, and ended up staying at the same cottage in the woods for a weekend, which is perfect as far as we’re concerned. For our Saturday night dinner, we repeated the routine of shopping at Kingston Farmer’s Market in the morning and cooking dinner with all the bounty we found there at night. We made grilled pizzas and watermelon panzanella, and enjoyed the sweetest local blueberries together with Fruition chocolate for dessert. The panzanella turned out so lovely, and I couldn’t help but think how perfect it would be for any type of summer gathering or potluck. The inclusion of watermelon is a bit unexpected for panzanella, but it works so well in place of tomatoes and makes the salad extra cooling and hydrating. It’s also a pretty satisfying dish since it’s a bread salad, so it could be served as the prominent or only side at any summery event. I hope you’ll give it a try while August is in full swing! Below is a list of a few new-for-us places we visited and liked in Woodstock and around, but make sure to check out this post from last year for a more extensive list of things to do, if you’re looking to visit the area. Food Cucina – a modern Italian restaurant located in a beautiful farmhouse, serving dishes made with local and seasonal ingredients. I highly recommend getting a table on their wraparound porch, it’s stunning. Oriole 9 – a breakfast and lunch restaurant with an inspired menu and great specials. The coconut tofu hash was really good. Kimchee Harvest – sold at the Kingston Farmer’s Market on Saturdays. Really tasty kimchi made with unique ingredients. They have cucumber kimchi and rhubarb kimchi! I highly recommend getting the rhubarb one. Stuff to Do /­­ Visit High Falls Waterfall – a big waterfall with excellent swimming a bit downstream from the main fall, as well as cliff jumping. Zaborski Emporium – a huge, four story warehouse full of chaotically organized ‘architectural salvage.’ You kind of have to see it to believe it. A very impressive place to visit, especially if you are looking for a vintage door, sink, bathtub, stove, dishes, furniture and sooo much more. Candlestock – a shop full of every kind of candle and candle accessory imaginable. I’m especially into their beeswax candles. Tinker Toys – the coolest toy shop I’ve ever been too. Little to none of that bright-colored plastic, but a ton of educational games and toys for every age. It made shopping for Paloma’s birthday present a breeze. Watermelon Panzanella   Print Serves: 4-6 as a side Ingredients half of a small red onion - thinly sliced 2½ tablespoons apple cider vinegar - divided about 6 slices of crusty, whole grain sourdough bread - torn into bite-sized pieces 1/­­4 cup plus 2 tablespoons olive oil - divided 2 large garlic cloves - minced 1/­­2 teaspoon salt quarter of a medium-large watermelon - cubed 1 English cucumber - sliced into half-moons 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard handful of sprouts or microgreens handful of torn basil Instructions Place the onion into a small bowl and drizzle 1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar over it. Set aside. Place the bread onto a covered baking tray, drizzle with 2 tablespoons of olive oil and sprinkle with the minced garlic and salt. Toast in the oven for 10-15 minutes, until the edges are golden. Combine the watermelon, cucumber and toasted bread in a large bowl. Whisk the remaining 1 1/­­2 tablespoons of the apple cider vinegar together with the Dijon mustard in a small bowl. Add the remaining 1/­­4 cup olive oil, whisking it until smooth. Pour the dressing over the salad and mix very well. Serve right away, garnished with sprouts/­­microgreens and basil. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Lemon Plum Salad with a Poppy Seed Dressing Vegan Caesar Salad with Tempeh Croutons, Roasted Peaches and Corn Market Berry Salad and a New York Weekend Spiced and Seeded Multigrain Loaf & A Giveaway .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Watermelon Panzanella appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Raspberry Curcuma Nicecream Bowl

August 4 2017 Veganpassion 

Raspberry Curcuma Nicecream Bowl If I have some leftover fruits and I don't get to eat it I'm freezing the fruits. I simply cut it into pieces and put it in a tupperware box. On hot days like today my body tells me: ice cream for breakfast. So I take the fruits out of the freezer and I'm enjoyig a nicecream bowl. Have you ever tried nicecream? I promise: once nicecream, always nicecream ? ?. Makes 2 small bowls. Ingredients: 1,7 oz frozen raspberries 2 frozen ripe bananas 1 frozen mango each 1 small piece of ginger and curcuma 1 pinch cinnamon 2 slices pineapple 2 tbsp. raspberry powder 1 kiwi 1 tbsp. granola some berries for dacoration Blend all frozen fruit in a blender. I recommend a strong blender. Peel ginger and curcuma if necessary then cut them into small pieces and add them to the blender. Also add cinnamon, pineapple and fruit powder and blend again. Fill everything into small bowls and decorate with granola and berries

Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 1

July 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 1 A few months ago, we asked if you would be interested in seeing semi-regular, seasonal meal plans here and heard a resounding yes. We love coming up with whimsical and creative, plant-based recipes to share here, but we also want this site to be a friendly space for busy people looking to eat more plants. You know, for those of you who might not have the time or brain space for making, say, an experimental aquafaba meringue, like we do. Meal planning is a great practice for saving money on groceries (and impulse takeout orders!), eating homemade meals (which inevitably equal healthier meals), and minimizing those situations of staring blankly into your refrigerator, wondering what to eat for dinner. Do I plan my meals? Sometimes. Ironically, I think that if cooking wasn’t my job, I would plan our family meals much more. But because I’m in the business of dreaming up recipes for this blog and for other publications, I often end up with random, non-coordinated dishes in my fridge, which then become our breakfast, lunch and dinner. For now, we are thinking of publishing one meal plan a season, while maintaining regular, single-recipe post programming the rest of the time. Not changing anything about the blog! Just adding to what’s already here. This is our meal plan for the Summer of 2017. I tried hard to make it comprehensive, practical, and budget-friendly, but also not boring and really delicious. It all starts out with cooking a big pot of chickpeas and making a batch of almond milk, and most of the recipes stem from there. We are splitting this plan into two parts. This first part will focus on the shopping list, prep, breakfast and lunch recipes. The second part is here, and it’s all about dinner and dessert. Here we go! Menu (for dinner and dessert recipes, see Part 2) Breakfast Almond Pulp Lime Ginger Granola Overnight Berry Chia Oats Lunch Loaded Veggie Chickpea Salad Basil Zucchini Chowder Dinner Cauliflower Chickpea Fajitas Zucchini Kimchi Tacos Dessert Peach and Blackberry Crisp *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free and will make enough for a week, for 2-3 people Shopping List (print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, it’s got all the ingredients you’ll need for the recipes in this meal plan. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Produce Vegetables - 1 cauliflower head - 1 small broccoli head - 5-7 small to medium zucchini - 3 corn ears or 1 corn ear and 2 1/­­2 cups frozen corn - 1 of each green and red (or yellow, or orange) bell peppers - 1 poblano or jalapeno pepper - 2 portobello mushrooms - 2 medium carrots - 1 large and 1 small red onion - 2 yellow onions - 1-2 garlic heads (6-7 cloves) - 1-inch piece ginger - 2 avocados - 3-4 radishes (optional) Fruits - 3-4 limes - 3-4 lemons - berries: 1 pint fresh blueberries or 8 oz frozen, 1 pint fresh raspberries or 8 oz frozen, 1 pint strawberries – fresh (optional) - 1 cup blackberries – fresh or frozen - 3 ripe peaches or nectarines Herbs - 1 bunch (about 2 cups) basil - 1 bunch dill - 1 bunch cilantro - parsley (optional) Bulk - 1 1/­­2 cups dried chickpeas - 2 1/­­2 cups raw almonds or 2 cups almonds and 1/­­2 cup walnuts/­­other nuts of choice - 3/­­4 cup pumpkin or sunflower seeds - 3/­­4 cup chia seeds - 3 cups gluten-free old fashioned rolled oats - 1/­­4 – 1/­­2 cup unsweetened shredded coconut Other - 1 13.5 oz can light unsweetened Thai coconut milk - 1 can green or black olives - about 1 cup kimchi - tortillas of choice (corn for gf) - sun-dried tomatoes packed in olive oil (optional) - vanilla ice cream to serve with the fruit crisp (optional) Pantry /­­ Refrigerator Staples - white miso paste - sunflower butter /­­ tahini /­­ almond butter - Dijon mustard - Sriracha or chili sauce of choice - neutral coconut oil - maple syrup - coconut sugar - arrowroot powder (optional) - vanilla extract (optional) - kombu (optional) - capers (optional) Spices - whole cumin seeds - whole coriander seeds - red pepper flakes - smoked paprika - chili powder - garlic powder - cayenne pepper - black peppercorns - bay leaves (optional) Day by Day Prep List Saturday Night (Night Before Main Prep Day): These are just quick tasks that need to be done the day before your main prep day. Soaking nuts and beans helps rid them of phytic acid, which makes them easier to digest. It also kickstarts the germination process, making the nuts and beans more nutritious. - Soak 1 cup of almonds overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. You may need to repeat it later in a week to make more almond milk if needed more for granola. - Soak 1 1/­­2 cups dried chickpeas overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. Sunday (Main Prep Day): This is your main prep day, which you can also split into multiple days, depending on your schedule. You will find all the recipes for this prep day in this post, which includes two breakfast options and two lunch options for the whole week, as well as some simple prep for the dinners during the week. - Make almond milk for the overnight oats and granola, reserve the leftover almond pulp for the granola and fruit crumble. - Make the Almond Pulp Ginger Lime Granola - Cook the chickpeas to be used in the soup, fajitas, tacos and salad, reserve the cooking liquid for the soup. - Make the Overnight Berry Chia Oats - Make the Creamy Salad Dressing and the Loaded Veggie Chickpea Salad - Make the Zucchini and Basil Corn Chowder - Mix the Fajita Spice - Prep the veggies for the Fajitas Monday Night: Make the fajitas to have for dinner on Monday, Tuesday, and possibly Wednesday nights. This will be fairly quick, since you already prepped the vegetables and spice blend during prep day. Bake the crumble for dessert on Monday or Tuesday night, it’s quick and you will have enough for dessert for the rest of the week. The recipes for the fajitas and the crumble are in Part 2. - Make the Fajitas - Bake the Crumble (+ second batch of almond milk if you didn’t make it on prep day) Wednesday/­­Thursday night: Once you’ve finished eating the fajitas, prepare the Kimchi Zucchini Tacos for dinner starting Wednesday or Thursday night and until the end of the week. They are a very quick, weeknight friendly dish. These tacos would also work well as a lunch, if you need a break from the soup and salad. The recipe for the tacos is in Part 2. - Make the Tacos Recipes 1. Once you try making almond milk at home, it will be hard to go back to the store-bought kind, since it’s infinitely more delicious and affordable. In this meal plan, we also show you how to utilize the almond pulp that is left over from making almond milk in an addictive granola recipe. You will likely need to make two batches of almond milk throughout the week. You can make the first batch (to use for the granola and overnight oats) during the prep day, and the second batch on the day that you make the crisp, which will give you more milk to serve with the granola. You can also make both batches during the prep day. Almond Milk   Print Serves: about 4½ cups Ingredients 1 cup almond - soaked overnight, drained and rinsed 4 cups purified water Instructions Combine the almonds with the water in an upright blender, blend until smooth. Strain the milk through a nut milk bag into a jar or bottle. Squeeze the pulp dry as much as possible and reserve the almond pulp to use for the granola and crumble. Store the milk in the refrigerator. 3.5.3226 2. This Ginger-Lime Granola is made with the pulp, leftover from making almond milk. Besides being zero waste, this recipe is also incredibly delicious, with bright flavors from ginger and lime, rich notes from shredded coconut, and crunch from pumpkin and chia seeds. It tastes great served with almond milk and fresh berries. Almond Pulp Ginger-Lime Granola   Print Ingredients reserved almond pulp from making almond milk ¼ - ½ cup unsweetened shredded coconut ½ cup pumpkin or sunflower seeds ¼ cup chia seeds 2 tablespoons melted neutral coconut oil ¼ cup maple syrup 1 tablespoon grated ginger zest of 1 lime juice ½ lime pinch of sea salt Instructions Preheat oven to 325° F (160° C). Combine the almond pulp, shredded coconut, pumpkin/­­sunflower seeds, chia seeds, coconut oil, maple syrup, ginger, lime zest and juice, and a pinch of sea salt in a large bowl. Mix thoroughly. Spread the granola mixture on a parchment paper-covered baking sheet in a somewhat even layer and toast for 20 minutes. Remove from the oven and stir, breaking apart any large clumps. Place the sheet back in the oven and turn off the heat. Leave to dry in the oven for 1 hour. If granola is not completely dry by that time, turn the oven back on the lowest temperature and let dry for another 30 minutes or until completely dry and crispy. If you have convection oven, that setting is really useful here. Keep the granola in an airtight glass container at room temperature. Serve with almond milk and berries. 3.5.3226 3. Cooking a big pot of beans on a Sunday is always a good idea, since you will then have a solid base for all kinds of meals throughout the week. In this meal plan, the chickpeas are utilized in every savory recipe, making the dishes more nourishing and satisfying. Pot of Chickpeas   Print Ingredients 1½ cups dried chickpeas - soaked overnight, drained and rinsed 3-4 garlic cloves - crushed with a knife half a yellow onion 1-2 bay leaves (optional) 2-inch piece kombu (optional) sea salt Instructions While the granola is baking, combine the chickpeas with plenty of purified water in a soup pot. Add the garlic, onion, bay leaves and kombu, if using. The water level should be about 4 inches above the beans. Bring the chickpeas to a boil over high heat, lower the heat to a simmer and cook for 30 minutes. Check for doneness. If the chickpeas are soft, salt the water generously and cook for another 10 minutes, until the chickpeas are tender but still intact. Simmer longer, before adding salt, if chickpeas are not yet soft. Drain the chickpeas, reserving the cooking liquid. Youll need 1 cup of it for this meal plan, for the chowder. Optionally, freeze the rest of the liquid for future use in place of vegetable broth in any dish. 3.5.3226 4. These overnight oats are a breeze to put together and make for a satisfying, summery breakfast. We like our overnight oats to be chia-heavy, so this is something between a chia pudding and overnight oats, layered with juicy summer berries. Overnight Berry Chia Oats   Print Ingredients 2 cups rolled oats ½ cup chia seeds 2¾ cups homemade almond milk - from above ⅓ cup maple syrup splash of vanilla extract (optional) about 2 cups mix of fresh or frozen blueberries and raspberries, or any other berries of choice Instructions While the granola is baking and the chickpeas are simmering, combine the rolled oats and chia seeds in a large bowl. Add the almond milk, maple syrup and vanilla extract, if using, and stir to combine thoroughly. Spoon the oats between 2-3 clean jars in layers, alternating them with fresh or frozen blueberries, raspberries or any other berries of choice. Cover the jars with their lids and place in the refrigerator overnight. Enjoy for breakfast. 3.5.3226 5. I make this simple, creamy dressing all the time. It’s perfect in salads, as well as a sauce or dip for so many veggie dishes. Universal Creamy Salad Dressing   Print Ingredients 2 tablespoons white miso paste 2 tablespoons sunflower butter, tahini or almond butter 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon sriracha or other chili sauce of choice juice of 2 large lemons, plus more if needed Instructions Combine all the ingredients, with the exception of the lemon juice, in a glass jar or a bowl. Mix until smooth. Add the lemon juice and stir until well combined. Store refrigerated in an airtight glass container. 3.5.3226 6. This rainbow salad is loaded with nourishing summer vegetables, chickpeas, olives, herbs and seeds. At the base of the salad is garlicky, sautéed broccoli, which keeps much better than greens and makes for a really sturdy bed for the veggies. When slathered in the creamy dressing (above), this salad is completely irresistible. Loaded Veggie Chickpea Salad   Print Ingredients ½ cauliflower head - chopped 1 cup cooked chickpeas - from above ¼ cup toasted sunflower or pumpkin seeds 1 small to medium carrot - shaved into ribbons with a vegetable peeler kernels from 1 corn ear ½ cup olives - halved or quartered ⅛ red onion - chopped ¼ cup chopped dill ¼ cup chopped parsley (optional) handful basil leaves - torn (optional) 3-4 radishes - sliced (optional) about 2 tablespoons chopped sun dried tomatoes (optional) 1 tablespoon capers (optional) 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 head broccoli - cut into florets sea salt 3 garlic cloves - sliced freshly ground black pepper about 6 tablespoons Universal Creamy Salad Dressing, plus more for serving - from above Instructions Place the cauliflower into a food processor and pulse a few times into rice-sized pieces. Combine the cauliflower rice, chickpeas, sunflower or pumpkin seeds, carrots, corn, olives, onion, dill, parsley and basil, as well as the radishes, sun-dried tomatoes and capers, if using, in a large bowl. Warm the coconut oil in a sauté pan over medium heat. Add the broccoli and salt and sauté until bright green, for about 5-7 minutes. Add the garlic and stir it around for 30 seconds, until fragrant. Add the garlicky broccoli to the bowl with the salad. Season the salad with freshly ground black pepper and add about 6 tablespoons of the Creamy Salad Dressing. Toss to combine well. Store the salad refrigerated in an airtight container. Serve with more dressing. 3.5.3226 7. One of our favorite, easy summer soups, with delicate flavors of zucchini and basil, sweetness from corn, and creaminess from coconut milk. It makes for the perfect, light warm weather lunch. Zucchini and Basil Corn Chowder   Print Ingredients 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 teaspoon cumin seeds 1 teaspoon ground coriander (optional) pinch of red pepper flakes 1 yellow onion - chopped sea salt freshly ground black pepper 2½ cups fresh or frozen corn kernels 3-4 small zucchini - cubed 3 garlic cloves - sliced juice of ½ lemon 1 can unsweetened light Thai coconut milk 1 cup reserved chickpea broth - from above 1 cup cooked chickpeas - from above 1 packed cup basil leaves, plus more for serving Instructions Warm the coconut oil in a medium soup pot over medium heat. Add the spices, onion, a pinch of salt and black pepper, and sauté for 5 minutes, until onion is translucent. Add the corn and another pinch of salt and sauté for another 5 minutes. Add the zucchini and garlic, and stir around for 1-2 minutes, until the garlic is fragrant. Add the lemon juice and let it absorb for about 1 minute. Add the coconut milk, chickpea broth and chickpeas and bring to a boil. Remove from heat. Measure 1½ cups of the soup into an upright blender, add the basil, and blend into a chunky puree. Return the pureed soup back to the pot and mix it in. Serve the soup garnished with more basil. Store refrigerated in an airtight container. 3.5.3226 8. Use this spice mix for the Cauliflower Chickpea Fajitas, as well as in any other dishes, where a piquant savoriness would be welcome. Fajita Spice   Print Ingredients 2 tablespoons chili powder ½ tablespoon sea salt ½ tablespoon smoked paprika ½ tablespoon ground cumin, preferably freshly ground ½ tablespoon coconut sugar ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper 1 teaspoon garlic powder (optional) a few grinds of black pepper Instructions Combine all the ingredients in a small jar with a tight fitting lid. Close the jar and shake until well-combined. 3.5.3226 9. Prep the vegetables for the Cauliflower Chickpea Fajitas ahead of time, in order to simplify your weeknight dinner. Fajita Vegetable Prep   Print Ingredients ½ cauliflower - cut into florets 2 portobello mushrooms - sliced 1 large red onion - chopped 1 red, yellow or orange bell pepper - seeded and sliced 1 green bell pepper - seeded and sliced 1 poblano or jalapeno pepper - seeded and sliced Instructions Prep all the vegetables as specified in the ingredients list. Store the chopped cauliflower and mushrooms in separate containers. Store the chopped onion and all sliced peppers in one container. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Whipped Chocolate Chia Pudding Summer Greek Salad Pink Soup with Roasted Onions and Broccoli Lemongrass Mango Curry with Toasted Pumpkin Seeds .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 1 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Easy as Chocolate Pie

November 14 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Easy as Chocolate PieThis decadent vegan chocolate pie assembles in minutes. After some time in the fridge, its ready to serve. What can be easier than that? Easy as Chocolate Pie This decadent chocolate pie assembles in minutes. - 12 ounces vegan semisweet chocolate chips - 1/­­4 cup almond milk or other nondairy milk - 1 tablespoon coconut oil - 1/­­2 cup chopped nuts, optional - 1/­­2 cup sweetened dried cranberries, cherries, or blueberries (optional) - 1 vegan chocolate cookie crust ((Keeblers brand is vegan-friendly)) - Chocolate curls or chopped nuts, for garnish - In a saucepan, combine the chocolate chips, almond milk, and coconut oil over medium heat. Cook, stirring until the chocolate and coconut oil are melted. Stir in the nuts and dried fruit, if using, until well combined. - Transfer the chocolate mixture to the crust and spread evenly. Refrigerate for at least 3 hours to firm up before serving. Garnish the top with chocolate curls. Recipe from Cook the Pantry (C) 2015 by Robin Robertson. Photo by Annie Oliverio. Used by permission Vegan Heritage Press LLC. Save Save The post Easy as Chocolate Pie appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Roasted Pumpkin Garlic Lasagna

October 30 2017 Meatless Monday 

Sugar pumpkin is slow roasted with garlic, then seasoned with oregano and sage in this Autumnal lasagna. Roasted garlic, cardamom and nutmeg deepen flavor of the pumpkin ricotta, while dried cranberries and apricots are sprinkled throughout to lend their complimentary fruit flavors. This recipe comes to us from Donna of Apron Strings. Serves 12 - 1 package lasagna noodles - 1 2 pound sugar pumpkin - 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided - 6 cloves garlic, peeled - 15 ounces part skin ricotta cheese - 1 15 ounce can pumpkin puree* - 1 teaspoon cardamom - 1/­­2 teaspoon nutmeg - 10 green onions, thinly sliced - 1 cup dried, sweetened cranberries - 1/­­2 cup dried apricots, diced - 1 tablespoon dried oregano - 1 tablespoon dried sage - 8 ounces lowfat mozzarella cheese, divided - 4 ounces parmesan cheese, grated *please note that canned pumpkin is not the same as canned pumpkin pie filling, which should not be substituted. Preheat an oven to 350 degrees. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over medium-high heat. When water boils, cook lasagna noodles according to package directions, or until al dente. Scoop the seeds and strings out of the pumpkin. Cut the pumpkin flesh into large chunks. Toss with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil and place on a baking sheet, cut size down. Scatter the garlic cloves over the pumpkin pieces. Roast 60-90 minutes, or until the pumpkin begins to brown and is tender when pricked with a fork. Remove from the oven and let cool slightly. Using a fork, smash the garlic cloves together in a medium sized bowl. Add the pumpkin puree, green onions, cardamom and nutmeg to the bowl. Stir together with the fork. When the pumpkin has cooled, remove its skin and cut into smaller cubes. Line a 13 by 11 inch baking dish with a layer of lasagna noodles. Top 1/­­4 of the ricotta garlic mixture and another layer of noodles. Top the 2nd layer of noodles with about 1/­­4 of the ricotta garlic mixture, then 1/­­3 of the cranberries, 1/­­3 of the diced apricot and 1/­­3 of the roasted pumpkin cubes. Season with 1/­­3 of the oregano and sage. Finish the layer with 1/­­3 of the mozzarella and parmesan cheeses. Repeat this layering process 2 more times, or until you are out of noodles, pumpkin, dried fruit, spices and cheeses. Bake for 30-45 minutes, or until the lasagnas edges are browned and bubbling. The post Roasted Pumpkin Garlic Lasagna appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Stuffed Pumpkins And Creamy Mushroom Sauce

October 13 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

How do you make a fall-inspired dish even more festive? Serve it inside a pumpkin! Brownble‘s stuffed pumpkin recipe is the ultimate autumn feast that is sure to get you in the spirit of all things fall. A delicious mixture of flavors from fragrant sage, cranberries, and crunchy pecans, your kitchen will smell amazing while cooking this up. The filling can be served in individual small pumpkins, or put in a large pumpkin for the middle of your table. What a great centerpiece that would make, right?? And don’t forget to top it off with some amazing creamy mushroom sauce! Here’s how to make everything: View the printable recipe here. The post Stuffed Pumpkins And Creamy Mushroom Sauce appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Apple Cranberry Oatmeal Bread

October 9 2017 Meatless Monday 

Applesauce and oatmeal are the basis of this hearty breakfast bread. Those breakfast flavors come together with cinnamon, cloves and dried cranberries, topped with a brown sugar nut streusel. This recipe comes to us from Patrice of Circle B Kitchen. Serves 12 For the nut streusal: - 1/­­4 cup light brown sugar - 1/­­4 cup walnuts or pecans, chopped - 1/­­4 teaspoon ground cinnamon For the Apple Cranberry Oatmeal Bread: - 2 eggs - 1 1/­­4 cups unsweetened applesauce - 1/­­3 cup canola oil - 1/­­4 cup plain yogurt - 1 1/­­4 cup all purpose flour - 1/­­2 cup sugar - 1 1/­­2 teaspoons baking powder - 3/­­4 teaspoon cinnamon - 1/­­2 teaspoon baking soda - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1/­­4 teaspoon ground nutmeg - pinch ground cloves - 1/­­4 cup dried cranberries - 1/­­4 cup raisins - 1 cup old fashioned oats Preheat an oven to 350 degrees. Prepare a loaf pan with a light layer of butter and flour. Toss the brown sugar, nuts and cinnamon together in a small bowl. Set aside. Whisk the eggs, sugar, applesauce, oil and yogurt together in a medium bowl. Whisk the flour, baking powder, cinnamon, baking soda, cinnamon, salt, nutmeg and cloves together in a separate large bowl. Stir in the oats. Toss the dried cranberries and raisins with 1/­­2 teaspoon of the flour mixture in a separate small bowl. Set aside. Pour the wet ingredients over the dry and fold with a spatula until just combined, taking care not to over mix. Fold in the fried fruit, taking care to ensure the fruit is evenly distributed in the batter. Pour the batter into the prepared loaf pan. Scatter the nut streusel mixture over the top, pressing it into the batter with your fingers. Place the loaf pan in the oven and bake 50-60 minutes, or until a sharp knife comes out clean. Cool for 10 minutes, then run a knife along the edges. Invert the loaf onto a plate, cut into slices and enjoy! The post Apple Cranberry Oatmeal Bread appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Meatless Monday Pittsburgh Hosts Vegan Night with the Pittsburgh Pirates

October 2 2017 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Pittsburgh Hosts Vegan Night with the Pittsburgh PiratesLast Monday, September 26th, Meatless Monday Pittsburgh hosted the first ever Vegan Night with the Pittsburgh Pirates! The event was a great success with over 300 tickets sold. Each ticket included a corner box seat for the Pirates vs. Orioles game, as well as access to the exclusive vegan menu. Guests dined on delicious meatless fare including: - Pretzels, chips and dips (house chips with French onion dip, corn chips with smashed avocado salsa, pretzel sticks with local PA maple mustard) - Power chop salad (kale, cabbage, grilled vegetables, garbanzo beans, sunflower seeds, pepitas, citrus-dijon dressing) - Ultimate vegan burger (beefless beef patty, lettuce, tomato, dill pickles, vegan house sauce, sesame seed bun) - Buffalo cauliflower with vegan ranch dipping sauce - Sweet potato tacos (black beans, cilantro, salsa verde, tortilla threads, nondairy sour cream, flour tortilla) - Watermelon and berries for dessert     The delicious meat-free menu was enjoyed by vegetarians, vegans, and flexitarians alike. Everyone left the ballpark full and the Pirates bringing home a win was the cherry on top! The post Meatless Monday Pittsburgh Hosts Vegan Night with the Pittsburgh Pirates appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut + Giveaway

September 27 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut + GiveawayThis post was created in partnership with Raw Rutes, fermenting crock giveaway below. I grew up with home-pickling and fermenting as the norm. Food in the Soviet Union was not only scarce, but also highly seasonal, so if you didn’t take care to preserve some tomatoes or cucumbers for the winter, you wouldn’t be able to taste any until the next summer. My mom made sure to stock our cool basement with jars of pickles, tomatoes, and fruit preserves every summer, as did pretty much every woman around. Other common fermentation projects included kombucha (or the ‘tea mushroom’ as we call it) way before it was cool, kefir, and of course sauerkraut. I can’t say that I’ve continued all these traditions. I do make my own kombucha, but I can’t motivate myself to do a big batch of pickles, and you can buy such good ones in the store anyways. Same goes for tomatoes, especially since California grown ones are available all year round, and will do if a big craving hits. Sauerkraut is a different story though, because it takes very little work, and the return is so good. I’ve fermented sauerkraut in jars and in big pots, inventing weighted contraptions out of any appropriately-sized object I could find, but what I’ve always dreamed about is a nice, clay fermenting crock with custom weights that fit inside perfectly. The two things that have stopped me from getting a proper fermenting crock were the hefty price tag and the considerable size that they usually come in, which is not very countertop-friendly. I was incredibly excited when Raw Rutes reached out about their Yaozu 2 Liter Fermenting Crock, because it addressed those two points perfectly. It’s petite and sits on my countertops very compactly, yet it can still fit two small-medium heads of shredded cabbage. It’s also quite a bit more affordable than traditional crocks. I love that it’s a clean white too, because they are often brown – not my favorite color, at least for my kitchen. If you’re not familiar with fermenting crocks, the main thing to know is that they make the whole fermenting process really easy and safe. All you have to do is shred whatever vegetables/­­fruits you want to ferment, salt them with either salt or salty brine until they are covered with water, weigh them down, and leave them be for a few weeks while they magically transform. The natural clay that the Yaozu crock is made with makes the environment clean and safe, and the water channel up top takes away the need for an airlock. The crock comes with clay weights, which fit inside perfectly, and ensure that all your veggies are submerged in the brine, which prevents any mold from developing. It’s truly a magical pot. For my first fermenting project, I wanted to do a sauerkraut that was a bit more colorful and exciting than the traditional kind. I used purple cabbage together with blueberries and apple, with a bit of coriander seeds for extra interest in flavor. It took about a week and a half, and came out really delicious. The predominant flavor is of sauerkraut, but there are juicy, sweet and salty bursts from the blueberries, as well as a bit of crunch and sourness from the apple. I can’t wait to experiment more. I even know my next project – the fruit kimchi from Sandor Ellix Katz’ book, The Art of Fermentation. Making your own kraut/­­any fermented vegetables is a really addicting activity. Once you try your first batch, you won’t be able to stop, which is great, since fermented foods are so nourishing. Probiotics are on the tip of everyone’s tongue nowadays – we’ve all heard that having a balanced microbiome is key for good health. Completing little fermenting projects at home and enjoying the results daily is the perfect, incredibly affordable way to contribute to that gut health of yours :) Giveaway: Raw Rutes, the charming online shop full of back-to-basics kitchen tools, is giving away their Yaozu 2 Liter Fermenting Crock to one Golubka Kitchen reader. To enter to win, leave a comment here with your favorite item from the Raw Rutes offering or favorite fermented food until October 11th, 2017 (USA only). Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut   Print Serves: about 2 large jars Ingredients 2 small-medium heads of red cabbage 2-3 tablespoons sea salt 2 green apples - peeled and sliced into 1-inch sticks 12 oz blueberries 2 teaspoons coriander seeds (optional) Instructions Rinse your cabbages and remove the outer leaves. Save a few of the leaves and set them aside. Cut the cabbages in half and cut out the core. Cut each cabbage half into quarters and shred on a mandolin slicer or with a sharp knife. Put the shredded cabbage in a large bowl and mix in the salt, then massage it well until the cabbage starts to release juices. Let the cabbage sit in the bowl for about 30 minutes to release more juices. Mix in the apple slices, blueberries, and coriander with your hands. Pack everything tightly into your fermenting crock using your fist. Cover the surface with the reserved cabbage leaves - this will make sure that nothing will float to the top. Place the ceramic weights on top. At this time, all the contents of the crock, including the ceramic weights, should be completely submerged in juices. If thats not happening, let everything sit for a few more hours and see if the cabbage releases more juices to submerge. If there is still not enough liquid after a few hours, make brine with 1 cup filtered water and 1 teaspoon sea salt. Pour the brine into the crock, until the weights are just covered with the liquid. Its important to have everything submerged in liquid at all times to prevent any mold from forming. Pour brine or filtered water into the water channel and cover the crock with its lid. Let everything ferment for 1-2 weeks, tasting periodically, until the flavor is sour to your liking. Refill the water in the water channel as it evaporates. After a few days of fermenting, the brine should be nice and bubbly. If you have a cool basement, you can also start out the fermentation in a warmer room for the first week, and then move the crock to the basement to finish off the process (the basement should not be too cold!). Once your sauerkraut is done, pack it into clean glass jars, covered with brine, and keep it refrigerated. Save some of leftover brine to use as a starter in your next fermentation project, which will kick-start the process much quicker. You can also take little shots of the brine for a nice probiotic, booster. Have fun! 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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No Bake Blueberry Coconut Bars

September 6 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

No Bake Blueberry Coconut Bars It’s been difficult for me to contain my excitement about these Blueberry Coconut Bars ever since I nailed the recipe a few weeks ago. They check all the boxes: easy/­­no-bake, gluten-free, vegan, refined sugar-free/­­not too sweet, fun to put together, and so so delicious. It’s the perfect recipe for those wanting to hold on to summer with all their might. These bars are made up of three complementary layers: there’s a crumbly, no-bake ‘shortbread’ crust, followed by a rich coconut creme layer, which is then topped with a juicy, no-cook blueberry chia jam. The combination is truly heavenly, especially since this is a lighter dessert that won’t weigh you down. You can see all the steps of the cooking process in the video we made above (P.S. We have a Youtube channel with lots of cooking videos, you can subscribe here). These bars are a definite, universal crowd pleaser – absolutely all the friends and family that have tasted them genuinely loved them. They would be the perfect, easy yet impressive dessert to bring to a gathering. Or just make the bars for yourself/­­your family for the week ahead, they’ll keep well in the refrigerator. Hope you’ll give these a try :) No Bake Blueberry Coconut Bars   Print Serves: 16 square bars Ingredients for the blueberry chia jam 3 cups frozen blueberries - thawed (do not use fresh, non-frozen blueberries for this recipe) juice of 1 small lemon 3 tablespoons maple syrup 3 tablespoons chia seeds 3 tablespoons chia meal (ground chia seeds) for the shortbread ¾ cup gluten-free rolled oats 12 Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in hot water for 10 minutes ¾ cup coconut flour ¼ cup melted coconut oil 1 tablespoon lemon juice pinch of sea salt for the coconut creme 1 can full fat Thai coconut milk - refrigerated overnight to separate fat from water ½ cup unsweetened dried shredded coconut 2 tablespoons maple syrup splash of vanilla extract Instructions to make the blueberry chia jam Thoroughly mix all the ingredients in a medium bowl. Cover and refrigerate for a few hours or overnight, until the chia seeds have bloomed and the mixture resembles a jam-like consistency. Mash the berries partially with a potato masher, leaving plenty of them whole. to make the shortbread Put the oats in a food processor and grind them into a flour. Drain the dates and add them to the food processor, along with the rest of the ingredients. Process until you have a well-combined dough that sticks together when pressed between your fingers. Prepare an 8 x 8 baking dish by lining it with parchment paper, extending the paper up the sides of the dish. Press the shortbread into the bottom of the dish in an even layer. Set aside. to make the coconut creme Scoop the separated coconut fat from the top of the can of coconut milk into a food processor (use the leftover coconut water in smoothies, soups, porridges or lattes). Add the shredded coconut, maple syrup and vanilla extract to the food processor and process until well combined. Be careful not to over-process, as the coconut fat can separate and curdle. to assemble the bars Spread the coconut creme over the shortbread in a thin, even layer. Take the blueberry jam our of the refrigerator and spread it on top of the coconut creme in another even layer. Place the dish into the refrigerator for a few hours or overnight, for the shortbread and coconut layer to set. Once the shortbread and the coconut layer have set, lift out the bar from the dish onto a cutting board, using the extended edges of the parchment paper. Cut into 16 squares or any size/­­shape of choice. Keep refrigerated. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Raw Multigrain Pear Ginger Cakes with Macadamia Whipped Cream Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits -- Ice Cream Sunday Peach and Avocado Overnight Oats with Moringa Powder Rose and Lavender Parfait and a Breakfast with Friends .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post No Bake Blueberry Coconut Bars appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Blueberry Crumble Cheesecake

August 18 2017 Veganpassion 

Blueberry Crumble Cheesecake Berry season is a wonderful season! My neighbor always hands me a bowl of his fresh garden berries and I get to enjoy them. In his garden 5 minutes feel like a whole week of vacation and I'm always very thankful if I get the chance to plant some onions or pick some cherries. I wish I had my own garden but with all the traveling right now it's not possible. To thank my neighbor I give him the result of his idea giving berries to me. This time it was a blueberry crumble cheesecake. Perfect for the season and very enjoyable. The almond flour in the cheese cream for it's creamy consistency. Just try it! Makes one cake 9,4 inch diameter. For the dough: 1 3/­­4 whole spelt flour 1/­­2 cup raw cane sugar 1 stick + 1 tbsp. vegan butter 2-3 tbsp. dairy-free milk + some fat for the form For the filling: 28 oz soy curd 1/­­2 cup starch 1/­­2 tsp. vanilla, grounded 1/­­2 cup raw cane sugar 4 heaped tbsp. almond flour 1 good pinch kala manak salt 1 pinch cinnamon 1 pinch saffron threads 1/­­3 cup almond flakes 4.2 oz blueberries 2 small apples In a mixing bowl mix together flour, sugar, butter, salt and dairy-free milk with a fork. If the tough gets crumbly you can knead the dough with your hands. Use a springform and grease it with butter. Then push 2/­­3 of the thin dough into the form. Form a 1,5 inch high edge. For the filling mix 4 tbsp. of curd, starch, vanilla, raw cane sugar, almond flour, kala manak and saffron. Then stir in the rest of the curd. Spread 3/­­4 of the cheese cream on the dough. Peel apples if needed and cut them into fine slices. Then spread them on the cream. Mix the blueberries with the rest of the cream and spread them on the apples. Use the rest of the dough and the almonds as crumbles. Bake at 356°F (180°C) top/­­bottom heat for 50-60 minutes. Let cake completely cool off. Enjoy with family and friends!

Vegan Cherry Blueberry Crisp – No Bake

August 7 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Cherry Blueberry Crisp – No BakeEasy 1 Pot No Bake Cherry Blueberry Crisp. Seasonal Berries cooked to a compote and topped with Toasted Crisp Oat crumble. Serve with favorite ice cream. Vegan Berry Crisp Recipe. Can be gluten-free, nut-free. It has been hitting 90s this past week in the PNW. Who wants to bake in this heat! I made these stove top No Bake crisps the other day and they worked out amazingly. I generally use whichever berries I have on hand. For this post I used cherries and Wild blueberries.  The blueberries add an amazing color and flavor with the tangy cherries. Use any seasonal berries of choice. The crisp is Easily made gluten-free with oat flour or other gluten-free flour. You can also bake the mix for 30 to 40 minutes. Easy, Gorgeous and perfect to use up all the fruit. 1 Skillet and 30 Minutes to Berry Bliss. Continue reading: Vegan Cherry Blueberry Crisp – No BakeThe post Vegan Cherry Blueberry Crisp – No Bake appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 2

July 20 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 2 Here comes Part 2 of our Plant-Based Summer meal plan, which we created in hopes of helping some of you get more plants into your life on a day-to-day basis. We aimed for efficiency, but also tried to come up with recipes that are inspired and delicious. Part 2 focuses on dinner and dessert only. There are tacos and fajitas, as well as a juicy fruit crisp. To see the breakfast and lunch recipes, as well as the grocery shopping list for the entire meal plan, head to Part 1. If you use this meal plan, we would appreciate your feedback a whole lot. Tell us which parts were useful and where we could improve. These meal plans are a ton of fun to come up with, but they are also a ton of work, so we want to make sure that we are putting our energy into something that’s practical to you. Providing that everything goes well, we’ll come out with the next meal plan in the fall. Until then, we are back to our regular schedule of two recipe posts a week :) Menu (see Part 1 for breakfast and lunch recipes) Breakfast Almond Pulp Lime Ginger Granola Overnight Berry Chia Oats Lunch Loaded Veggie Chickpea Salad Basil Zucchini Chowder Dinner Cauliflower Chickpea Fajitas Zucchini Kimchi Tacos Dessert Peach and Blackberry Crisp *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free and will make enough for a week, for 2-3 people Day by Day Prep List Monday Night: Make the fajitas to have for dinner on Monday, Tuesday, and possibly Wednesday nights. This will be fairly quick, since you already prepped the vegetables and spice blend during prep day. Bake the crumble for dessert on Monday or Tuesday night, it’s quick and you will have enough for dessert for the rest of the week.  - Make the Cauliflower Chickpea Fajitas - Bake the Crisp (+ second batch of almond milk if you didnt make it on prep day) Wednesday/­­Thursday night: Once you’ve finished eating the fajitas, prepare the Kimchi Zucchini Tacos for dinner starting Wednesday or Thursday night and until the end of the week. They are a very quick, weeknight-friendly dish. These tacos would also work well as a lunch, if you need a break from the soup and salad. - Make the Zucchini Kimchi Tacos   Recipes 1. These fajitas make for a very satisfying dinner, and they taste like the real deal, too. They utilize the chickpeas and half of the cauliflower, left over from Part 1, as well as the piquant fajita spice. When wrapped in a tortilla, the spicy onions and peppers, meaty portobello wedges, caramelized cauliflower, and chickpeas make up the perfect pocket of flavor, especially when finished off with all the fixings. Cauliflower Chickpea Fajitas   Print Ingredients 4 tablespoons neutral coconut oil 1 cup cooked chickpeas (from part 1) fajita spice mix - (recipe in part 1) ½ cauliflower - cut into florets (left over from part 1) juice of 2-3 limes - divided 1 large red onion - chopped 1 red, yellow or orange bell pepper - seeded and sliced 1 green bell pepper - seeded and sliced 1 poblano or jalapeno pepper - seeded and sliced 2 portobello mushrooms - sliced tortillas of choice (corn for gf) 1 avocado - sliced, for serving cilantro - for serving vegan sour cream or yogurt - for serving (optional) Instructions Warm 1 tablespoon of coconut oil in a large cast iron pan over medium heat. Add the chickpeas, sprinkle with the fajita spice and sauté until golden. Remove the chickpeas from the pan and set aside. Add another tablespoon of oil to the pan, add the cauliflower florets in a single layer, sprinkle with the fajita spice and cook for about 3 minutes, until the underside is golden. Flip the florets, sprinkle with more of the fajita spice and cook for another 3 minutes or until the other side is golden. Pour the juice of ½-1 lime over florets and cook until it evaporates, stirring. Remove the cauliflower from the pan and set it aside. Add one more tablespoon of the oil to the pan, followed by the onion and all the peppers. Sprinkle with the fajita spice and sauté for about 8 minutes, until the onion the vegetables are soft and golden in places. Pour the juice of 1 lime over the vegetables and stir them around until it evaporates. Push the vegetables to one side of the pan and add another tablespoon of the oil to the emptied space. Add the mushrooms in a single layer, sprinkle with the fajita spice and let them cook for about 3 minutes, until the underside is golden. Flip the mushroom slices, sprinkle with more of the fajita spice and cook for another 3 minutes, or until the other side is golden as well. Pour the juice of ½-1 lime over the mushrooms and stir around until evaporates. Stir the onion-pepper mixture into the mushrooms and turn off the heat. Warm the tortillas, if desired, and keep them wrapped in a kitchen towel. To serve, place a few pieces of the cauliflower in the middle of the tortilla, followed by a small handful of the pepper and mushroom mixture and some chickpeas. Top with avocado slices, cilantro leaves and sour-cream, if using. Repeat with the other tortillas, as you go, and enjoy. 3.5.3226 2. These tacos are incredibly easy to make, but mindblowingly good despite that fact. I make them at least once a week in the summer, for a reliable, no brainer-style dinner. The kimchi basically does all the work for you here, infusing the zucchini and carrots with its powerful flavor, while the creamy avocado and cilantro bring on the perfect finishing touch. Zucchini Kimchi Tacos   Print Ingredients 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 1 small to medium carrot - shaved 2-3 small to medium zucchini - spiralized or julienned about 1 cup kimchi, or more to taste ½ cup cooked chickpeas (from part 1, optional) 1 avocado - cubed handful cilantro leaves - for serving tortillas of choice (corn for gluten-free) - for serving Instructions Warm the oil in a large sauté pan. Add the carrot and zucchini and sauté for a couple of minutes, until they are just beginning to soften. Remove the pan from the heat, add the kimchi and chickpeas, if using, and toss to mix. Warm up the tortillas, if desired, and serve the zucchini-kimchi mixture inside the tortillas, topped with the cubed avocado and cilantro. 3.5.3226 3. A fruit crisp is one of the easiest desserts to make, especially in the summer, when so many fruits and berries are at the peak of their flavor. This recipe utilizes the almond pulp, left over from making almond milk, for the crisp topping, leaving no part of the almond behind! Feel free to use any other fruit or berries for this recipe, just make sure to adjust the sweetener if you have a fruit that’s less sweet, like plums. Peach and Blackberry Crisp   Print Ingredients for the filling 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 3 ripe peaches - sliced 1 cup blackberries freshly squeezed juice from ½ lemon 2 tablespoons coconut sugar or maple syrup splash of vanilla extract (optional) ½ tablespoon arrowroot powder (optional) for the topping 1 cup almond pulp (left over from making nut milk in part 1) 1 cup rolled oats sea salt ¼ cup chopped almonds, walnuts or other nuts of choice ¼ cup maple syrup ¼ cup coconut oil - soft Instructions Preheat the oven to 375° F (190° C). Oil a medium-sized baking dish or a 9-10-inch cast-iron pan and combine the rest of the filling ingredients in the pan. Toss to mix. Combine all the topping ingredients in a medium bowl and mix thoroughly with your hands. Sprinkle over the filling. Place the pan into the oven and bake for 30 minutes. Cover with parchment paper and bake for 10 more minutes, until the fruit is bubbly and the topping is golden. Enjoy right away with vanilla ice cream, if desired. Store in the refrigerator. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin

July 16 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline ChardinToday’s self-care dialogue is with Pauline Chardin, a Parisian, a pro-traveler, and the author of our favorite wanderlust blog, The Voyageur. Pauline is a freelance art director and trend consultant in fashion, who looks to travel as a steady source of inspiration. Her blog is unlike any travel blog you’ve ever seen. Each story is accompanied by photo essays that are aesthetically sensitive to their environment and attentive to details that might otherwise go unnoticed. The documented destinations are always interesting and full of beauty that feels raw and true, captured from a less expected angle. From a secluded cabin in the mountains of Central France, a Moss Temple in Japan, to a lush sculpture park in Brazil, Pauline’s got us daydreaming and plotting future adventures any chance we get. In her self-care, Pauline is refreshingly down to Earth, with a bit of that inevitable, French chic thrown into the mix. Here, she tells us about her upcoming move to the South of France as a way to be closer to nature, her bedtime and beauty routines, her ways of dealing with jet lag, why she makes a point of packing parmesan and olive oil to bring on her journeys, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Making the best of time and things is definitely a big preoccupation of mine. I like to plan and think ahead, I guess that puts me in the routine camp. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I’m in the process of becoming more of a “morning person”, we’ll be moving from Paris to the countryside next year, and I have this image of myself getting up at 6am  and having all the time of the world. I’m not there yet, but here’s a typical morning from these last weeks. I wake up at 7:30 , before my husband, open all the windows while the air is still fresh and the street not too noisy. I spend some time in the bathroom before sitting at my desk to start working on some not-too-demanding tasks. An hour or so later, I prepare breakfast for us two. We’re both mostly working from home, which gives us the leisure of enjoying rather stress-free breakfasts and the time to have a nice conversation before digging into work. Everything is rather quiet until 10am , that’s when e-mails start to arrive and phones start to ring. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I found that there are three things that help me find a deep, relaxing sleep : the first one is the Sarvangâsana posture (also supposed to keep you from growing older if you do it 30 minutes every day, but I’m far from being that disciplined), my husband giving me a head massage and watching episodes of Cosmos (I’ll never know the secrets of the universe because I always fall into the most blissful sleep after 10 minutes). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – homemade fare, like vanilla millet pudding with fresh mango and almonds. Lunch – cereals with vegetables, like polenta fries with peperonata and fresh ricotta. Generally no dessert but an espresso with a piece of chocolate. Snack – I don’t really eat much between meals, except fruits in the summer. Dinner – mostly vegetables, cold or hot depending on the season, like a beet and cucumber carpaccio with green peppers. I have fruits for dessert, cooked in the winter and fresh in the summer, often with a bit of ice cream! -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I drink Mariage Fr?res tea in the morning and rarely have more than one espresso a day, at lunch. I only break that rule in countries where the coffee is very good, in Italy of course, but also in Japan because I love their milk coffee. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I really do, but I also find that I don’t like very sweet things anymore. My rule is to almost only eat pastries I’ve prepared myself. I’ve also realized that fruits are often enough to fulfill my cravings.  -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I’m a big fan of Yotam Ottolenghi’s cooking and his sincere and generous approach to cooking, I have a few of his books, and his recipes rarely disappoint me. I have also been very inspired by my trips to Japan and Japanese wisdom in general, from their ‘it’s the journey that matters’ philosophy to their culture of bathing, or their ceramics. I find these things really help my happiness. More broadly, my way of living and eating is and was influenced by my parents, whose health would put any twenty-year old to shame! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I’ve been doing pilates and yoga for years. I try to do at least one lesson a week, but lately it’s been more small home-sessions, by myself, two or three times a week. I also love to hike and swim whenever I have the opportunity. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it?  I really enjoy it and would love to do more (hopefully having a big house instead of a small apartment will help). I’ve been working a lot lately and I’ve been finding it hard to take a break during the day to do it. It’s a pity because I know the benefits all too well! Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I feel it’s very important to be comfortable in my body, to take good care of it and to be healthy, but I don’t like to dwell too much on the idea of my own beauty. I’m much more interested in what others project. Partly because of my line of work, I’ve learned to appreciate and enjoy all the subtleties of female beauty (much more than men, I must admit). I should also mention that I work in a very feminine environment that definitely puts style and personality before plastic beauty and basic seduction. I find it very freeing! -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Like a lot of people, these last years I’ve been trying to embrace more natural products. I aspire to low maintenance but find as I get older that being a woman is definitely high maintenance. For now I put in the time because I find it relaxing and a good break from working. My favorites include Nuxe Huile prodigieuse, almond oil, Océopin pine powder scrub, and Aesop déodorant herbacé. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Not really, I think I haven’t graduated to supplements yet. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My mother often used an eyebrow pencil and it has become a make-up staple of mine. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Yoga, cooking and being close to nature are the three simple things I strive to include in my daily life to keep things relaxed. So far I’ve been really good with the cooking part, I could definitely do better with the yoga, and the nature is still a work in progress. At the moment I live in Paris, so it’s complicated, but I look forward to a future where I can just open the window and hear the cicadas. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I find it ironic, and well, sad, that stress tends to keep you from doing anything that would make you feel better. It’s paralyzing in a way. Besides the solutions cited above, I find that making something with my hand (be it a cake, a dress or a drawing) helps me get centered again. Another good measure is travel or any form of exploration, if I manage to get excited and curious again, then I’m on my way to feeling better. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I cook your magical broth! I really do, even when I’m in good shape…which probably makes me too energized for my own good. Apart from that, working mostly from home means I’m rarely sick. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? It’s complicated. I’m very passionate about my job, which is relatively stress-free but also quite time-consuming. After ten years of doing it, I’m only realizing now that I may be working too much. This being said, I totally embrace the overlap, for me everything is connected, everything could and should be a source of inspiration, I “just” need to be careful about keeping some time to explore new things… I stopped counting the people around me who are in pain because of their job, so I try to be extra vigilant about the choices I and my loved ones make on the subject. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Most of my work requires that I spend a lot of my time in front of a computer and it would not come off as shocking to say that this isn’t a good thing. I’ve found out it has a way of making me feel like I’m not accomplishing much, even though I’ve been working for hours, maybe it’s because tasks get blended with one another, I don’t know. In any case, this “distortion” has the added drawback of not making me feel really good about myself, like I’m spinning in a wheel. On the other hand, when I spend a day, of even half a day, off my computer, I feel like I’m moving mountains, even if I’m only attending to mundane things. This is a great feeling and I wish it didn’t feel like some sort of luxury! -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Picking up yoga and pilates years ago was life-changing. I wasn’t into sports before that, and the body awareness it creates is an endless source of fascination. Knowledge -- You have a talent for seeking out the less traveled paths, hidden corners and beautiful places to stay wherever you travel. What is your approach when it comes to planning a trip? Coming up with the destination is a rather subjective process, which is often more about fantasy and pieces of information than reality. It might come from photographs I’ve seen, or a movie, or a conversation I’ve had. It’s a difficult balance to pick a place that sounds promising but which still remains a bit mysterious. Today with instagram, you sometimes feel like you’ve been there already, and it’s nice when you’re on your couch but a bit disheartening when you’re planning a trip. I sometimes also like to pick a rather touristic place and go there to see if it could be done off the beaten track, or photographed differently, like when we went to Rome, or to see the Giza pyramids. Besides that, I find that doing a lot of research is key if you want the trip to be both relaxing and interesting. It takes a lot of time and might ruin the surprise a little bit, but unless you’re traveling for a month, I find it too frustrating to “fail” a destination because you were too lazy to check opening hours and interesting spots. It’s a complicated task though, because you have to find recommendations from people whose sensibility is close to yours. It’s easy enough to find adresses of shops and restaurants, but when it comes to knowing that little neighborhood with a fantastic atmosphere, or that incredible building from the 70’s, or that little-known museum, then it gets complicated. For me travelling isn’t necessary about “consuming” or doing “breathtaking” things, it’s about finding inspiration. I’m doing The Voyageur to make it easier for others! -- Do you practice any special self-care routines while traveling, especially when it comes to jet lag? Sadly I’m not immune to jet-lag, on the contrary I find it totally messes up my digestion (in addition to my sleep). Jet-lag or not, I found that the best way to feel good abroad was to cook for myself as much as I can. To me it’s a win-win, it’s cheaper, I feel better and lighter, and I get to shop groceries and cook in a totally different setting. It has become an important part of our travels, one that I enjoy very much. I pack a whole battery of pantry essentials and then I buy fresh produce when I’m the ground. Every destination has its on treasures, things you’ll probably have a hard time finding back home, and it’s not necessary what you would get in restaurants : mountains of berries in Finland, cheap zucchini flowers in Venice, sour cream in St Petersburg or sweet muffin bread from the Azores islands. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I tend to believe I allow more time for packing than most people (I’m puzzled when I hear someone telling me they just throw random stuff in a suitcase an hour before their flight). I like to really think through what clothes I’m bringing, so it will fit the atmosphere of the destination, but also obviously local constraints and the kind of adventure I’m embarking on. I don’t really believe in a standardized list, I’m actually rather depressed by this packing advice of people bringing the same standard black and white things everywhere. I’m more about having the right equipment for each situation, it might be a stylish rain cloak if you go to Yakushima island, a fan for Egypt or a scarf in Andalucia that echoes the local ceramic patterns. It’s about those items that will be useful but will also make you happy. I find that objects can take on a new life when you bring them somewhere far-flung, they become the green dress you couldn’t stop wearing in Kerala or the perfumed oil you wore in Brazil. It builds new connections, it’s somewhere between a science and an art! Whatever the trip, beside the obvious items, you’ll have a good chance of finding in my luggage : – a camera – a Mason Pearson comb and brush – a swimsuit, even when swimming doesn’t sound like an option – A homemade meal for the trip, which makes a world of difference, and was actually initiated by your article on the subject. I recently acquired a wood bento box which makes it even greater! It also means that I have a box at hand if we’re having picnics during the rest of our stay. – If I know I’m going cook, I’m bringing a few ingredients, but most certainly there will be olive oil, a box of pasta and a chunk of Parmesan, which sounds pretty weird. It’s kind of a survival kit, when I have that, I know that we’re only a couple of tomatoes away from a comforting meal. Also, I’ve been to countries where finding all three ingredients would prove quite challenging, and expensive, which makes you cherish them even more. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Pretty much what I do to keep stress at bay, but if we’re taking things to another level of indulgence, I’d say anything water-related : a Japanese onsen bath, hammam, a swim in the sea or even just a plunge in the pool. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Way of the World by Nicolas Bouvier, and, any of his books really. He’s a Swiss writer and traveler who documented his journeys with a lot of wisdom and poetry. Song/­­Album – Nina Simone and Piano, even though it might be more soul-wrenching than soul-feeding. Movie – The Vertical Ray of the Sun by Tran Anh Hung, makes me want to book a ticket to south-east Asia right away. Piece of Art – Crépuscule by Felix Vallotton, strangely the landscape in the painting appeared to me on a stormy evening on Yakushima island in Japan… -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in Paris? Mokonuts, 5 rue st bernard, 75011 Paris A Japanese and a Lebanese in a tiny kitchen. I’m in love with their olive and white chocolate cookie and their carrot soup. They’re only open for lunch and you have to book ahead. Café Ineko, 3 Rue des Gravilliers, 75003 Paris Freshly opened vegetarian restaurant. Sincere and flavourful, my favorite of late. Their breakfast sounds fabulous and I’m planning to go very soon! Rice and Fish, 16 Rue Greneta, 75002 Paris Delicious fusion-style makis in a super relaxed atmosphere. Come early to get a seat. Pizzeria Dei Cioppi, 44 Rue Trousseau, 75011 Paris It’s easier than ever to find good pizza in Paris, but we’re faithful to this tiny one. Light, sophisticated pizzas in a quiet street with good music, what else? Osteria Ferrara, 7 Rue du Dahomey, 75011 Paris A slightly high-end italian restaurant with to-die-for risotto. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Tina of tforia.com, I love her very low-profile and delicate approach. All photos are from Pauline’s travels (and kitchen), courtesy of Pauline Chardin. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.


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