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beauty vegetarian recipes

Peach and Zucchini Smoothie

July 30 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Peach and Zucchini Smoothie I love those stands at the farmer’s market, where the fruit is a little too ripe and bruised, and therefore discounted. I can never pass one by and end up stocking up on the rejected fruit to freeze for smoothies. Since there’s an amazing abundance of peaches around right now, I’ve managed to collect quite a bit of them, sliced and bagged, in my freezer. They are great for making the most refreshing smoothies, but can also be easily defrosted for a crumble. In any case, it’s always a great idea to buy and freeze some overripe peaches :) Like seemingly everyone else in the (smoothie) world, I’ve been changing up my smoothie routine by using various frozen vegetables in place of banana, for a lower sugar start to the day. So far, I’ve had success with a mix of steamed and frozen cauliflower and sweet potato, as well as raw, frozen zucchini. Zucchini is especially lovely in combination with peaches, and I’ve been really liking the very minimal smoothie that we’re sharing here today. It’s nothing more than frozen zucchini, peaches, basil and a splash of vanilla, whirled with your liquid of choice. It’s barely sweet and very refreshing, but if you prefer your smoothies on the sweeter side, you can add any sweetener you like, or even a banana. Lots of great weekend links below. Enjoy your Sunday :) Kitty – Chloe Sevigny’s directorial debut is magical Bonsergent Studio – the most beautiful vintage online store based in Paris Alison Scrapulla – in love with this photographer’s work (the double exposures!) Shiso Delicious – a plant-based bento master, her Stories are also great Recipes at The Fullest – so many good ones + beautiful photos Clarisse Demory in Another Mag – we love her work, really excited to see this more in-depth profile about her approach Hormone-Balancing Helva Bars – into these A Simple Table – why don’t I have this cookbook yet? Vegan Ice Cream Enters A Golden Age – always great to hear, and if you want to try making vegan ice cream at home, we have a bunch of recipes here Peach and Zucchini Smoothie   Print Serves: 2 Ingredients 2 ripe, sweet peaches, plus more for garnish 1 medium zucchini handful of basil leaves splash of vanilla extract 1½-2 cups coconut water, water, almond milk or other liquid of choice bee pollen - for garnish (optional, not vegan) desiccated coconut - for garnish (optional) Instructions Slice the peaches and zucchini, and place them on a parchment paper-covered baking tray. Place in the freezer for about 2 hours or overnight, until frozen, then transfer to freezer bags to store. Combine the frozen peaches and zucchini with the basil, vanilla and liquid in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Serve, garnished with fresh peach slices, bee pollen and desiccated coconut, if using. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Avocado Kiwi Smoothie and a Jus by Julie Cleanse Giveaway Almond Milk and Almond Pulp Cookies Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 2 Peach, Honey and Thyme Lemonade Popsicles - Ice Cream Sunday .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Peach and Zucchini Smoothie appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin

July 16 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline ChardinToday’s self-care dialogue is with Pauline Chardin, a Parisian, a pro-traveler, and the author of our favorite wanderlust blog, The Voyageur. Pauline is a freelance art director and trend consultant in fashion, who looks to travel as a steady source of inspiration. Her blog is unlike any travel blog you’ve ever seen. Each story is accompanied by photo essays that are aesthetically sensitive to their environment and attentive to details that might otherwise go unnoticed. The documented destinations are always interesting and full of beauty that feels raw and true, captured from a less expected angle. From a secluded cabin in the mountains of Central France, a Moss Temple in Japan, to a lush sculpture park in Brazil, Pauline’s got us daydreaming and plotting future adventures any chance we get. In her self-care, Pauline is refreshingly down to Earth, with a bit of that inevitable, French chic thrown into the mix. Here, she tells us about her upcoming move to the South of France as a way to be closer to nature, her bedtime and beauty routines, her ways of dealing with jet lag, why she makes a point of packing parmesan and olive oil to bring on her journeys, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Making the best of time and things is definitely a big preoccupation of mine. I like to plan and think ahead, I guess that puts me in the routine camp. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I’m in the process of becoming more of a “morning person”, we’ll be moving from Paris to the countryside next year, and I have this image of myself getting up at 6am  and having all the time of the world. I’m not there yet, but here’s a typical morning from these last weeks. I wake up at 7:30 , before my husband, open all the windows while the air is still fresh and the street not too noisy. I spend some time in the bathroom before sitting at my desk to start working on some not-too-demanding tasks. An hour or so later, I prepare breakfast for us two. We’re both mostly working from home, which gives us the leisure of enjoying rather stress-free breakfasts and the time to have a nice conversation before digging into work. Everything is rather quiet until 10am , that’s when e-mails start to arrive and phones start to ring. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I found that there are three things that help me find a deep, relaxing sleep : the first one is the Sarvangâsana posture (also supposed to keep you from growing older if you do it 30 minutes every day, but I’m far from being that disciplined), my husband giving me a head massage and watching episodes of Cosmos (I’ll never know the secrets of the universe because I always fall into the most blissful sleep after 10 minutes). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – homemade fare, like vanilla millet pudding with fresh mango and almonds. Lunch – cereals with vegetables, like polenta fries with peperonata and fresh ricotta. Generally no dessert but an espresso with a piece of chocolate. Snack – I don’t really eat much between meals, except fruits in the summer. Dinner – mostly vegetables, cold or hot depending on the season, like a beet and cucumber carpaccio with green peppers. I have fruits for dessert, cooked in the winter and fresh in the summer, often with a bit of ice cream! -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I drink Mariage Fr?res tea in the morning and rarely have more than one espresso a day, at lunch. I only break that rule in countries where the coffee is very good, in Italy of course, but also in Japan because I love their milk coffee. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I really do, but I also find that I don’t like very sweet things anymore. My rule is to almost only eat pastries I’ve prepared myself. I’ve also realized that fruits are often enough to fulfill my cravings.  -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I’m a big fan of Yotam Ottolenghi’s cooking and his sincere and generous approach to cooking, I have a few of his books, and his recipes rarely disappoint me. I have also been very inspired by my trips to Japan and Japanese wisdom in general, from their ‘it’s the journey that matters’ philosophy to their culture of bathing, or their ceramics. I find these things really help my happiness. More broadly, my way of living and eating is and was influenced by my parents, whose health would put any twenty-year old to shame! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I’ve been doing pilates and yoga for years. I try to do at least one lesson a week, but lately it’s been more small home-sessions, by myself, two or three times a week. I also love to hike and swim whenever I have the opportunity. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it?  I really enjoy it and would love to do more (hopefully having a big house instead of a small apartment will help). I’ve been working a lot lately and I’ve been finding it hard to take a break during the day to do it. It’s a pity because I know the benefits all too well! Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I feel it’s very important to be comfortable in my body, to take good care of it and to be healthy, but I don’t like to dwell too much on the idea of my own beauty. I’m much more interested in what others project. Partly because of my line of work, I’ve learned to appreciate and enjoy all the subtleties of female beauty (much more than men, I must admit). I should also mention that I work in a very feminine environment that definitely puts style and personality before plastic beauty and basic seduction. I find it very freeing! -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Like a lot of people, these last years I’ve been trying to embrace more natural products. I aspire to low maintenance but find as I get older that being a woman is definitely high maintenance. For now I put in the time because I find it relaxing and a good break from working. My favorites include Nuxe Huile prodigieuse, almond oil, Océopin pine powder scrub, and Aesop déodorant herbacé. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Not really, I think I haven’t graduated to supplements yet. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My mother often used an eyebrow pencil and it has become a make-up staple of mine. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Yoga, cooking and being close to nature are the three simple things I strive to include in my daily life to keep things relaxed. So far I’ve been really good with the cooking part, I could definitely do better with the yoga, and the nature is still a work in progress. At the moment I live in Paris, so it’s complicated, but I look forward to a future where I can just open the window and hear the cicadas. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I find it ironic, and well, sad, that stress tends to keep you from doing anything that would make you feel better. It’s paralyzing in a way. Besides the solutions cited above, I find that making something with my hand (be it a cake, a dress or a drawing) helps me get centered again. Another good measure is travel or any form of exploration, if I manage to get excited and curious again, then I’m on my way to feeling better. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I cook your magical broth! I really do, even when I’m in good shape…which probably makes me too energized for my own good. Apart from that, working mostly from home means I’m rarely sick. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? It’s complicated. I’m very passionate about my job, which is relatively stress-free but also quite time-consuming. After ten years of doing it, I’m only realizing now that I may be working too much. This being said, I totally embrace the overlap, for me everything is connected, everything could and should be a source of inspiration, I “just” need to be careful about keeping some time to explore new things… I stopped counting the people around me who are in pain because of their job, so I try to be extra vigilant about the choices I and my loved ones make on the subject. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Most of my work requires that I spend a lot of my time in front of a computer and it would not come off as shocking to say that this isn’t a good thing. I’ve found out it has a way of making me feel like I’m not accomplishing much, even though I’ve been working for hours, maybe it’s because tasks get blended with one another, I don’t know. In any case, this “distortion” has the added drawback of not making me feel really good about myself, like I’m spinning in a wheel. On the other hand, when I spend a day, of even half a day, off my computer, I feel like I’m moving mountains, even if I’m only attending to mundane things. This is a great feeling and I wish it didn’t feel like some sort of luxury! -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Picking up yoga and pilates years ago was life-changing. I wasn’t into sports before that, and the body awareness it creates is an endless source of fascination. Knowledge -- You have a talent for seeking out the less traveled paths, hidden corners and beautiful places to stay wherever you travel. What is your approach when it comes to planning a trip? Coming up with the destination is a rather subjective process, which is often more about fantasy and pieces of information than reality. It might come from photographs I’ve seen, or a movie, or a conversation I’ve had. It’s a difficult balance to pick a place that sounds promising but which still remains a bit mysterious. Today with instagram, you sometimes feel like you’ve been there already, and it’s nice when you’re on your couch but a bit disheartening when you’re planning a trip. I sometimes also like to pick a rather touristic place and go there to see if it could be done off the beaten track, or photographed differently, like when we went to Rome, or to see the Giza pyramids. Besides that, I find that doing a lot of research is key if you want the trip to be both relaxing and interesting. It takes a lot of time and might ruin the surprise a little bit, but unless you’re traveling for a month, I find it too frustrating to “fail” a destination because you were too lazy to check opening hours and interesting spots. It’s a complicated task though, because you have to find recommendations from people whose sensibility is close to yours. It’s easy enough to find adresses of shops and restaurants, but when it comes to knowing that little neighborhood with a fantastic atmosphere, or that incredible building from the 70’s, or that little-known museum, then it gets complicated. For me travelling isn’t necessary about “consuming” or doing “breathtaking” things, it’s about finding inspiration. I’m doing The Voyageur to make it easier for others! -- Do you practice any special self-care routines while traveling, especially when it comes to jet lag? Sadly I’m not immune to jet-lag, on the contrary I find it totally messes up my digestion (in addition to my sleep). Jet-lag or not, I found that the best way to feel good abroad was to cook for myself as much as I can. To me it’s a win-win, it’s cheaper, I feel better and lighter, and I get to shop groceries and cook in a totally different setting. It has become an important part of our travels, one that I enjoy very much. I pack a whole battery of pantry essentials and then I buy fresh produce when I’m the ground. Every destination has its on treasures, things you’ll probably have a hard time finding back home, and it’s not necessary what you would get in restaurants : mountains of berries in Finland, cheap zucchini flowers in Venice, sour cream in St Petersburg or sweet muffin bread from the Azores islands. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I tend to believe I allow more time for packing than most people (I’m puzzled when I hear someone telling me they just throw random stuff in a suitcase an hour before their flight). I like to really think through what clothes I’m bringing, so it will fit the atmosphere of the destination, but also obviously local constraints and the kind of adventure I’m embarking on. I don’t really believe in a standardized list, I’m actually rather depressed by this packing advice of people bringing the same standard black and white things everywhere. I’m more about having the right equipment for each situation, it might be a stylish rain cloak if you go to Yakushima island, a fan for Egypt or a scarf in Andalucia that echoes the local ceramic patterns. It’s about those items that will be useful but will also make you happy. I find that objects can take on a new life when you bring them somewhere far-flung, they become the green dress you couldn’t stop wearing in Kerala or the perfumed oil you wore in Brazil. It builds new connections, it’s somewhere between a science and an art! Whatever the trip, beside the obvious items, you’ll have a good chance of finding in my luggage : – a camera – a Mason Pearson comb and brush – a swimsuit, even when swimming doesn’t sound like an option – A homemade meal for the trip, which makes a world of difference, and was actually initiated by your article on the subject. I recently acquired a wood bento box which makes it even greater! It also means that I have a box at hand if we’re having picnics during the rest of our stay. – If I know I’m going cook, I’m bringing a few ingredients, but most certainly there will be olive oil, a box of pasta and a chunk of Parmesan, which sounds pretty weird. It’s kind of a survival kit, when I have that, I know that we’re only a couple of tomatoes away from a comforting meal. Also, I’ve been to countries where finding all three ingredients would prove quite challenging, and expensive, which makes you cherish them even more. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Pretty much what I do to keep stress at bay, but if we’re taking things to another level of indulgence, I’d say anything water-related : a Japanese onsen bath, hammam, a swim in the sea or even just a plunge in the pool. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Way of the World by Nicolas Bouvier, and, any of his books really. He’s a Swiss writer and traveler who documented his journeys with a lot of wisdom and poetry. Song/­­Album – Nina Simone and Piano, even though it might be more soul-wrenching than soul-feeding. Movie – The Vertical Ray of the Sun by Tran Anh Hung, makes me want to book a ticket to south-east Asia right away. Piece of Art – Crépuscule by Felix Vallotton, strangely the landscape in the painting appeared to me on a stormy evening on Yakushima island in Japan… -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in Paris? Mokonuts, 5 rue st bernard, 75011 Paris A Japanese and a Lebanese in a tiny kitchen. I’m in love with their olive and white chocolate cookie and their carrot soup. They’re only open for lunch and you have to book ahead. Café Ineko, 3 Rue des Gravilliers, 75003 Paris Freshly opened vegetarian restaurant. Sincere and flavourful, my favorite of late. Their breakfast sounds fabulous and I’m planning to go very soon! Rice and Fish, 16 Rue Greneta, 75002 Paris Delicious fusion-style makis in a super relaxed atmosphere. Come early to get a seat. Pizzeria Dei Cioppi, 44 Rue Trousseau, 75011 Paris It’s easier than ever to find good pizza in Paris, but we’re faithful to this tiny one. Light, sophisticated pizzas in a quiet street with good music, what else? Osteria Ferrara, 7 Rue du Dahomey, 75011 Paris A slightly high-end italian restaurant with to-die-for risotto. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Tina of tforia.com, I love her very low-profile and delicate approach. All photos are from Pauline’s travels (and kitchen), courtesy of Pauline Chardin. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Berry Kombucha Float

July 9 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Berry Kombucha Float A confession – I’ve never actually tried a classic root beer float, but if it’s anything like this kombucha float, I’m all in. It’s a recent discovery for me, and the absolute favorite, quick treat of the season in our household. I’ve been making my own kombucha for years, but took a very long break from the booch production recently, because of all the chaos that came with the kitchen renovations. I finally got the scoby and starter back in shape, and have been infusing my kombucha with strawberries, raspberries and basil for a summery flair. I thought a berry kombucha would make for a nice, probiotic alternative to root beer and decided to drop a few scoops of my favorite vanilla ice cream into a glass of it to see what happens. That first sip was so good that I had to take a quiet moment to myself and take the float down to the pool to enjoy it in the sun. The contrast of the bubbly sharpness of the kombucha and the smooth creaminess of the ice cream is heavenly. The berries and basil contribute their fresh, sunny notes, and I could imagine infusing this treat with all kinds of other fruit and berries. If you aren’t into making your own kombucha, you can just buy it (already flavored) for an express version of the float :) Lots of great weekend links below, enjoy your Sunday! 16 Personalities – this nicely designed personality test was so fun to take and the results were pretty accurate (Anya is a ‘Mediator’ /­­ Masha is an ‘Architect’) The Savvy Cook – Izzy Hossack’s new budget vegetarian cookbook looks amazing Stasher Reusable Food Bags – I use ziplock bags a whole lot, and even though I tend to reuse them a few times, I don’t feel great about storing my food in plastic, not to mention eventually throwing the plastic away. Putting an end to that with these reusable, food grade silicone storage bags that are freezer/­­dishwasher safe. Self Care: Routines for Busy People – an interview with the founders of CAP Beauty The Vegan Argument (Made by a Non-Vegan) Sans Ceuticals Journal – even though I’ve never tried this brand’s products, I love the interviews and recipes over at their journal. Pyramid Crudité – tempted to cut all of my veggies this way from now on :p Raspberry Tomato Yogurt Pops?! – what a great idea Loungewear Dress – I want one in every color A Quick Interview With Me on The Plus Berry Kombucha Float   Print Serves: 2 Ingredients handful of mixed organic strawberries and raspberries, plus more for serving - sliced for strawberries handful of basil leaves - rubbed between your hands to bruise 3-4 cups plain kombucha a few scoops of vanilla ice cream (I used Coconut Bliss non-dairy) Instructions Place the berries and basil in a bottle or jar and muddle with the back of wooden spoon. Add the kombucha, cover and place in the refrigerator for about 24 hours. Distribute the kombucha between two glasses and drop a few ice-cream scoops inside each glass. Add more berries, if desired, and enjoy immediately. If using store-bought flavored kombucha, distribute the berries and basil between two glasses and muddle with the back of a wooden spoon. Add the chilled kombucha to the glasses and drop a few ice-cream scoops inside each glass. Enjoy right away. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Peach and Raspberry Summer Tart and a Guest Post for Scandi Foodie Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans Raw Summer Fruit Samosas and a Guest Post for My Sweet Faery Double Chocolate Layer Cake and a Giveaway .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Berry Kombucha Float appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Le Botaniste – New York City

July 3 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

A beauty-salon for you insides. We are a plant-based organic food & natural wine bar. – Le Botaniste The beautiful logo & website caught my attention... So this place was high on my list of places to visit in New York. And the reality was even so much better than I thought. image via Le Botaniste Le Botaniste is a botanical-based, apothecary-inspired restaurant. It is created by Le Pain Quotidiens Founder & Chief Creative Officer, Alain Coumont, and he knows a thing or two about good food and good restaurants. The restaurant looks like a classic apothecary including glass tincture bottles and white lab coats. image via Le Botaniste The menu is 100% organic and entirely botanical, which means there are no animal products used on-site. The seasonally changing menu features chef-designed prescriptions such as the Tibetan Mama: a savory combination of brown rice, peanut curry sauce, steamed greens and spicy kimchi, and the Dirty Noodle Soup: with velvety tofu, steamed leeks, garlic and spicy ginger. Hearty specialty soups and fresh juices rotate daily. image via Le Botaniste The menu also encourages DIY meal-building, allowing guests to design their own hot or cold entree from the many bases, spreads and toppings available. […] The post Le Botaniste – New York City appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Green Pea Falafel Bowl

April 26 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Pea Falafel Bowl One of the first recipes we posted on the blog was baked herb & pistachio falafels. That was back in the days when we didn’t have three monsters tearing down the house. When I still had an old-fashioned job. And when baking a falafel instead of deep-frying it felt like a fresh new idea. Elsa once asked me if grandma’s older sister was alive when the dinosaurs lived on earth. I told her no (while simultaneously typing a message with a ton of dinosaur emojis to my mom). That is roughly how long ago that falafel recipe feels like. Dinosaur age. So much has happened since then. I still think it’s a good recipe and today’s falafel recipe has much of the same qualities. They are simple, baked, packed with fresh herbs and hold together excellently. If you don’t serve it with the mint yogurt, it is also vegan. We subbed the pistachios with some pumpkin seeds/­­pepitas this time and replaced half of the chickpeas with green peas to make them more suited for spring. It also gives them a slightly sweet tone and less dry than your average falafel (which is one of our favorite features with this recipe). We serve them in a bowl with roasted carrots, cinnamon spiked quinoa, beetroot hummus and a splash of mint yogurt instead of wrapping them up in lettuce or bread. We think of it as a spring-y Moroccan falafel bowl. I won’t claim that this is a dead-simple recipe (as it involves cooking, mixing and baking), but I at least find it comforting that the carrots, beetroot and falafels all are baked simultaneously in the oven. Before we jump to the recipe, we wanted to share the updated schedule for our little Green Kitchen At Home US book tour. And also this short video about the book that we did the other day. As we mentioned in our last post, we are coming to the US next week for some press activities. Both Luise and I will be in New York and then I’ll continue on my own to SF and LA. We are only doing a few public events and are very much hoping to see some of you there. New York > 1 May Our cooking class at Sur La Table is sold out but we will have a mingle, book signing and Q&A at CAP Beauty on 1 May, 7 pm. Entrance is free, you get to try some tasters from the book and we’ll both be there to chat. All you need to do is RSVP here.  San Francisco & Los Angeles > 3-5 May I’ll be at Credo Beauty in San Francisco on 3 May, 2-4 pm, signing books and chatting with you all about food, photography, kids and whatnot. I will also be doing the same in their Los Angeles store on 4 May, 5-7 pm. Free entrance, just RSVP to both events here. I’ll also be teaching a hands-on cooking class at Sur La Table in Los Angeles. There are still a few tickets available - so go get them here! For those of you who’s been asking, we will also be coming to London in June and Amsterdam after the summer. Enough about that. Let’s start cooking! Recipe notes o Falafel purists use soaked chickpeas instead of cooked. Cooked is however much quicker and works just fine. We also find that it’s easier on our digestion. o You don’t have to roast the beetroot for the hummus but can simply grate raw beetroot before mixing it. But since we’re using the oven anyway for the other parts of the bowl, we roast them to give the hummus a rounder flavor. Green Pea Falafel Bowl Serves 4 Falafels 1 cup /­­ 150 g green peas, fresh or frozen (thawed) 1 cup /­­ 150 g cooked chickpeas 2 small shallots, peeled and coarsely chopped 1-2 cloves garlic, peeled 2 tbsp buckwheat flour or potato starch 1/­­2 tsp baking powder 3 stalks fresh mint, leaves picked 3 stalks parsley, stems discarded 1 tbsp lemon juice 1 tsp ground cumin 1 tsp flaky sea salt 1-2 tbsp olive oil Beetroot Hummus 200 g raw beetroots 1 cup /­­ 150 g cooked white beans  3 tbsp light tahini (sesame paste) 4 tbsp lemon juice 3 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil 1 tsp ground cumin 1 clove garlic, peeled 1 tsp flaky sea salt Cinnamon Quinoa 1 cup uncooked Quinoa pinch flaky sea salt 1/­­2 tsp ground cinnamon 1 small handfull raisins (we used green raisins with a smoky flavor) To serve 4 carrots, peeled and cut into thick sticks (bake together with the beetroot) 2 avocados, sliced 4 handfuls mache lettuce 1/­­2 cucumber, sliced 12 radishes, sliced 1 cup plain yogurt a bunch fresh mint leaves, chopped a handful toasted almonds, chopped sesame seeds Preheat the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F fan mode (this is because we’re doing two plates simultaneously). Add all falafel ingredients (except the oil) to a food processor and pulse until mixed but not pureed. With moist hands, shape 16 mini falafel patties (roughly 1 generous tablespoon per falafel). Pour a little olive oil into the palm of your hand and then place each falafel in it, smoothing out the falafel and at the same time coating it in oil. Refill with oil for every fourth falafel. Place them on a baking tray covered with baking paper. Bake in the oven for 20 minutes, turning them after half the time. Peel the beets and cut in quarters. Place on a baking tray together with the prepared carrots (from the To serve list) and place in the oven (this can be done simultaneously as the falafel tray) for about 20 minutes or until baked through and soft. Let cool slightly and then place the beets (set the the carrots aside for serving) in a food processor (or bowl if using a stick blender) with the rest of the ingredients and mix for at least 2 minutes until very smooth. Taste and adjust the flavors to you liking. Prepare the quinoa while the vegetables are in the oven: Place rinsed quinoa in a saucepan, add 2 cups water, salt and cinnamon and bring to a boil. Lower the heat immediately and simmer for about 12-15 minutes. Stir in raisins and set aside. Stir together yogurt and a handful chopped mint leaves, set aside. Arrange all serving ingredients in bowls and top with beetroot hummus, quinoa and pea falafels. Sprinkle with almonds, sesame seeds and mint. Enjoy! PS! If you have already received our new book through online orders, we’d be super grateful if you could leave a short review of it on Amazon. Thank you! 

top 5 curd benefits | diy home remedies with curd – health & beauty

April 14 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

top 5 curd benefits | diy home remedies with curd - health & beauty with photos. curd is considered as one of the best dairy product with several health benefits. curd is obtained by coagulating luke warm milk using acidic substance like lemon juice or vinegar. this process is called curdling. curd is not only used in cooking, but also as a medicinal purposes, skin and hair care. it is substitute for milk. in this article i have mentioned 5 major tips however there are myriad significances and uses of curd. Continue reading top 5 curd benefits | diy home remedies with curd – health & beauty at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways

March 22 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Quick Blender Pancakes, Three WaysThis post was created in partnership with Revol. So excited to share this recent discovery with you today. If you follow us on instagram, you may have seen me posting an abnormal number of pancake photos recently. That would be because Ive been cooking some variation of blender pancakes almost every morning for the past couple of weeks. Seriously obsessed. Blender pancakes start out with whole grains instead of flour, which get soaked overnight in purified water. Soaking not only softens the grains and makes them more blend-able, but also awakens the life within each individual grain and rids them of phytic acid, making them more bioavailable and easier to digest. You could use a number of grains here, but I find raw buckwheat to be the perfect neutral base. Buckwheat is also incredibly nutritious, and is actually not a grain at all, but a fruit/­­berry of the buckwheat plant (related to rhubarb!). In the morning, simply combine your soaked grains with a liquid and other add-ins in a blender, whirl everything into a smooth batter and you are ready to fry up your pancakes. Its all super quick, easy and so tasty, and there is a lot of room to get creative, too. The whole process kind of reminds me of making a smoothie because the flavor combo possibilities are endless, and because you can just throw a bunch of ingredients into the blender and expect totally delicious results (almost) every time. I offer three of my favorite flavor combinations here, two sweet and one savory. The orange, sweet potato pancakes are subtly sweetened with maple syrup and jazzed up with spices. They are hearty, warming, and very kid-friendly. The green ones are flavored with matcha and studded with sesame seeds that add tiny pops of crunch throughout. Matcha is the star in this variation, youll be able to taste its lovely, grassy and sweet notes very well. The pink, savory pancakes, combine beet with spices, ginger and greens, making them a great option for those who favor a non-sugary breakfast. I love them with our avocado mayo, but you can employ pretty much any one of your favorite, creamy sauces as an accompaniment. Whichever variation you try, you will love how easily they come together and how forgiving the recipes are in terms of add-ins. I know by now youve noticed the beautiful plates/­­cups /­­enamel board in the photos. They are from Revol, a French cookware and bakeware brand with a newly launched website. They sent me a few items of my choice from their Color Lab and Crumple collections, and I was blown away by the quality of their wares. The half-glazed dinner plates are handmade in France and feel incredibly sturdy. They stack up perfectly when you store them in the cupboard and are just a true pleasure to eat off of. I couldnt resist the pink crumple cups because they are adorable, and because I was missing vessels of that size in my kitchen. They are the ideal size for espresso or cappuccino, if thats your thing, but I will be using them for my occasional morning ginger-turmeric shots. The little cheese plate/­­presentation board is hand-dipped in enamel, and will make for a perfect snack board at any get-together. All the pieces are refined and minimal, yet they still feel warm and welcoming, and you can definitely sense the hand in all of them. Everything is oven and dishwasher safe, too, so there’s a perfect balance of beauty and utility. Spiced Sweet Potato Blender Pancakes   Print Serves: about 12 pancakes Ingredients 1 medium sweet potato coconut oil for roasting sweet potato and frying ¾ cup raw buckwheat groats - soaked in purified water overnight 1 tablespoon sesame tahini or other nut/­­seed butter 1 cup almond milk or water 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar ½ teaspoon baking powder pinch of sea salt 1 teaspoon cinnamon ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg 4 cardamom pods - green shells removed (optional) ½ teaspoon ground ginger (optional) 1 tablespoon maple syrup, plus more for serving 1 tablespoon ground flax or chia seeds (optional) 2 tablespoons hemp seeds (optional) Instructions Preheat oven to 400°F (200° C). Prick the sweet potato with a fork several times and place it on a parchment paper-covered baking tray. Roast for 40-50 minutes or until tender throughout. Let cool, then peel. Alternatively, peel the sweet potato and roughly chop it into cubes. Place onto a parchment paper-covered baking tray and roast for 30-40 minutes, until tender. Mash the sweet potato pieces a bit with a fork when you are measuring out 1 cup of the flesh in the next step. Drain the buckwheat over a colander and rinse very well. Combine it with 1 cup sweet potato flesh, sesame tahini, almond milk/­­water, apple cider vinegar, baking powder, salt, spices and maple syrup in an upright blender, and blend until smooth. Add flax/­­chia and hemp seeds, if using, pulse to combine. Warm ½ tablespoon of coconut oil in a medium non-stick frying pan over medium heat. The pan should be very hot, but not smoking. Pour ¼ cup of the batter per pancake into the pan and spread each one out slightly with the back of a spoon, into roughly a 4-inch pancake. Fry as many pancakes as the pan can hold, I did 3 at a time. Fry until the edges turn dry and bubbly, for at least 2 minutes, flip and cook for 1-2 minutes, until the underside is golden brown. Continue with the rest of the batter, keeping the cooked pancakes covered and warm. You should not need to add any more oil, and you may need to lower the heat a bit once youve fried up your first batch to keep the pan from smoking. Enjoy right away with fresh fruit, maple syrup/­­honey, yogurt and/­­or cacao nibs. These pancakes are best eaten fresh, but you can also reheat them on low temperature in the oven or toaster, in case you have leftovers. 3.5.3226 Matcha Sesame Blender Pancakes   Print Serves: about 8 pancakes Ingredients ½ cup raw buckwheat groats - soaked in purified water overnight ½ cup almond milk or water 1 teaspoon matcha powder 1-2 tablespoons maple syrup, plus more for serving 1 tablespoon sesame seeds (I used black) Instructions Drain the buckwheat over a colander and rinse very well. Combine it with almond milk/­­water, matcha, and maple syrup in an upright blender, and blend until smooth. Add sesame seeds and pulse on low to mix the seeds into the batter. Warm ½ tablespoon of coconut oil in a medium non-stick frying pan over medium heat. The pan should be very hot, but not smoking. Pour ¼ cup of the batter per pancake into the pan. Fry as many pancakes as the pan can hold, I did 3 at a time. Fry until the edges turn dry and bubbly, for at least 2 minutes, flip and cook for 1-2 more minutes, until the underside is golden brown. Continue with the rest of the batter, keeping the cooked pancakes covered and warm. You should not need to add any more oil, and you may need to lower the heat a bit once youve fried up your first batch to keep the pan from smoking. Enjoy right away with more sesame seeds, coconut flakes, fresh fruit, maple syrup/­­honey, yogurt, etc. These pancakes are best eaten fresh, but you can also reheat them on low temperature in the oven or toaster, in case you have leftovers. 3.5.3226 Savory Beet Blender Pancakes   Print Serves: about 9 pancakes Ingredients ½ cup raw buckwheat groats - soaked in purified water overnight ½ cup whole sorghum groats or more buckwheat/­­barley/­­quinoa etc. - soaked in purified water overnight ½ small cooked beet 1 tablespoon sesame tahini ½ cup water 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar 1 teaspoon tamari or more to taste ½-inch piece ginger ¼ teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon smoked paprika ½ teaspoon cumin ⅛ teaspoon red pepper flakes 1 tablespoon chia or flax seeds (optional) 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast (optional) 1 tablespoon dulse (optional) large handful chopped spinach/­­kale leaves or small handful sliced scallions avocado mayo - for serving (optional) Instructions Drain and rinse the buckwheat and sorghum very well. Combine the grains with the beet, sesame tahini, water, apple cider vinegar, tamari, ginger, baking powder, smoked paprika, cumin, red pepper flakes, and chia/­­flax, nutritional yeast, dulse, if using, in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Add chopped spinach/­­kale/­­scallions and pulse to mix in. Warm ½ tablespoon of coconut oil in a medium non-stick frying pan over medium heat. The pan should be very hot, but not smoking. Pour ¼ cup of the batter per pancake into the pan and spread each one out slightly with the back of a spoon, into roughly a 4-inch pancake. Fry as many pancakes as the pan can hold, I did 3 at a time. Fry until the edges turn dry and bubbly, for at least 2 minutes, flip and cook for 1-2 minutes, until the underside is golden brown. Continue with the rest of the batter, keeping the cooked pancakes covered and warm. You should not need to add any more oil, and you may need to lower the heat a bit once youve fried up your first batch to keep the pan from smoking. Enjoy right away with avocado mayo/­­plain yogurt/­­any sauce of choice and more sliced scallions. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache Raw Summer Fruit Samosas and a Guest Post for My Sweet Faery Raw Greenylicious Herb Soup and BBQ Grissini by Earthsprout Kaffir Lime Mango Ice-Cream .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

The Kitchen Renovation

February 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

The Kitchen Renovation Vintage European bistro chairs found on Craigslist, kitchen table passed down to my husband from his grandmother. We’ve been living in our home for fifteen years now and up until this fall, we had never put a hammer or paintbrush to anything in the house except for Paloma’s baby room, right before she was born. We inherited some classic 90s Florida detailing from the previous owners – dust-attracting, shaggy red and white carpeting, stucco walls, green laminate countertops and a low-hanging ceiling in the kitchen. Just like many other families I know, we are quite food-oriented and tend to crowd in the kitchen, since that’s where most of the action happens. It’s also where I work, where I come up with recipes for this site and for my cookbooks, so it’s fair to say that I spend most of my life in this space. We recently completed a long, laborious kitchen renovation that spilled out into the living room, and I cannot describe how much my heart sings when I come downstairs every morning and see this kitchen that finally feels so entirely mine. It took us a decade and a half to gather up the courage and the funds to do this, and these past few months have brought some of the most trying times for us as a family, but it finally feels like it was worth it and I’m so excited to share some snaps of Golubka Kitchen HQ with you. We took a documentary approach to these photos, and instead of shooting everything in one day, the photos were taken over a week, on cloudy days and on sunny days, in the morning and in the evening. There are different aspects of the kitchen that shine on different days, and we really wanted to capture that. ‘Farmhouse’ kitchen sink from Ikea, faucet from Ebay. Our house has three stories – garage on the first floor, open kitchen and living room on the second, and bedrooms on the third. We renovated the kitchen, the living room floor, ceiling, and fireplace (yes, we have a fireplace in Florida and we use it, too), and both staircases leading up and down to the kitchen and living room. The most expensive part of the whole renovation was the removal of the old hanging ceiling in the kitchen, together with all the electrical work involved. We decided on the cabinets and countertops quickly, but the easy decisions ended there. It took me so incredibly long to settle on a cohesive look for the kitchen. As a notoriously undecisive Libra, I endlessly kept changing my mind about the wall treatment, the tile, the light fixtures, the shelves, the faucet, cabinet pulls, etc. I do love those clean, white kitchens with minimal everything, but in the end I decided that in order to stay true to my heart, I had to go with something a little more feminine and detail-oriented, with a hint of the Downton Abbey kitchen. The old kitchen had endless cabinets on the walls, some of which always ended up a mess, while others weren’t utilized at all, so I knew I wanted exposed shelves. I’m super happy with that decision – I love having my dishes and jars within arm’s reach and at eye level, since it allows me to be more organized and minimal. Many people wonder whether dust is an issue with open shelves, and I’ve found that it’s not any more of an issue than anywhere else in the house. I also use all the objects on the shelves quite frequently, which doesn’t allow too much dust to accumulate. The shelves are made of very beautiful and sturdy wood reclaimed from an old barn in Kentucky, which we found at Barn Works. I finished the wood myself without the use of a wood stain. The floating shelf arrangement was made possible with the heavy duty brackets from Shelfology, which secure the shelves to the wall very safely and seamlessly. Tadelakt Moroccan Plaster with Benjamin Moore ‘White Stone’ color pigment Industrial brass rod with copper hooks from Etsy, vintage Brazilian copper utensils with wooden handles found on Craigslist. During the initial planning stage, I was certain that I wanted a subway tile backsplash, but was simultaneously seeing and liking backsplashes made with Moroccan, Spanish and Mexican patterned tiles. I agonized over my choice between the two until I discovered Tadelakt, the Moroccan plaster, and there was no turning back. I knew I wanted grey shaker kitchen cabinets, but the plaster treatment also presented the possibility of grey walls. I’ve always been attracted to grey rooms, to me they just speak of serenity, so I was pretty happy with this opportunity. Finding someone who would apply the plaster masterfully but for a fair price, and getting the job completed was probably one of the most nerve-racking parts of the renovation. We did find someone brilliant, and it ended up worth the stress, because I am completely in love with my new walls. The material is so warm, textural and interesting, and it totally ties the whole kitchen together. As much as I loved the idea of a patterned tile floor, I was still torn between its beauty/­­practicality and the homey feel of hardwood floors, which I wanted to have in the living room. I finally settled on the idea of combining the two, and as a result, the tile follows the line of the kitchen cabinets in the shape of an inverted ‘Z,’ while we can still enjoy the warmth of the hardwood floors in the sitting area and into the living room. The tile is from the Cement Tile Shop, which offers an overwhelming array of the most beautiful, authentic patterns. Of course I found settling on one to be a near impossible task. I went from multicolored to black and white, to pastel, to monochrome tiles dozens of times before landing on the Fountaine Antique pattern with a custom border. As for the hardwood floor, I’d always dreamt of an old-fashioned herringbone pattern in real wood, which proved to be really difficult to find within the United States. The one company that carried thick oak planks in a herringbone pattern didn’t have enough to cover our floor at first, but they later ended up finding one extra box tucked away in a different warehouse. I’m so glad that they did because I’m completely over the moon about how the floors turned out. It’s worth mentioning that the old kitchen floor was white tile that showed off every spec of dust that landed on it, and the living room floors had white plush carpeting, and I am so happy to finally be rid of both. We found the best contractor, Don, who left us endlessly impressed, together with his talented and considerate team. He truly cared about every step of the process and saved us so many times with his expert advice and creative input. The most standout showcase of the team’s work is the spacious drawer pantry they built out of vintage fruit crates from Schiller’s Salvage. My idea was realized even better than I had envisioned – the crates were originally too long and the crew manually disassembled, shortened and rebuilt them, then positioned them on smoothly sliding tracks. The countertop over the crates is made of old barn oak and finished by me in the same way as the floating shelves. The whole piece, on top of being unique and beautiful, is the most functional and spacious storage space in the whole kitchen. Quartz countertops from the Home Depot in ‘Snowy Ibiza’ Antique Spanish hutch from the 1800s, a lucky Craigslist find, brought to the U.S. from Madrid Vintage ceramic and brass cabinet pulls from Ebay and Etsy Vintage ceramic door knob from eBay, ‘Pink Shadow’ Sherwin Williams paint on the door. Custom built computer shelf made by Algis from old barn wood. My favorite thing about the vintage French chandelier that I found on Etsy are the rainbows it sends onto the walls in the evenings. Fireplace brick wall made with 100 year old sliced brick from Craigslist, arranged beautifully by Algis. Stairs leading up to the third floor with the bedrooms. Since both of the staircases connect to the kitchen and living room, we realized that we had to redo them as well, so that they wouldn’t be an eyesore within the new renovation. My husband and I set out to do the whole thing ourselves to save some cash, but in hindsight, I wouldn’t wish this type of adventure upon my worst enemy. All the stairs were covered with red carpeting, and the railings were painted an ugly orange-ish brown. The original plan was to remove the old carpet and to cover the existing stairs with new wood planks. To our surprise, however, we discovered a beautiful pine under the carpeting and decided to restore the original stairs along with stripping and re-finishing the railing. It took me two and a half months to complete this part of the project alone. Stairs leading up to the kitchen/­­living room from the garage. Ceramic tile from Spain with weathered grey hues, uneven borders, satin finish. This kitchen renovation wouldn’t have been possible without the help and generosity of Cement Tile Shop, Shelfology, Barn Works, Schiller’s Salvage, and Floor and Decor. My eternal gratitude goes out to Don and the team for your incredible care and craftsmanship in everything you do, Algis for the amazing job with the tile, plaster, fireplace and shelf, Vadim for the impeccable hardwood installation, and Dale for the immense help with the tile and stairs. Resources Contractor – Don Violette at V & P Construction and Maintenance Kitchen Tile – Cement Tile Shop Shelves – Shelfology for the floating shelf brackets, Barn Works for the reclaimed lumber Vintage Fruit Crates – Schiller’s Architectural and Design Salvage Hardwood Floors – Floor and Decor Kitchen Cabinets – Floor and Decor Countertops – Home Depot, quartz in ‘Snowy Ibiza’ Accessory Resources – in photo captions If you happen to be looking for some incredibly talented craftsmen for your renovation in the Tampa Bay area, please reach out to me and I will be happy to connect you. The post The Kitchen Renovation appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Need a beauty boost?

January 20 2017 Vegetarian Times 

Getting enough rest is one key to looking your best--but what you eat is, of course, essential too. Our friends at BioSil explain what vegetarians need for optimal health--and beauty. Click here to find out more.

Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower

December 11 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower Since winter in the northern hemisphere is most definitely in full swing, we thought it was time for another quick, creamy winter soup recipe that’s nourishing and warming to the core. This one’s got a balance of grounding winter roots like celeriac and parsnip with some brighter, crisper veggies like spinach and fennel, finished off with a kiss of lemon. The roasted cauliflower pieces that stud each bowl are cooked in a special, sweet and spicy dressing that helps create those caramelized edges we are all so fond of. Eating this soup during this time of year just feels right – it’s incredibly cozy and feeds both body and soul. This soup is stunning enough in looks to serve as a starter to a festive meal, so we encourage you to get radical and serve green soup at your holiday party :) There are some weekend links after the jump, have a cozy Sunday. Natalie Weinberger interviewed on Sight Unseen – one of our favorite ceramicists Botanica – a soon to be, vegetable forward restaurant in LA + a lovely online journal with some amazing recipes like Spiced Spaghetti Squash Pancakes, Whole Roasted Cauliflower, Banana Buckwheat Poppyseed Bread The Founders of CAP Beauty interviewed by Ashley Neese – and if you haven’t heard of CAP Beauty, check it out, it’s an amazingly well-curated one stop shop for natural beauty products Pirelli Calendar 2017 Goes Makeup-Free McKel Hill of Nutrition Stripped interviewed on Chris Ducker’s podcast Pulp Pantry – a snack company that utilizes pulp from making juice, which normally gets discarded, to make granola, veggie crisps and more – such a smart idea! GIFs by NASA Gourmet Print Shop – Sarah Britton of My New Roots is now selling some of her beautiful food photographs for making prints Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the cauliflower 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil - melted ½ tablespoon Dijon mustard ½ tablespoon maple syrup ½ tablespoon tamari ½ teaspoon sriracha 1 medium cauliflower head - cut into florets for the soup 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 2 teaspoons whole coriander seeds or 1 teaspoon ground coriander 1 large yellow onion - chopped sea salt - to taste 2 small or 1 medium to large celery root - peeled and roughly chopped 1 medium parsnip - peeled and roughly chopped 1 medium to large fennel bulb - roughly chopped, green fronds reserved 3½ - 4 cups purified water 2-3 bay leaves (optional) few large handfuls arugula or spinach leaves freshly ground black pepper - to taste ½ lemon - juice Instructions to roast the cauliflower Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Combine coconut oil, mustard, maple syrup, tamari and sriracha in a medium bowl and whisk until smooth. Place cauliflower florets onto a parchment paper-covered baking tray, drizzle with the dressing and toss to coat evenly. Roast for 30 minutes or until soft and caramelized at the edges, stirring at halftime. to make soup While the cauliflower is roasting, warm coconut oil in a medium soup pot over medium heat. Add coriander and toast for 1-2 minutes, until fragrant. Add onion and a pinch of salt and let onion sweat for a few minutes. Lower the heat to medium low and sauté for 20-30 minutes, stirring frequently, until onion is soft and caramelized. Add celery root, parsnip, fennel, water, bay leaves, if using, and a few generous pinches of salt to the pot, bring to a boil over medium high heat. Adjust the heat to establish a strong simmer and cook, partially covered, for about 20 minutes, or until vegetables are soft throughout. Remove and discard bay leaves. Combine soup with half of the roasted cauliflower, arugula/­­spinach, fennel fronds (reserve a few for garnish) and black pepper in an upright blender and blend until smooth. You may need to do this in batches, depending on the size of your blender. Use caution when blending hot liquids. Transfer the pureed soup back into the pot, squeeze the lemon juice and mix it in. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Distribute between bowls and serve warm, garnished with the rest of the roasted cauliflower florets and fennel fronds. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Taco Collard Green Rolls Barley Tomato Salad Summer Greek Salad Yerba Mate Infused Sunchoke Soup .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Tahini Hot Chocolate

December 4 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Tahini Hot Chocolate Most of us know that feeling that usually rolls around at around 3 pm on a workday, when it seems as if you’ve hit a wall and need to somehow recharge before going back to work. I have to say that since I’ve been taking a break from caffeine, it has been less a of a crash and more a need to get up, stretch and whip up some kind of fun potion in the blender, just as a mental breather. Since it’s been cold out, I’ve been really into making hot, frothy, restorative drinks as my 3 pm activity, and this super quick tahini hot chocolate has come out on top many times. This drink gets its decadent chocolate flavor from raw cacao powder, which, contrary to popular (and my own until very recently!) belief, contains insignificant amounts of caffeine. The energizing properties of cacao come from theobromine, a mild cardiovascular stimulant (while caffeine is a nervous system stimulant) that increases heart function and blood flow and is much milder in effect than caffeine. Cacao is also high in magnesium, a mineral known for its relaxing properties, anandamide – the ‘bliss chemical,’ and PEA – the ‘love chemical.’ So this drink will calmly wake you up and give you a lift in mood – nothing crazy and no jitters. It gets its creaminess from tahini and nut butter, and its sweetness from prunes (you can also use dates, but I like the richer flavor the prunes yield here) and honey. It’s very easy to make and comes together in no time. I drink this hot chocolate as an afternoon pick-me-up, but it’s good enough to serve on a special occasion, and could act as an elegant, sweet finish to a festive meal. There are some links after the jump, have a nice Sunday :) Immunity Herbal Infusion – I’ve been very much into making herbal infusions and drinking them instead of water throughout the day (nettle, raspberry leaf and goji is still my favorite), and this immunity-supporting one sounds amazing. Actually, Let’s Not Be in the Moment – an article questioning the recent trends of mindfulness, full of many valid points and this response, very valid in its own way. Willka Yachay Instagram – amazing photographs of the Q’eros Nation of Peru by an organization helping their community thrive in the modern world. Well + Good’s Health and Wellness Trends of 2017 – I’m especially into the #s 5, 11, 13 and 14 Amanda Chantal Bacon on the One Part Podcast How Ayurvedic Beauty Can Change Your Health – all good reminders Tahini Hot Chocolate   Print Serves: 1 mug full (about 1½ cups) Ingredients 1½ cups hot water 2 prunes or dates 1 heaping teaspoon tahini 1 heaping teaspoon almond butter 1 tablespoon raw cacao powder 1 tablespoon raw honey, or more to taste pinch cinnamon (optional) Instructions Combine all ingredients in a blender until smooth and frothy. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Late Summer Oat Milk Smoothie with Figs and Grapes Black Sesame Cappuccino Beet Tahini Snack Bars Garlic Onion Veggie Dip from Food Loves Writing .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Tahini Hot Chocolate appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Herbal Mocha with Chicory and Maca

October 12 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Herbal Mocha with Chicory and Maca This weekend, we are off to a log cabin in the Appalachian Mountains with the whole family. Our kitchen is finally being taken apart in preparation for renovations, so we’re getting away from the dust and craziness for a week while the space gets stripped. The cabin is in a pretty remote and quiet place, and the leaves are turning – all great reasons to chill, hike, meditate, and get some much needed sleep. I’ve already packed up all the ingredients for this mocha to bring on the trip, since it’s been my favorite thing to drink in the mornings, and I can’t wait to sit on the cabin porch, sipping on this cozy herbal coffee. The base for this drink is roasted chicory root, a common coffee substitute, which gives it the deep flavor and rich color. In the U.S., chicory coffee is known as New Orleans style coffee, where it became popular during the Civil War, when the importing of coffee was stalled due to blockades. Chicory is also very common throughout Europe, and I grew up in a culture, where it was highly regarded as a medicinal plant and foraged in the summer for making herbal tea. Chicory is easy to distinguish in the wild due to its bright blue flowers (pick some if it grows around you!) and is related to dandelion, so you can use Dandy Blend here if you can’t get your hands on pure chicory (Dandy Blend includes both dandelion and chicory roots). It contains no caffeine, is rich in vitamin C and has the highest concentration of inulin of all plants. When roasted and ground, chicory miraculously resembles the flavor and depth of coffee. These days, I mostly try to stay away from caffeine, so coming up with drinks that will provide some of that much-needed comfort in the morning, minus the jitters, makes me quite happy. I add raw cacao and maca powders here for an energy boost, which also contribute more wealth to the flavor and take this drink into the ‘mocha’ territory. I’m in love with this cozy sip and find myself craving it throughout the day. It’s great hot and equally as good chilled, after some time in the fridge, or even iced. We’ve accumulated quite a few interesting links, which we are sharing today. We will be back with our weekend link roundups, along with all kinds of other good stuff very soon ;) Enjoy. Inside Glossier – I find this beauty company’s no-makeup makeup strategy and image quite fascinating and inspiring, so I found this in depth article and interview with their founder very interesting How I Built This – I listen to podcasts almost every day in the kitchen, and get very excited when a new, high-quality one comes out. This one is by NPR and has a series of interviews with successful entrepreneurs about how they started their businesses. So far they’ve interviewed creators of Instagram, Vice, Spanx and more. Reluctance NY – love cool bakery instagrams like this one Sans Ceuticals Journal – a natural beauty company with a journal full of clever, health-centric recipes like lacto pickles, Buddhist lunch, vegan butter, Bloodlesss Mary, vegan berry Eton Mess and much more How the Sugar Industry Shifted Blame to Fat – this is crazy!!! Navigating the Beauty Supplement Aisle Interview with Jacqui Lewis – Vedic meditation teacher Lauren Spencer King – studio and short interview, love the photos here Eat This Food – refreshingly unique food blog design Behind the Scenes with Solange + love her new, perfectly pastel videos, one, two Herbal Mocha with Chicory and Maca   Print Serves: 2 Ingredients 1 teaspoon roasted and ground chicory root 2 soft Medjool dates - pitted 1⅓ cup boiling water 1 cup unsweetened almond milk or other plant milk 1 tablespoon raw cacao powder 2 teaspoons maca powder ½ tablespoon mesquite powder (optional) seeds of ½ vanilla bean (optional) 1 teaspoon coconut oil - if drinking hot (optional) Instructions Place chicory into a strainer or a tea bag and combine with dates in a heat-proof vessel. Pour boiling water over them and leave for 10 minutes to steep. Combine chicory coffee, dates, almond milk, cacao, maca, mesquite, vanilla, and coconut oil, if using, in an upright blender. Blend until smooth and frothy. Serve warm, chilled or over ice. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Black Sesame Cappuccino Quinoa Collard Wraps from the Sprouted Kitchen Cookbook White Chocolate Blood Orange Mousse Tart Sprouted Almond Romesco Pasta with Roasted Cauliflower and Blistered T... .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Herbal Mocha with Chicory and Maca appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops with a Chocolate Core - Ice Cream Sunday

July 31 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops with a Chocolate Core - Ice Cream Sunday This week, I wanted to re-create my favorite Ben & Jerry’s ice cream flavor, making it vegan (though B&J came out with their own non-dairy ice cream, which is so awesome) and nutritious with the addition of a few energizing superfoods. Another thing I know people can’t get enough of in B&J’s ice cream are their decadent cores, so I went ahead and gave these Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops a chocolate core to really drive the point home. If you’re wondering why the pops are minty-colored, it’s due to the addition of spirulina, along with other nutritionally dense ingredients like hemp hearts and cacao nibs. A bonus – no ice-cream maker is needed for these. Moving to the U.S. from small-town Russia in the 90s and going to a Ben & Jerry’s ice cream shop for the first time was completely mind-blowing because a) back home, we did not have dedicated ice cream shops, b) ice cream flavors I grew up with were very basic and I had never seen so many extensive flavor options c) they sold little tubs of ice cream to take home, which was unheard of in Russia at the time d) everything tasted incredibly decadent and delicious. So here’s my B&J tribute, as a thanks for opening my eyes to possibilities I didn’t know existed. Read on for some weekend links and have a peaceful Sunday. Kids Taste-Test the New Ben & Jerry’s Vegan Ice Cream  Essentials – since we get many questions about our chosen kitchen and photography tools, we’ve made a page with links to all our favorite and most-used products – Kitchen Tools here, Photography here (also working on a round-up of favorite health-related books/­­cookbooks and natural beauty!) The Sad, Sexist History of Salad – Americans, in particular, strongly associate healthy or light foods, such as salad, chicken, and yogurt, with women, and unhealthy or heavy foods, such as beef, potatoes, and beer, with men, both men and women preferred unhealthy foods with masculine packaging and healthy foods with feminine packaging. Fascinating. The World’s Most Innovative Companies in 2016 – according to Fast Company Julia Turshen on the One Part Podcast – loved this, especially her point on asking for credit/­­compensation – if you don’t ask, you will never know what the possibilities are. You may know Turshen from co-authoring Gwyneth Paltrow’s cookbook, along with many others. Cannot wait for her own cookbook to come out. Meryl Streep: A League of Her Own, also, Taste of Streep!? Obama After Dark – how one can average only 5 hours of sleep a night AND run the country is beyond me, also Obama Sets the Record Straight on His 7-Almond Habit :) About Us – we’ve updated our about page a bit, with very important info like our zodiac signs ;) Snapchat – follow @golubkakitchen for all behind-the-scenes Superfood Cherry Garcia Pops with a Chocolate Core   Print Serves: 7-10 pops Ingredients for the cherries 1 heaping cup cherries - pitted and halved 1 tablespoon maple syrup 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder 1 tablespoon water for the spirulina mix 1½ cup raw cashews - soaked for 2-4 hours 1 cup canned unsweetened full fat Thai coconut milk 3 tablespoons maple syrup or more to taste ½-1 tablespoon spirulina powder ½ tablespoon vanilla extract ½ teaspoon xanathan gum or 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder (optional) 1 tablespoon shaved dark chocolate or raw chocolate 1-2 tablespoons cacao nibs for the chocolate core ⅓ of the spirulina mix 2 tablespoons shaved dark chocolate or raw chocolate 3 tablespoons raw cacao powder for the pops 7-10 tea cups, small glasses or pop molds neutral coconut oil for oiling the cups spirulina mix (recipe above) chocolate core (recipe above) 7-10 wooden sticks - soaked for 2 hours or overnight hemp hearts cacao nibs Instructions to prepare the cherries Combine cherries with maple syrup and bring to a boil in a small saucepan. Reduce the heat to a simmer and simmer for 2 minutes. Combine arrowroot powder with water in a small bowl and add to the saucepan, while stirring. The cherry compote should thicken slightly. Remove from heat and let cool. to make the pops Make the spirulina mix. Drain and rinse cashews and put into an upright blender, preferably high-speed. Add coconut milk, maple syrup, spirulina, vanilla, and xanathan gum/­­arrowroot powder, if using and blend until smooth. If not using a high-speed blender, optionally strain mixture through a fine-mesh strainer for the most smooth and velvety texture. Spoon about ⅓ of the spirulina mix into a medium, heat-proof bowl and set aside. Add shaved chocolate and cacao nibs to the blender with the remaining ⅔ of the spirulina mix and pulse to combine briefly. Transfer the mixture into a separate bowl, then fold in the cherries. Make the chocolate core. Place the reserved ⅓ of the spirulina mix onto a double boiler, add chocolate and let it melt, stirring to incorporate. Remove from the heat, add in cacao powder, mix to combine and let cool. Make the pops. Oil your cups/­­molds generously with coconut oil and spoon the spirulina-cherry mix in, leaving a well in the center for the core. Spoon the chocolate core into the well. Even out the surface and insert the wooden stick. Repeat with the rest of the pops. Freeze until completely firm. Prepare a plate with cacao nibs and hemp hearts for coating, along with a parchment paper-covered surface for placing pops onto. Take cups with pops out of the freezer and place into a dish with hot water for a minute, for easier removal. Remove popsicles from cups, pulling them out by the sticks. Dip the top of each pop into the prepared hemp/­­cacao nib mixture and press gently to make the pieces stick. Place onto a parchment paper-covered surface and keep frozen until ready to eat. Take the popsicles out of the freezer 5-10 minutes prior to eating. 3.5.3208 You might also like... 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Dusk by Adele Skincare has arrived- organic, vegan, cruelty free and palm oil free skincare.

July 22 2016 Vegie Head 

Over the many years that I’ve been in the Health and Beauty industry, and then moved on into owning my own businesses, this branch of my brand, Dusk by Adele was something that I’d always dreamt about the most. I’ve been trained with, and used over 100 different skincare ranges- ev... The post Dusk by Adele Skincare has arrived- organic, vegan, cruelty free and palm oil free skincare. appeared first on Vegie Head.

Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright

June 14 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright We’re so excited to introduce this new interview series today! It’s something that we’ve had in the works for a while, and we’re really happy to be kicking it off with such a special guest. Self-care has been a very prevalent topic in the wellness sphere lately, and it’s something that we’re both very passionate about, as evidenced by our love for nourishing foods :) We do, however, find that many articles on the subject can be quite generalized and anxiety-inducing, often leaving us with a feeling of not doing it right, or not doing enough. We became interested in digging a little deeper, in order to see what self-care looks like applied to real life, by real people we admire. We are fascinated by the quiet elegance of everyday routine and always searching for day-to-day inspiration, which we’ll strive to discover plenty of in the series. We hope you enjoy these in-depth conversations, and feel free to reach out with suggestions for future interview guests! Today’s dialogue is with Laura Wright, blogger and author of The First Mess Cookbook. Laura is a magician when it comes to approachable, plant-based cooking, and we look to her blog and cookbook almost every day for reliable, delicious recipes, as well as beautiful photography and an overall feeling of warmth and lightness. In this interview, Laura talks about her approach to self-nourishment, exercise, beauty, stress, fun, and much more. As expected, her self-care routine is full of wisdom and inspiration. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I get in moods where both are equally important. I stick to a certain rhythm with my early mornings and evenings though because I find it makes for better sleep and more productive days. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I wake up with the sun and take our dog out. Then, I drink a huge glass of water and make coffee, tea, matcha, or some sort of elixir. It’s usually coffee though. I read for a bit while I have my first morning beverage, or I’ll do a bit of journaling. After my partner leaves for work, I head out for a walk/­­run or do some form of exercise. Then, I fix up breakfast (usually a smoothie) and plan out what I’d like to accomplish that day. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? This time of year, I do most of my gardening after dinner, and I find that really helps me wind down. Just being out there as the sun’s going down seems to send a good message to my brain that it’s time to relax. Also, limited screen exposure after dinner is key. I use the Saje Natural Wellness Sleep Well roller on the soles of my feet, too. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Either a smoothie with greens and healthy fats (avocado, almond butter, coconut etc) or steel-cut oatmeal with tons of toppings in the winter. Lunch – Usually whatever I’m working on suffices as lunch, but ideally a salad with a little bit of grains tossed in and some legumes/­­nuts/­­seeds for protein. Stuff on toast is a go-to lunch for me as well. Snack – Right now I’m really into plantain chips with guacamole. Dinner – This time of year, we grill almost all of our vegetables and serve them with a big salad or slaw, whatever protein we’ve got, and a little heap of fermented vegetables or sauerkraut. I’ve been making these amazing grilled veggie tacos with cassava flour tortillas lately too. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Yes! Coffee, matcha, black tea, green tea–I love it all in moderation. I can be sensitive to caffeine sometimes, so I try to limit myself to 2 caffeinated beverages a day, and always before 2 pm . -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I try to never skip breakfast because when I do, I need something sweet by the time 3 o’clock  hits. I find that consuming a good amount of healthy fat in the mornings helps me curb those cravings. Sometimes you just need a treat though. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? So many! I have this tray on my counter with all of these powders and tinctures that I sprinkle into my coffee/­­tea or other elixirs. For supplements, I take a probiotic, Vitamin D3, B12, and Omega 3 daily. With superfoods/­­powders etc: I like all of the mushroom powders these days (reishi, chaga, lion’s mane and cordyceps) because they help soothe my nerves as well as provide a focused mental energy of sorts. I put spirulina in every smoothie I make because it has so much going on nutritionally. I take ashwagandha and mucuna pruriens to help with stress management. I love all the Moon Juice Dusts, too (Spirit Dust is my go-to). -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I could count a hundred personal influences in the realm of self-care, but I think Jason Wachob’s Wellth is a good place to start for a lot of people thinking about the subject. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I do! I’m always changing it up because I like variety. I like to run, hike, do weight and resistance routines, swim in the summertime, and yoga here and there too. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I really like it, but I find I need some convincing to get started. Getting to it early in the morning is the safest bet for me personally, just to have it ticked off the list before the day really starts. And thinking about the delicious smoothie I’m going to drink after always helps :) -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Getting a step tracker! I know that sounds weird. I work from home and sometimes I spend way too much time puttering on the computer or standing still in my kitchen. Now I head out for at least 13,000 steps a day in addition to my workouts. I sleep deeper and have so much more energy during the day. Plus our dog loves all the extra walks :) Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Feeling clear-minded, open, and confident in any situation. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? My skin is so sensitive so I have my routine down to a science. I love to dry brush before I hop in the shower. From there, I use this special oil-based soap from France, and then while my skin is still damp, I moisturize with coconut oil. For my face, I use a similar oil-based cleanser, rosewater and witch hazel toner, the Cell Serum from Living Libations and Tata Harper’s Clarifying Moisturizer. I’ve also been using Cocokind’s Chia Facial Oil at night along with their Full Brow Balm. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Tocotrienols! They make smoothies/­­hot drinks super creamy and my skin loves all that Vitamin E. Plus all the usuals like greens, proper hydration, and omega-rich foods like flax seeds. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? The only tip I have is to pay attention to what you’re eating and drinking! Your skin/­­hair/­­overall appearance is a direct reflection of what’s happening on the inside. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? I’m a lot better at knowing my limits these days. I can sense when I’m bordering on overcommitment, and I just shut it down and start saying no to stuff. I try to nourish my body well and carve out frequent pockets of time for quiet and stillness. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Going outside, meditating, reading a good book, cooking a beautiful meal with no intention of posting it to Instagram :) -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I’ll eat lots of citrus and ginger and make a pot of vegetable broth with thyme, garlic, and shiitake mushrooms. I do immune tonics with mushroom powders too, drink lots of fluids, and take extra care to get a good night’s sleep and think positive. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? Like I mentioned before, I’m a lot better at sensing when a project may not serve me/­­my career than I used to be. I think the work/­­life balance comes a lot more naturally now. When I was making my cookbook, it felt like I lived in that world, and I was eating a lot of takeout and just not looking after myself because I put that work first. When I start turning to certain shortcuts or I’m habitually depending on caffeine or working on the computer past my bedtime, I know it’s time to reset my outward glance. A reset usually means a day off with some gardening, intentionally simple meal prep, and creative pursuits that aren’t food related. Knowledge -- Your way of coming up with healthful, plant-based recipes that are unique and modern, but also doable and approachable is unprecedented in the food blog world. What is your process when it comes to developing recipes? That is very generous of you to say! I have a professional cooking background, but I also appreciate the comfort of ease and efficiency. Ultimately I want my recipes to bring some kind of enjoyment or sense of ease/­­relief in someone’s life. Those two goals are front of mind when I get to work on a certain recipe concept. The recipe will usually start out slightly chef-y (lots of ingredients, multiple cooking methods, longer prep time), and then slowly I edit it down to streamline and make it do-able for most lightly experienced cooks. I also read every food magazine/­­food media website I can to stay up to date on new cooking methods and ingredients. Fun & Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I work on my house! I like tinkering with the layout and picking up new pieces, plants, rugs etc. My favourite/­­ultimate “treat yourself” strategy though is booking a weekend (or longer) away somewhere with my partner. -- A book/­­song/­­movie to feed the soul: Book – Invincible Living by Guru Jagat Song/­­Album – The Master of None Season 2 soundtrack on Spotify. Italian disco, classic New Edition etc.! Movie – Win It All on Netflix (such a feel good movie, seriously) -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? –  A rosewater sprayer in TSA-approved size for a fresh/­­hydrating face mist –  Snacks (raw nuts, bars etc) –  Amazing Grass packets for when I need greens fast. –  Moisturizer –  Large scarf that doubles as a blanket –  A smoky quartz that I don’t leave home without. –  A hemp cloth and tiny container of oil-based soap because I always want to wash my face immediately after a flight, even a short one. –  Minimal clothing–usually neutral coloured basics that work well for a variety of situations. I tend to always buy clothing at my destination so I go light on it when I’m packing. –  Saje Peppermint Halo: I get back pain here and there and use this as a pain killer of sorts, both at home and away. It’s like rolling ice right onto the problem area! –  Bamboo utensils and metal straw for minimizing waste on the go. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Renee Bird! Based on this amazing post, I think she may be just the person for this series ;) All photos courtesy of Laura Wright The post Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

top 6 turmeric benefits | diy home remedies with turmeric powder

April 18 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

top 6 turmeric benefits | diy home remedies with turmeric powdertop 6 turmeric benefits | diy home remedies with turmeric with photos. turmeric is considered as one of the best plant with several health benefits. it is not only famous for its medicinal purposes but also used for cooking and beauty care. turmeric plays a very important role in hindu tradition. in south indian marriage ritual, a dried turmeric piece is tied with thread as mangalasutra. i have mentioned 6 major tips in this article. however there are myriad uses and significances of turmeric. Continue reading top 6 turmeric benefits | diy home remedies with turmeric powder at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Swirled Mousse Jars + US book events

April 11 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Swirled Mousse Jars + US book events So, David and I had a full evening without the kids last weekend (we still had the baby to look after but that is basically like holiday for us). Our grand plan was to go out for dinner at a busy Swedish/­­Japanese restaurant which we haven’t been to for years. Then rent a proper Hollywood movie and watch it in the couch (instead of the usual watching-half-a-tv-series-on-the-phone-while-the-kids-are-sleeping-on-top-of-us-mode) while eating a yummy dessert. It turns out that the food at that restaurant wasn’t as good as we remembered it and the movie was the worst catastrophe movie we have ever seen. Dessert was however right on point. Our first intention was to buy ice cream but we both felt slightly nauseous after dinner so David said he would improvise and make something fresh instead. These jars took 10 minutes to prepare (which he since then has speeded up to 7), looked pretty, had very few ingredients and tasted super good - creamy and limey with dark chocolate, crunchy nuts and nut butter on top. It’s a dessert that is very nice to keep up your sleeve, so we thought we’d share it with you. Encouraged by last weeks video, we did a short one of this recipe as well. Press play! US book events! And on the subject of being kid-free. David and I (+baby) are coming to the US for the release of our new book there. Yippie! We will be in New York for a couple of days to do some PR and press stuff. We have teamed up with Sur La Table and we’ll be doing a hands-on cooking class there on Sunday 30 April. Get your tickets for the class here! Be aware that there are only a limited amount of seats. We will also have a little mingle, book signing and Q&A at CAP Beauty on Monday May 1st. We would LOVE to meet and chat with as many of you as possible there. We don’t have an RSVP-link for that yet but will let you know as soon as we do. David will then continue on to the West coast for some more events there. I would have loved to join him but I simply couldn’t handle too many days of work while also looking after the little one + jetlag. And I don’t want to be away from the other kids too long either. Sorry! David is the funny and talented one of us anyway so you should definitely go see him. Although he will probably tell a lot of lies about me - dont believe him ;) The schedule isn’t entirely ready yet. He will host another Sur La Table cooking class in Los Angeles May 5th. Get your tickets here! There will also be a mingle, book signing an Q&A at Credo Beauty in LA and we will post the link for that asap. We will update soon with more information about a possible event in San Francisco too. Lots of love! /­­Luise PS. Notice that the baby currently is back on a no-name status - aaargh! Okay, back to these jars. You might recognize that the base is similar to the Key Lime Mousse in Green Kitchen Travels. The smart thing here is that we use the same base for the top layer as well but with an additional flavor, which makes it really simple and quick. Enjoy! Super-Quick Swirled Mousse Jars Serves 2 Note: It’s optimal to use chilled avocados or chilled glasses as you don’t want the bottom layer to be lukewarm. Best advice is to keep ripe avocados in the fridge. Or look for frozen precut avocado, which is becoming increasingly popular in the supermarkets (and often cheaper than buying fresh). 2 avocados 3 lime 6 soft dates, stoned 1 cup /­­ 150 g frozen blackcurrants (or frozen blueberries, raspberries or blackberries)  1/­­2 tsp cardamom 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml yogurt Topping 1 oz /­­ 20 g dark chocolate 10 almonds 2 dollops nut butter of choice Cut the avocados in halves, remove the stone, scoop out the flesh and add it to a food processor or blender (a food processor is a little easier as it has a wider base and this is thicker than a smoothie but a blender works if you add a splash of water) along with the juice of 3 lime and 6 soft dates. Mix until creamy, adding a splash of water if needed. Taste and add more lime or dates if needed. Scoop out half of the mousse into 2 jars. Add berries and cardamom to the remaining avocado mousse in the blender and mix again until smooth. Add a few spoons of yogurt to the jars and then add the berry mousse. Use the backside of a spoon to swirl the layers a bit and then top with dark chocolate, almonds and a large dollop of nut butter. Enjoy!

Baked Polenta Basil Fries

March 13 2017 Meatless Monday 

Who says fries are always full of fat? Polenta is cut into strips and baked before being served alongside marinara sauce. Sea salt and fresh basil ground together make an ideal sophisticated seasoning as this finger food gets a health makeover. This recipe comes to us from Sherry of Exploits of a Vegan Wannabe. Serves 8 - 1 teaspoon sea salt - 2 tablespoons fresh basil, chopped - 1 18 ounce package prepared polenta*1 teaspoon olive oil - black pepper, to taste - a little marinara sauce**, for dipping *Found in a roll shape in the Italian section of most grocery stores. **Optional. Preheat an oven to 400 degrees. Grind the salt and basil together in a mortar and pestle or with the back side of a large knife. Unwrap the polenta. Cut in half, then cut the halves in half. Cut the quarters into slices the shape of French fries. Place the chopped polenta in a large bowl. Drizzle with the olive oil and toss with the basil sea salt and pepper to taste. Place the seasoned fries in a single layer on a baking sheet. Season with a little more salt and pepper if desired. Bake for 20 minutes and flip for maximum browning and beauty. Cook 6-8 minutes more on their other side, or until the fries reach a desired level of doneness. Take the polenta fries out of the oven and place onto a paper towel or brown paper bag to absorb the remaining oil. Serve alongside marinara sauce for dipping, if desired, and enjoy! The post Baked Polenta Basil Fries appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Immunity-Boosting Beet and Camu Camu Breakfast Bowl

January 22 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Immunity-Boosting Beet and Camu Camu Breakfast Bowl Hope your weekend’s been great so far! Checking in with a fun, immunity-boosting smoothie bowl recipe that we developed for Nuts.com. This smoothie contains a powerful, vitamin C-rich trio of raw beet, cranberries and camu camu powder. Camu camu is a magical amazonian berry that has the highest naturally occurring vitamin C content of all the known plants in the world. I did a little test and have been adding camu camu powder to my morning smoothies and porridges this winter instead of taking my usual C vitamins, and no major cold yet! This smoothie is perfectly good without camu camu too, in case you aren’t planning on adding another item to your pantry/­­superfood collection. If you are worried about the raw beet here, don’t be – its flavor gets neutralized and masked by the other ingredients, while you benefit from its wealth of nutrition and magnetic color. There are also bananas and dates for sweetness, seasonally-appropriate cranberries for bit of tartness, and avocado for some healthy fats. Some weekend links below. Enjoy your Sunday :) - Invincible Living: The Power of Yoga, The Energy of Breath, and Other Tools for a Radiant Life – currently reading this book, written by an inspiring Kundalini yoga teacher. Perfect for a Kundalini beginner like me and very down to earth – not too technical or woo woo, with tons of practical tips for a more healthful and mindful existence. I’ve been very curious about Kundalini for a while now, and have began incorporating simple techniques from this book into my daily routine, like 7 minutes of Breath of Fire (breathing in and out through your nose at even increments), which is supposed to help get your glandular system back in order. Really loving it so far! - The Well/­­Aware Podcast – we love our podcasts around here and super thrilled about this new discovery, favorite episodes include interviews with Kerrilynn + Cindy of CAP Beauty, Satsuki Shibuya, Caitlin Mociun - Anny Wang – obsessed with this Swedish artist/­­furniture designer who does these insane in 3D illustrations, just look at them! Want her prints all over my walls. - In My Fridge: Heidi Swanson - How To Put Plants at the Centre of Your Plate by Anna Jones – that celeriac steak! - The First Mess Cookbook – I’m not sure I’ve ever been this excited for a cookbook to come out, it’s going to be SO good! Laura has a little preview of the book here. Follow this link for the Immunity-Boosting Beet and Camu Camu Breakfast Bowl Recipe :) You might also like... Sprouted Sunflower Seed Cocoa Bars Sweet Potato Buckwheat Snack Bars with Cardamom Ginger Marinated Tofu with Citrus Salsa Mango, Jicama and Grilled Corn Tacos .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Immunity-Boosting Beet and Camu Camu Breakfast Bowl appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Roasted Garlic and Parsnip Hummus

January 15 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Roasted Garlic and Parsnip Hummus If you ever do meal prep on the weekends for the week ahead, hummus is a great thing to consider including in your repertoire of preparations. It’s easy to make, keeps pretty well, and is a very useful thing to have on hand, since so many meals can be centered around it. Plop a generous dollop into your salads and grain bowls, spread onto sandwiches and flatbreads, use as a dipping component for snacks (roasted winter roots dipped in hummus is a recent favorite) – any way you use it, it’s a great, fast way to make your meal more filling and nourishing. Plus, homemade hummus tastes so much better than store-bought! I don’t think I’ve ever made the same hummus recipe twice. It always differs based on my mood and what I have on hand, but I tend to include a bit more than just garlic when it comes to the veggies (pack them in whenever you can!). Roasted cauliflower, red pepper, sweet potato and beets have all made their way into my hummus throughout the years, and it’s tasted good pretty much every time – hummus has a very forgiving and highly customizable recipe. Have you ever made a smoothie by packing your blender full of not only fruit but also a ton of greens, superfood powders, seeds, nuts and who knows what else? Did you then proceed to marvel at the result, which came out tasting nice and fruity, despite looking like swampy slush? It’s sort of the same deal with hummus – anything goes. Or most things do, anyway. This past week, I added roasted garlic, parsnips and red onion into a batch of hummus and it turned out exceptionally delicious. All the vegetables are roasted together until soft and caramelized, then thrown into a blender/­­food processor together with the chickpeas and the rest of the ingredients. The process is quick, and the veggies bring all kinds of additional nourishment to the hummus, along with sweet and earthy notes. The recipe is very alteration-friendly, too – add sweet potato instead of parsnips, regular onion instead of red, a few small cloves of raw garlic instead of the whole head of roasted garlic, it will all taste great in its own way. And you will be prepared for success with your meals and snacks for the next week or so. Last Sunday, we hosted a Moon Juice cookbook giveaway in our newsletter. In order to enter, we asked you to share one inspiring book, article, film or podcast that’s made an impression on you throughout the years. We were so moved by all your amazing suggestions and inspiring, personal notes, that we were truly wishing we had a cookbook to give away to each and every one of you. We feel so lucky to be connected with you guys, even in this tiny way. This Sunday’s links feature a selection of the suggestions and inspirations we received during the giveaway. We wish we could share them all because every one was amazing, but the list would be much too long, so there’s just a snippet below. So much good stuff there! Enjoy your Sunday :) Books - The Book of Joy: Lasting Happiness in a Changing World (by the Dalai Lama) – from Angelina - Radical Beauty: How to Transforms Yourself from the Inside Out – from Danae - A People’s History of the United States – Kendal says, ‘it’s inspired me to think about our history in the Big Picture, and even helps a little with not getting too bogged down by all the bad news that’s out there. The main thing I think we need to do in these times is take care of ourselves and each other.’ - You Are a Badass: How to Stop Doubting Your Greatness and Start Living an Awesome Life – from Susan - Consolations: The Solace, Nourishment and Underlying Meaning of Everyday Words  – from Dina - Anam Cara: Spiritual Wisdom from the Celtic World – from Elizabeth Cookbooks, Nutrition, Food - Nutrition Stripped: 100 Whole-Food Recipes Made Deliciously Simple – from Joana - The Oh She Glows Cookbook: Over 100 Vegan Recipes to Glow from the Inside Out – from Isa - Kitchen Literacy: How We Lost Knowledge of Where Food Comes from and Why We Need to Get It Back – from Rebekah - Healing With Whole Foods: Asian Traditions and Modern Nutrition – from Deb Podcasts - WANT Podcast – stands for ‘women against negative talk.’ Guests include Sarah Britton of My New Roots, Jessica Murnane of One Part Plant, Adina Grigore of S.W. basics and many, many more – from Lea - The Dinner Party Download, especially this episode – from Ariela - Radio Cherry Bombe, especially this episode – from Maia - The Rich Roll Podcast, especially The Best of 2016 – from Abigail Videos, Movies - World Peace and Other 4th Grade Achievements, the Ted Talk – from Robin - Minimalism: A Documentary About the Important Things – from Valentina - Why Some of Us Don’t Have One True Calling, Ted Talk – from Elizabeth Roasted Garlic and Parsnip Hummus   Print Serves: 3-4 cups Ingredients 3 medium parsnips - peeled and cut into strips 1 red onion - sliced into 8 wedges olive oil or neutral coconut oil sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1 head garlic - about ¼ cut off the top of the garlic head, some of the outer skin peeled off 1 15oz can chickpeas or 1¾ cup cooked chickpeas ½ cup tahini 2 tablespoons olive oil, plus more for garnish 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1 teaspoon toasted whole cumin seeds - ground 1 teaspoon smoked paprika ½ teaspoon sea salt or more to taste 1 cup water olives - for garnish (optional) Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Place parsnips and red onion onto the baking sheet, drizzle with oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and mix well with your hands. Drizzle the top of the garlic head with oil, salt and pepper. Make a parchment paper packet or tin foil packet and place the garlic inside. Place packet onto the tray with the vegetables. Garlic must remain covered when roasting. Put the tray with the vegetables into the oven and roast for 15 minutes. Remove from the oven, mix the parsnips and onion, trying to flip over each piece, then roast for another 15 minutes, until soft throughout and caramelized at the edges. Check the garlic, it should be soft and cooked through after the 30 minutes. If not, roast it for another 5 minutes or so until nice and soft. Let the garlic cool down a bit and slip all the garlic cloves out of their skins. Combine all the roasted vegetables, chickpeas, tahini, olive oil, lemon juice, cumin, paprika, ½ teaspoon sea salt and water in a high-speed blender or food processor until smooth and creamy. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve the hummus garnished with more olive oil and olives, if using. Keep refrigerated in an air-tight container. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Givea... Miso Caramel Popcorn Garlic Onion Veggie Dip from Food Loves Writing Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Roasted Garlic and Parsnip Hummus appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache

December 8 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache Since we’ve been making a point of keeping things festive around here for the past month or so, we thought it was time that we do a proper cake recipe. By proper I mean layered, frosted, stunning and decadent. Then again, this cake is also vegan, gluten-free and the chocolate layers contain no added sugar, which are all elements not very commonly seen in those ‘proper’ cakes, but that’s just the way we do things around here ;) By now it’s no secret that sweet root vegetables are not to be underestimated when it comes to vegan baking. They are so good at contributing that right texture, moisture and body to baked goods, together with a neutral base for any flavor. Beets, the root vegetable I use in this cake, are all that and happen to be nature’s very best food coloring. The rich and moist chocolate layers of this cake are made of a mixture of gluten-free flours, dates and beet, and get their depth of flavor from cocoa, chicory coffee and a splash of balsamic vinegar. If you are wondering what the coffee and balsamic are doing in this recipe – they both work well at emphasizing the chocolate flavor and taking it up on the decadence scale. The beet-colored frosting is based on home-‘condensed’ coconut milk and is creamy but very light, and the same can be said for the chocolate ganache that glazes over the cake. Although this is a layered cake that requires time, attention and ritual, I would say that technique-wise, this cake is on the simpler side when it comes to traditional layer cakes. All the elements come together fairly quickly, and I find the assembly and frosting to be the most challenging part, as always. We hope this beauty makes it on your holiday table or birthday table, or rainy day baking table. In any case, let us know how it goes :) Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache   Print Serves: one 6-inch, double layer cake Ingredients for the pink frosting 2 cans full fat unsweetened coconut milk ⅔ cup raw sugar 2 tablespoons coconut oil, plus more for oiling parchment paper 1½ cups cashews - soaked for 2-4 hours, divided ¼ small beet root 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice ⅔ cup almond milk or purified water for the cake 1 cup brown rice flour ½ cup almond flour ½ cup cocoa powder 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda pinch sea salt 1 cup Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in hot water for 10 minutes 1 cup chicory coffee (1 teaspoon ground roasted chicory root or coffee substitute such as Dandy Blend per 1¼ cups boiling water, brewed for 5 minutes and strained) or strong regular coffee ⅓ cup apple sauce 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil - melted 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar 1 medium beet root - peeled and shredded for the chocolate ganache ½ cup condensed coconut milk (reserved when making frosting) ¼ cup cashews (reserved when making frosting) 5-7 tablespoons cocoa powder 2 tablespoons almond milk or water Instructions to make the frosting Combine coconut milk and sugar in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil over medium heat. Reduce heat to establish a strong simmer and cook, stirring often, for 20 minutes, until the mixture thickens and resembles condensed milk. Stir in coconut oil until well incorporated. Reserve ½ cup of the condensed coconut milk and ¼ cup soaked cashews for the ganache, below. Combine the rest of the condensed coconut milk, remaining soaked and rinsed cashews, beet, lemon juice and almond milk/­­water in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Scoop into an airtight container and chill in the refrigerator until firm, preferably overnight. to bake the cake Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Prepare two 6-inch spring forms or cake pans by lining them with lightly oiled parchment paper (if you only have one spring form/­­pan, you can bake one chocolate cake layer at a time). Combine all flours, cocoa powder, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a large bowl. Reserve ½ cup of the date soaking liquid and combine it with the dates, chicory coffee/­­regular coffee and apple sauce in an upright blender, blend until smooth. Add coconut oil and balsamic vinegar and pulse to incorporate. Pour the blended liquid into the bowl with the dried ingredients and mix to combine. Fold in the shredded beet. Divide batter in half between prepared pans and bake for 40-45 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean (or bake one at a time if you only have one pan). Remove from the oven and let cool completely. to make chocolate ganache Combine reserved ½ cup condensed coconut milk and ¼ cup reserved soaked and rinsed cashews with cocoa powder and 2 tablespoons almond milk/­­water in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Set aside. to assemble the cake Invert one of the chocolate cake layers onto a large plate or cake stand. Frost with about ⅓ of well-chilled, firm frosting. Place the other cake layer on top and frost the entire cake with the rest of the frosting. Chill the cake in the refrigerator for 10-15 minutes to firm up the frosting once again. Take the cake out of the refrigerator and pour the chocolate ganache over the cake, taking care to create photogenic drips, if you wish. Place the cake in the refrigerator for 30 minutes to an hour before slicing. Keep the leftovers refrigerated. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Asian Flavoured Veggie Burgers with Asparagus Fries Kohlrabi Avocado Salad Kaffir Lime Mango Ice-Cream Raw Berry Tarts with a Peach and Herb Sorbet .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage

November 6 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage This past week, we posted a recipe for a Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower, which was pictured served with this very nourishing and super tasty Celeriac and Parsnip mash. We promised to come back with the mash recipe this weekend, so here it is. I grew up on mashed potatoes – my mom probably made them twice a week or more, which is quite standard for a Russian household, where potatoes somehow make it into every meal every day. I love mashed potatoes to this day and can easily put away a good portion, which I think is true for a lot of people due to the dish’s comfort food status. I remember discovering that other roots could be eaten as a mash upon moving to the U.S. – I was at one of my first Thanksgiving dinners and was quite impressed with the mashed sweet potato option that was offered. Slowly, I came around to the idea at home, and now, whenever I have a craving but don’t feel like being weighed down by the inevitably large portion of mashed potatoes I will consume, I make something similar with other, more nutritious and lighter roots. This celeriac and parsnip mash is my absolute favorite version for that scenario. Each of the pale roots are known for their unique, characteristic flavors, which combine well in this mash and become quite complementary with that earthy sweetness they both have going on. This is mash elevated – lighter and more nourishing than mashed potatoes and more interesting in flavor than mashed sweet potato, but still starchy, creamy and very comforting. This stuff is great to have on your holiday table to surprise your guests with something new, yet familiar, or just make a batch of it to have alongside your meals for the week, to get more nutritious wintery roots in your diet. Frying up sage leaves until they are crispy is an easy trick for fancying up a modest looking autumn dish like this one, and the chip-like sage itself is surprisingly delicious. There are some weekend links after the jump, have a cozy Sunday ;) How to Master the Art of Getting Noticed – Austin Kleon’s advice to aspiring artists Salad for President – always so much good stuff on this website, like Leif Hedendal cooking salad at the David Ireland House, Yuri Shimojo’s home and Japanese Crudité Recipe, Laila Gohar’s food as installation art and more The Woman Code Cleanse Review – just read Alisa Vitti’s The Woman Code (and loved it), and was very excited to read about Dana’s experience of the gentle four-day cleanse proposed in the book Noël Graupner – new instagram crush, plant-based private chef with an Ayurvedic tradition background and great photography skills Street Vendors of Hanoi, Photographed from Above – amazing Jade Rolling – have you tried it? I saw a lady doing this on the subway recently (weird setting for that), and it looked really relaxing. Three New Cookbooks, for Health’s Sake – so many health-centered cookbooks coming out nowadays, and these three look great (two of them are from our publisher!) I have a copy Dandelion and Quince and it’s a beauty. Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients 1 large or 2 medium celeriacs - peeled and roughly chopped 2-3 parsnips - peeled and roughly chopped sea salt 1 large red onion - peeled and sliced into 8 wedges 1-2 garlic heads - separated into cloves (no need to peel the cloves) coconut oil - to taste freshly ground black pepper any plant milk or cooking water from boiling the roots - to taste ghee or olive oil - to taste 1 small bunch sage - leaves smoked paprika - for garnish (optional) olive oil - for garnish (optional) Instructions Preheat oven 400° F (200° C). Bring celeriac and parsnips to a boil in a large pot of water. Reduce heat to a strong simmer and cook vegetables for 10-15 minutes, until soft throughout, adding salt towards the end. Place onion and garlic onto a parchment paper-covered baking tray. Add coconut oil, salt, pepper and mix well. Bake for 20 minutes. After 20 minutes, garlic should be done but the onions might need more time - in this case, remove garlic from oven and finish baking the onion until completely soft and caramelized. Slip garlic cloves out of their shells. Drain the boiled vegetables, reserving some of the cooking liquid if youll be using it in place of plant milk. Place vegetables into a large bowl together with the roasted garlic and mash with a potato masher to your desired consistency. Place roasted onion and ½ cup plant milk/­­cooking water into a blender and blend until smooth. Add blended onion to the mashed vegetables, adding more liquid if needed to achieve your desired consistency. Add ghee or olive oil to taste. Alternatively, mix all the vegetables in a food processor together with the plant milk/­­cooking liquid, which will make for a smoother, less textured puree. Heat 2-3 tablespoons coconut oil in a medium pan on medium heat. Add well-dried sage leaves to the pan along with salt and pepper and fry, stirring, for a couple of minutes until crispy. Mix the oil left over from frying the sage into the mash. Optionally, mix in some of the crispy sage into the mash as well. Garnish mash with crispy sage, smoked paprika and olive oil, and serve. Notes You can use just celeriac or just parsnips for this mash as well. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Givea... Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin Chocolate Fudge with Fresh Sage and Goji Berries Raw Rainbow Lasagne with Heirloom Tomatoes, Mushrooms, and Castelvetra... .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Spiced and Seeded Multigrain Loaf & A Giveaway

September 15 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Spiced and Seeded Multigrain Loaf & A GiveawayBefore I tell you about this bread, I want to mention that we are hosting an amazing giveaway for one KoMo grain mill this week, so be sure to read on for the details – it’s a beauty! I have a friend who inspires me to no end (hi Ira!). When she comes over, we sit at my kitchen table for hours, exchanging stories and drinking way too many cups of tea. My husband is always amazed – what can we possibly be discussing for that long? Ira formally studied Ayurveda and has an amazing wealth of knowledge when it comes to a good wellness routine, so there’s one answer to his question. We can go on and on about things like oil pulling, abhyanga, herbs, Tibetan rites, and food, always food. She is one of those cooks who is just naturally really good at it. As in, every one of her ‘recipes’ sounds as if she threw a bunch of things together, always eyeing and never measuring, but the result is devastatingly delicious every time. The idea for this bread comes from this magician of a friend, who prepares something similar weekly. It falls into the category of soda breads, which is a lower maintenance breed of bread that rises with the help of baking soda instead of yeast. The approach here was to make a ‘complete’ loaf of bread, full of freshly ground flours, grains, seeds, nuts, and aromatic spices. It’s not a traditional loaf, being more dense, nutritious and filling than your basic sourdough – one slice goes a long way. I feel okay about making a simple sandwich with it for my eight year old’s school lunch, knowing that she will stay full throughout classes and an after school activity after eating it. It’s special and it’s powerful. Make it, and you will have a dependable accompaniment to any one of your meals throughout the week. This week, we are hosting one of the most exciting giveaways we’ve ever done. It’s for one KoMo grain mill from Pleasant Hill Grain – a beautiful, electric stone-grinding appliance for dry grains and beans, which I used/­­talked about in last week’s recipe. I utilized it to grind the wheat and rye for this bread, and baking with the super-fresh flours it produced was such a pleasure. I talked in depth about the benefits of stone grinding in my previous post, but basically, stone grinding preserves all of the grain’s nutrition and produces the most delicious flour. The mill itself is almost a museum-worthy object, skillfully crafted in Austria. I truly can’t wait for one of you to get a hold of this beauty. To enter the giveaway, Pleasant Hill Grain asks that you like their Facebook page, visit their website and leave a comment here with the product(s) you like from their offering – they will appreciate your feedback. The giveaway is for U.S. 48 Contiguous States only and open until 9/­­22/­­16. Good luck ;) Spiced and Seeded Multigrain Loaf   Print Serves: 1 loaf Ingredients 2 cups sprouted/­­whole spelt flour 1/­­2 cup rye flour 1/­­4 cup corn grits/­­polenta 1/­­4 cup steel cut oats ½ cup mixed chopped nuts and seeds (ex: walnuts, pecans, hazelnuts, sunflower, pumpkin, sesame, chia and poppy seeds), plus more for garnish 1/­­4 cup coconut sugar 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 tablespoon coriander seeds - freshly ground 1 tablespoon cumin seeds - freshly ground 5 cardamom pods - freshly ground 1/­­2 teaspoon cinnamon ¼ cup millet - soaked overnight 1 1/­­3 cups plain kefir or yogurt neutral coconut oil or other vegetable oil for oiling the baking surface Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Combine spelt and rye flours, corn grits, steel cut oats, nuts and seeds, sugar, salt, baking soda and spices in a large bowl. Drain and rinse millet and set aside. Make a well in the center of the flour mix and pour kefir/­­yogurt in, then add the millet. Mix by gradually incorporating flour into the kefir in a circular motion. You should end up with a very soft dough thats not too sticky. Turn the dough onto a well-floured working surface and gently roll into the flour. Shape into a round loaf. Place the loaf onto a well-oiled baking surface - a cast-iron pan or tray. Alternatively, put the dough into a well-oiled or lined loaf pan. Slice the top surface of the bread a couple times and sprinkle with nuts and seeds of choice. Bake for 40-45 minutes, until the crust is golden. The base of the bread should sound hollow when you tap on it. Notes If you dont have rye flour, use 2 1/­­2 cups sprouted/­­whole spelt flour. 3.5.3208 You might also like... 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Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops with a Chocolate Core

July 31 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops with a Chocolate Core This week, I wanted to re-create my favorite Ben & Jerry’s ice cream flavor, making it vegan (though B&J came out with their own non-dairy ice cream, which is so awesome) and nutritious with the addition of a few energizing superfoods. Another thing I know people can’t get enough of in B&J’s ice cream are their decadent cores, so I went ahead and gave these Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops a chocolate core to really drive the point home. If you’re wondering why the pops are minty-colored, it’s due to the addition of spirulina, along with other nutritionally dense ingredients like hemp hearts and cacao nibs. A bonus – no ice-cream maker is needed for these. Moving to the U.S. from small-town Russia in the 90s and going to a Ben & Jerry’s ice cream shop for the first time was completely mind-blowing because a) back home, we did not have dedicated ice cream shops, b) ice cream flavors I grew up with were very basic and I had never seen so many extensive flavor options c) they sold little tubs of ice cream to take home, which was unheard of in Russia at the time d) everything tasted incredibly decadent and delicious. So here’s my B&J tribute, as a thanks for opening my eyes to possibilities I didn’t know existed. Read on for some weekend links and have a peaceful Sunday. Kids Taste-Test the New Ben & Jerry’s Vegan Ice Cream  Essentials – since we get many questions about our chosen kitchen and photography tools, we’ve made a page with links to all our favorite and most-used products – Kitchen Tools here, Photography here (also working on a round-up of favorite health-related books/­­cookbooks and natural beauty!) The Sad, Sexist History of Salad – Americans, in particular, strongly associate healthy or light foods, such as salad, chicken, and yogurt, with women, and unhealthy or heavy foods, such as beef, potatoes, and beer, with men, both men and women preferred unhealthy foods with masculine packaging and healthy foods with feminine packaging. Fascinating. The World’s Most Innovative Companies in 2016 – according to Fast Company Julia Turshen on the One Part Podcast – loved this, especially her point on asking for credit/­­compensation – if you don’t ask, you will never know what the possibilities are. You may know Turshen from co-authoring Gwyneth Paltrow’s cookbook, along with many others. Cannot wait for her own cookbook to come out. Meryl Streep: A League of Her Own, also, Taste of Streep!? Obama After Dark – how one can average only 5 hours of sleep a night AND run the country is beyond me, also Obama Sets the Record Straight on His 7-Almond Habit :) About Us – we’ve updated our about page a bit, with very important info like our zodiac signs ;) Snapchat – follow @golubkakitchen for all behind-the-scenes Superfood Cherry Garcia Pops with a Chocolate Core   Print Serves: 7-10 pops Ingredients for the cherries 1 heaping cup cherries - pitted and halved 1 tablespoon maple syrup 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder 1 tablespoon water for the spirulina mix 1½ cup raw cashews - soaked for 2-4 hours 1 cup canned unsweetened full fat Thai coconut milk 3 tablespoons maple syrup or more to taste ½-1 tablespoon spirulina powder ½ tablespoon vanilla extract ½ teaspoon xanathan gum or 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder (optional) 1 tablespoon shaved dark chocolate or raw chocolate 1-2 tablespoons cacao nibs for the chocolate core ⅓ of the spirulina mix 2 tablespoons shaved dark chocolate or raw chocolate 3 tablespoons raw cacao powder for the pops 7-10 tea cups, small glasses or pop molds neutral coconut oil for oiling the cups spirulina mix (recipe above) chocolate core (recipe above) 7-10 wooden sticks - soaked for 2 hours or overnight hemp hearts cacao nibs Instructions to prepare the cherries Combine cherries with maple syrup and bring to a boil in a small saucepan. Reduce the heat to a simmer and simmer for 2 minutes. Combine arrowroot powder with water in a small bowl and add to the saucepan, while stirring. The cherry compote should thicken slightly. Remove from heat and let cool. to make the pops Make the spirulina mix. Drain and rinse cashews and put into an upright blender, preferably high-speed. Add coconut milk, maple syrup, spirulina, vanilla, and xanathan gum/­­arrowroot powder, if using and blend until smooth. If not using a high-speed blender, optionally strain mixture through a fine-mesh strainer for the most smooth and velvety texture. Spoon about ⅓ of the spirulina mix into a medium, heat-proof bowl and set aside. Add shaved chocolate and cacao nibs to the blender with the remaining ⅔ of the spirulina mix and pulse to combine briefly. Transfer the mixture into a separate bowl, then fold in the cherries. Make the chocolate core. Place the reserved ⅓ of the spirulina mix onto a double boiler, add chocolate and let it melt, stirring to incorporate. Remove from the heat, add in cacao powder, mix to combine and let cool. Make the pops. Oil your cups/­­molds generously with coconut oil and spoon the spirulina-cherry mix in, leaving a well in the center for the core. Spoon the chocolate core into the well. Even out the surface and insert the wooden stick. Repeat with the rest of the pops. Freeze until completely firm. Prepare a plate with cacao nibs and hemp hearts for coating, along with a parchment paper-covered surface for placing pops onto. Take cups with pops out of the freezer and place into a dish with hot water for a minute, for easier removal. Remove popsicles from cups, pulling them out by the sticks. Dip the top of each pop into the prepared hemp/­­cacao nib mixture and press gently to make the pieces stick. Place onto a parchment paper-covered surface and keep frozen until ready to eat. Take the popsicles out of the freezer 5-10 minutes prior to eating. 3.5.3208 You might also like... 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Papaya Lime Sundae - Ice Cream Sunday

June 26 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Papaya Lime Sundae - Ice Cream Sunday Papaya is one of my favorite things to eat this time of year, so figuring out a papaya sorbet recipe that worked was very exciting. It admittedly took me a few tries. One version that involved banana came out tasting quite strange, while another one just tasted like plain ice.  Then I had a revelation about the fact that papaya always pairs amazingly well with lime – both are tropical in flavor, and lime gives creamy and mild papaya just the right hint of brightness and zing. Presented here as a very refreshing version of a sundae, with delicious and healthful add-ins – desiccated coconut, cacao nibs (which we sprinkle on everything sweet in this house), and a drizzle of Lady Date pure date syrup, an amazing new discovery (thank you Laura for the tip). In the absence of this sorbet, we’ve been having fresh papaya slices with all the same add-ins, as an easy summer dessert. Since our book manuscript is due this coming Thursday, we’ve had our heads down and haven’t had the time to read any interesting articles for our Sunday link list. Instead, we thought it would be fun to compile a list of old and new cookbooks that have been inspiring us and helping us get through these final stages of the manuscript, whether with their recipes, visually or both. Read on for the list and have a relaxing Sunday! Bowl by Lukas Volger Gjelina by Travis Lett Hartwood by Eric Werner Nopi by Yotam Ottolenghi Ayurveda: The Science of Self Healing by Vasant Lad Dandelion and Quince by Michelle McKenzie (got a sneak peak from my publisher and it’s a beauty) Ripe and Tender by Nigel Slater It’s All Easy by Gwyneth Paltrow At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen by Amy Chaplin Hot to Cook a Wolf by MFK Fisher Sweeter Off the Vine by Yossi Arefi Papaya Lime Sundae   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients 1 medium papaya - peeled, seeded and roughly chopped ½ cup freshly squeezed lime juice - from about 3 limes ⅓ cup maple syrup pinch sea salt cacao nibs - to taste desiccated coconut - to taste pure date syrup - to taste Instructions Combine all the ingredients, with the exception of cacao nibs, coconut and date syrup, in a blender and blend until smooth. Chill the mixture well in the refrigerator, preferably overnight. Churn in an ice-cream maker for 20 minutes or according to the manufacturers instructions. Spoon into a container and freeze for at least 2 hours before serving. Top with cacao nibs, desiccated coconut and pure date syrup. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Zucchini Blossoms with Roasted Eggplant Raw Summer Fruit Samosas and a Guest Post for My Sweet Faery Black Bean Chocolate and Fig Cookies Kaffir Lime Mango Ice-Cream .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Papaya Lime Sundae - Ice Cream Sunday appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.


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