beetroot - vegetarian recipes

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beetroot vegetarian recipes

Beets and Mint Tartar

September 19 2018 VegKitchen 

Beets and Mint Tartar Today, the recipe that I propose is a tartar of beetroot with mint. Its an entree that is both pretty and very light. But beware not to use canned, but fresh beet! In fact, this beetroot tartar and mint is more of a salad. What we are going to do is cut the cooked beetroot into small pieces, then season with mint vinaigrette. Beetroots are rich in B vitamins, iron, manganese, copper, magnesium, and potassium. A diet rich in these things is believed to result in improved blood pressure, improved cognition, and reduce accumulation in your liver. Prep Time: 45 minutes Cook Time: 20 to 40 minutes Servings: 8 Ingredients 2 lb yellow and red beets (6 or 8) 2 small cloves garlic minced 2 tsp dried mint 1/­­4  tsp salt and pepper 1 tbsp balsamic vinegar 1/­­3 cup extra virgin olive oil Preparation Dip the unpeeled beets in a large pot of salted boiling water and cook until tender--20 to 40 minutes. While still warm, remove them with a cloth or paper towel, remove the stem, and remove the skin by simply sliding. Slice the hot beets into rings and arrange them on a serving platter. Before they cool, sprinkle […] The post Beets and Mint Tartar appeared first on VegKitchen.

Smörg?st?rta - Savory Rye Sandwich Cake

June 23 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Smörg?st?rta - Savory Rye Sandwich Cake Hey friends and happy midsummer! We spent midsummer eve at a friends house, dancing like frogs around a flower covered midsummer pole. It’s one of many weird traditions that we do in Sweden on this longest day of the year. Today we are off to Noma (as in one of the coolest restaurants on earth) to test their new plant focused menu that is launching next week. We’re very excited - obviously for Noma, but also for eating a fancy dinner together with zero kids around. Before we are leaving, I wanted to post this little recipe that we uploaded to our youtube a few days ago. Just like frog dance, this savory layered sandwich cake is also a very Swedish thing. It is called smörg?st?rta and is traditionally made by layering white bread with mayonnaise, creme cheese, whipped cream, dill, chives, shrimps, salmon and a bunch of other stuff. It’s basically like a sandwich gone wild. Even if we are not completely sold on the very heavy traditional version, there is something intriguing about the concept of a sandwich cake. So we made our own version, using rye bread and three colorful and fresh (but still quite rich) spreads in between. One green spread with avocado, dill and peas. One white spread with egg, sauerkraut and creme fraiche. And one purple spread with beans, beetroot and sunflower seeds. We cover it with cream cheese with a sting of horseradish and lots of finely sliced veggies and flowers. It looks great, is fun to make and really delicious. Sandwich cake FTW! Check out this recipe video to see how we make it. This is the perfect savory dish to make for a party, brunch or gathering with friends. You can easily half the recipe or make it vegan by skipping the egg layer and replacing the cream cheese with coconut cream. If you want to try a gluten-free version of this cake you could either simply use a gluten free bread, or bake 4 trays of our vegetable flatbreads (this option is a little time consuming but would probably taste amazing). Smörg?st?rta (Savory Rye Sandwich Cake) Serves 12-16 Green Spread 300 g /­­ 2 cups cup green peas 1 small lemon, juice 1 bunch dill, chopped 2 avocados, flesh scooped out 2 tbsp olive oil 1 large pinch salt White Spread 6 hard-boiled eggs 250 g /­­ 1 cup creme fraice or sour cream 2 tbsp capers 4 tbsp sauerkraut a pinch black pepper Purple Spread 1 cup sunflower seeds, soaked for an hour in water 1 x 400 g tin white beans, drained and rinsed 2 cooked beetroots, roughly chopped 1 small lemon, juice 4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil salt and pepper Assembling 36 slices of sourdough rye bread (or bread of choice), thinly sliced 500 g cream cheese 1 tbsp grated horseradish Decoration 1 avocado, sliced or shaped into a rose 1/­­2 cucumber, sliced thinly 1 small bunch of asparagus, thinly shaved 1 lemon, halved and thinly sliced mache lettuce chives, finely chopped Start by making the spreads. Add all the ingredients for the green spread to a food processor and mix until smooth (or use a bowl and a hand blender). Taste and adjust the flavour to your liking. Transfer to a bowl and clean the food processor. For the white spread, peel and roughly chop the eggs, place in a bowl and gently stir through cr?me fraiche, capers, sauerkraut and a little black pepper. Set aside. Drain and rinse the sunflower seeds for the purple spreads and add them to the food processor (or use bowl and hand blender) along with beans, beetroot, lemon juice, olive oil and a good grind of salt and pepper. Pulse a couple of times until combined but still a little chunky. To assemble: Trim any hard ends off the bread and line up the rye slices so you have a rectangle, 3 slices wide and 3 slices long. Spread the green spread evenly on top and then place another layer of bread. Now layer they white spread evenly on top. Place another layer of bread, followed by the purple spread. Place the final 9 slices of rye on top. Add cream cheese to a mixing bowl and grate in the horseradish. Whisk to make sure it’s incorporated, taste and add more if desired. Use a palette style knife to cover the cake with a layer of cream cheese. Decorate with an avocado rose, ribbons of cucumber, shaved asparagus, machet lettuce, slices of lemons, chives and flowers. Or whatever you think looks good. Tip: You can make this cake 12-24 hours ahead and store in the fridge to let the spreads soak into the bread and soften it up a bit. Then add the cream cheese and decorations right before serving.

Sweet Potato Sandwiches

February 9 2018 My New Roots 

Sweet Potato Sandwiches Necessity is the mother of invention, and when youre missing all of your kitchen equipment, you get creative. Weve been living out of a single suitcase for some months now, and although I have found a couple of major necessities in the mountain of unpacked moving boxes, I havent been able to locate my silicon loaf pan. As someone who makes the Life Changing Loaf of Bread on the reg, its been a challenge living without, but a stellar opportunity to come up with bread alternatives that dont involve a lot of ingredients or special equipment. As I was chopping up some sweet potato for a soup a couple of weeks ago, it dawned on me: what if I cut the sweet potato the other way and turned it into a slice of bread?! It was just crazy enough to work. And it did. Ever since then, Ive been roasting sweet potato slices once a week, keeping them in my fridge and having a sandwich-like-thing when the mood strikes. Its delicious! Not to mention wildly satisfying and so easy to make. Ive experimented with different herbs and spices on the sweet potatoes, using special salts, and even drizzling with flavoured oils once theyre out of the oven. So far, Im digging smoked salt and garlic powder, but the cinnamon, ginger, and cardamom combo was a close second at breakfast, smeared with chunky hazelnut butter.    The spread Ive come up with as a pairing to this sandwich sitch, is a horseradish and beetroot schmear. Partly because I like saying the word schmear, but mostly because its incredible in combination with the sweet potatoes. Its earthy, spicy, and complex - a great counterpoint to the sweetness of the spuds. I also like the texture difference: the sweet potatoes are so smooth and creamy, while the beet schmear is chunky and toothsome. If youve never had fresh horseradish before, be prepared to be blown away! This stuff is so, so special and delicious, I have no idea why its such an under-utilized root veggie. A part of the Brassicaceae family, horseradish shares ties with mustard, broccoli, cabbage, and wasabi. In fact, most commercially-available wasabi is made of horseradish (along with mustard, starch, and green food dye) since wasabi is challenging to grow and therefore much more expensive. But that familiar and addictive rush of sinus-clearing pleasure-pain? Thats the action of isothiocyanate, the compound found in wasabi, horseradish, and strong mustard that gives off heat when crushed, grated, or chewed. This stuff tends to mellow out once it hits the air, which is why horseradish snobs (they exist!) insist on grating it fresh. In the case of my schmear here, it will still taste delish a day or two after youve made it, but you may want to grate a little fresh over the top for a boost. Its the best way to clear out those nasal cavities this side of a neti pot! Horseradish has been used as powerful winter medicine for hundreds of years. Widely recognized for its expectorant capabilities, it is incredibly effective at removing mucus, and aiding with bronchial and lung disorders. Horseradish is a good source of vitamin C and zinc, two key players in immune system support, so consuming it in the colder months will help ward off the seasonal bugs flying around. For sore throats and coughs, combine one tablespoon of freshly grated horseradish with one teaspoon of raw honey, and one teaspoon of ground clove to some warm water. Sip the brew slowly, or use it as a gargle. This is more of a concept than a recipe, and a chance to try out sweet potatoes in a new way. Cut them as thick or as thin as you like. Mine are around 1cm, but that is just my personal preference. Remember that the slices will definitely shrink a bit during cooking, so slice them a tad thicker than you would want the finished roasted slice to be. You can even make shapes with a cookie cutter – great for kids lunches! Let your imagine run with this one, and keep me posted on which spreads and seasonings youre vibing on.     Print recipe     Sweet Potato Sandwiches Makes 6-8 sandwiches 2-3 fat, stubby sweet potatoes (organic if possible) coconut oil for rubbing (optional) salt and pepper + other spices or herbs 1 batch Horseradish Beet Schmear (recipe below) sliced fresh veggies: bell peppers, cucumber, avocado, sprouts, grated carrot etc. Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 375°F /­­ 190°C. 2. Wash and scrub sweet potatoes well, then slice lengthwise into 1 cm-thick slabs (approximately .4 inches). Place on a baking sheet and rub with coconut oil if using, and sprinkle with salt and pepper, plus any other spices or herbs youd like. 3. Place in the oven and bake until tender, about 20-25 minutes. Remove from oven and use immediately or store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for up to five days. 4. To assemble, spread one slice of sweet potato with the Horseradish Beet Schmear. Top with your favourite sliced veggies, sprouts, salt and pepper and another slice of sweet potato. You can also add mustard, vegan mayo, or any other condiment that you like. Enjoy! Horseradish Beet Schmear Makes 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 1 lb. /­­ 500g beets (about 4-5 small) coconut oil for rubbing 1 small clove garlic 3 Tbsp. freshly grated horseradish, or more to taste 3 Tbsp. tahini 3 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt, to taste 1/­­4 tsp. freshly cracked black pepper Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Rub beets with a little coconut oil, set on a baking try, and place in the oven. Roast for 20-30 minutes until you can easily pierce the beets with a sharp knife tip. 2. Remove baking tray and let cool until you can handle them. Slide off the skins, or use a vegetable peeler. Roughly chop the beets and set aside. 3. In a food processor, pulse garlic until minced. Add horseradish, tahini, lemon juice, olive oil, salt and pepper, then blend on high to combine. Add the chopped beets and pulse to chop. Blend as much or as little as you like – I like my spread a bit chunky. Taste and adjust seasoning as necessary. Some may like more horseradish - go for it! Remember that the bite will mellow out when its mixed with everything in the sandwich. 4. Use immediately, and store any leftovers in a tightly sealed container in the fridge for up to five days. Although the past few months of life limbo have been pretty frustrating, there are so many exciting things on the horizon that I cannot wait to share with you! First, my family and I are getting closer and closer to our new move-in date (you can watch house renovation updates on my Instagram Stories). Second, Im heading to Palm Springs for an EPIC bloggers retreat organized by my friend Sasha Swerdloff at the end of this month. And Im finishing up details on a sweet collaboration with one of my favourite juice bars in Toronto, that we will launch with a free public event! Stay tuned for more details on all the things. Love you guys. Now go have a sandwich, Sarah B   The post Sweet Potato Sandwiches appeared first on My New Roots.

Grandma’s Danish Apple Cake

October 26 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Grandma’s Danish Apple Cake I know what you are thinking. Where is the cake and what is that red sauce? In most other countries this would be called a trifle or a parfait, but in Denmark we call this an old-fashioned apple cake (although our version is modernized). I have the fondest memories leaning over a huge bowl of Gammeldags aeblekage at my grandmother’s kitchen table. It’s made of smooth apple sauce (our version is red) topped with crushed cookie crumbles and whipped cream and it was my favorite dessert in the world. Me and my twin brother spent every other weekend and school holiday at my grandmother’s house. She was the warmest and calmest person we knew, always smiling. My memories are fading but whenever I think of her I can smell the cigarillos she loved to smoke and the hair spray she always wore. And I remember her huge black & white marble coffee table that we often sat around and her warm hugs. She had a big house and rented out one room in the basement, one on the top floor and one in the garden to various tenants. On weekends she baked for everyone in the house. Large batches of spiced pound cake, chocolate cake or her famous (in my world) old-fashioned apple cake. I never thought of it back then but - damn! - she must have been the best landlord. When my twin brother and I were 10 years old she sadly passed away, two days after Christmas, and she left a big hole of emptiness in me. I have been thinking about her so much lately as I have been making this recipe for our kids and telling them stories about her. So this cake and this video is for you grandma. /­­Luise We have actually changed quite a few things from my grandmother’s recipe. We ditched the sugar in the apple sauce (because it’s really not needed if you use sweet apples), replaced cookie crumble with a simple nut and date crumble and used whipped coconut cream on top to make it vegan. But it still tastes a lot like the ones she made. And the texture is ace! It’s sweet and tangy and soft and rich and crunchy. And it’s pretty easy to make as well. 1) Cook apple sauce (or use readymade). 2) Chop toasted nuts and mix with sticky dates. 3) Whip cream. 4) Layer. 5) Dive in. While testing the first version of the recipe, David’s main concern was that it didn’t look pretty enough (typically him). I peeled the apples and didn’t blend the sauce so it did look rather yellow/­­brownish. But he figured out that by using the most deep red apples we could find, kept the peel on, cooked on low heat and then blended the sauce, it got a beautiful pink/­­red color. I’ve never seen an apple sauce looking radiant like that before. Make sure to cook a double batch of the sauce. It’s crazy good on top of yogurt and porridge bowls. We are definitely not experts on whipped coconut cream. We have failed at making it numerous times as different brands behave differently and some simply don’t work at all. Key is keeping it chilled to get the cream to separate from the liquid and the chilling is also essential when whipping. Usually, the cream solidifies so you scoop it out with a spoon, but when making the video above, we used a brand that separated without solidifying so we could simply pour the cream into the bowl while the rest of the liquid stayed at the bottom of the can. If you want to learn more about Whipped Coconut Cream (and which US brands that work best), go read Ashlae’s post on Coconut Whipped Cream. I should also mention that if you are not vegan or too fond of coconut cream, regular whipped cream is just as delicious. Grandma’s Danish Apple Cake Serves 4 If you cant find red apples like ours, you can add a little pomegranate juice or grated beetroot to the apple sauce while mixing to make it more red. Red Apple Sauce 1 kg /­­ 2 lb red apples (use local produce if available) 250 ml /­­ 1 cup water 1 tbsp fresh ginger, grated 1/­­2 tsp ground vanilla powder 1 tsp ground cinnamon (or cardamom) 1 tbsp lemon juice Date & Nut Crumble 180 g /­­ 1 cup almonds 100 g /­­ 1 cup walnuts 8 dates Whipped Coconut Cream (or regular cream) 1 can coconut milk, placed in the fridge for a few hours (or coconut cream or heavy cream) Rinse the apples and chop them in bite size pieces, discarding the core. Place in a large sauce pan along with water, fresh ginger, vanilla powder and cinnamon. Let simmer on low heat for approx 20 minutes or until soft. Meanwhile, place the nuts on a tray and roast at 150°C /­­ 300°F for approx 15 minutes. Remove the stone from the dates and use a knife to chop them or a fork to mash them. Chop the nuts medium fine, reserve a handful a nuts for topping and mix the rest with the date paste into a crumble. Set aside. When the apples are done, use a hand (immersion) blender to mix into a smooth apple sauce. Stir lemon juice into the sauce,  leave to cool or scoop into a large jar and place in the fridge. Scoop out the solid cream from 1 can of chilled coconut milk. Use a hand mixer to whip the coconut cream until it’s fluffy and forms soft peaks. If it feels too runny, place the bowl in the freezer for 10-15 minutes and then try whipping again. If you like it sweetened, you can fold in some maple syrup or vanilla into the cream after it is whipped. If using regular cream, simply whip it until soft peaks form. Place apple sauce as bottom layer in 4 glasses or jars (or use 1 big glass bowl). Top evenly with nut and date crumble and then scoop over whipped cream. Sprinkle chopped nuts on top. Enjoy! They sit quite well in the fridge so they can be prepared a few hours ahead. PS! Yesterday also happened to be Noah’s first birthday! Happy day little man! David usually post a little letter to the kids here on their first birthday but he’s been a little busy lately but promises that he will write it in a later post. Oh, one more thing! The Dutch edition of Green Kitchen At Home has been nominated for Cookbook of the Year in Holland. There are two awards, one is decided by a jury and the other is people’s choice. We’d be super happy if our Dutch readers (or anyone) would like to vote for us. It only takes 30 seconds. Here is the link!

Beetroot and Vanilla Sorbet

October 5 2017 Oh My Veggies 

Beets add nutrition, flavor, and a burst of vibrant color to this delicious vegan sorbet.

Beet Tartare with Sesame Labneh + Amsterdam

August 19 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Beet Tartare with Sesame Labneh + Amsterdam Earlier this year we were in New York to launch Green Kitchen at Home. We had a blast doing a live cooking session at Food52, teaching a cooking class and had a book signing in a tiny but packed little store in Greenwich Village. But what I really wanted to talk about today was our night off. When we tucked baby Noah (formerly known as Gabriel) to sleep in his stroller and headed to ABCV for dinner. Side note: You should know that for being a food writing couple, Luise and I very rarely go out and eat at proper restaurants. With kids, it’s just easier to do takeaway or pick places where it’s okay that they climb, run and crash. Also, fancy restaurants make me feel awkward. But we had an epic evening at ABCV. We tried the tasting menu of which I can’t even remember half of the dishes. But I know that there were simple crudités with lots of spreads, some kind of soft beet carpaccio/­­tartare with a little bit of sting to it, a whole roasted cauliflower with turmeric tahini dressing(!), avocado lettuce cups, roasted shiitake and a couple of desserts. And what made the evening even better was that Noah slept through almost the entire dinner (thank you jetlag!). We have been talking about that beet carpaccio (and the cauliflower with tahini turmeric dressing) a few times since we got back. And when Luise recently spotted a recipe for roasted beets and sesame labneh in the latest issue of Jamie Magazine, we started talking about it again. Looking through our recipe archive, it is pretty obvious that we’ve got a love for beets. They are sweet and mildly earthy, have an awesome color, can grow in our harsh Swedish climate and are cheap! What’s not to love? So a couple of days ago, we picked up a few bunches of beets, started cooking and here we are. With some kind of beetroot tartare (mixed minced beets), dollops of sesame labneh and a few suggestions on what can be used to scoop it into your mouth, apart from crackers. And as a last minute contribution, we are also offering a less fancy way of serving this, inside a rye waffle toast (yup, you might want to scroll down to it right away). This recipe is great as a starter, at a buffet table or a party. It’s pretty and impressive, creamy and delicious with plenty of flavor from fresh dill and mint and a little sting from horseradish. Since we love yogurt just as much as we love beetroots, we invited labneh (yogurt’s fancy cousin) to the party. We totally stole the idea to mix tahini into labneh from that Jamie Mag article. You should too. You need at least two hours to let the yogurt drain into labneh cheese but I’m still going to claim that this is an easy recipe - only a few ingredients and apart from draining the yogurt, it’s all pretty quick.  I imagine that a quick cheat version could be accomplished by simply using thick yogurt without draining it and buying pre-cooked beetroots. I can’t promise that it will be as good, but it’ll at least be quick and effortless. http:/­­/­­www.greenkitchenstories.com/­­wp-content/­­uploads/­­2017/­­08/­­Labneh_­drip.mp4 Okay, I can hear Isac trying to teach baby Noah how to roar like a lion with the only result that little brother cries like a baby. So I better post this now before major chaos is breaking out. No proofreading needed because yolo. Enjoy the recipe and check out info below re Amsterdam. Ciao! Beet Tartar & Sesame Labneh Serves 4 Recipe is inspired by a recipe from Jamie Magazine, Aug 2017 and a dinner we had a ABCV NYC. Sesame labneh 2 cups /­­ 500 g Greek or Turkish Yogurt 1/­­2 tsp salt 2 tbsp tahini 1 tbsp olive oil Beet Tartare  1/­­2 kg /­­ 1 lb  beetroots 2 tbsp capers juice from 1/­­2 lemon 1 tsp horseradish (or mustard) 1 handful fresh dill 1 handful fresh mint leaves salt & pepper Topping 1 handful pistachio nuts, finely chopped fresh dill, chopped fresh mint leaves, chopped 2 tbsp capers, halved lemon slices olive oil Serve with rye bread crisps, tender gem lettuce or cucumber slices Start by making the labneh. Add salt to the yogurt and stir until smooth. Wrap the yogurt in a cheese cloth or other clean thin cloth and tie it over a bowl for about 2 hours or more to allow liquid to be drained (meanwhile, cook the beetroots). You can leave it for 24-36 hours if you prefer a thicker labneh but 2 hours and a gentle squeeze (to get rid of some extra liquid) works fine. Stir in tahini, transfer to a serving bowl and top with a little bit of olive oil. Peel the beetroots, divide them in quarters and cook in salted water for approx 20 mins min or until tender. When ready, let cool and then transfer them to a food processor along with capers, lemon juice, horseradish, fresh dill, mint and seasoning. Pulse a few times until the beetroot has the consistency of course grits. Not too much though or you will end up with a sauce. You can also dice them finely. Arrange the beet tartare on a large serving plate. Fold in large dollops of sesame labneh and top with pistachio, fresh herbs, capers and lemon slices. Add a drizzle of olive oil and serve with crackers or thin rye bread crisps (thin rye bread pieces toasted in a pan or the oven for a couple of minutes), tender gem lettuce or cucumber slices to scoop with. Beet & Labneh Rye Waffle Toast We made this Waffled rye bread toast with the leftovers.  It’s a family favorite and we’ve got another recipe and the whole story behind this method in our latest book. Here are some quick instructions: Simply smudge labneh on two pieces of dark rye bread, add some spinach, fresh dill and mint and a thick layer of beet tartar. Brush a hot waffle iron with butter or coconut oil, combine the two slices and place inside the waffle iron, pressing together lightly. When you’re bread has got a nice and brown waffle pattern, the toast is ready. Cut the waffle toast in half and eat it while it’s hot. **************************** AMSTERDAM & ANTWERP - 7-9 September Green Kitchen at Home is being released in Dutch next week and to kick things off, we are coming to Amsterdam and Antwerp for a couple of press events, signings, dinners and talks. We will have a little talk, signing and dinner at the bookstore ‘t Stad Leest in Antwerp at 19.30 pm on 7 September. Tickets can be booked here. We are having a little talk + Q&A and a book signing at Limon in Amsterdam on 9 September between 10.30-11-30. There will be nibbles from the book served and we will end with a book signing. There will also be a lunch afterwards (between 12.00-14.00) and we will try to move around so we get the chance to chat with all of you. You can either buy tickets for both the talk and lunch, just the talk or just the lunch. Follow this link to read more about it in Dutch: Greenkitchenbooks.nl  

Green Pea Falafel Bowl

April 26 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Pea Falafel Bowl One of the first recipes we posted on the blog was baked herb & pistachio falafels. That was back in the days when we didn’t have three monsters tearing down the house. When I still had an old-fashioned job. And when baking a falafel instead of deep-frying it felt like a fresh new idea. Elsa once asked me if grandma’s older sister was alive when the dinosaurs lived on earth. I told her no (while simultaneously typing a message with a ton of dinosaur emojis to my mom). That is roughly how long ago that falafel recipe feels like. Dinosaur age. So much has happened since then. I still think it’s a good recipe and today’s falafel recipe has much of the same qualities. They are simple, baked, packed with fresh herbs and hold together excellently. If you don’t serve it with the mint yogurt, it is also vegan. We subbed the pistachios with some pumpkin seeds/­­pepitas this time and replaced half of the chickpeas with green peas to make them more suited for spring. It also gives them a slightly sweet tone and less dry than your average falafel (which is one of our favorite features with this recipe). We serve them in a bowl with roasted carrots, cinnamon spiked quinoa, beetroot hummus and a splash of mint yogurt instead of wrapping them up in lettuce or bread. We think of it as a spring-y Moroccan falafel bowl. I won’t claim that this is a dead-simple recipe (as it involves cooking, mixing and baking), but I at least find it comforting that the carrots, beetroot and falafels all are baked simultaneously in the oven. Before we jump to the recipe, we wanted to share the updated schedule for our little Green Kitchen At Home US book tour. And also this short video about the book that we did the other day. As we mentioned in our last post, we are coming to the US next week for some press activities. Both Luise and I will be in New York and then I’ll continue on my own to SF and LA. We are only doing a few public events and are very much hoping to see some of you there. New York > 1 May Our cooking class at Sur La Table is sold out but we will have a mingle, book signing and Q&A at CAP Beauty on 1 May, 7 pm. Entrance is free, you get to try some tasters from the book and we’ll both be there to chat. All you need to do is RSVP here.  San Francisco & Los Angeles > 3-5 May I’ll be at Credo Beauty in San Francisco on 3 May, 2-4 pm, signing books and chatting with you all about food, photography, kids and whatnot. I will also be doing the same in their Los Angeles store on 4 May, 5-7 pm. Free entrance, just RSVP to both events here. I’ll also be teaching a hands-on cooking class at Sur La Table in Los Angeles. There are still a few tickets available - so go get them here! For those of you who’s been asking, we will also be coming to London in June and Amsterdam after the summer. Enough about that. Let’s start cooking! Recipe notes o Falafel purists use soaked chickpeas instead of cooked. Cooked is however much quicker and works just fine. We also find that it’s easier on our digestion. o You don’t have to roast the beetroot for the hummus but can simply grate raw beetroot before mixing it. But since we’re using the oven anyway for the other parts of the bowl, we roast them to give the hummus a rounder flavor. Green Pea Falafel Bowl Serves 4 Falafels 1 cup /­­ 150 g green peas, fresh or frozen (thawed) 1 cup /­­ 150 g cooked chickpeas 2 small shallots, peeled and coarsely chopped 1-2 cloves garlic, peeled 2 tbsp buckwheat flour or potato starch 1/­­2 tsp baking powder 3 stalks fresh mint, leaves picked 3 stalks parsley, stems discarded 1 tbsp lemon juice 1 tsp ground cumin 1 tsp flaky sea salt 1-2 tbsp olive oil Beetroot Hummus 200 g raw beetroots 1 cup /­­ 150 g cooked white beans  3 tbsp light tahini (sesame paste) 4 tbsp lemon juice 3 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil 1 tsp ground cumin 1 clove garlic, peeled 1 tsp flaky sea salt Cinnamon Quinoa 1 cup uncooked Quinoa pinch flaky sea salt 1/­­2 tsp ground cinnamon 1 small handfull raisins (we used green raisins with a smoky flavor) To serve 4 carrots, peeled and cut into thick sticks (bake together with the beetroot) 2 avocados, sliced 4 handfuls mache lettuce 1/­­2 cucumber, sliced 12 radishes, sliced 1 cup plain yogurt a bunch fresh mint leaves, chopped a handful toasted almonds, chopped sesame seeds Preheat the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F fan mode (this is because we’re doing two plates simultaneously). Add all falafel ingredients (except the oil) to a food processor and pulse until mixed but not pureed. With moist hands, shape 16 mini falafel patties (roughly 1 generous tablespoon per falafel). Pour a little olive oil into the palm of your hand and then place each falafel in it, smoothing out the falafel and at the same time coating it in oil. Refill with oil for every fourth falafel. Place them on a baking tray covered with baking paper. Bake in the oven for 20 minutes, turning them after half the time. Peel the beets and cut in quarters. Place on a baking tray together with the prepared carrots (from the To serve list) and place in the oven (this can be done simultaneously as the falafel tray) for about 20 minutes or until baked through and soft. Let cool slightly and then place the beets (set the the carrots aside for serving) in a food processor (or bowl if using a stick blender) with the rest of the ingredients and mix for at least 2 minutes until very smooth. Taste and adjust the flavors to you liking. Prepare the quinoa while the vegetables are in the oven: Place rinsed quinoa in a saucepan, add 2 cups water, salt and cinnamon and bring to a boil. Lower the heat immediately and simmer for about 12-15 minutes. Stir in raisins and set aside. Stir together yogurt and a handful chopped mint leaves, set aside. Arrange all serving ingredients in bowls and top with beetroot hummus, quinoa and pea falafels. Sprinkle with almonds, sesame seeds and mint. Enjoy! PS! If you have already received our new book through online orders, we’d be super grateful if you could leave a short review of it on Amazon. Thank you! 

1 Christmas - 4 menus

December 23 2016 Veganpassion 

1 Christmas - 4 menus It's that time of the year again. Christmas has come. Time to relax, enjoy the peace and family time while baking cookies. With the warmth of a chimny spreading through the room. It's a time to introspect and value the quiet. Sense of wholeomness that each day brings. I always get excited for Christmas. Not only because of the iceflowers on the windows, the sugar frosted trees and the gleaming leaves in the morningdew. I love the family time spent at the dinner table that the season brings. Even if you cant always tell with me, food is there to be enjoyed and what better way to do it than to do it at an oaktable surrounded by the people you love. It's because of that reason, that I created four whole menus for you this year. From easy and fast meals to gourmet cooking; these meals will hopefully contain something for everyone, because there's no better time to enjoy a happy wholesome vegan meal than now. What are you guys planning in eating on Christmas? I'm so excited to hear which ideas you guys bring to the table whether is be an exravagant classic meal or something quick and easy. Who's swinging the cooking spoon in your kitchen on Christmas eve? Menu 1: Easy Peasy Quick and easy. Making a meal for the whole family in the blink of an eye. Soup and tart are easy to prepare and the one pot pasta basically cooks itself. Beetroot Almond Soup with roasted chickpeas One Pot Pumpkin Pasta Banana Choc Tarte Menu 2: Around the world To Asia and back please. This menu seduces everyone with its colorful flavours and ingredients. An eating experience for everyone set up in a"selfserve" manner.  Quinoa Rolls with Butternut Green Thai Curry Curcuma Pumpkin Semolina  with Berries Menu 3: Jolly xmas Christmas happy and healthy. Not in the mood to be stuffed, but rather enjoy a nutritient rich meal? This Menu is rich in proteins and packed full with healthy ingredients. Raw Cheese Green Bowl Açai Cheesecake Menu 4: Christmas Gourmet For really enjoying a meal and showing the vegan delicousness off to the whole family. This meal will certainly allow you to impress everyone. Hobbycooks and homemakers will thrive with joy while cooking this meal Baked Persimmon Red Cabbage Salad Porcini Risotto with Beetroot Balls Aquafaba Gingerbread Mousse I hope you guys have lots of fun preparing these meals, which hopefully include something for everyone. If you guys have requests or ideas for new recipes, let me know in the comments. Hugs and love to all of you and have a happy fourth Advent.

Beetroot Almond Soup with roasted chickpeas

December 23 2016 Veganpassion 

Beetroot Almond Soup with roasted chickpeas As a child beetroot was awful to me. Earthy and red, that had to keep off my plate. Since I'm a vegan my taste definitely changed. I'm using beetroot all the time and I love it. If grated in a salad, in a cream sauce, roasted with finger-shaped potato dumpling, in a risotto or in a dessert. The colour just makes me smile. In the winter I love earthy vegetables like pumpkin and potatos. The beetroot just fits perfectly into a colorful menu. Before you know it the nodule has turned into a soup. I ate it all even though I wanted to keep something for my boyfriend...oh well, next time :-) Makes 4 portions. Ingredients: 2 beetroot (700 g) 1 onion 3 tbsp. olive oil 1 small piece ginger 2 tsp. vegetable broth, powder 100 ml orange juice 5 cloves 1/­­2 tsp. cilantro seeds, grounded 1/­­4 tsp. cinnamon 1 can (400 g) coconut milk 0,8-1 l water 1 tbsp. almond butter salt, pepper 4 tbsp. non-dairy cream 1 tsp. thyme, dried orange zest Peel the beetroot and the onion and cut them into cubes. Stew in olive oil until the onion start roasting. Cut ginger into small pieces and add it to the vegetable broth. Deglaze it with orange juice. Add cloves, cilantro, cinnamon, coconut milk and half of the water. Let it cook with closed lid for 10 minutes than add almond butter. Mash everything and taste it. For the roasted chickpeas: 1 can chickpeas 1 tbsp. olive oil 1/­­2 garlic paste 3/­­4 tsp. sweet paprika powder 3/­­4 tsp. curcuma powder seasalt, pepper Pour off the chickpeas and mix them with olive oil, garlic, paprika powder and curcuma powder. Flavour it with salt and pepper. Bake at 200°C (392°F) upper-/­­lower heat for 20 minutes. Turn them around once a while so they don't get burned. Serve the soup with dab of cream, some thyme, orange zest and put the chickpeas on top. Enjoy the recipe!

Purple Kale, Aubergine & Blackberry Salad

September 7 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Purple Kale, Aubergine & Blackberry Salad At first, it was a coincidence. When we looked at the vegetables we had brought home from the market this weekend, many of them just happened to have purple, violet and dark lavender tones. We talked about how that huge bunch of purple kale could make a beautiful salad base together with the rainbow chard, mint flowers and purple sugar snaps. It was at that point my obsessive side took over. “Let’s ONLY DO purple ingredients!” I shouted into Luise’s ear. She turned her head towards me with that hesitant look she always has when I get one of my “brilliant” ideas: “Ok, slow down now, let’s talk about the flavours first”. Of course I didn’t hear her as I was already writing a list with all the purplish ingredients I could think of: “aubergine, purple cauliflower, plums, figs, olives, blackberries, grapes, beetroot, red onion, …”. Some recipes are born out of genius flavour combinations or new preparation methods, this one simply started out as a colour. Luise did however quickly gain back control and started shifting focus to the flavour and combination of vegetables as well. In the end, I think we managed to combine both flavour, colour and texture in a great way. We roasted aubergine and purple spring onion in warm spices until soft and sweet. Massaged the kale with a flavourful dill, mint, lemon and honey dressing to round off its flavour and make it less sturdy. Cooked black lentils were added as a filler, along with rich and creamy avocado (even though it’s more black than purple - and green inside!). Hazelnuts are not purple at all but they added a nice crunch to the texture. Juicy blackberries made a perfect topping. The result was beautiful, a true harvest salad. Maybe not as purple as I originally imagined it (basically because most vegetables loose their colour when they are cut/­­baked/­­cooked), but still with lovely deep hues and so many interesting flavours - a mix of herby, sweet and tangy. When the salad was assembled it still felt like we missed a creamy element, so we tried the honey roasted feta that we had seen on New York Times Cooking last week. It was perfect. Burnt and caramelised on the outside and almost melted on the inside. It completely ruined the dark purple theme but flavour- and texture wise, it was worth the sacrifice. You’ll notice that I smudged it in mashed blackberries as a poor attempt to camouflage it.   We should perhaps add that this wasn’t our kids favourite dish. They picked out the blackberries, avocado and feta cheese from the salad, leaving the raw kale to us. I guess purple isn’t their colour… Purple Kale & Blackberry Salad with Roasted Honey Feta Vegans can just skip the feta cheese or replace it with hummus. And replace honey with maple syrup. Baked vegetables 1 aubergine /­­ eggplant 4 spring onions or 2 red onions 2-4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil 1/­­2 tsp ground cinnamon 1/­­4 tsp ground cumin 1 pinch ground cayenne 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 1 handful hazelnuts Cooked lentils 1/­­2 cup uncooked lentils (we used black lentils) 1 1/­­2 cup water 1 pinch sea salt Dressing 1/­­3 cup extra virgin olive oil 1/­­2 lemon, juice 2 tsp honey or more to taste sea salt & pepper 1 large handful mixed fresh dill, parsley and mint Other salad ingredients 4 stalks curly kale, green or purple 4 stalks rainbow chard or spinach 2 avocadoes 1 small handful snap peas 1 punnet fresh blackberries, halved Roasted feta with honey (from NYT) 1 block feta cheese, patted dry 2 tbsp olive oil 1 tbsp honey Start by preparing the baked vegetables. Preheat the oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Wash and cut the aubergine into large cubes and trim and slice the onions, then place in a mixing bowl. Stir together oil and spices in a small bowl, pour the oil mixture over the aubergine and onions and toss to combine. Transfer to a baking tray covered with baking paper. Bake in the oven for about 20 minutes or until very soft and golden, check every now and then to prevent from burning, the baking time depends on the size of the vegetables. Add the hazelnuts halfway through. Meanwhile, cook the lentils in a saucepan with the water for 15 minutes or until tender and can be mashed easily between two fingers. Add sea salt towards the end of the cooking time. Drain any excess water and leave to cool. Prepare the dressing by mixing oil, lemon juice, honey, salt and pepper in a small bowl. Chop the herbs finely and add to the oil mixture. Taste and adjust to your liking. Remove the stems from the kale and coarsely chop the leaves. Finely slice the chard. Place all in a large mixing bowl, add 2 tbsp of the dressing and massage for a couple of minutes until soft. Transfer to a large serving bowl. Mix the lentils with the remaining dressing and pour them over the kale and chard mixture. Cut the avocado into cubes, slice the snap peas and roughly chop the hazelnuts. Add to the salad bowl together with the roasted  aubergine, onions and hazelnuts. Toss slightly to combine and then scatter blackberries on top. If you like to serve the salad with the baked feta cheese, follow the instructions below. Keep the oven at 400°F /­­ 200°C. Place the feta cheese in a small ovenproof dish covered with baking paper and cover with oil. Bake in the oven for about 8 minutes, until soft but not melted. Melt the honey. Remove the cheese from the oven and turn the heat to broiler. With a baking brush, paint the cheese with the melted honey. Place back in the oven and broil until the top starts to brown. Use a spatula to immediately and carefully transfer the cheese to the salad, or serve it on the side.

Beetroot Paratha – Beet flatbread Stuffed with Split Peas

June 13 2016 Vegan Richa 

Beetroot Paratha – Beet flatbread Stuffed with Split PeasBeetroot Paratha – Beet flatbread Stuffed with Split Peas. Easy Pink flatbread stuffed with spiced split peas or chickpeas. Vegan Yeast-free flatbread Recipe. Pin this post.  Stuffed Parathas used to be a favorite breakfast and snack option while growing up. Now they are a treat made for light dinner or premade for snacking or travelling. I applaud all Indian Moms, rolling out stuffed flatbreads for morning breakfast, plain flatbreads for lunch and for dinner, almost every day.  Just like the Broccoli Chickpea Parathas, these flatbreads are super easy. Blend some cooked beet to a puree, add to dry ingredients, knead into a dough and set aside. Choose your filling of choice, add spices and mash everything well. roll out the dough into flabreads, place filling in the center, seal, roll, cook and serve these Beetroot Parathas with pickle, curries or dip! Continue reading: Beetroot Paratha – Beet flatbread Stuffed with Split PeasThe post Beetroot Paratha – Beet flatbread Stuffed with Split Peas appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Green Pea, Millet & Mint Fritters

April 19 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Pea, Millet & Mint Fritters Elsa planted a few pea seeds in pots that we placed in our kitchen window a couple of weeks ago. It has turned out to be a fun little project as they have been growing rapidly and she has been measuring them every morning. Isac was very intrigued by the part where you water the seeds and has been a keen helper in that area. He has also started experimenting with watering a few other things in our apartment, like the pestle and mortar, my shoes and our living room sofa. We’re still waiting to see if any of them will start growing. It would be a great story if I could tell you that we’ve been harvesting the peas from Elsa’s plants and used in this pea fritter recipe but her little hobby project will probably only leave us with a handful of tiny peas. So the peas in this recipe came from a different source. I am not sure if fritters actually is the correct word as we don’t use any flour in this recipe and they are aren’t deep-fried either. Perhaps pea pancakes would describe them better? We however rarely get the chance to use the word fritters so that’s what we’re sticking with. These are fresh and light with distinct tones of mint and spring. We enjoyed them for lunch but they could make for a nice breakfast as well. Apart from peas and herbs, we use cooked millet, eggs and ricotta cheese in the batter. They are quite delicate and need a gentle hand when flipped, but the easiest trick is to keep them quite small in size. You could of course serve this with a number of different options but here we have simply wilted spinach with chili flakes for a bit of a punch, added a soft boiled egg and topped it with a dollop of yogurt, sprouts, radishes and lemon zest. Pea, Millet & Mint Pancakes Serves 4 We have listed the amount of uncooked millet that you need for this recipe but we recommend cooking a larger batch while you are at it. We always keep cooked millet or quinoa in the fridge so we easily can create patties like these or to make our soups more filling. 1 1/­­2 cup /­­ 225 g fresh green peas (or frozen and thawed) 1 packed cup /­­ 160 g cooked millet (1/­­3 cup /­­ 70 g uncooked) (cooked quinoa or rice should work too) 1 spring onion, chopped 2 eggs 1 handful fresh mint and parsley leaves (6 sprigs, picked) 4 tbsp ricotta cheese (or cottage cheese) salt and pepper coconut oil, for frying Wilted spinach coconut oil a few handfuls wild spinach 1-2 tsp chili flakes salt and pepper Serve with Yogurt Soft or medium boiled egg (ours were cooked for 7 minutes) Beetroot sprouts Radishes Lemon zest Add 1 cup /­­ 150 g of the peas to a food processor along with millet, spring onion, eggs, herbs, ricotta cheese, salt and pepper. Pulse a few times on high speed until mixed but still slightly chunky. Mash the remaining peas roughly with a fork and stir into the batter. Let sit for 20 minutes to let the ingredients come together (which will make them easier to fry). Add a teaspoon of coconut oil to a non-stick frying pan on medium heat, wait until it’s hot and then use a large spoon to dollop the fritters into the pan and flat them out into rounds (depending on the size of the pan, you should be able to fit between three and five of them each time). Cook until they begin to set, roughly about 3 minutes and then carefully flip them with a spatula. If the batter feels too soft and runny, you can add some extra millet to it. Fry all the fritters and place on a tray to cool off just slightly while wilting the spinach. Using the same frying pan, simply add the spinach to a little oil and chili flakes on a medium heat and let sauté for a few minutes until it has wilted down. Place the spinach on plates, top with a few sweet pea fritters, yogurt, sprouts, radishes and a generous amount of lemon zest and soft boiled eggs on the side. Enjoy! ****************** PS! We have released an update for our Green Kitchen app which includes a search bar (finally, right!?) where you can search on recipe names and ingredients. We have also added more recipes, Quick Actions with 3D Touch and a whole lot of backend fixes that will make it run even smoother. All the recipes in the app are available in English, German, Spanish, Italian and French, with more languages coming. All this comes for free if you already have the app, just hit update in App Store!

Swedish Pancake Cake

February 9 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Swedish Pancake Cake I started counting how many pancake recipes we have posted since we started the blog and it’s surprisingly few. At least if you divide that number with the number of times we have made pancakes since we started the blog, which is embarrassingly many. We like pancakes in our family and I think we need to blog more about it. We have pancakes for breakfast, lunch or dinner at least once a week. So with a few hours left on Shrove Tuesday aka Pancake Tuesday, we wanted to throw in a little collection with some of our favourite pancake recipes from the past years - both sweet and savoury. We are also sharing the ultimate way to eat pancakes, in the form of a cake! If not for tonight, it’s an unbeatable breakfast (or dessert) for your loved ones on Valentine’s Day. The recipe is from our first book, The Green Kitchen, which btw is coming out on Portuguese this Spring (the 11th language it is being translated to, crazy!). We love American style pancakes that are stacked up high and topped with a drizzle of syrup and fruit. These Flour-free Banana, Blueberry & Coconut Pancakes are made simply with egg, banana, blueberries and desiccated coconut and they are much lighter than common American pancakes. The recipe is from The Green Kitchen but can also be found on Cooked.com. All our book recipes are actually available on the Cooked website, it’s a subscription based site but they have a 30-day free trial. Spinach Crepes with Chickpea, Apple & Tahini Filling. We have been making green pancakes for years and it’s simply achieved by mixing pancake batter in a blender with the addition of spinach (or beetroot). We serve these with a savoury filling for dinner but they also taste great on their own. Click here for the full recipe. And here is a video with us making them. Masala Dosa filled with Sweet Potato & Peas, Mango & Raisin Chutney and Raita. We loved eating dosa for breakfast in India and all the different fillings add so much flavour with both sweet and savoury tones. The dosa batter is made without eggs so these are perfect for vegans. This recipe is from Green Kitchen Travels and is available on Cooked.com. Coconut & Quinoa Pancakes with Clementine Marmalade. These vegan pancakes are from Amy Chaplin’s brilliant book that we blogged about last year. Here is the recipe. Buckwheat cr?pes with passion and mango syrup. Our version of French dessert cr?pes are topped with an addictive Mango & Passionfruit Syrup and a dollop of mascarpone. The recipe is from Green Kitchen Travels and can also be found on Cooked.com. Summer Berry Pancake Cake I have made different versions of this cake since I was a child, and I never get tired of it. I think it is so beautiful with all those stacks of pancakes, and the berries and cream squishing out from the sides. Traditionally you put jam between the layers, but we stick to fresh fruit, nut butter and date syrup. The pancakes should be very thin, so we always use a non-stick frying pan when we make these. You can prepare the pancakes one day in advance and assemble the cake just before serving. If fresh berries aren’t in season, you can use frozen instead./­­David Pancake Batter 200 g /­­ 1 3/­­4 cup buckwheat flour 3 large eggs (or 4 medium) 500 ml /­­ 2 cups soy milk or milk of your choice 1 tbsp butter, plus extra for frying pinch sea salt Layers 3 ripe bananas, sliced thin 225 g /­­ 1 1/­­2 cup raspberries, mashed with a fork 225 g /­­ 1 1/­­2 cup blackberries, mashed with a fork 125 g nut butter 120 ml raw date syrup (soft dates mixed with a splash of water in a blender) 500 ml /­­ 2 cups thick cream, chilled Topping 150 g /­­ 1 cup raspberries 125 g /­­ 1 cup blackberries 2 tbsp pistachio nuts, chopped To make the batter, add all the ingredients, plus 250 ml /­­ 1 cup  water to a large mixing bowl and whisk vigorously until you have a smooth batter. Make sure that there are no lumps of flour left. Refrigerate for 20 minutes. Give it a good whisk after you have removed it from the fridge, as the flour tends to sink to the bottom. Heat a 20 cm /­­ 8, preferably non-stick, frying pan on medium-high heat. When the pan is hot, add a few drops of oil and about 75 ml of the batter. Tilt the pan until the batter is evenly distributed. Fry for 45-60 seconds on each side, until the pancakes are golden and can be flipped easily with a spatula. Fry all of the pancakes - the batter should make about 15 - and place on baking paper to cool off. You can layer with baking paper between the pancakes to stop them sticking together. To assemble, pour the cold cream into a large chilled bowl. Use an electric hand mixer or a whisk to whip it until soft peaks form. Set aside. Put the cold first pancake on a cake stand. Spread a layer of thin slices of banana evenly over the top. Add another pancake and top it with about a third of the mashed raspberries. Then continue with next pancake and a third of the mashed blackberries. Continue with another pancake and carefully spread a thin layer of nut butter and date syrup on it. Add another pancake and spread with a layer of whipped cream. Then start all over with the banana layer. Continue until all the pancakes are covered. Top with whipped cream, fresh fruit and finely chopped pistachios. All photos from our first book by Johanna Frenkel.

Beet, Raspberry and Vanilla Smoothie Bowl

November 13 2015 My New Roots 

Beet, Raspberry and Vanilla Smoothie Bowl Hey buddy, hows your blood doing these days? Is it healthy and flowing? Full of oxygen and freshly-made red blood cells? Have you ever even thought about this?! The answer is, not likely. And that is nothing to be ashamed about. We are never really taught to think about our blood, how to nourish and take care of it, how to tell if something is missing. When I studied Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) I learned about blood building, a term to describe nourishing the body with the nutrients required for ample and healthy blood. For some reason, I took a particular interest in this field, and have been a passionate blood builder of my own ever since. If this sounds dorky (it is) and a little confusing, think of your blood almost like a muscle. We are more familiar with the idea of muscle building, in that our muscles require specific macro and micro nutrients to grow and thrive. Same as blood. Pretty simple, except you cant do it at the gym – you gotta get in the kitchen.  The role of blood in our body is to transport nutrients, oxygen, immune cells, and hormones, along with removing toxins and waste, and disperse heat. The components that make up our blood are used and disposed of extremely quickly, so there is a high cell turnover, which also means high nutritional requirements. Iron, folic acid, vitamin B-12, and protein are the major building blocks of blood. All of these things work synergistically to make your blood as potent and healthy as possible. Besides folic acid, you can see from the list that most of these nutrients are found abundantly in animal foods, but not so abundantly in the wonderful plant kingdom. So how do vegetarians build blood anyway? First and foremost eating a wide variety of fruits, veggies, legumes, whole grains, nuts, seeds, and superfoods is a good place to start. Hey wait! That sounds like a balanced diet. So if youre already there, great. If youre just starting out, your blood is about to get real strong. More specifically, the best blood building foods are the darkest of dark leafy greens and their powders, such as spinach, kale, beet greens, wheatgrass, barley grass, spirulina and chlorella, and deeply pigmented red foods such as beets, cherries, raspberries, goji berries, raisins, kidney beans, adzuki beans, and blackstrap molasses. I also find that drinking a cup of nettle tea every day, which contains high amounts of iron, is really effective in helping to tone the blood. This smoothie bowl is a one tasty blood builder. Its got a solid dose of greens (think iron, folic acid, and protein) from the spinach and wheatgrass, with beet, raspberry and prunes (lots of deep, dark, iron-rich goody goodies!) plus lemon for a vitamin C boost – since we cant absorb iron from plants unless we have a little help from vitamin C.  Although you may think that putting raw beetroot in a smoothie is a little odd, I was shocked at how utterly DELICIOUS the combination was with the raspberry. Its altogether earthy, sweet and tart, with a divine vanilla kiss that makes me swoon. Plus can we talk about the colour?! I can practically feel it feeding my blood with all of those juicy pigments and nutrients. Gosh. Isnt life grand? Smoothie bowls are a divine invention because you can eat them with a spoon, and you can top the heck out of them for a real meal situation. Although Im sure its just a psychological thing,  I sometimes feel a bit under-fed after a smoothie in a glass. Plus I like chewing a lot, and chewing a beverage can sometimes be boring without some chunks involved. Dont you agree? Ive topped mine here with raspberries, pomegranate, sea buckthorn, bee pollen and almond butter, but get creative with this on your own! Ive listed some other topping ideas in the recipe. And I will also say that taking just one extra minute to decorate your bowl delivers major self-love points and satisfies the creative genius in us all. There are no wrong answers or unattractive smoothie bowls! Go wild, you strong-blooded creature, you!     Print recipe     The Blood Building Beetroot, Raspberry and Vanilla Smoothie Bowl Serves 1 Ingredients: 1 small beet, peeled and chopped 1 cup raspberries, fresh or frozen (I use frozen) 2 cups packed /­­ 45g spinach 3 prunes, soaked in 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water small wedge organic lemon (including the peel!) 1-2 scoops protein powder (I use sprouted brown rice or pumpkin seed protein powders) 1-2 tsp. wheatgrass powder (or spirulina /­­ chlorella) a generous pinch ground vanilla powder (or 1 tsp. vanilla extract) 1/­­2 cup water or milk of choice Toppings pictured: frozen raspberries pomegranate seeds sea buckthorn berries bee pollen raw almond butter Other topping ideas: sliced fresh fruit fresh berries hemp seeds toasted nuts and /­­ or seeds chia unsweetened coconut granola cacao nibs goji berries Directions: 1. Soak prunes overnight in water, or for a minimum of one hour. 2. Pour the soaked prunes and their liquid into a blender. Add all remaining ingredients and blend on high until completely smooth (if you do not have a high-speed blender, this may take a minute or so). Taste and adjust sweetness /­­ vanilla /­­ lemon as desired. 3. Pour contents into a glass or bowl and garnish with desired toppings. Enjoy!   I hope you guys are fired up to build your blood now. Happily, it involves eating and not donning spandex and running on a treadmill. Although, that is important too. The running part. The spandex I’ll pass on, thank you. Cheers to your blood, Sarah B. Show me your smoothies on Instagram! #MNRbeetsmoothie  

beetroot cutlet recipe | beetroot tikki recipe | beetroot patties

October 25 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

beetroot cutlet recipe | beetroot tikki recipe | beetroot pattiesbeetroot cutlet recipe | beetroot tikki recipe | beetroot patties with step by step photo and video recipe. cutlet can be prepared with myriad vegetables, but the beetroot cutlet recipe is the most popular one. perhaps it is due to the health aspect related to this pan fried snack. whatever it is but certainly a healhty snack for your kids and all age groups. Continue reading beetroot cutlet recipe | beetroot tikki recipe | beetroot patties at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Veggie Tray Extra Everything

October 1 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Veggie Tray Extra Everything We’ve got a small, square shaped wooden table with three chairs + a highchair in our kitchen. I bought the table when I moved to my first 1-bedroom apartment and it was perfect for that tiny space. Back then I only had two chairs and the table mostly carried pasta dishes and red wine glasses. Eighteen years, four apartments and three children later, we still eat most our meals on it. It is honestly not very pretty and its wine stains are now mixed with blueberries, turmeric, coconut and all the stains, smudges and scratches that come from years of feeding babies. Because it is square shaped and we are five in the family, Luise or I end up either eating our meals standing up or snugged on an extra chair on a corner. Its a small but pretty striking symbol that: A) I am too sentimental about my furniture. B) We werent entirely prepared for how life with three children would be. I wrote a little text on Instagram about this. That behind glossy photos of food, travels and a kitchen that on good days looks picture perfect, we are still trying to figure out life. And find somewhere to sit. The plan is to get a round table that hopefully both will fit into the kitchen and have seats for the entire family. But until then, I’ll keep eating standing up. I first shared this recipe/­­method about a week ago on Instagram stories (hence the poor image quality above) and judging from the number of direct messages in my inbox, I thought I’d post an more outlined version here as well. We cannot get enough of tray bake dinners in our family. They are simply one of the easiest and most delicious weekday solutions we know and this recipe represents much of what we love about food. Easy to make, easy to like, easy to adapt. It combines warm and cold and sweet and savory. It is vegetable centered, comforting and leaves a minimum of dishes. And the kids like it too. Our twist is that we add lots of fresh ingredients to the tray once it’s ready in the oven; yogurt, pesto, lettuce, spinach, black beans and pomegranate seeds. They add texture and make it feel more like a proper meal. Some days we act like adults and put plates on the table. Other days we just stick the kids a fork each and we all eat from the same tray (sorry mum!). Weve shared the recipe exactly as we made it last week but weve also included a list of variations below the recipe. So don’t get hung up on any specific ingredients, simply use this more as a starting point. The important thing in this recipe is the combination of roasted ingredients + fresh veggies + fruit + something creamy. I hope you give it a try. All-in-One Veggie Tray We wrote a similar recipe for the September issue of Jamie Magazine. We added raw spiralized vegetables (makes it even prettier!) and halloumi instead of yogurt. We add kale and Brussels sprouts midway through roasting since they need less time. The goal is that they will be perfectly crunchy at the same time as the other vegetables are ready. It can be a little tricky to time it right on your first try but second time around you usually get the hang of it. Warm ingredients 1 kg /­­ 2 lbs potatoes 3-4 carrots, peeled 1 broccoli  250 g /­­ 1/­­2 lb Brussels sprouts 3-4 large kale leaves olive oil Cold ingredients 2 handfuls baby spinach 1 avocado 1 cup cooked black beans yogurt pesto (you can thin it out with a little olive oil) lemon Cut potato, carrots and broccoli into bite-sized pieces. Add to a large tray and drizzle with oil and salt. Bake at 200°C /­­ 400°F for approx. 15-20 minutes. Cut the Brussels sprouts in halves. Trim off the thick stalks from the kale and tear the leaves into smaller pieces. Drizzle with oil and salt, add to the tray and bake for 10-15 minutes more or so. The vegetables are ready when they are golden and tender and the kale chips are crunchy. Scatter baby spinach, sliced (or mashed) avocado, black beans, dollops of yogurt and pesto evenly over the vegetables. Squeeze over a little lemon and drizzle with oil. Dig in! Variations Roasted ingredients: Carrots /­­ Broccoli /­­ Cauliflower /­­ Cabbage /­­ Sweet potato /­­ Bell pepper /­­ Brussels Sprouts /­­ Kale /­­ Potatoes /­­ Parsnip /­­ Beetroot Fresh ingredients: Lettuce /­­ Aragula /­­ Spinach /­­ Avocado /­­ Cucumber /­­ Cherry Tomatoes /­­ Spiralized Carrots, Beetroot or Zucchini Fruit: Apple /­­ Orange /­­ Pear /­­ Pomegranate Seeds /­­ Grapes Sauce: Yogurt /­­ Tahini /­­ Pesto /­­ Romesco /­­ Hummus /­­ Dijon Vinaigrette /­­ Coleslaw Extra: Nuts /­­ Seeds /­­ Beans /­­ Boiled eggs /­­ Halloumi cheese /­­ Feta Cheese /­­ Goat’s Cheese

5 Health Benefits of Beets

July 31 2017 VegKitchen 

5 Health Benefits of Beets The most vibrant of vegetables are beets. Here are a few health benefits of beets that will inspire you to enjoy them in your diet more often. Their rich hue comes from a pigment called betalain that imparts a bright pinkish shade to anything. But thats not all! Beets (called beetroot in English-speaking cultures outside […] The post 5 Health Benefits of Beets appeared first on VegKitchen.

Roasted Rainbow Root Tangles

April 1 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Roasted Rainbow Root Tangles Apart from discussing important topics like if it’s worth climbing a mountain of bureaucracy to change baby Gabriel’s name (long story…), if we would be much happier running a smoothie bar on a small tropical island than living in a cold and dark Stockholm (obviously that is a yes), and how ALL of Elsa’s leggings suddenly have huge tears around the knees (she swears that she is innocent), we have also spent the past week playing around with this super simple recipe based on root shoestrings. It turns out that if you spiralize (check notes below if you don’t have a spiralizer) root vegetables, toss them in a little bit of oil and salt, arrange into tangled nests and roast for 25 minutes, you get something similar to rösti or hash browns. These little root tangles are quick, cheap and easy, they are crispy towards the edges and soft in the middle, contain a lot more nutrients than just potatoes and since they are baked instead of pan-fried, they don’t cause a smoke alarm situation in the kitchen. Not to mention how pretty they look with the different colors combined. Our kids devour them straight from the plate (they call them root fries) and we have been using these root tangles as a base for a bunch of meals lately. In this recipe we’ve topped them with yogurt and a herby chickpea salad, which is perfect as you get something creamy, a few greens and proteins along with the roots. But they also work well paired with avocado mash, hummus or with a poached egg, asparagus and spinach on top, for an Easter twist. Instead of trying to convince you with words, we did a little recipe video for our youtube channel that shows how it’s done. Press play! We always have so much fun making these videos, can’t believe it’s been seven months since we last did one - that needs to change. You can basically use any roots or hard vegetable of preference to make these - beetroot, potato, sweet potato, carrot, parsnip, turnip and even butternut squash. If you choose organic, you don’t have to bother peeling them. It actually tastes better with the peel left on, just like sweet potato fries. You can obviously flavor these root tangles in lots of ways. Try tossing them with cinnamon or sumac, or add vinegar for an acidic twist. If you prefer them crisp all the way through, you can spread them out on the trays instead of arranging them like nests. If you don’t have a spiralizer, you can use a julienne peeler or the coarse side of a box grater instead (you can place the grated roots in muffin tins if you like them to hold together better). Although a spiralizer is pretty fun tool to have at home. It doesn’t cost much and it’s great for making vegetable noodles and slices that can be used in pasta dishes, salads or thai noodle dishes. Roasted Root Tangles with Yogurt and Chickpea Salad Serves 4 1 1/­­2 lb /­­ 750 g mixed roots (we used 1 sweet potato, 3 beetroots, 1 parsnip) 2 tbsp olive oil 1 tsp salt Herby Chickpea Salad 2 cups mixed baby leaf lettuce 4 sprigs cilantro /­­ coriander 4 sprigs fresh mint 1 x 14 oz /­­ 400 g can chickpeas /­­ garbanzo beans 2 tbsp toasted sesame oil 1/­­2 lemon, juice To serve 1 cup Turkish yogurt or coconut yogurt 1 avocado 2 tbsp mixed sesame seeds sauerkraut (fermented cabbage), store-bought or homemade (we are sharing three varieties in our new book) Preheat the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F and grease or place baking paper on two baking trays. Rinse the roots and scrub off any dirt. Trim off the edges, attach to a spiralizer and make noodles/­­ribbons/­­shoestrings (or use a julienne peeler or box grater). Drizzle with olive oil and salt and toss and mix so all root ribbons are combined. If you have very long ribbons, you can cut them with a scissor to make it easier to mix. Arrange the tangled ribbons into nests and place on the baking tray, make sure that there aren’t too many loose ribbons on the sheet or they will burn quicker. Roast for 25-30 minutes or until crispy on the outside but not yet burnt. While the roots are roasting, prepare the salad. Chop the herbs and mix with the lettuce. Rinse the chickpeas thoroughly and add them to the lettuce. Drizzle with toasted sesame oil, lemon juice and sea salt. Toss and mix. Divide the avocado into quarters, remove the stone and use a sharp knife to slice each quarter thinly. Remove the roots from the oven. Arrange 2-3 root tangles on each plate. Add a dollop of yogurt on each root tangle, top with salad, sliced avocado, sesame seeds and a spoonful of sauerkraut. Enjoy! *********** PS! Today Green Kitchen At Home is released in Australia! And in just three weeks it will launch in the UK and next month in the US. Exciting! Here are some links in case you would like to order or pre-order it: Amazon.co.uk (UK). Amazon.com (USA). Booktopia.com (Australia & NZ).

Beetroot Soup with Roasted Chickpeas

December 23 2016 Veganpassion 

Beetroot Soup with Roasted Chickpeas As a child beetroot was awful to me. Earthy and red, that had to keep off my plate. Since I'm a vegan my taste definitely changed. I'm using beetroot all the time and I love it. If grated in a salad, in a cream sauce, roasted with finger-shaped potato dumpling, in a risotto or in a dessert. The colour just makes me smile. In the winter I love earthy vegetables like pumpkin and potatos. The beetroot just fits perfectly into a colorful menu. Before you know it the nodule has turned into a soup. I ate it all even though I wanted to keep something for my boyfriend...oh well, next time :-) Makes 4 portions. Ingredients: 2 beetroot (700 g) 1 onion 3 tbsp. olive oil 1 small piece ginger 2 tsp. vegetable broth, powder 100 ml orange juice 5 cloves 1/­­2 tsp. cilantro seeds, grounded 1/­­4 tsp. cinnamon 1 can (400 g) coconut milk 0,8-1 l water 1 tbsp. almond butter salt, pepper 4 tbsp. non-dairy cream 1 tsp. thyme, dried orange zest Peel the beetroot and the onion and cut them into cubes. Stew in olive oil until the onion start roasting. Cut ginger into small pieces and add it to the vegetable broth. Deglaze it with orange juice. Add cloves, cilantro, cinnamon, coconut milk and half of the water. Let it cook with closed lid for 10 minutes than add almond butter. Mash everything and taste it. For the roasted chickpeas: 1 can chickpeas 1 tbsp. olive oil 1/­­2 garlic paste 3/­­4 tsp. sweet paprika powder 3/­­4 tsp. curcuma powder seasalt, pepper Pour off the chickpeas and mix them with olive oil, garlic, paprika powder and curcuma powder. Flavour it with salt and pepper. Bake at 200°C (392°F) upper-/­­lower heat for 20 minutes. Turn them around once a while so they don't get burned. Serve the soup with dab of cream, some thyme, orange zest and put the chickpeas on top. Enjoy the recipe!

Porcini Risotto with Beetroot Balls

December 22 2016 Veganpassion 

Porcini Risotto with Beetroot Balls We're always splitting up the preperation for our christmas dinner. I'm sending the menu ideas to my family first and everyone decides what they would like to eat and what they could imagine to prepare. Mostly it ends with the men sitting on the couch and the women cooking a wunderful menu. But we're working on that. At least they have the will to do something and after the dinner all plates are empty *proud* As an entree for this years phony menu I have chosen a porcini risotto. It's very easy to make alongside. You can draft one of the men to help you stir while you can organize the rest of your menu. With oven baked carrots, beetroot balls and a wonderful sauce your christmas dinner is going to be amazing. Have lots of fun with cooking! Makes 4 portions. For the porcini risotto: 1 onion 2 tbsp. olive oil 300 g risotto rice 2 tbsp. dried porcini or 250 g fresh porcini 1,2 l vegetable broth salt, pepper, nutmeg 1 tbsp. yeast flakes 1 tbsp. almond butter Cut the onion into cubes and sweat them in olive oil, then add risotto rice. Add mushrooms and 200 ml vegetable broth and let it cook while stiring. Flavour it. As soon as the rice absorbed the vegetable broth add some more liquid until the rice is covered. Stiring makes the rice creamy so don't waste your arm power. After 30-40 minutes when all the liquid is gone an the rice is done, add yeast flakes and almond butter. Taste everything. For the beetroot balls: 250 g fresh beetroot 200 g tofu 2-3 tbsp. olive oil 1 onion 2 tbsp. soy curd 3 tbsp. breadcrumbs, whole spelt salt, pepper, nutmeg, sage 1 tbsp. yeast flakes olive oil for the taste Grate beetroot. Crumble tofu and roast it in a pan with lots of olive oil. Cut onions into cubes and add them to the pan. Roast the mixture until it gets brown. Then flavour it and add beetroot. Roast everything a little bit unil the flavours evolve. In a mixing bowl mix together the beetroot mixture, soy curd, breadcrumbs and yeast flakes. Form the mixture into 12 balls and bake them in the pan with some olive oil. For the oven baked carrots: 500 g multicolored carrots 3 tbsp. olive oil 2 tbsp. maple sirup salt, pepper Quater the carrots lengthways and put it on a baking sheet with baking paper. Sprinkle with olive oil and maple sirup. Roast them in the oven at 190°C (374°F) upper-/­­lower heat 15-20 minutes. For the gourmet sauce: 1 big onion 1 carrot 2-3 tbsp. olive oil 2 tbsp. tomato paste salt, pepper, nutmeg, paprika 1 tbsp. starch 1 tbsp. soy sauce 500 ml vegetable broth Cut onion and carrot into very fine cubes. Sweat in olive oil until they get brown and aromatic. Then add tomate paste and let it caramelize a little bit. Flavour it. Stir in the starch and the soy sauce and mix until everything is smooth. Add more and more vegetable sauce and let it boil down. Serve risotto with dark sauce, oven baked carrots and beetroot balls. Feast until santa comes.

Beet & Berry Yoats + Big Love

July 25 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Beet & Berry Yoats + Big Love A few years ago we had a section on this blog called Big Love where we shared links and things that inspired us at the moment - high and low. We’re reviving it today as we have too many unanswered emails and comments asking about everything from our favorite places, books, ceramics and camera gear. We also added a couple of other things to the list, like Elsa’s favorite song. Of course we’re also sharing the recipe for these Yoat jars further down in this post. Big Love! o Our cookbook shelf is always overflowing, here are our two latest additions. My Darling Lemon Thyme (by Emma Galloway) is a truly great book with recipes right up our alley (all vegetarian and gluten free). Tasting Rome (by Katie Parla and Kristina Gill) brings back so many memories from the time I was living there. Beautiful photography both of the city and its food. o Luise is in love with the apron that Sara from Sprouted Kitchen made in collaboration with her sister from Stone Cold Fox. Luise is wearing it in this blog post and it can be found here. o The ceramics from this Danish family company will make any food look pretty. Here are two examples where we have used it {uno | due}. o If you are visiting Scandinavia, make sure to check out these links to some of our favourite places in Stockholm and Copenhagen. o Our smoothie book is coming out in the US next week and can be pre-ordered here! o For those of you asking about camera gear. I have a Canon EOS 5D mark iii with two different lenses. A 50 mm f/­­1.2 for all top shots and a 100 mm f/­­1.8 macro lens for all close-ups. I use the same equipment when I film videos for our youtube channel. When we travel I use this camera bag. o If you love kombucha you should check out this incredible guide by Sarah from My New Roots. o Even if it is our third time around, I will never get tired of seeing Luise’s tummy growing. o Elsa is constantly humming on this song by two 14-year old Norwegian twin brothers (gone are apparently the days when she just played with teddybears and sang Twinkle Twinkle…). o Isac’s new hair style - the boy-bun. We call this quick breakfast recipe Yoats. It is a mashup of yogurt and oats (and a few other simple ingredients) that we prepare in jars for a simple outside breakfast in the sun. In a way, this recipe is similar to a bircher muesli as you can leave it in the fridge overnight, but because the yogurt loosens up the oats real quickly, it can also be indulged right away. For flavour and extra va-va-voom, we layer it with a rather thick raspberry and beetroot smoothie (maybe puree is a more describing word?) and also add some of it to the oats for a beautiful pink hue. The layers are not only visually appealing but also more interesting as the flavours change as you work your way through the jar. Beetroot for breakfast might sound scary but the earthiness from the root is perfectly balanced with tanginess from the lemon, sweetness from dates and fruitiness from the raspberries. We’ve tried the yoats recipe with coconut yogurt (as a vegan option) and Greek yogurt and they both taste great. Obviously you can change the flavour by simply making a different smoothie/­­purée. Beetroot & Raspberry Yoats Serves 4 Yoats 2 cups /­­ 500 ml plain thick yogurt, Greek or Turkish (vegans can use Coconut Yogurt) 1 cup /­­ 90 g rolled oats 1/­­4 cup /­­35 g sunflower seeds 1 small apple, cored and roughly grated on a box grater 1 pinch ground vanilla or vanilla extract 1 tsp freshly grated ginger or ground ginger Beet & Raspberry Purée 1 cup /­­ 125 g raspberries (fresh or thawed frozen) 1 small raw beetroot (approx 65 g /­­ 2 oz), peeled and coarsely chopped or grated (depending on the strength of your blender) 1/­­2 lemon, juice 2 tbsp water 2 soft dates, pitted To serve raspberries fresh mint leaves, chopped bee pollen Place all ingredients for the yoats in a mixing bowl and gently stir to combine. Set aside. Meanwhile prepare the purée. Add all ingredients to a high speed blender and blend until smooth. Taste to see if more lemon juice, water or dates are needed. When done, mix  1/­­4 cup of the purée with the yoats. Then divide the rest of the purée into 4 glass jars. Spoon the pink yoats into each jar. Eat right away or store in the fridge for up to a couple of days. Ideally make the recipe in the evening and serve for breakfast the following morning. Top with fresh raspberries, chopped mint and bee pollen before serving.

Sensational Sweet and Spicy Sambols

May 13 2016 My New Roots 

Sensational Sweet and Spicy Sambols Being someone who loves a meal with many elements, Sri Lankan food was pretty much my dream come true. Every meal is served with plenty of sides: sauces, chutneys, relishes, and pickles, to make each bite unique and surprising. Sambol is the word for this seemingly endless collection of condiments, and I lost count trying to sample them all in a week. I believe I mentioned in my previous post about Sri Lanka, how spicy the food is there. Like, blow-your-head-off spicy. And as if the curries themselves werent hot enough, the chili-based sambols on the side will certainly commit your taste buds to perplexing levels of pain. Pol sambol is the ubiquitous, fiery condiment served at breakfast, lunch, and dinner. It is probably one of the simplest dishes to make, consisting mainly of chili, shredded coconut, chili, lime, and chili - did I mention the chili? Yea. This mix ranges from very spicy to volcanically hot depending on whose table youre sitting at. On the second day of the trip, my tongue seeking refuge in something, dare I say it, borderline bland, I discovered one of the most delicious things I have ever tasted - and it wasnt bland to say the least, just not sweat-inducing. Seeni sambol, a fragrant, Sri Lankan caramelized onion jam, turned out to be incredible on everything from hoppers to curries, and could turn a pretty plain bowl of red rice into something remarkably special. I became totally obsessed with this sambol and it was the very first thing I attempted to make when I came home. I really cannot tell you enough how awesome this stuff is. Do yourself a favour and make a batch soon! The most memorable experience I had in Sri Lanka was learning to cook traditional recipes with two women in the local village. It was likely one of the most eye-opening culinary experiences Ive ever had - not only learning from such passionate and experienced cooks, but seeing their traditional kitchen, tools, and techniques really inspired me. Take their stove, for example. A large clay bench with large mounds molded into it held the earthenware pots in place, and the heat underneath was adjusted by adding more sticks to the fire, or taking them away. Genius. Above the stove was a large wooden wrack to hang beans, seeds, and herbs for fast drying, which I thought was a brilliant way to take advantage of the residual heat. Ingredients were prepped on the floor, since its cooler down there, and also nice to sit while youre working. The knife to cut veggies was actually attached to a stool, and instead of holding the blade, you hold the vegetables and basically drop them on top, slicing them in the air to fall onto a grass mat. The sambol was made by grinding all the ingredients together on a huge flat stone designed specifically for this task, and as such took all of ten seconds to prepare. Spoons were made from dried coconut shells. The plates were made of woven grass, topped with fresh lotus leaves from the nearby creek. The leaves protected the plates from the saucy curries, and when you were finished your meal, youd discard the leaf into the compost, so that there was literally nothing to wash! I mean. This day made me take a long hard look at how much stuff I use in the kitchen. Water, electricity, appliances - these women were literally using nothing but things from the earth around them and it made me wonder how weve come so far from that connection. Cooking has become so overblown, and it was this experience that reminded me to cook simpler and eat simpler. Get closer to the earth. I dont have some grand solution, but its food for thought. I’ll share a few notes on the recipes… You will likely think Ive lost my mind when you begin the task of slicing two pounds of onions (#worthit), but I promise you it is the correct amount, and youll see that it cooks down to nearly nothing. I tried half this amount my first time and it just simply wasnt enough. If youre going to go for this, you may as well make a batch that will last you at least a few meals, right? Fresh curry leaves are a definite preference for this recipe, but Ive never been able to find them here in Copenhagen so I used dried. Theyre not great, but better than nothing. If you dont want to gnaw on whole spices or curry leaves you can remove them after the seeni sambol is cooked, but it can be a bit of a treasure hunt situation, just sayin. Once Ive smashed the cardamom pods, I like to remove the outer skin and just add the inner seeds to the spics mix. I tend to leaves the cloves and curry leaves in since I like those bursts of flavour. The pol sambol recipe Ive written here is admittedly, a wimps version. Ill admit that I can only tolerate spice until it begins to overwhelm the other flavours in the food, so mine is strong but still edible on its own. I invite you to go with your instincts on this one and dial up the heat to suit your tastes. If you can find freshly grated coconut (or a fresh coconut that you can grate yourself) by all means use that instead of the desiccated variety! Some versions of pol sambol include curry leaves, but because I only had dried I left them out. If you can find fresh ones, add about a sprig for this recipe, and crush them well before incorporating. As far as serving these two sensational sambols go, they are pretty much great with All. The. Things. Rice dishes, curries, stews, soups, wraps, sandwiches, salads...I mean it! Once you taste them Im confident youll find infinite uses for them. The first photo is of steamed brown rice and the Kale Mallung recipe that I wrote from the last Sri Lankan post - still a major fav around here. I love this meal for breakfast with a poached egg, lots of seeni sambol and, ahem, lightly sprinkled with the pol sambol.     Print recipe     Seeni Sambol Makes 1 heaping cup /­­ 300ml Ingredients: 2 lb. /­­ 900g red onions 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml coconut oil 10 green cardamom pods 8 cloves 3 Tbsp. dried curry leaves (or 2 sprigs fresh curry leaves if you can find them!) 1 cinnamon stick 2 tsp. fine sea salt 2 tsp. coconut sugar Directions: 1. Peel and slice the onions. 2. Pound the cardamom pods in a mortar and pestle until they have split open. You can remove the outer skin and just save the seeds inside, but its only if you dont like eating the exterior. 3. Place a large, heavy-bottomed pot over medium-high heat and melt the coconut oil. Add the cardamom pods, cloves, curry leaves, and cinnamon stick. Stir and cook until fragrant, about 3-4 minutes. Add the onions, salt and sugar, stir very well to coat and cook uncovered, stirring every couple minutes until the onions have completely melted down - this can take anywhere from 30-45 minutes. Be patient and enjoy the process! 4. Transfer seeni sambol to a glass jar and store in the fridge for up to one month. Remove from fridge at least half an hour before serving, as the coconut oil will cause the sambol to solidify in the fridge.   Pol Sambol Makes 4 cups /­­ 1 liter Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 180g desiccated coconut 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml warm water or coconut water 1 clove garlic 2 shallots or small red onions 1-3 red chilies (or as many as you think you can handle!) I used fresh Thai chilies 1 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. chili powder (or as much as you think you can handle!) juice of 1 lime Directions: 1. Combine the desiccated coconut with the water and stir thoroughly to combine. Let sit for 15-30 minutes until softened. 2. Place the garlic in a food processor and blend to finely mince. Roughly slice shallots and chili, and place them in the food processor with the garlic and blend to mince.  Add the softened coconut, salt, chili powder and lime juice. Blend on high to fully incorporate. Taste and adjust seasoning if desired.   A huge thanks to Cinnamon Hotels and Resorts  and Sri Lankan Airlines for making this incredible trip possible! Show me your sambols on Instagram: #MNRsambol The post Sensational Sweet and Spicy Sambols appeared first on My New Roots.

Sri Lankan Beetroot Curry & Kale Mallung

February 18 2016 My New Roots 

Sri Lankan Beetroot Curry & Kale Mallung Where do I even begin? I guess Ill start by saying that I feel like I am waking up from the most spectacular, flavourful, technicolour dream. Sri Lanka deeply touched me, from its incredible landscape, beautiful people and of course, the food. The food! The food. When I was first invited by Cinnamon Hotels and Resorts to go on a food tour of Sri Lanka, I was a bit uncertain - to be honest, I didnt know anyone who had visited Sri Lanka before, and I especially had no idea what the cuisine was like. I assumed that it was probably very much like Indian, but what I discovered is that it has its own totally distinctive flavours and cooking techniques. Sri Lankan people are very passionate about their food and the culture around it. From my perspective, they seemed especially connected to the earth and the bounty that springs year-round from their incredibly fertile land. Many of the worlds spices are grown on the island, so you can imagine how rich and complex their traditional dishes are. Sri Lankan food is also hot. Like, crazy hot. Chilies play a dominant role in everything from curries to relish and are accompany every meal of the day - even breakfast. An interesting way to start your morning, I might add, is being startled awake by an explosive plate of food. And with coconuts quite literally dripping from the trees everywhere you look, the backbone of many Sri Lankan dishes, both savoury and sweet, is coconut water, milk and flesh. Heavenly. And a welcome antidote to all that chile. Rice and curry is a Sri Lankan staple, and in fact the word food there is synonymous with this combination. Happily for me, there are countless vegetarian and vegan options to choose from. My favourites were jackfruit curry (mindblowing!), cashew curry (yes, a whole pot of cashews cooked in coconut milk), wingbean curry, mung bean curry, eggplant curry, lentil curry, and pumpkin curry. But my favourite curry of all? Beetroot curry. Surprising, eh? The first time I was offered this dish, I kind of thought that it was an accommodating east-west mashup or something, but no! Its a thing. And a wildly delicious thing at that. I never imagined combining beets and coconut before, but it works incredibly well. The earthiness of the beets contrasts perfectly with the sweetness of the coconut milk, and the beets are neither crunchy or mushy, but a perfectly balanced succulent-tender texture that pairs so well with rice. The other major love affair I had in Sri Lanka was with all the little side dishes that come with the curries themselves: sambol and mallung (or mallum). Sambol is like a relish, typically based on freshly shredded coconut (but not always), with a featured vegetable, along with chilies and lime. Pol sambol (coconut sambol) is ubiquitous and served at every meal I can remember. It varies in spiciness from table to table, but more often than not I couldnt eat more than a couple teaspoons with my curry - which was already insanely hot enough, thank you. Mallungs are “green dishes” made with cabbage, kale, broccoli, beans or other leafy veg. These are always cooked without any oil, and instead use just the heat of the pan and a little bit of water to steam the vegetable – a groovy technique in my opinion. Spices are used in mallung as well, and vary from recipe to recipe. They can be served warm or at room temperature, almost like a lightly cooked salad. Curry leaves are an essential ingredient in Sri Lankan food. Many people are confused by this name because they associate curry with a spice blend, and assume that curry powder must then come from dried and ground curry leaves. In truth the word curry vaguely refers to a dish prepared with spices, but means very little to Indian or South Asians, where curries originate. Curry powder is largely a Western creation, and should in fact be referred to as masala, meaning a spice mix. Most curries in Sri Lanka rely on whole spices, not ground or pre-mixed ones, so that the cook can balance flavours according to his /­­ her tastes. Anyway, back to the curry leaves. Small, dark green and glossy, they are deeply aromatic with a distinctive savoury-smoky scent that is difficult to describe. And no, they dont smell like curry powder - weve already established that. They can be difficult to find fresh here in Copenhagen (and I would imagine, many places in the world!), but dried ones are available at most ethnic grocers or specialty shops. With about half the pungency of fresh curry leaves, the dried ones are an okay substitute if thats all youve got, but do try and seek out some fresh ones - youll never look back! Plus, if you find them fresh, you can easily freeze them until your next curry. It was very difficult to decide what kind of Sri Lankan dish I would post first (oh yea, theres more to come...) but I chose beetroot curry and kale mallung because they are both relatively seasonal here in Denmark, and because I think that both of these recipes take us out of our comfort zone with familiar veggies, and make use of entirely unique cooking techniques. Youll find both applications totally surprising, I guarantee that, and I hope that they inspire you to make curry out of things you wouldnt normally, or try an oil-free, steamy stir-fry. Yum town. There is so much complexity and diversity to Sri Lankan food and I am forever inspired. I cannot wait to go back to this enchanted island to explore, and eat, once again.     Print recipe     Sri Lankan Beetroot Curry with Kale Mallung Serves 3-4 Ingredients: 1.3 lbs /­­ 600g red beetroots 1 large onion, finely chopped 3 cloves garlic 1 Tbsp. coconut oil 2 tsp. black mustard seeds 1 teaspoon coriander seeds 20 dried curry leaves curry leaves (or 1 sprig fresh) 2-3 small green chilies, finely chopped 1 cinnamon stick 1 tsp. fine sea salt, plus more for finishing 1 14 oz. /­­ 400ml can full-fat coconut milk juice of 1 lime large handful of cilantro 4 portions of cooked red or brown rice (red is more traditional) 1 batch Kale Mallung (recipe to follow) lime wedges to serve Directions: 1. Peel beets and cut them into matchsticks. Chop onions, slice garlic. Set aside. 2. In a large pot over medium-high heat, melt coconut oil. Add the mustard seeds, stir, and let cook for a couple minutes until they begin to pop (be careful that they do not burn!). Add the coriander, curry leaves, chilies, and cinnamon, stir well, and cook for one minute until fragrant. Add the onion and salt, stir to coat and cook until the onions are translucent, about 5-7 minutes. Add garlic, stir and cook one minute. Add beets and coconut milk, bring to a simmer, reduce heat and cover (make sure that the liquid is simmering very lightly, not boiling. Boiling over high heat will cause the coconut milk to split). Cook until the beets are tender, about 15-20 minutes. 3. While the curry is cooking, wash and roughly chop the cilantro. 4. To finish the curry, squeeze in the lime juice, stir, and add more salt to balance the flavours. Add cilantro and serve immediately over rice with the kale mallung and extra lime wedges. Kale Mallung Serves 3-4  Ingredients 1/­­2 cup /­­ 45g unsweetened desiccated coconut 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml coconut water 4 cups /­­ 130g shredded + packed kale 1 small red onion 1 tsp. ground cumin 3/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt, plus more for garnish 1 green chilli, if desired Juice of 1/­­2 lime, plus extra for garnish Directions: 1. Combine desiccated coconut and coconut water in a small bowl and let soak for about 30 minutes. 2. Slice onion in thin sections. Mince chili. Wash kale and spin dry. Remove any tough ribs, stack leaves and cut into thin ribbons. Set aside. 3.In a large, dry pot over medium heat, add the onions, salt and cumin. Stir often, letting the onions soften in the pan. Add a couple tablespoons of the liquid from the soaking coconut if the pot becomes too dry (reserve as much liquid as you can, however). After about 8-10 minutes, add the kale and the coconut mixture. Stir to coat, and quickly cover the pot with a lid so that the kale steams inside. Wait just 30-60 seconds – the kale is ready when it is bright green and tender. Remove from heat and squeeze in the lime juice. Season to taste. Serve warm or at room temperature.   A huge thanks to Cinnamon Hotels and Resorts for making this incredible trip possible!   The post Sri Lankan Beetroot Curry & Kale Mallung appeared first on My New Roots.

Vegetable flatbreads + video

February 4 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Vegetable flatbreads + video These colorful flatbreads are quick to make, have only 3 ingredients (well kind of, if you are not counting salt or pepper) with the main one being a vegetable (which is why they have such awesome colors). Sounds interesting? We created this recipe for our youtube channel so make sure to watch the video to see what a simple, savoury snack this is. Our plan was to make a really instructional video but Elsa came crashing our shoot with all her crazy monkey faces and dances and we just couldn’t leave those parts out when editing. Hopefully you will still find some helpful cooking instructions in there. Press play! We really enjoy shooting these videos and will try making them more frequently. We are thinking about adding some Q&A videos as well, so subscribe to our youtube channel for the latest updates and to ask us questions. Our flatbreads are simply made with mixed vegetables, ground almonds and eggs. The recipe is based on the quite popular cauliflower pizza crust recipe from our first cookbook The Green Kitchen. We found these to be a fun variation and quite useful to have at home. We have broccoli in the green ones, and mix cauliflower with carrots or beetroot for the orange and purple/­­red flatbreads. You can also add spinach or kale to the broccoli or cauliflower mix. A handy and a bit unusual way to eat your veggies. The almond flour add a sweet roundness to the flavor but if you are allergic to nuts you could try using chickpea flour and a splash of olive oil instead. We should perhaps add that raw mixed broccoli smells a lot like fart, so you should perhaps not make these right before you are having a romantic date (the smell disappears when they are baked though). With a stack of these in the fridge, you’ve got a number of quick meal options. Most commonly, we eat them as sandwiches filled with mashed avocado, vegetables, hummus or cheese (you can of course add whatever you prefer). Or we make super quick mini pizzas by spreading a single layer pesto or tomato puree on each, then add topping of choice and bake for 7-8 minutes on high heat. You can also make larger pieces and roll them into thick wraps. Thank you Angela for leaving a comment suggesting these would be great canapés, stamped out with cookie cutters, excellent idea! Broccoli Flatbread Makes about 12 slices 1 large head of raw broccoli 100 g /­­ 1 cup almond flour /­­ ground almonds 4 eggs 1 tsp dried herbs of choice (oregano, thyme, lemon pepper), optional sea salt and black pepper to taste Preheat the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F and line a baking tray with baking paper. Coarsely chop the broccoli (use the brighter part of the stem too), place in food processor and blend until you have got a fine rice-like texture. Measure 4 cups /­­ 1 liter of the vegetable rice and place in a mixing bowl. Add ground almonds, salt and pepper (plus herbs, if using) and mix with your hands. Make a well in the centre and add the eggs. Whisk the eggs with a fork. Use your hands to pull the dry ingredients towards the middle until everything is combined and you can shape it into a ball. It should be more loose and wet than a traditional bread dough. Transfer to the baking paper and form into a rectangular base by flattening the dough with your hands. Bake on the middle rack in the oven for 23-25 minutes or until slightly golden and firm. Remove from the oven and let cool completely. Turn it upside-down and carefully remove the baking paper. Cut into bread-sized slices and store in the fridge. Beet flatbread 1 small head of raw cauliflower, including the stem 2 medium raw beetroots, peeled 100 g /­­ 1 cup almond flour /­­ ground almonds 4 eggs 1/­­2 tsp sea salt and black pepper Use the same instruction and measurements as above. The dough is slightly more moist than when using broccoli but dries up when baked. Carrot flatbread 1 small head of raw cauliflower 1 large raw carrot, peeled 100 g /­­ 1 cup almond flour /­­ ground almonds 4 eggs 1/­­2 tsp sea salt and black pepper Use the same instruction and measurements as above. The dough is slightly more moist than when using broccoli but dries up when baked. Note for vegans: We have tried a vegan version of this recipe but weren’t entirely satisfied with it. We used 3 chia ‘eggs’ (3 tbsp chia + 9 tbsp water, set a side for 15 minutes) instead of eggs, but it didn’t hold together well enough once baked. Next time we will try replacing the almond flour with a more starchy flour (rice flour or chickpea flour) or replacing chia seeds with psyllium seeds for the bread to hold together better.

Pumpkin and Cashew Cheese Tortillas

September 11 2015 Vegie Head 

Using two simple and creamy spreads, this otherwise plain pumpkin tortilla morphs into something spectacular. A symphony of colour, golden pumpkin, passionate pink beetroot and vibrant greens… Try this Roasted Beet Dip (recipe a part of Kale and Beet Pizza) Try this Cashew Cheese (minus the Za...


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