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beans vegetarian recipes

Black Bean Nachos

before yesterday Meatless Monday 

Nachos get a healthy plant-based boost with nutritious black beans, which are sauteed with Tabasco sauce for a little heat and honey for a little sweet. This crowd-pleasing recipe comes together in no time and can be customized with your favorite toppings. This recipe comes to us from Golden Blossom Honey. Serves 6 - 1/­­2 medium onion, chopped - 1 clove garlic, minced - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 (15 ounce can) black beans, drained and rinsed - 2 dashes Tabasco sauce - 1 tablespoon honey - 3 medium tomatoes, chopped - 1 jalapeno pepper, seeded and minced - 2 scallions, chopped - 1 (8 1/­­2 ounce) bag tortilla chips - 4 ounces sharp cheddar cheese, grated - 4 ounces Monterey Jack cheese, grated - 1 avocado, peeled and sliced - 3 tablespoons fresh cilantro, chopped - sour cream - salt and pepper to taste   Preheat oven to 475°.   Saute onion and garlic for 5 minutes in olive oil over medium heat. Reduce heat. Add black beans and Tabasco sauce. Stir in honey. Cook for 10 minutes, stirring often. In a medium bowl, mix together tomatoes, jalapeno pepper, and scallions. Place tortilla chips evenly on baking sheet. Place black bean mixture over chips, followed by tomato mixture and grated cheeses. Bake for about 5 minutes, until cheese melts. Top with avocado slices, cilantro and sour cream. The post Black Bean Nachos appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Shortcut Apple Steel Cut Oats + A Day of Eating Video

December 6 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Shortcut Apple Steel Cut Oats + A Day of Eating Video Hi friends! Today we’re sharing a new video as part of a video series we are working on, where well be going through a whole day of plant-based meals, as well as little tricks, ideas, and inspirations around the kitchen. We’ve always been fascinated with peoples everyday routines (which is why we have the self-care interview series), and we love getting a peak at how they sustain themselves throughout the day, so we thought it would be fun to film something similar. Todays video has a shortcut recipe for creamy steel cut oats, as well as ideas for lunch, a pick-me-up hot chocolate, dinner, and an end of day treat. All the recipes mentioned in the video are linked below. Let us know what you think! Ever since I discovered steel cut oats, I haven’t been able to go back to rolled oats for porridge purposes. They just seem so sad and mushy, compared to the al dente, textured goodness that are steel cut oats. The only thing that puts steel cut oats at a disadvantage is that they take a while to cook – 30 or so minutes, which is an amount of time that most busy people don’t have in the mornings. Thankfully, there’s a shortcut! It involves quickly bringing your steel cut oats to a boil the night before and leaving them to sit overnight, and you end up with a pot of creamy, dreamy oats in the morning. In the fall, I like to have them with apples, but the possibilities for flavoring and toppings are endless here. Here are all the other recipes mentioned in the video: Nettle Infusion – full of vitamins and minerals, great for hair, nails, and skin, and I actually like the taste, too. Harissa – a powerful, North African condiment that can really take a meal to the next level. Our Plant-Based Meal Plan – the link is to the most recent meal plan we posted, but you can also see all of our meal plans here. Black Bean Sweet Potato Soup – this is such a cozy, fall soup (that uses harissa!) Tahini Hot Chocolate – I drink a variation of this drink every day that I’m working from home. It’s a great pick-me-up, and full of healthful ingredients, too. Red Lentil Stew – this Ottolenghi recipe is so solid and delicious. We also have a step-by-step, no-recipe red lentil soup recipe saved in our Instagram highlights. Shortcut Apple Steel Cut Oats   Print Serves: 1 Ingredients ¼ cup steel cut oats pinch of sea salt a few shakes of cinnamon, or to taste 1¾ cup water 1 apple lemon juice (optional) 2 teaspoons coconut sugar (optional) plant milk of choice - for reheating (optional) hemp hearts or other nuts or seeds - for sprinkling on top almond butter - for garnish Instructions The night before you want steel cut oats for breakfast, combine the steel cut oats, salt, cinnamon, and water in a pot with a lid. Place the pot over high heat and bring up to a boil. Turn off the heat immediately as the oats start boiling. Leave the pot with the oats to sit on the stove top, covered, until morning. In the morning, the oats will be cooked and creamy. The next morning, cut your apple in half and core. Grate half of the apple and mix it into the pot with the oats. Slice or cube the other half of the apple, for topping the porridge. Optionally, mix the apple slices/­­cubes with a few squeezes of lemon juice and coconut sugar for a more impactful topping. Reheat the oats with the grated apple over medium high heat, mixing regularly. If the oats seem too watery, cook them for about 5 minutes, and theyll thicken up. On the other hand, if youd like the oats to be more creamy, reheat them with a splash of plant milk or water for a creamier consistency. Serve, topped with sliced apple, hemp heart or other nuts/­­seeds, and almond butter. Notes This recipe is highly customizable: use any seasonal fruits or berries you have on hand in place of apples, mix in cacao powder and top with banana for chocolate oats, switch up the toppings...the possibilities are endless! 3.5.3226 You might also like... Sprouted Spelt Pancackes Sweet Potato Buckwheat Snack Bars with Cardamom Carrot Cake Smoothie Bowl Creamy Steel Cut Oats with Spring Vegetables .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Shortcut Apple Steel Cut Oats + A Day of Eating Video appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

carrot beans poriyal recipe | carrot beans thoran | carrot beans stir-fry

December 4 2018 hebbar's kitchen 

carrot beans poriyal recipe | carrot beans thoran | carrot beans stir-frycarrot beans poriyal recipe | carrot beans thoran | carrot beans stir-fry with step by step photo and video recipe. poriyal recipes are very common in south indian cuisine and is a must for day to day lunch and dinner. it can be made with myriad vegetables and also with the combination of veggies. one such hugely popular poriyal stir fry recipe is carrot beans poriyal ideally made for religious celebration feast. The post carrot beans poriyal recipe | carrot beans thoran | carrot beans stir-fry appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Come Along! Join Meatless Monday and Slow Food for Terra Madre Day on December 10th

December 3 2018 Meatless Monday 

Come Along! Join Meatless Monday and Slow Food for Terra Madre Day on December 10thWere partnering with Slow Food to celebrate their annual Terra Madre Day with a Meatless Monday meal. Take part in an international day of celebration by cooking up a plant-based dish and sharing it on Meatless Monday with family, friends, and colleagues. Every year, on December 10th, Slow Food - a global nonprofit committed to food that is good, clean, and fair for all - celebrates Terra Madre Day (Italian for mother earth). The theme this year is Food for Change, to illustrate how everyday food choices can make an impact on climate change and the planet. The celebration falls on a Meatless Monday, so naturally, we joined forces to double the impact for the climate. Why? Cutting out meat one day a week is good for the planet because it lessens the demand to raise livestock, which requires an extraordinary amount of resources and takes a devastating toll on the environment.   How to Join in the Meatless Monday Celebrations on Terra Madre Day: 1. Plan to cook a Meatless Monday meal on December 10th. Consider cooking with ingredients like protein-rich and delicious beans and legumes . 2. Share your recipe here . 3. During your Meatless Monday meal, share your photos on social media with the hashtags #MeatlessMonday and #FoodForChange   -For Chefs : Feature this dish in your restaurant on Meatless Monday and the rest of the week. Consider donating 50% or more of the sales to Slow Food USA. -For Meatless Monday Ambassadors and Slow Food Chapters: Host a #FoodForChange potluck or meal for your family, friends, and colleagues. On December 10th, make a difference in your community with Meatless Monday and Slow Food for Terra Madre Day. Join two distinguished worldwide movements that are committed to making change for personal health and the health of the planet. To get inspired, enjoy a short video celebrating Meatless Monday and Slow Food with chefs from Africa to Japan.     Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram!   Are you interested in getting Meatless Monday started in your restaurant or community? Become a Meatless Monday Ambassador! We have all the resources and tools you need. Get started here . You can also get in touch with us at info@meatlessmonday.com. The post Come Along! Join Meatless Monday and Slow Food for Terra Madre Day on December 10th appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Start the Monday after Thanksgiving with Healthy Eating

November 26 2018 Meatless Monday 

Start the Monday after Thanksgiving with Healthy EatingMeatless Monday is here to help you get back on track from your epic meal of turkey, three kinds of stuffing, four slices of pie, and a glass or two of wine...but whos counting? Its fine to overindulge now and then. Why? By getting off track, its easier to get back on! To recuperate, choose plant-based foods like fruits and veggies, which will help you detox and give you lots of fiber - a perfect combination after heavy meals. Try these recipes, which re-imagine holiday leftovers like carrots, green beans, pumpkin, and sweet potatoes. Breakfast – Black Bean Sesame Veggie Hash Lunch – Sesame Tempeh with Green Beans Side – Tahini Curried Carrot Salad Dinner – Stuffed Shells with Pumpkin Kale Filling Continue your detox with a Monday Mile ! Enjoy being outside in nature, getting fresh air, and burning off some extra calories. 2,000 steps, or a mile, takes about 20 minutes and is a beautiful way to start the week after Thanksgiving. Monday has been proven  to be an effective day to start healthy routines; studies show that people who start a new routine or activity on Monday are more likely to keep it up for the rest of the week. Giving up meat one day a week may also inspire other healthy changes to your lifestyle, such as adding more physical activity  or reducing your stress . Meatless Monday has multiple benefits , not just for your health but also for the environment. Follow us on Facebook , Twitter , and Instagram ! Did you try one of our recipes? Please share your photos and experiences with us on social media by tagging @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday. The post Start the Monday after Thanksgiving with Healthy Eating appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Instant Pot Vegan Enchilada Soup – Stovetop Option

November 2 2018 Vegan Richa 

Instant Pot Vegan Enchilada Soup – Stovetop OptionInstant Pot Vegan Enchilada Soup with Quinoa, walnuts, mushrooms. Pressure Cooker Bean-free Vegan Quinoa Chili with Homemade enchilada seasoning. Saucepan Option. Vegan  Glutenfree Recipe. Soyfree Nutfree Oilfree option.  Jump to Recipe  The cold weather calls for bowls full of comforting soups and sometimes I like them to be bean-free. You know age and all ;). Enter this Quinoa Walnut Veggie soup! Quinoa, mushrooms, walnuts, optional soy curls or beans/­­lentils all go into a pressure cooker with some enchilada seasoning, which is a dry enchilada sauce mix with various spices and chilies. Add some broth and done! The quinoa and walnut add amazing texture to this thick soup more like a enchilada filling. If you add a bit more broth and some cooked beans, it makes a great Quinoa chili! Serve with toppings of choice. This savory, warming, flavorful bowl is a perfect quick weeknight meal. Saucepan instructions in the notes. Can be made without walnuts. Lets make some!!Continue reading: Instant Pot Vegan Enchilada Soup – Stovetop OptionThe post Instant Pot Vegan Enchilada Soup – Stovetop Option appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegan Chili Verde

October 23 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Vegan Chili VerdeChili is always a cold weather favorite, and this vegan Chili Verde from One-Dish Vegan is a fun twist on the classic dish. Fresh tomatillos look like small green tomatoes in papery husks, and they have a slightly tart flavor. If fresh ones are unavailable, use the canned variety. Salsa verde, a green salsa, is available in most supermarkets. I use less chili powder than usual in this recipe to try to retain as much of the green color of the chili as possible. If you prefer additional chili powder, add it according to taste. When Lori Maffei tested the recipe, we discussed how nice it would be to have white chili powder and--guess what? -- she found some online! I havent tried it yet, but it sounds intriguing.   Chili Verde Fresh tomatillos look like small green tomatoes in papery husks, and they have a slightly tart flavor. If fresh ones are unavailable, use the canned variety. Salsa verde, a green salsa, is available in most supermarkets. I use less chili powder than usual in this recipe to try to retain as much of the green color of the chili as possible. If you prefer additional chili powder, add it according to taste. When Lori Maffei tested the recipe, we discussed how nice it would be to have white chili powder and--guess what? -- she found some online! I havent tried it yet, but it sounds intriguing. - 1 tablespoon (15 ml) olive oil or 1/­­4 cup (60 ml) water - 1 medium-size yellow onion, chopped - 3 garlic cloves, minced - 1 large green bell pepper, seeded and chopped - 1 medium-size zucchini, chopped - 1 or 2 jalape?o chiles, seeded and minced - 1 1/­­2 cups (198 g) husked and chopped tomatillos, or 1 can (14 ounces, or 395 g) of tomatillos, drained and chopped - 1 cup (256 g) salsa verde - 1 to 2 tablespoons (8 to 15 g) chili powder - 1 teaspoon dried oregano - 1 teaspoon ground cumin - Salt and freshly ground black pepper - 1 1/­­2 cups (355 ml) vegetable broth or water, plus more if needed - 3 cups (531 g) cooked Great Northern or other white beans or 2 cans (15.5 ounces, or 440 g each) of Great Northern or other white beans, rinsed and drained - 1 ripe Hass avocado, for serving -  1/­­4 cup chopped fresh (4 g) cilantro or (15 g) Italian parsley, for serving - Heat the olive oil or water in a large pot over medium heat. Add the onion, garlic, bell pepper, zucchini, and jalape?os. Cook, stirring, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 5 minutes. Add the tomatillos, salsa verde, chili powder, oregano, cumin, and salt and pepper to taste. - Add the broth and beans and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables are tender, about 40 minutes. Add more broth if the chili becomes too thick. - Taste and adjust the seasonings if needed. When ready to serve, pit, peel, and dice the avocado. Top each serving with avocado and cilantro and serve hot. From One-Dish Vegan by Robin Robertson (C) 2018 Quarto Publishing Group USA Inc. Used with permission. The post Vegan Chili Verde appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri

October 20 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri Sana on the left Sana Javeri Kadri is the founder of Diaspora Co., a radically different spice collective dedicated to equity, sustainable agriculture, and decolonization. We’ve been fortunate to try Diaspora’s heirloom, organic, single-origin turmeric powder, and let’s just say it’s going to be very hard to go back to enjoying any other powdered turmeric ever again. Sana lives between Mumbai and Oakland, California. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I crave routine and am most productive when Im following a routine. However, Im unable to do deep thinking work or larger creative work in the middle of a hectic routine, so I like to keep at least one day of the week wide open for creative projects and giving myself the time and space I need to create something important. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I have been trying really hard to wake up, spend as little time on my phone as possible and then make myself a nourishing drink and most importantly, make myself some breakfast. One of my worst habits is to wake up, get on my phone, start responding to emails and then quickly get changed for work and dive straight into a full workday without taking any time to nourish myself or check in with my body. It means that by 1pm Im starving, cranky and already tired for the day. The life changing power of breakfast is something Im still learning… -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? My girlfriend and I try not to spend too much time on our phones before bed, or looking at a screen. She recently introduced a 20 mins of reading before bed practice that were trying to stick to, its my favorite way to wind down and Im committing to not responding to work emails at 10:45pm, even if its 11:15am in Mumbai and my team there is just getting fired up. Work in progress. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  My therapist guides me into mindfulness during our sessions every week because I often come in feeling stressed, frantic and a bit fragile. Shes always able to help me get back in touch with my body and begin to feel grounded again. At her urging, I handle all my stressful work calls or emails sitting outside in the sunshine, ideally with my bare feet in the ground. This practice of grounding has been particularly helpful to me in the past few months of managing a stressful season. I also recently downloaded the Headspace app, and just the five minutes everyday of meditation has made a huge difference to me. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – In Oakland – Bread srsly gluten free sourdough, crispy fried egg cooked in ghee topped with smoked paprika, turmeric and salt, sliced avocado or smoky pinto beans or sliced tomatoes or any veggie leftovers I can wrangle from the fridge, maybe a slice of bacon if Im wanting some extra fat. In Mumbai – a loaded crispy veggie dosa. Either way, I love hot and savory breakfast. The cold and sweet breakfast tradition isnt common in India so, cereal and granola with milk culture is something I find very odd about the United States. Lunch – Leftovers express. My girlfriend and I both work long hours, so our saving grace is prepping large meals a couple times a week and then subsisting on leftovers. Gluten-free pasta with canned early girls (I can 80 lb every summer so that we never have to buy store bought tomato sauce) with every vegetable in the fridge/­­our imperfect produce box and ground beef is a family classic. Rosie is always joking that my stomach doubles when it comes to pasta and shrinks for everything else. Shes not wrong. Snack – My favorite snack is stovetop popcorn. Growing up in Mumbai we never had a microwave, it was my parents most loathed kitchen appliance. So now Im following that tradition of never owning a microwave. My favorite stovetop popcorn is popped in ghee and then topped with nutritional yeast, turmeric, and salt. Its perfect. Dinner - My perfect dinner is khichdi (spiced rice and lentils cooked in ghee and heavy on the ginger, turmeric and cumin), thick full fat yogurt, masala okra, a little bit of pickle (Brooklyn Delhi achaars are divine) and a side of spicy amaranth battered fish. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I used to do caffeine, in a delicious ghee, turmeric, cardamom and coconut sugar concoction, but over time Ive stopped being able to handle it. It started to make my stomach hurt and made me anxious. So I now drink either matcha with rice milk and date syrup, or hot chocolate with hemp oil, coconut sugar and adaptogens if Im needing the extra nourishment. Some days, if Ive slept enough and rested enough, I do better on just water and breakfast, no extra boost needed. -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? I had a notorious sweet tooth all the way until my early twenties – I couldnt be trusted with bars of chocolate and was known to sneak spoonfuls of cake first thing in the morning. However the older Ive gotten (Im still technically in the early twenties), sweets just give me a sugar crash and make me feel sluggish. As an avid lover of food, Id rather eat plenty of things that make me feel fantastic, than the things that make me feel terrible. Both Rosie and I have been surprised and how quickly our respective sweet tooths have disappeared since we started living together, and how easily weve been able to cut out sugar from our life once we could verbalize how terrible it made us feel. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I swear by cannabis tinctures. Im not big on cannabis in other ways, but I find cannabis to be the only way to really deal with chronic pain. Ive also started using Super Good Hemps Turmeric Full Spectrum Hemp Oil in my morning drinks, and I find that it has similar effects. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I used to weight lift and do Crossfit pretty intensely, but had a really awful injury in 2016. Since then, Ive really had to reframe my definition of exercise. Now, I consider it an extension of my healing process. Intense exercise just isnt possible for me in the same way, so I stick to swimming as often as I can (usually a couple times a week), doing Nike Training body weight workouts at home, and talking our dog for a long walk every evening. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I love exercise and do best when Im outside and moving my body. Rosie and I try to take our pup Lilly out for a hike at least once a week, and we notice how much more present are with each other and our work when weve exercised.  That being said, Im also an incredibly competitive person, so reframing exercise to no longer be an intensely competitive thing has been very hard for me. I find it difficult to work up the enthusiasm to go on a leisurely swim, without a team to train with, or a competition to work towards. Switching off my producing strategy is my biggest challenge. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Both! It took me a long time to love my face, acknowledge that it was beautiful despite not looking like everything I saw on magazines and on billboards. But that acceptance and love for my external beauty definitely came from tending to, and growing confidence in my inner beauty. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I grew up using raw honey as a face cleanser, handmade ayurvedic soaps for my body, and a mom who never used makeup. So that has informed a lot of my skincare today. My skincare guru is 300% Abena, the founder of Hanahana Beauty, I use her shea butter exfoliating body bar and swear by it, and I use Abenas recipe for a rose water, tea tree oil and jojoba oil soaked cotton pad as a cleanser morning and night, and it has been a complete game changer for getting my glow back. Ive also been using Curology, which is a custom dermatologist service, that is super affordable and came highly recommended by friends. They prescribed me their night cream, which has really taken care of my breakouts and blackheads. Im not usually big on using chemicals on my skin but have found Curology to be a minimalist option that really works. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Cutting out sugar and gluten entirely is the most obvious one – I break out as soon as I am eating sugar, so its first to go. I also use a turmeric, honey, hemp oil and cornmeal face mask every couple weeks that always makes me feel radiant. My dentist has noticed and commented on the huge difference in my teeth that shes seen since I stopped drinking coffee – theyre whiter than ever before and need much less cleaning, which for me is reason enough to skip the coffee. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Abenas DIY rose water, jojoba oil and tea tree oil cotton pads! I used to be a ardent fan of Thayers Rose Witch Hazel Toner but in my experience with skincare – once you go DIY, its impossible to go back :) That being said – I will admit to being a Glossier believer, I didnt use makeup until I discovered Glossier concealer and highlighter. Its so easy and lazy but it works so wonderfully. Stress, Etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Taking our pup out for a long walk by the water is a really grounding activity for me. I have no idea how I managed my stress before she moved in with us. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Honestly Im a spokesperson for not really managing my stress well. My partner often comes home to a fuming, off the hook Sana and it takes significant chatting, massaging and cuddling to work me out of the state that I can get into if Im very stressed.  Im an extrovert and a peoples person so being around people that I love is my best coping mechanism. That being said – I have to be careful not to emotionally dump onto my loved ones, just because theyre willing to be there for me. Ive definitely been guilty of that in the past. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? The first one is to make sure I get a really good nights sleep, and make sure Im not drinking alcohol, eating dairy or any processed food. Usually, managing my sleep and diet is the easiest way to kick a cold before it hits. If the cold cant be stopped, I usually start by accepting that my bodys way of asking for rest is by getting sick, and its important to just honor that and completely rest. Then – turmeric, ginger, honey tea all day long.  -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? Ive been trying really hard to take weekends off, and any weekend that I succeed at that- the balance feels so much better. Honestly, as a young business owner, the hustle is so glamorized and romanticized. Youre told that now is your time to grind, and to get further in your career. Whilst this is true, Id also argue that now is the time to establish healthy boundaries and habits in your life so you learn how to maximize your productivity and your potential. Any day that I work a 16 hour day (which is too often), I know that I am not focusing on the bigger picture, and am actually sacrificing my long term goals as a business owner. Remembering that, and focusing on working more effectively, rather than working more, has been a huge step towards achieving healthier work life balance. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Therapy. Every week, no matter what. That perspective and process is something Im deeply committed to. Therapy rarely feels easy, but it is always in service of myself and my larger goals, so its the easiest way to feel on track. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Eating based on how it makes me feel, not how it sounds or tastes. As soon as I focused on how it made me feel, my taste buds changed, I lost weight, my skin issues cleared and I became a very healthy person, with remarkable ease. I know how obnoxious that sounds, Im sorry. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I fly home to India. I know this is incredibly privileged, and a bit excessive, but shuffling back and forth between two continents constantly gives me a broader perspective, and somehow – the psychology of taking an international flight is an incredibly cathartic and productive experience for me. I almost always come back from my trips to India with fresh eyes, new vision and a bigger picture. Thats true for all travel, in my opinion. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. The fundamental line of Crossfit – eat meat and vegetables, nuts and seeds, some fruit, little starch and no sugar. has influenced my self nourishment beyond any book or movie. I may not be a competitive Crossfit athlete any more but eating to nourish my body is so much more fulfilling than eating to nourish my cravings. Knowledge --  What was your path to starting Diaspora Co.? You can read a lot more about that here, but long story short – Ive been working in the food industry since I moved to the United States in 2012 and I quickly noticed that whilst the farm to table movement felt at its zenith in the Bay Area, it only applied to certain things. Spices and imported foods were somehow excluded from those quality standards. The idea for a new kind of import export company formed in November 2016, and in February 2017 I quit my job and embarked on seven months of research visiting farms, research institutions and markets across India. Diaspora Co. was formally launched as a direct trade sustainable food company with our first offering of turmeric in August 2017. Its been a total rollercoaster since then. --  Can you tell us about the kind of turmeric you sell and how it differs from most turmeric one can buy at a store today? Im biased, but Im also overly honest so I dont think it would be an exaggeration to say that we sell the worlds best turmeric. Historically, there hasnt ever been a quality standard for how to define the highest quality, beyond arguments and branding largely based in exoticism and the colonizer/­­savior mindset. It is the freshest, as in it was harvested in 2018 and is milled every 3 months, versus powders that can be up to five years old and still on a grocery store shelf, stale as ever. It is the most potent variety of turmeric out there, with a tested 4.7% curcumin content. It is a fragrant and exceptional heirloom rhizome variety that compares to other turmeric powders out there as an heirloom summer tomato would to a grocery store store tomato grown for storage not flavor. Finally, it is organically farmed in a spice agriculture landscape where pesticide overuse and residue is notorious. Phew! --  Can you tell us about your decision to pay your turmeric producer really well and about owning the fact that your product costs more because of this? I think part of our work is that what the industry considers paying our producer really well, we consider basic human dignity of paying a living wage and for the price of sustainability, flavor and honest work. If we didnt pay our partner farmers the prices that we do, they wouldnt have the power or the incentive to produce at the standard that they do. To me, this big word decolonizing really just means how are you going to empower the people around you who have historically been stripped of their power? Paying our farmers well is actually the easiest embodiment of our decolonizing mission. As for owning our higher prices – we simply couldnt exist without charging what we do. And ultimately, were dedicating to riding the fine line between being affordable to the home cook and being a leader of sustainability and supply chains and therefore being regarded as a luxury product. I have to believe that we can do both. Turmeric latte blends or turmeric centered businesses that dont want to pay our prices or wholesale from us because theyd like to continue to exploit their sources and maintain their ridiculously high margins, Im in this for the long game and their reckoning will come. It always does. Apologies if I sound cold and jaded, business is vicious and Ive had to steel parts of myself to tolerate it all. --  What are some of your favorite ways to use Diaspora Co. turmeric? Honestly, turmeric was so woven into the fabric of my childhood that it was invisible to me. We cooked with it, made beauty treatments with it, and we used it to mark life and death. So even now, my favorite way to use turmeric is still in simple Indian vegetable dishes – lightly cooked okra tossed in cumin, turmeric and salt is the definition of comfort for me, or a coconut milk turmeric chicken broth with squash and long beans. Comforting, vegetable heavy home cooking is how I innately know how to use turmeric. Lattes just arent for me. --  We love your photos! How did you become a photographer? When I was 14 and going through a really tough phase at school (bullying, puberty, the patriarchy et all), my parents taught me how to use their DSLR. Ive used photography as the lens through which I make sense of and connect with the world ever since. When my academic pursuits turned to food and agriculture in college, my lens turned to it too. In so many ways, I recognize that I was never particularly talented or the best or the brightest, I was always just a really solid worker, and entirely self motivated, and that meant that once I started photographing, I just never stopped, and now here we are. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Ive found that balancing my role as a business owner with my role as a photographer is what gives me the most joy professionally. So I have a couple exciting photo shoots planned for the coming months that will be a welcome respite to the chaos of holiday e-commerce. That, and I havent seen my girlfriend and pup in almost a month since Ive been in India and I miss them terribly, so very excited to come home to my two favorite living beings. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Were so lucky to live in Oakland, where eating out is an incredible experience, especially at a time where women chefs are absolutely excelling in their field. So eating delicious meals by our favorite local women chefs is my favorite treat – Cosecha Cafe (Mexican), Nyum Bai (Cambodian), Champa Garden (Laotian) and 20th Century Cafe (Eastern European) to name a few.  -- A book to feed the soul:  I just finished reading Yvon Chounards Let My People Go Surfing and its been so deeply inspiring to me. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Akwaeke Emezi, they are my favorite writer, a member of this third culture/­­diaspora/­­immigrant excellence interweb community and has navigated their self care so beautifully and visibly through the years. Id love to learn more from them. Photos by Sana Javeri Kadri, Sophie Peoples, Assad Keval /­­/­­ This post contains Amazon Affiliate Links You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Ashley Neese Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Amanda Forcella Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Sheet Pan fajitas Dinner with Chipotle Garlic Sauce – Tacos or Bowl

October 16 2018 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Sheet Pan fajitas Dinner with Chipotle Garlic Sauce – Tacos or BowlSheet Pan Fajitas. Tacos with Fajita Veggies with Chipotle Fajita Sauce. 1 Pan Vegan Glutenfree Soyfree Nutfree Recipe  Jump to Recipe  I have been loving Sheet Pan Meals that get baked up in 1 Pan and that can be served in a bowl, as wraps or tacos. These Fajita Veggies are perfect to bake in one pan and serve in a bowl, tacos or wraps.  The spicy and delicious Chipotle pepper marinade is quick to put together, then toss in with the veggies, spread and bake. Add some of the marinade to beans and bake those with the veggies too.  Layer however you like in tacos or a bowl. Add some crunchy lettuce or greens, avocado and lime juice or salsa. Perfect! Lets make this Sheet Pan Fajita Dinner.Continue reading: Vegan Sheet Pan fajitas Dinner with Chipotle Garlic Sauce – Tacos or BowlThe post Vegan Sheet Pan fajitas Dinner with Chipotle Garlic Sauce – Tacos or Bowl appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Butternut Squash & Black Bean Enchiladas

October 8 2018 Meatless Monday 

For these seasonal enchiladas you can use either fresh butternut squash from your local farmers market or save time with pre-chopped squash from your grocery store’s produce section. Either way, youll have a great fall recipe: a little spicy, a little cheesy and lots of flavor. Round out the meal with a small side of rice and some fresh salsa. This recipe comes to us from Kelly of The Quotable Kitchen. Serves 5 - 2 teaspoons olive oil - 1/­­2 cup,  chopped onion - 4 cloves, minced garlic - 2 teaspoons taco Seasoning - 1 chopped red bell pepper - 1 can black beans (15.5 oz) - 3 cups butternut squash, cooked and chopped into small pieces - 10 medium flour tortillas - 2 – 10 oz cans enchilada sauce - 8 oz, shredded cheddar cheese - Cilantro – for topping   Preheat oven to 350°. Saute the onion and garlic in olive oil in a medium-sized pan over medium-high heat until onions are soft. Add in the taco seasoning, red bell pepper and black beans and saute for five minutes. Set aside. Pour one can of enchilada sauce in an oven-safe pan. To assemble the enchiladas: spoon 2 heaping tablespoons of the black bean mixture onto one tortilla. Top with 2 tablespoons chopped butternut squash and one tablespoon cheese. Roll up tightly and place in pan over the enchilada sauce. Repeat with remaining tortillas using any leftover butternut squash as a topping. Pour remaining can of enchilada sauce over the rolled enchiladas. Top with additional cheese and butternut squash (optional). Bake in preheated oven for twenty minutes until cheese is melted and enchilada sauce is hot. Garnish with fresh cilantro (optional) and serve over rice or with a small side salad to round out the meal. The post Butternut Squash & Black Bean Enchiladas appeared first on Meatless Monday.

One-Dish Vegan Revised and Expanded Edition

October 2 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

One-Dish Vegan Revised and Expanded EditionMany of you may be familiar with the first edition of One-Dish Vegan that came out over five years ago.  I’m excited to announce the publication of the Revised and Expanded Edition. In it, you will find all of the favorites you’ve come to love, along with 25 all-new recipes, and more for a total of 175 fast and convenient one-dish meals, all beautifully photographed, and ready to get you cooking. The bold and vibrant recipes range from the most popular categories of one-dish dining like stews, chilis, and casseroles, to a host of stove top sautes and stir-fries. You will also enjoy substantial salads, as well as pastas and other noodle-based dishes. Convenience and easy cleanup are key in One-Dish Vegan; not only can each meal be served and enjoyed in a single dish, but most can also be prepared in a single container. Now you can spend more time eating and less time cleaning. The 25 all-new recipes in One-Dish Vegan Revised and Expanded Edition include: - Easy Ramen Bowls - Cheesy Cauliflower Soup - Panzanella Salad with White Beans and Artichokes - Barbecued Jackfruit with Sweet Potatoes and Cauliflower - Jungle Curry - Thai Coconut Rice with Edamame and Asparagus - Vegan Shakshuka - Jackfruit Stroganoff - Millet and Chickpea Curry - One-Pot Sicilian Couscous - Spicy Korean Stir-Fry - Lobster Mushroom Newburg - Vegetable Donburi - Coconut Curry Noodles and Butternut Squash - Black Bean Tortilla Casserole - Layered Brunch Bake - Shepherd’s Pie, Two Ways - Nacho-Chilaquile Bake - Lentil Tourtiere   The recipes in One-Dish Vegan Revised and Expanded Edition are at once homey and adventurous, comforting and surprising. Above all, they demonstrate that it really is possible to get a complete vegan meal into one dish, full of good-for-you nutrients and bright, satisfying flavors. One-Dish Vegan Revised and Expanded Edition will be released on October 9 and is now available for pre-order. The post One-Dish Vegan Revised and Expanded Edition appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Meatless Monday Joins Slow Food at Leading International Event

September 24 2018 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Joins Slow Food at Leading International EventOn Monday, September 24, Slow Food, the global grassroots organization, will highlight Meatless Monday with celebrated chefs at Terra Madre Salone de Gusto, one of the biggest international events devoted to food. Slow Food was founded in 1989 to inspire individuals and communities to change the world through food that is good, clean and fair for all. The global Slow Food movement is creating dramatic change in more than 160 countries. Now, Slow Food and Meatless Monday have partnered to provide a weekly platform to highlight the delicious taste, diversity and rich cultural heritage of plant-based cuisine around the world. At the Taste Workshop, Peggy Neu, president of Meatless Monday, will share the exciting story of the growth of the Meatless Monday Movement . Shell also introduce two celebrated chefs who will showcase imaginative plant-based recipes. Chef Drew Deckman, restaurateur and culinary consultant based in Baja, California, received a Michelin Star for his work and was acknowledged as a Rising-Star Chef when he was in Germany. Hell thrill taste buds with his Grilled Bread and Raw porcini salad with Parmesano Reggiano. Jennifer Jasinski, a James Beard Foundation award winner for Best Southwest Chef owns and runs several restaurants in Denver, Colorado. Shell refresh palates with her Chilled Beans Vinaigrette, Yellow Watermelon and Jimmy Nardello Jam. For more about Meatless Monday at Terra Madre, visit: https:/­­/­­www.slowfoodusa.org/­­meatless-monday-at-terra-madre The post Meatless Monday Joins Slow Food at Leading International Event appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Instant Pot Tikka Masala – Vegan Tikka Masala Sauce

September 16 2018 Vegan Richa 

Instant Pot Tikka Masala – Vegan Tikka Masala SauceInstant Pot Tikka Masala – Vegan Tikka Masala Sauce Recipe. Easy Tikka masala sauce, made in a Pressure Cooker. Saucepan option. Add veggies, tofu, chickpeas, vegan chickin subs. Freezer Friendly. Glutenfree Soyfree Nutfree   Jump to Recipe This Tikka Masala Sauce is ridiculously delicious, super easy and freezer friendly. Cook the sauce in a pressure cooker. Then use or freeze for later! If you are new to the Indian Tikka Masala Sauce, it is a tomato based, tangy spicy flavorful sauce often found in Indian restaurants, served with veggies, paneer, meats. Many of the restaurant sauces have similar base or flavor components with variations here and there. They vary slightly in flavor and texture (creamy, chunky etc). Make this fabulous sauce, adjust after pressure cooking to your preference and use with veggies, beans, tofu, vegan chikin/­­meat subs or however! Freeze in serving portions, so you can use the sauce to whip up a meal in 10 mins! See Saucepan and oilfree options in the Recipe notes. Also see Tips section below.Continue reading: Instant Pot Tikka Masala – Vegan Tikka Masala SauceThe post Instant Pot Tikka Masala – Vegan Tikka Masala Sauce appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Easy Homemade Salsa – 5 Min Blender Salsa

September 10 2018 Vegan Richa 

Easy Homemade Salsa – 5 Min Blender SalsaAre you ready for this 5 minute – Easy Homemade Salsa. This fresh tomato salsa is super quick to make in a blender or a food processor and is always a hit at the party. Vegan, Glutenfree, Soyfree, Nutfree recipe.  Jump to Recipe What do I write about Salsa, that has not been said before. It is one the easiest, most versatile thing, goes with everything dip. I whip it up on a whim and we always have savory snacks or chips. Or add to a tacos, wraps, nachos or a bowl with spiced up beans or veggies. I think everyone can use more. How do you like yours?  Just 7 ingredients.. Tomatoes, onion, jalapeno, cilantro(omit if you dont like it), garlic, cumin, black pepper. Try my version of salsa. Refreshing and so Delicious.Continue reading: Easy Homemade Salsa – 5 Min Blender SalsaThe post Easy Homemade Salsa – 5 Min Blender Salsa appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Quick and Easy Hummus

December 3 2018 Meatless Monday 

Sure, you can pick up hummus in any grocery store these days, but nothing beats the flavor of homemade! And it couldnt be simpler to make, plus making it at home allows you to customize the flavor. This recipe comes to us from USA Pulses.   Serves 8 - 1 15-ounce can chickpeas (garbanzo beans), rinsed - 1 clove garlic, - 1/­­4 cup olive oil - 2 tbsp lemon juice - 2 tbsp tahini - 1 tsp ground cumin - 3/­­4 tsp salt - sprinkle of paprika   In a food processor, puree the chickpeas (save out a few to sprinkle on top) and garlic with the olive oil, lemon juice, tahini, cumin, and 3/­­4 teaspoon salt until smooth and creamy. Add 1 to 2 tablespoons water as necessary to achieve the desired consistency. Transfer to a bowl. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with remaining chickpeas and paprika before serving. The post Quick and Easy Hummus appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Black Beans, Sweet Potatoes, Harissa

November 7 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Black Beans, Sweet Potatoes, Harissa We finally pulled together another meal plan! This ‘mini’ is very simple, seasonally-inspired, and will leave you with a bunch of nourishing food for the week. Everything starts out with a pot of black beans, a batch of roasted sweet potatoes, and a jar of homemade harissa (so easy to make, and such a flavor bomb ingredient!), which will then make their way into three interconnected savory meals and one snack. Ready? Menu - Roasted Sweet Potato and Black Bean Soup - No-Huevos Rancheros - Curried Cauliflower Rice and Beans - Harissa Black Bean Dip *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free, see the recipes for serving sizes Shopping List (Print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, its got all the ingredients youll need for the recipes in this meal plan mini. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Add whatever other ingredients you’ll need for the week here, if doing shopping for the whole week. Produce - 1 large head of garlic - 3 medium sweet potatoes - 3 large yellow onions - 1 large carrot - 2-4 celery ribs - 1 bunch kale (2 packed cups) - 3 limes - 2 lemons - 1 large bunch of cilantro - 2-3 avocados - 1/­­2 lb crimini mushrooms - 1 small head of red cabbage - 1 large head of cauliflower Bulk - 4 cups black beans - 2 cups Basmati rice - 3 large prunes Spices - black pepper - curry powder (1 tablespoon) - bay leaves - 8 dried chipotle chilis - whole caraway seeds - whole coriander seeds - whole cumin seeds - harissa paste – if not making your own Staples - neutral coconut oil or avocado oil - red wine vinegar - sea salt - tahini - kombu (optional) - balsamic vinegar (optional) Other - corn tortillas or other tortillas of choice - 8 sun-dried tomatoes Basic Prep 1) Cook the Black Beans Pot of Black Beans   Print Ingredients 4 cups black beans 2-3 garlic cloves - smashed 2-3 bay leaves 1 sheet of kombu (optional) sea salt Instructions Soak the beans overnight or up to 24 hours in plenty of purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar. Drain and rinse the beans. Place them in a large soup pot with plenty of purified water (about 10 cups). Add the garlic cloves, bay leaves and kombu, if using. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 30 minutes. Taste for doneness. If the beans are not completely soft and buttery inside, continue to cook until fully done. Salt at the last 10 minutes. Drain, saving the cooking liquid. Discard the bay leaves and kombu, if using. 3.5.3226   2) Cook the Rice Pot of Basmati Rice   Print Ingredients 2 cups basmati rice Instructions Cook 2 cups of basmati rice according to the instructions on the package (if your rice came in a package). Or cook the rice according the this method, or any other rice cooking method you prefer, like in a rice cooker, etc. You should end up with about 5-6 cups of cooked rice. 3.5.3226   3) Roast the Sweet Potatoes Roasted Sweet Potatoes   Print Ingredients 3 medium sweet potatoes avocado oil or other neutral oil of choice sea salt freshly ground black pepper Instructions Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare 2 parchment paper-covered baking trays. Peel and cube two of the sweet potatoes and place them on the trays. Sprinkle with avocado oil, salt and pepper, toss to cover and spread into a single layer. Leave the third sweet potato whole, just scrub it and prick with a fork, and place on one of the baking trays. Roast the sweet potatoes for 20-30 minutes, until the cubed ones are soft and browned in places. Toss at half time. The whole sweet potato will take a little longer to bake. Cook it until its easily pierced with a knife. Store the potatoes in an airtight container in the refrigerator. 3.5.3226   4) Make the Harissa (you can also buy harissa paste) Harissa   Print Adapted from Vibrant Food Serves: about 1 cup Ingredients 8 dried chipotle chilis 8 sun-dried tomatoes 1 tablespoon whole caraway seeds 1 tablespoon whole coriander seeds 1 tablespoon whole cumin seeds 1 large garlic clove - minced ¼ cup olive oil juice from ½ lemon 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 1 teaspoon sea salt Instructions Place the chipotle chilis and sun dried tomatoes in a medium bowl and cover with boiling water. Cover the bowl and let soften for about 30 minutes. Toast the caraway, coriander, and cumin seeds in a dry pan over medium heat until fragrant, about 2 minutes, stirring regularly. Grind the seeds using a spice grinder, dedicated coffee grinder, or mortar and pestle. Drain the chilis and sun-dried tomatoes. Remove the seeds and stems from the chilis (wear gloves to protect your hands if sensitive to spice). Place the chilis and sun-dried tomatoes in a food processor, add the toasted and ground spices, garlic, olive oil, lemon juice, vinegar, and salt. Process into a slightly chunky paste. Refrigerate in an air-tight container for up to 1 month. 3.5.3226   Recipes This soup is cozy and incredibly quick to put together once you’ve done all the prep. It gets its rich, earthy flavor from the black bean broth and harissa. Roasted sweet potatoes bring more depth and nourishment to the table, and kale provides a dose of dark leafy green magic. Roasted Sweet Potato and Black Bean Soup   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil or avocado oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped 1 large carrot - sliced 2-4 celery ribs - sliced thin 3 large prunes - chopped sea salt 3 garlic cloves - minced 3 cups cooked beans (from above) 3 teaspoons harissa or more to taste (from above) 5-6 cups black bean broth (from above) 2 cups packed chopped kale leaves 2 cups roasted sweet potatoes (from above) splash of balsamic vinegar (optional) juice of 1 lime cilantro - for garnish Instructions Warm the oil in a medium soup pot over medium heat. Add the onion, carrot, celery and prunes, and sauté for 8 minutes, until the vegetables are soft. Add salt and garlic, stir around for 1 minute. Add the beans, harissa and black bean broth, and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 30 minutes, until all the vegetables are completely cooked. Add the kale, sweet potatoes, splash of balsamic vinegar, if using, and more black bean broth, if needed. Bring back to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for another 10 minutes. Add the lime juice. Taste for salt and spice and adjust if needed. Serve over the prepped rice, garnished with cilantro. This soup freezes very well. 3.5.3226   This huevos rancheros-inspired dish utilizes crimini mushrooms, together with the already prepped black beans, sweet potatoes, and harissa, to make a delicious topping for warm tortillas. Everything comes together in a flash, and it’s a meal that can be easily eaten for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. No-Huevos Rancheros   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil or avocado oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped sea salt ½ lb crimini mushrooms - sliced 1½ cups cooked black beans (from above) harissa - to taste (from above) roasted sweet potatoes (from above) corn tortillas or other tortillas of choice - warmed or charred avocado - sliced or cubed shredded red cabbage - for garnish lime - for serving cilantro leaves - for garnish Instructions Warm the oil in a medium pan over medium heat. Add the onion and salt and sauté for 7 minutes, until translucent. Add mushrooms and sauté for 8-10 minutes, until all the liquid released by the mushrooms evaporates. Add the beans, harissa, and prepped sweet potatoes (amount to taste), and stir to incorporate and warm everything through. Serve the mushrooms and beans over tortillas, topped avocado, shredded red cabbage, a squeeze of lime, and cilantro. 3.5.3226   This re-imagined rice and beans recipe gets its bright flavor from the addition of curry, which is always great at providing a shortcut to flavor. It’s also full of cruciferous goodness from cauliflower, a little zing from lime, and some serious freshness from the essential topping of cilantro. Curried Cauliflower Rice And Beans   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil or avocado oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped 1 large cauliflower - chopped into small florets sea salt 5 garlic cloves 1 tablespoon curry powder, or more to taste 3 cups cooked black beans (from above) 3 cups cooked basmati rice (from above) juice of 1 lime cilantro - to garnish Instructions Warm the oil in a large saucepan. Add the onion, cauliflower and salt, and sauté for about 15-20 minutes, until the cauliflower is soft. Splash some water in the pan if things begin to stick. Add garlic and curry powder, and stir around for 1 minute. Add the beans and rice, and stir to mix everything together until warmed through. Pour the lime juice over top and stir to incorporate. Serve, garnished with cilantro. 3.5.3226   A flavorful dip is a great thing to have on hand at all times. It saves the day during snacking emergencies, but can also be spread on sandwiches and dolloped into bowls. Homemade dips are usually cheaper, healthier, and more flavorful than store-bought ones, and they’re easy to make. All of that is definitely the case with this black bean dip, which is made with the remaining, prep day black beans and whole baked sweet potato. If you happen to have any chipotle in adobo, those are a great addition to this dip as well. Harissa Black Bean Dip   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients the rest of the cooked black beans (from above, about 4 cups) 1 whole roasted sweet potato (from above) - peeled ¼ cup tahini juice from 1 lemon harissa (from above) - to taste sea salt black bean broth (from above) - for thinning, if needed Instructions Combine the beans, sweet potato, tahini, lemon juice, harissa, and sea salt to taste in a food processor and blend until smooth. Add some black bean broth if necessary to thin the dip out. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve, garnished with more harissa, toasted sesame seeds, and a drizzle of good olive oil. This dip freezes well if you end up with leftovers. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Sweet Potato and Kale Salad Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower Coconut-Ginger Eggplant Fried Rice Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Black Beans, Sweet Potatoes, Harissa appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Sweet Potato Wedges with Tahini-Honey Sauce and Everything Bagel Spice

October 24 2018 My New Roots 

Sweet Potato Wedges with Tahini-Honey Sauce and Everything Bagel Spice   Ive now been blogging for eleven years (11years!!!). And in those eleven years, you know what Ive learned about you? You love sweet potatoes. You love tahini. And you love sauce. And if I post anything with those things - or even better - a combination of those things, I know its going to go over well. I often get preoccupied with making my recipe posts totally out there with crazy ingredients, involved techniques, and lose sight of the fact that a lot of you like really simple things too. Just like me. And just like me you like sweet potatoes and tahini and sauce. The sweet potato wedges with tahini-honey sauce and everything bagel spice that I posted on Instagram drew many requests for the recipe. I thought it would be way too easy, but your encouragement reminded me that its okay if its easy! We all have a place for uncomplicated in our lives.     I was first introduced to everything bagel spice while teaching cooking classes down in the states this past summer. One of the women in the group proclaimed that it took avocado toast to the next level, and after trying it once, I was totally hooked. She gave me two jars of the flavour confetti before I flew home, and I have just recently shaken out the last grain of salt. Without a clue on where to buy such a random thing in Canada, I set out to make my own - only I decided to be highly practical and mix up a laughably large batch because it is literally good on everything. For those of you who arent familiar with everything bagel spice mix, its the simplest combination of flaky salt, onion flakes, garlic flakes, sesame seeds, and poppy seeds, which classically tops an everything bagel. It doesnt sound like that much, but trust me, if it can make a white, doughy   this blend far more than the sum of its parts. A generous sprinkle on any dish makes it all that much more dimensional, seasoned, and delicious. My favourite applications for it include sliced garden tomatoes, cucumber, steamed green beans, roasted beets, goat cheese, cauliflower, popcorn, green salads, steamed brown rice or quinoa, eggs, hummus, and sweet potatoes...you see where Im going with this. Maybe its faster to write a list of the foods that it wouldnt be good on? Chocolate cake. There, that was easy.     But Im actually here to talk about sweet potatoes. These gorgeous golden roots are now in season, and the last local tubers being pulled from the earth as I write this. Since I live so close to a number of organic farms here in Ontario, I thought it would be fun to go see them being harvested. I called around my area to see if anyone still had them in the ground, and I got lucky when one place, Fiddlehead Farm, called me back with good news and an invitation out to their field. Fiddlehead Farm is run by a tribe of boss women who support over 150 local families through their CSA program, and hold stands at four different markets. These ladies are busy, and growing a diverse range of vegetables, greens, and herbs that seemed to stretch on for miles. I could tell from walking around the property how passionate they were about their work, and how deeply they care for their little corner of the earth. What an inspiration! Heather, the farms co-owner, hopped off her tractor to introduce herself and show me the goods. She pulled back a tangle of stems and gave a good yank to unearth a juicy bunch of sweet potatoes, all clumped together like a vegetable cuddle puddle. Jackpot! She said it had been a really good year for this particular crop, and right under my feet were literally hundreds of roots waiting patiently to be harvested before the impending frost. Seeing how things grow and meeting the people that work so hard to bring these food gifts to us gives me a deeper appreciation for every bite I take.     Sweet potatoes are nutritional powerhouses, as one of natures best sources of beta-carotene. Beta-carotene is a carotenoid form of vitamin A - an essential anti-inflammatory and antioxidant nutrient. The intensity of a sweet potatos orange flesh is a direct reflection of its beta-carotene content, so find the most vibrant ones you can, and dig in. Remember that you need a little fat to help your body absorb beta-carotene, so a drizzle of olive oil, or dousing your taters in a sauce like the one in this recipe is an important step in receiving those life-giving nutrients. Not a bad deal if you ask me. Sweet potatoes can be enjoyed roasted, steamed, sautéed, or even eaten raw, but however you choose to eat them, keep those skins on! The skin of a sweet potato is loaded with extra fiber to regulate blood sugar and support digestion, potassium to maintain normal blood pressure, and iron to deliver much-needed oxygen to your cells. Scrub sweet potatoes firmly with a soft vegetable brush - you want to remove the dirt but not take the skin away. When purchasing sweet potatoes, look for smooth, even skin without bruises or soft spots. Avoid buying sweet potatoes that are in the fridge, since cold temperatures negatively affect their flavour. Once you get them home, store them in a dry, and well-ventilated place away from a hot spot (like near the stove or on top of the fridge). Instead of keeping them in plastic, which can cause them to mold, store them in an open paper bag to extend their life.   Some notes on the recipe. Other methods Ive seen online for everything bagel spice do not suggest toasting the seeds beforehand, and I think this is a major miss. It makes a huge difference giving the sesame and poppy seeds a quick tour in a hot pan to coax out more of their flavour. If youre in a rush or simply cant be bothered, thats fine, just know that youll be missing out on some bonus taste points. And if you dont want to make three cups of the mix to start, simply half, or even quarter the recipe. I am pretty confident that youll love it though, especially once you try it on avocado toast. The Tahini Honey Sauce makes about one cup (250ml), which is plenty to cover the sweet potato wedges, but make a double batch if you want a great staple dressing for the week ahead. Its delicious on simple green salad, folded into cooked grains, drizzled over roast vegetables, or on avocado toast. The honey taste is present, but not overpowering, so feel free to add more if you want to ramp up the sweetness. For a vegan version, use maple syrup or date syrup in its place.       Print recipe     Sweet Potato Wedges with Tahini- Honey Sauce and Everything Bagel Spice Serves 4 Ingredients: 3 medium organic sweet potatoes (about 1 1/­­2 lbs. /­­ 650g) coconut oil (expeller-pressed and flavour-neutral) sea salt flat-leaf parsley and /­­ or cilantro for garnish chili flakes toasted pumpkin seeds Tahini-Honey Sauce (recipe follows) Everything Bagel Spice Mix (recipe follows) Tahini-Honey Sauce Makes 1 cup /­­ 250ml Ingredients: 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml tahini 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml water 2 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 Tbsp. extra virgin cold-pressed olive oil 1 Tbsp. raw liquid honey (substitute with maple syrup for a vegan version) 1 small clove garlic, minced 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt Big Batch Everything Bagel Spice Mix Makes 3 cups /­­ 430g Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup /­­ 80g garlic flakes 3/­­4 cup /­­ 85g onion flakes 3/­­4 cup /­­100g sesame seeds (any colour you like) 1/­­2 cup/­­ 85g poppy seeds 1/­­2 cup /­­ 80g flaky sea salt (I used Maldon) Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. 2. Scrub the sweet potatoes well under running water. Slice them lengthwise into wedges of your desired thickness. Place them on a baking sheet with space between them (if theyre too close together theyll steam each other and get soggy), and roast for about 20-25 minutes, depending on their size. Remove from the oven when fork-tender. 3. While the sweet potatoes are roasting, make the Tahini-Honey Sauce by placing all the ingredients in a blender and blend until completely smooth. Taste and adjust seasoning if necessary. To thin, add a little water and blend or stir until the desired consistency is reached. Store leftovers in the fridge for five days. 4. Make the Everything Bagel Spice Mix In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast the sesame seeds until fragrant. Remove from heat and let cool. Place poppy seeds in the same skillet, and toast over medium heat until fragrant. Remove from heat and let cool. In a large jar combine the cooled sesame and poppy seeds, garlic flakes, onion flakes, and salt. Shake or stir to combine, and secure with an airtight lid. Store in a cool, dry place away from direct light. Keeps for 3-4 month. 5. To serve, drizzle the Tahini-Honey Sauce over the sweet potato wedges (you can keep them on the baking sheet or plate them as desired), then sprinkle generously with the Everything Bagel Spice Mix, and top with fresh herbs, toasted pumpkin seeds, and chili flakes (but get creative, these are just suggestions!). Enjoy. I want to sign off with a sincere thanks for the past eleven years of support from all of you. It’s hard for me to believe that I’ve been creating in this space for so many years now (I’ve never done anything for this long!), but I wouldn’t have the motivation to keep going if it weren’t for your curiosity, enthusiasm, and appetite for the heart work I put in here. I know that I’ll stay hungry if you do Let’s keep going, together. In sincere gratitude and love, Sarah B. *   *   *   *   *   * I have great news, dear friends! Due to the overwhelmingly positive response to the Life-Changing Loaf Subscription Box, we have reopened the sales so that you can still receive (or give!) the box before the holiday season. Click here for more information, and to subscribe. Thank you very much for your ongoing support of My New Roots! The post Sweet Potato Wedges with Tahini-Honey Sauce and Everything Bagel Spice appeared first on My New Roots.

Kevin Curry and Rip Esselstyn celebrate Meatless Monday in Panera Bread’s “Food Interrupted” series

October 22 2018 Meatless Monday 

Kevin Curry and Rip Esselstyn celebrate Meatless Monday in Panera Bread’s “Food Interrupted” seriesTune in today to watch Kevin Curry and Rip Esselstyn show how easy it is to swap beans for beef and cook up a meatless chili for a table of hungry firemen in busy Los Angeles County. Meatless Monday is front and center in todays Food Interrupted episode produced by Panera Bread to demonstrate their commitment to plant-forward and meatless meals . Kevin Curry, influencer and author of Fit Men Cook , hosts the series and is joined in the episode by the creator of plant-forward The Engine 2 Diet , and former fireman, Rip Esselstyn. The Food Interrupted, series which began on October 16, will run for six weeks. Each episode addresses a different aspect of the food system, covering topics like sugar, whole grains, meatless, clean food, and others. Rip shared his reasons for diving into the meatless lifestyle after a fellow firemen was a heart attack waiting to happen, We started eating a plant based diet and the results were insane! But wait, theres more! From November 28th to January 7th, a meatless Tex Mex Abundance Bowl created by Kevin Curry will be available in five Panera Bread locations in New York City. For those not in New York, meatless menu options will also be featured in the over 2,000 Panera Bread locations across the country. Kevin is convinced, If you can get six hearty firemen to eat this, then I think you can probably get other people to do it too! So check out this weeks episode featuring Meatless Monday then visit a Panera Bread location near you and enjoy a plant-based meal thats good for you and good for the planet. Tell them, Meatless Monday sent me! Find out more on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post Kevin Curry and Rip Esselstyn celebrate Meatless Monday in Panera Bread’s “Food Interrupted” series appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Caribbean Greens and Beans Soup

October 16 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Caribbean Greens and Beans SoupThis Caribbean Greens and Beans Soup is inspired by a delicious Jamaican soup made with callaloo (taro) leaves in a light coconut broth. My version calls for the more readily available spinach, although cabbage, kale, or chard may be used instead. The soup has a nice heat from the jalape?os, but you can omit them for a milder flavor or increase them if you want more heat. Caribbean Greens and Beans Soup This soup is inspired by a delicious Jamaican soup made with callaloo (taro) leaves in a light coconut broth. My version calls for the more readily available spinach, although cabbage, kale, or chard may be used instead. The soup has a nice heat from the jalape?os, but you can omit them for a milder flavor or increase them if you want more heat. - 1 tablespoon (15 ml) olive oil or 1/­­4 cup (60 ml) water - 1 medium-size red onion, chopped - 3 garlic cloves, chopped - 2 medium-size sweet potatoes, peeled and diced - 1 medium-size red bell pepper, seeded and chopped - 1 or 2 jalape?os or other hot chiles, seeded and minced - 1 can (14.5 ounces, or 410 g) of diced tomatoes, drained - 1 1/­­2 cups (266 g) cooked dark red kidney beans or 1 can (15.5 ounces, or 440 g) of dark red kidney beans, rinsed and drained - 4 cups (950 ml) vegetable broth - 2 teaspoons fresh thyme or 1 teaspoon dried thyme -  1/­­4 teaspoon ground allspice - Salt and freshly ground black pepper - 9 ounces (255 g) baby spinach - 1 can (13.5 ounces, or 380 ml) of unsweetened coconut milk - Heat the olive oil or water in a pot over medium-high heat. Add the onion and sauté for 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute longer. Add the sweet potatoes, bell pepper, jalape?o, tomatoes, and beans. Stir in the broth, thyme, and allspice and season to taste with salt and pepper. Bring to a boil and then reduce the heat to a simmer and cook until the vegetables are tender, about 30 minutes. - Stir in the spinach and coconut milk, stirring to wilt the spinach. Taste and adjust the seasonings. Cook for 5 to 10 minutes longer to wilt the spinach and blend the flavors. Taste and adjust the seasonings if needed. Serve hot. From One-Dish Vegan by Robin Robertson (C) 2018 Quarto Publishing Group USA Inc. Used with permission. The post Caribbean Greens and Beans Soup appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Quick Mixed Beans and Corn Stew

October 12 2018 VegKitchen 

Quick Mixed Beans and Corn Stew Kind of a simplified chili, heres a hearty stew featuring beans and corn. If your beans are cooked, or youre using canned, this comes together very quickly when you want a cool-weather dinner in a hurry. Serve with a simply prepared grain like quinoa, rice, or couscous and a big salad. Serves: 6 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 large onion, chopped 1 large carrot, peeled and chopped 2 to 3 cloves garlic, minced 1/­­2 medium zucchini, diced 15- to 16-ounce can red or pinto beans, drained and rinsed 15- to 16-ounce can chickpeas or black beans, drained and rinsed 2 cups cooked fresh or frozen corn kernels, thawed 15- to 16-ounce can fire-roasted or Mexican-style stewed tomatoes, chopped, with liquid 1 to 2 jalape?o peppers, seeded and minced, or one 4- to 7-ounce can mild green chilies 2 to 3 teaspoons good-quality chili powder 1 teaspoon ground cumin Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste Chopped fresh cilantro as desired, optional Heat the oil in a small soup pot. Add the onion and carrot, and sauté over medium heat until the onion is translucent. Add the garlic and continue to sauté until the onion is golden. Add the remaining ingredients […] The post Quick Mixed Beans and Corn Stew appeared first on VegKitchen.

Jamaican Red Beans and Rice

October 5 2018 VegKitchen 

Jamaican Red Beans and Rice This is an easy version of a traditional Jamaican dish that is often simply referred to as rice and peas (though the peas are actually small red beans). I first learned to make this the authentic way from a Jamaican friend -- cooking the beans from scratch and cracking open and grating a whole coconut. Coconut milk and canned beans are good shortcuts! This dish is traditionally served with sautéed plantains, a starchy, banana-like fruit. Try them if youre feeling adventurous. You can also serve with Banana Fritters, another adaptation of a traditional Jamaican recipe. Photos by Evan Atlas. Save Print Jamaican Red Beans and Rice Author: Nava Recipe type: Grain and bean main dish Cuisine: Jamaican Prep time:  10 mins Cook time:  35 mins Total time:  45 mins Serves: 6 to 8   This is a version of a traditional Jamaican favorite, there simply called rice and peas (though the peas are actually small red beans). I Ingredients 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 large onion, finely chopped 3 cloves garlic, minced 1½ cups uncooked brown rice (see note) One 15-ounce can light coconut milk 3½ to 4 cups cooked small red beans (or two 15- to 16-ounce cans, drained and rinsed) 4 to 5 scallions, thinly sliced ½ teaspoon […] The post Jamaican Red Beans and Rice appeared first on VegKitchen.

Sesame Mochi

September 25 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Sesame MochiThe Japanese confection known as daifuku mochi are small, smooth rice cakes or balls stuffed with a sweet filling. Mochi are made with mochiko, a flour made from ground sweet glutinous rice called mochigome. For daifuku mochi, the rice is pounded into paste, stuffed with a filling (usually sweet red bean paste) and molded into various shapes. They are often coated in a fine layer of cornstarch, potato starch, or confectioners sugar to keep them from sticking. These treats are eaten year-round, but are also a traditional food for the Japanese New Year. I admit I was never a fan of the traditional red bean paste filling, but when I tried them with a sesame filling, I was hooked. The microwave method used in this Sesame Mochi recipe was developed by Eleanor Urakawa, a mochimaker for thirty years, living in Hawaii. Note: Glutinous rice flour, also called mochiko, is available at Asian markets or online. Sesame Mochi The Japanese confection known as daifuku mochi are small, smooth rice cakes or balls stuffed with a sweet filling. Mochi are made with mochiko, a flour made from ground sweet glutinous rice called mochigome. For daifuku mochi, the rice is pounded into paste, stuffed with a filling (usually sweet red bean paste) and molded into various shapes. They are often coated in a fine layer of cornstarch, potato starch, or confectioners sugar to keep them from sticking. Note: Glutinous rice flour, also called mochiko, is available at Asian markets or online. - 1 1/­­4 cups glutinous rice flour (mochiko) ((see headnote)) - 1/­­3 cup sugar - Pinch salt - 1 1/­­4 cups almond milk - 1/­­3 cup sesame paste - 1/­­3 cup cooked white beans - 2 tablespoons confectioners sugar - 2 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds - Coconut flour or finely ground unsweetened coconut, for dusting - In a heatproof bowl, combine the flour, sugar, and salt. Stir in the almond milk and mix well. Cover with plastic wrap and microwave for 5 minutes, then uncover and set aside to cool for 5 minutes. Cut into twelve pieces. - In a food processor, combine the sesame paste, white beans, confectioners sugar, and sesame seeds and mix well. Set aside. - Dust your hands with coconut flour, then flatten each piece of mochi into a small disk. Place 1 1/­­2 teaspoons of the sesame mixture in center of each piece of mochi. Pinch closed to seal, then lightly roll it into a ball, using both palms. Repeat with the remaining mochi and filling. - Pour about 1/­­2 cup of coconut flour into a shallow bowl. Roll the balls in the coconut flour to keep the mochi from sticking. Transfer to a plate and serve. Mochi will keep for up to 2 days at room temperature. If not using right away, they will keep in the freezer for up to 2 weeks. Do not refrigerate, or they will become hard. This recipe is from Vegan Without Borders (C) Robin Robertson, 2014, Andrews McMeel Publishing, photo by Sara Remington. The post Sesame Mochi appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Best Vegan Restaurants – Dallas

September 18 2018 VegKitchen 

Best Vegan Restaurants – Dallas Where do you find the best plant-based meal in Dallas, Texas? The prospect of eating out while vegan may seem daunting at first. Dallasites are well-known for their love of BBQ, and steak features in many of the local specialties. But Dallas is a diverse and evolving city, with a wide selection of vegan eateries. Dont forget to check out the food trucks, which can rival the citys best vegan restaurants. Dallas also offers various upscale, all-vegan cafés. 12 of the Best Vegan Restaurants in Dallas, TX If youre new in D-Town or you dont have much experience with the vegan food scene, it can be hard to know where to start. Here is a list that will help you discover some of the most delicious vegan dishes out there. 1. Spiral Diner & Bakery If youre on the hunt for vegan comfort food, consider Spiral Diner on North Beckley Avenue. Spiral has a proud tradition of serving plant-based versions of your favorite childhood dishes. Founded in 2002, Spiral is now one of the pillars of the Dallas vegan scene. You may want to start with their Blue Plate Special with vegan chickn, potatoes, peas, carrots, and green beans. Then […] The post Best Vegan Restaurants – Dallas appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegetarian Chili with Corn and Soy Beans

September 15 2018 VegKitchen 

Vegetarian Chili with Corn and Soy Beans Here is a tasty recipe for a small budget. This is where the chili comes in--this great classic, a thousand times reinvented. This is a really simple version that is prepared in a single saucepan in an hour! If you want to spoil yourself a little bit more, serve it with a vegetable sour cream, avocado, fresh tomato cubes, and organic corn chips. But its honestly so tasty that you can eat it plain! You can also serve it as a garnish on fries, on nachos, on a baked potato, on a veggie dog, or even in a sloppy joe! The possibilities are endless when you have a creative imagination. Preparation: 5 minutes Cooking: 1 hour Total: 1 hour 5 minutes Servings: 4   Ingredients  1 tablespoon olive oil 1 large chopped onion 3 chopped garlic cloves 1 can (28 oz) drained diced tomatoes 1 can (28 oz) crushed tomatoes 2 tablespoons tomato paste 1 to 2 tablespoons chili spices 1 tablespoon ground cumin 1 tablespoon ground coriander 1 tablespoon sugar 3/­­4 cup frozen corn kernels 3/­­4 cup canned red kidney beans, rinsed and drained 3/­­4 cup thawed frozen soy beans (edamame)   Preparation In a saucepan, heat the oil to medium […] The post Vegetarian Chili with Corn and Soy Beans appeared first on VegKitchen.

ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

August 29 2018 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on KickstarterThe Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA just launched on Kickstarter! watch the video: PRE-ORDER the ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2NrnNXl This year I traveled to Ethiopia in the weeks before Easter - one of several special times of fasting, when the majority of the country eats entirely vegan! I explored the central cities, traveled overland to the north, went trekking in the highlands and stayed with families in remote villages. As with all my travels and culinary research, I am extremely grateful for the privilege to learn, share & exchange, and be guided & supported by many families and professional cooks who invited me in their kitchens and shared amazing meals with me. Since returning to Berlin, I’ve been cooking Ethiopian and Eritrean food practically non-stop, recreating recipes and dishes, constantly inviting friends and guests to my cooking studio for lunch and dinner parties. Abebech showing me traditional village cooking in the Ethiopian Highlands. Making Injera for the first time in Ethiopia The Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA is my newest cookbook with original recipes, artwork, photography and stories inspired by these latest culinary adventures. It includes over 70 recipes based on the mouth-watering meals in bustling cities & towns, at road-stop eateries, and in rural highland villages. As with my previous 5 cookbooks, I have written, illustrated, cooked, photographed, and designed this book myself. The Lotus and the Artichoke is the ultimate combination of my passions: art, travel, vegan cooking, and photography. The ETHIOPIA Cookbook at a glance: - My 6th cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide - 140 pages with 70+ recipes and over 60 full-page color photos - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by my travels and culinary adventures in East Africa - Also based on experiences with international communities of Europe (London, Paris, and Berlin) and North America (Philadelphia, New York, and Washington D.C.) and over 25 years of vegan cooking - Ethiopian & Eritrean classics, familiar restaurant & family favourites, delicious delights, wonders & surprises, and creative culinary experiments - Discover new flavors, tasty spices, and cooking skills - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients (Cook everything, anywhere!) - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Doro Wat – spicy seitan stew Spinach Dinach Butecha – Chickpea “Egg” Salad Minchet Abish – spicy soy mince & walnuts Duba Wot – pumpkin stew Shimbra Asa – chickpea “fish” Asa (Jackfruit) Tibs Fosolia – green beans & carrots Pizza Lalibela Ingudai Tibs – spicy mushrooms Shepherd’s Pie – lentil filling & mashed potato topping Ambasha – sweet bread Recipes in The Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA - Traditional Berbere spice mix (simple + advanced) - Nitir Qibe – spiced butter/­­oil - Mitmita – extra hot spice mix - Yewot Qimen – black pepper spice mix - Shiro – chickpea/­­bean spice mix - Data (Yekarya Delleh) – roasted chili, garlic, onion & herb sauce - Traditional Injera – Ethiopian sourdough crepe - Quick Injera - Ambasha - sweet raisin bread - Doro Dabo – baked stuffed bread - Difo Dabo - spiced bread - Pizza Lalibela - with tomato sauce & roasted potato topping - Sambosa – savory pastry with lentil filling - Senig Karia – roasted spicy stuffed chilies - Injera Firfir – traditional flatbread with spicy tomato sauce - Yesuf Fitfit – chopped injera & lemon sunflower seed dressing - Kita (Injekita) – sweet breakfast flatbread & jam - Chornake /­­ Pasty – fried bread - Genfo – roasted wheat & barley porridge - Selata - super simple salad - Selata Delux - with mango, dates, avocado mixed greens & lentils - Butecha - chickpea “egg” salad - Selata Timtim - tomato salad - Selata Dinich - potato salad - Selata Bekarot - carrot salad - Telba - roasted flax dressing - Shiro Wot - chickpea puree - Misir Wot – red lentils - Doro Wot – spicy seitan - Soy Tibs - spicy soymeat strips - Ingudai Wot - spicy mushrooms - Bamia - spicy okra - Minchet Abish - spicy soy mince & walnuts - Shimbra Asa – spicy chickpea “fish” - Kik Alicha – yellow lentils - Atakilt Alicha – cabbage, carrots & potatoes - Keysir - beet root - Duba Alicha - pumpkin stew - Tikr Gomen - greens with garlic - Spinach Dinich - spinach & roasted potatoes - Fosolia – green beans & carrots - Asa Tibs – lemon pepper jackfruit fritters - Tofu Alicha - batter fried tofu in mild garlic & onion sauce - Ingudai Alicha – mushrooms w/­­ creamy cashew, lemon, pepper, thyme, parsley - Peppers & Potatoes - garlic ginger stir-fry - Inkulal Firfir – spicy tofu scramble & tomatoes - Ful – fava beans - Ayib – cottage cheese - Bedergan – roasted eggplant - Vegetable Lentil Soup - Vegetable Pasta – spaghetti with mixed chopped vegetables - Macaroni Firfir – noodles with garlic onion tomato sauce on injera - Shepherd’s Pie – lentil filling & mashed potato topping - Ethiopian Mashed Potatoes - Traditional Coffee Ceremony - Spiced Black Tea - Roiboos tea with lemon, ginger &cardamon - Mango Moringa Banana Smoothie - Injera w/­­ dates - Banana Bread - Fasting Muffins - Rooibos Tea Ice Cream Video: Justin P. Moore Music: Nils Kercher Nanfulle from Ancient Intimations (live) (C)2016 Ancient Pulse Music PRE-ORDER the ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2NrnNXl The post ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.


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