bean soup - vegetarian recipes

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bean soup vegetarian recipes

Easy Black Bean Burritos

September 18 2017 Meatless Monday 

These burritos are so delicious, youll want to eat them every night - and theyre so easy to make, that you can! Here, canned black bean soup, seasoned with onions, pepper and extra virgin olive oil, get a kick of flavor from smoky chipotle chiles. The beans are stuffed into burritos with tender rice, crisp cabbage, creamy avocado, tangy pico de gallo and lime juice. The result is the perfect meal, all wrapped up into one delicious pouch. This recipe comes to us courtesy of our friends at Goya. Support their “Can Do” campaign in September and October by using their red label black bean soup for this recipe and help support Feeding America and local food banks. Serves 8 - 3 cans (15 oz. each) black bean soup - 1 chipotle chile, finely chopped, plus 1 tbsp. sauce from 1 can (7 oz.) chipotle chiles in adobo sauce - 1 pkg. (20 oz.) large flour tortillas, warmed according to package instructions - 3 cups cooked extra long grain rice - 4 cups shredded cabbage - 2 avocados, chopped (about 2 cups) - 1 cup mild chunky salsa, drained - 2 limes, juiced (about 2 tbsp.) Add black bean soup, chopped chipotle chile and sauce to small pot over medium heat; bring soup to boil. Reduce heat to low; simmer, stirring occasionally, until bean mixture thickens, about 10 minutes. Assemble burritos: To center of tortilla, add about 1/­­3 cup cooked rice, 1/­­2 cup beans with sauce, 1/­­2 cup shredded cabbage, 1/­­4 cup chopped avocado, 2 tbsp. salsa and 1 tsp. lime juice. To roll up tortilla into burrito shape, fold in left and right ends of tortilla. Then, holding the closed ends, fold tortilla in half from bottom to top. Using the top layer of tortilla, push filling towards you to compact. Roll tortilla into log and wrap in foil to secure. Repeat with remaining ingredients; serve. The post Easy Black Bean Burritos appeared first on Meatless Monday.

20-Minute Salsa Black Bean Soup

May 2 2017 VegKitchen 

20-Minute Salsa Black Bean Soup There are those times -- and it doesnt have to be in the dead of winter -- when you crave a really hefty, hearty, satisfying soup. A rainy day, a sudden head cold, and you want some soup NOW. This delicious salsa black bean soup is yours in not more than 20 minutes. Seriously. And its […] The post 20-Minute Salsa Black Bean Soup appeared first on VegKitchen.

Simple Instant Pot Black Bean Soup

March 31 2017 FatFree Vegan Kitchen  

I had a craving for black bean soup but didnt feel like cooking. I wanted to keep the chopping and measuring to a minimum, so I tried to narrow down black bean soup to its most essential flavors. I came up with a soup that took just a few minutes to throw together and then... Read More » The post Simple Instant Pot Black Bean Soup appeared first on FatFree Vegan Kitchen.

Sweet Potato and White Bean Soup

January 30 2017 Meatless Monday 

This soup is free from dairy and gluten, and the white beans add body and protein without distracting from the rich sweet potato flavor. Try serving it with chopped green apple and a spoonful of Greek yogurt for a tangy flavor. To keep it vegan, skip the yogurt - tastes just as good! This recipe comes to us from Neda of Healthy with Nedi. - 2 lbs sweet potatoes, peeled and cut in pieces - 2 tbsp coconut oil - 1 red onion, chopped - 5 garlic cloves, chopped - 1 can white beans, rinsed and drained - 1 cup coconut milk - 2 cups low-sodium, vegetable stock - 1/­­2 cup water - 1 tbsp fresh sage - 1/­­2 tsp turmeric - Sea salt & pepper to taste   Toppings (optional) - Sliced green apple - Greek plain yogurt - Fresh sage   Wash the potatoes with water, peel and cut them in large pieces. In a large pot, melt coconut oil over medium heat. Add the chopped onion, garlic, turmeric and sage. Sauté for 2 minutes, until translucent. Add the potatoes, stock, coconut milk, water and season to taste with salt and pepper. Bring to a boil, and lower the heat to medium. Cook for 30 minutes, until the potatoes are soft. Add the canned beans and turn off heat. In small batches, transfer the vegetables to a high-powered blender. Add broth as you go, depending on how thick or thin you want the soup to be. For thicker, add less broth, and for thinner add more broth. Blend until smooth. Pour the soup back into the pot. Taste and adjust seasonings to your liking. Ladle soup into bowls and enjoy with any of the suggested toppings! The post Sweet Potato and White Bean Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Meal Plan | 12.12.16

December 9 2016 Oh My Veggies 

This weeks vegan meal plan includes: slow cooker Indian spiced chickpeas and potatoes; spaghetti allarrabbiata with mushrooms and bell peppers; Thai stuffed peppers, 5-ingredient black bean soup; and roasted vegetable and white bean hummus pizza.

9 Meatless Monday Slow Cooker Recipes

November 14 2016 Meatless Monday 

9 Meatless Monday Slow Cooker RecipesSavor the Flavors of These Slow Cooker Recipes Frustrated with the time it takes you to prepare meals? Simmer down, because slow cookers will have you rethink the way youve been cooking all this time. Many of the recipes featured in this list are hearty stews and chilis, perfect for curling up on a cold fall day. All of these recipes are prepared just using a slow cooker, courtesy of our Official Meatless Monday Bloggers. Weve got you covered with 9 slow cooker recipes that are sure to satisfy! Crockpot Chickpea Stew with Balsamic Caramelized Onions | Cookin Canuck Slow Cooker French Onion Soup | The Veg Life! Spicy Lentil Pasta Sauce | Made By Luci Slow Cooker Soy Chorizo Chili | Veggie Chick  Slow Cooker Veggie Lasagna | Produce for Kids and The Kids Cook Monday Crock- Pot Potato Leek Soup | The Mountain Kitchen  Tomato Parmesan Slow Cooker Soup | Life Currents Slow Cooker Black Bean Soup | Crackle and Temper Vegan Lentil Curry- Slow Cooked | Healing Tomato The post 9 Meatless Monday Slow Cooker Recipes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Schnippelbohnensuppe {Green Bean Soup}

September 2 2015 seitan is my motor 

Schnippelbohnensuppe {Green Bean Soup}Hello all, welcome to the second day of Vegan Mofo 2015. Today’s promt is: I am pretty sure that my grandmother’s Schnippelbohnensuppe was one of my favourite foods when I was a kid. (Schnippeln is a verb, it means to chop or cut up vegetables, but the verb sometimes also refers to cutting something with scissors.) But although I always loved green beans, I probably didn’t like this soup because it had beans. I liked it because it had sausages. My grandmother put smoked sausage (called mettwurst) in there and they contributed most of the flavour. Although I really do not miss meat, I couldn’t live without the combination of smoky and salty. I am thankful there are things like liquid smoke and smoked salt to stand in for the sausages I used to eat. I freely admit that I put a vegan sausage into my soups here and there, too. I don’t really get the hate that is directed at these products sometimes. Meat eaters telling me I shouldn’t eat them, vegetarians telling me I shouldn’t eat them and even vegans who tell me this and refuse to eat “fake” meats with a passion. Sure, they are processed. Sure, they have a lot of salt. So what? You can eat them once in a while. Also, please don’t tell me I shouldn’t eat sausages and other plant based meat products because I swore off meat. Exactly. I swore off meat. I never swore of sausage shaped seitan or tofu. It’s plant based. It’s not different from plant based cheeses or plant based milks which never get that amount of hate. So, if you have access to smoky vegan sausages or something like this Merguez that would be a great mettwurst substitute. For this soup, I still used smoked tofu (which can be substituted with any kind of your favourite sausage) because more accessible, I hope. Print Schnippelbohnensuppe {Green Bean Soup} 2 servings Ingredients2 tablespoons oil 100g (3.5 oz) smoked tofu, cubed 50 g (1/­­2 cup) finely sliced leeks 70 g (1/­­2 cup) celeriac (celery root), cubed 280 g (3 small) potatoes, cubed 1 carrot, sliced into thin rounds 350 - 400 g (13 - 14 oz) fresh runner or other green beans, cut into bite-size pieces 480 ml (2 cups) water 1-2 teaspoons fresh rosemary 1 teaspoon smoked salt, or to taste salt and pepper to taste InstructionsHeat the oil in a large pot. Add tofu and fry for five minutes. Add vegetables and fry for another five minutes. Pour water into the pot and add rosemary. Cook for 10 minutes and add smoked salt. Season with salt and pepper. 3.1 http:/­­/­­www.seitanismymotor.com/­­2015/­­09/­­schnippelbohnensuppe-green-bean-soup/­­ Copyright (C)2015 All rights reserved. www.seitanismymotor.com

Weekday Plant-Based Meal Plan-- June 22 – 26, 2015

June 22 2015 VegKitchen 

Weekday Plant-Based Meal Plan-- June 22 – 26, 2015This first week of summer will be hot it much of the northern hemisphere, so here’s a meal plan that will get you in and out of the kitchen quickly. Vegan Salade Niçoise  above is a beautifully composed salad of French origin that looks fancy but is incredibly easy to make. The array of ingredients--white beans or chickpeas, slender green beans, tomatoes, and olives--makes it a great cool main dish salad for a summer meal. All you need to go with it is some crusty bread and your favorite spread.   With the help of a food processor, Quick Cool Pinto Bean Soup is ready to eat in minutes. Enlivened with fresh tomatoes, olives, corn, and chiles, this is a filling bowlful for warm weather, served with tortilla chips or warmed flour tortillas. Add our Super-Easy Guacamole , and save some room for a fruity dessert! Fettuccine Carbonara with Broccoli  goes vegan by substituting smoky tempeh for the real thing. Its made even tastier with lots of broccoli, and some optional asparagus. All you need to finish this meal is a colorful tossed salad.   You can build a meal around this pretty but really easy Sweet and White Potato Salad with Mixed Greens. Serve side by side with one of our bountiful bean salads or a simple tofu dish like Sweet and Savory Sautéed Tofu.   End the week with a VegKitchen reader favorite, Pinto Bean and Quinoa Sloppy Joes. Serve with corn on the cob or simply prepared potatoes, and any kind of slaw-style salad.

6 Hearty Vegan Soups Under 200 Calories Per Serving

October 17 2014 VegKitchen 

6 Hearty Vegan Soups Under 200 Calories Per ServingStarting a meal with a veggie-packed vegan soup fills you up in a good way. Hardy vegetables (especially roots and cruciferous veggies), grains, beans, peas, and lentils are quite filling, yet low in calories. Veggie-filled soups contains more water then other dishes, keeping you hydrated, which also helps maintain healthy. They’re quite appetizing, yet at the same time help curb appetite for foods that may not benefit you or which you may be tempted to overeat. Because soups based on vegetables and/­­or legumes are high in fiber, they also keep you full for a long time. Pureed soups, like a vegan cream or broccoli or carrot soup, will really amp up your veggie intake in one meal. They can be a nice first course or a  a complete meal with a hearty salad featuring beans or lentils. Plant-based soups are filled with vitamins and other nutrients. All in one delicious bowl, you can get a great part of your daily needs of protein, fiber, vitamins A, C, and the B vitamins, folate, iron, calcium, potassium, zinc, folic acid, and antioxidants, depending on which particular ingredients you use. Spice your soups up as you wish, to boost flavor as well as increase health benefits. Here are a half dozen soups that so hearty that their modest calorie count is truly surprising. There are many variations on Tortilla Soup, a southwestern classic. The common denominator is a crisp corn tortilla garnish. This veggie-filled rendition is a light and pleasant way to begin a meal with a southwestern theme. See the photo at the top of this post. Like Minestrone, Italian Pasta and Bean Soup is a classic, sometimes referred to as  pasta e fagiole. Its a meal in a bowl that you can complete easily with fresh garlic bread and a big salad.  The earthy flavor of these protein-packed legumes shines in this basic rendition of Hearty Lentil Soup. Make sure to see the variations listed below the recipe. This is perfect as a soup centerpiece,  An appetizing, mildly spiced mélange of nourishing ingredients, Pink Bean, Quinoa, and Spinach Soup makes a stellar centerpiece for a soup-based meal, as its done in 30 minutes or less. Everything about this Butternut Squash and Apple Soup says fall harvest, from its warm golden color to its slightly sweet, fresh flavor. Once youve got the squash baked, it cooks fairly quickly. Of course, you can enjoy this throughout winter as well. Heres the comforting Classic Mushroom-Barley Soup. Its nothing fancy, but always so satisfying. Change it up by using different kinds of mushrooms.    

Green Kitchen Travels + Ribollita + Giveaway!

September 16 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Kitchen Travels + Ribollita + Giveaway! Our new book has finally been released in the UK and Australia! And already next week it will be available throughout the US. We really hope that you will find it an inspiring and helpful tool in the kitchen and also something beautiful that you want to keep in your home. And who knows, it might even trigger you to save up some money (actually, most of our travels have been done on very low budget) and bring the family or friends on your own travel adventures. To celebrate the occasion, we have created this book video. We filmed one half of the video in Marrakesh last winter and the rest quite recently with a little baby boy dangling on David’s shoulder while he was filming. So if you find the video shaky, Isac is to blame. Enjoy! Apart from all the recipes (more than 90 of them), we are also quite fond of the personal stories behind many of the recipes. Just like on this blog, the stories give the recipes extra flavour. You will find insights in our escapades that we haven’t shared on the blog before. Like the time in Sicily when we spent a night in a car to save money after a few too hefty restaurant bills. Or the look on David’s face when we visited a Californian Avocado farm and were told to watch out for the rattle snakes… The chapter about traveling with kids is also not to be missed. You can order the book within the UK from Waterstones (at the moment they have a ?5 discount) or Amazon.co.uk. In Australia from Booktopia. And in the US from Amazon.com. Or just pick up a copy from your local book seller. If you already have received the book and like it, please leave a review on the book sellers site. Thank you!!! *********** Giveaway! To make things extra fun, we are also giving away a signed copy of the book. The giveaway is open worldwide! Simply leave a comment with your name, where you are from and what your favorite cuisine from around the world is. We will pick one winner using random.org. The giveaway closes on Thursday at midnight and will be announced on Friday. *********** We are sharing one recipe from the book today. This rustic bread and bean soup sums up all the things I love about the italian way of cooking. Even if many italians themselves are very fashionable, with high heels, sunglasses and expensive clothes, their cooking is the opposite; simple, rustic and down to earth. They dont need any fancy accessories to cook up the most delicious and beautiful meals. A few good-quality vegetables, fresh herbs and beans are quickly turned into a warm and comforting soup. In Tuscany it is common to add some day-old bread and a few slices of Parmesan to it, but if you are vegan or gluten intolerant they can be left out. Zuppa di Ribollita 2 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil, plus extra for serving 1 onion, chopped 4 garlic cloves, finely chopped 2 carrots, diced a pinch of dried chilli flakes 10 sage leaves a handful flat leaf parsley, leaves picked 1 tomato, diced 1 courgette (zucchini), halved lengthwise and sliced 300 g (101/­­2 oz) cavolo nero green kale or Savoy cabbage 100 g (3/­­1/­­2 oz/­­1/­­2 cup) dried cannellini beans, soaked and cooked (or a 400g/­­14 oz can, drained) about 1 litre (34 fl oz/­­4 cups) vegetable stock or water sea salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste To Serve 4 slices wholegrain sourdough bread, cubed or torn in pieces a piece of Parmesan cheese, shaved Heat the oil in a saucepan. Add the onion, garlic, carrots, chilli and sage and cook over a low heat for 20 minutes until softened but not browned. Add the parsley, tomato and courgette and cook for a couple of minutes. Add the cavolo nero and beans and cover with stock or water. Bring to the boil, reduce the heat and simmer for 30 minutes. Season to taste. The soup should be the consistency of a thick stew with a little broth. Serve in bowls and arrange bread cubes, shaved Parmesan cheese and a drizzle of olive oil over each.

A Visit from Acacia Courtney, Miss Connecticut

July 21 2014 Meatless Monday 

A Visit from Acacia Courtney,  Miss ConnecticutOn June 28th, Acacia Courtney was crowned Miss Connecticut. Her personal platform is “The Monday Campaigns: A Guide to a Healthier World”--a platform were completely behind. Last week, Acacia stopped by Monday Campaigns HQ to answer questions, take some photos, and meet the staff. Left to right: Sid Lerner (Chairman of The Monday Campaigns), Acacia Courtney (Miss Connecticut 2014), and Peggy Neu (President of The Monday Campaigns)     Meatless Monday: First off, congratulations on a winning the Miss Connecticut Crown. How did it feel, what was going through your head at the time? Acacia Courtney: Thank you! It was a very surreal moment. This was my fourth year competing at the state level in the Miss America Organization, and even though I felt that I was ready to do the job of Miss Connecticut, I didn’t know what was going to happen. When I heard my name called, it was a beautiful instant full of shock, joy, and an overwhelming sense of excitement and gratitude. It felt very surreal, and yet, at the same time it also felt right. I am someone who has grown up through the Miss America Organization, and I am beyond honored to have the chance to serve my state. MM: Calling the Miss Connecticut Scholarship Program a pageant isnt really enough is it? Its more: for one, its a scholarship program and its also a forum for you to give voice to the issues (regional or global) that concern you. Can you tell us a bit about what the Miss Connecticut Scholarship Program is all about, beyond the pageantry? AC: While we only see the contestants onstage during the final night of competition, so much of what the Miss America Organization truly is actually takes place in the months leading up to the pageant. The organization has labeled the four points of the crown as service, scholarship, success, and style, and we all strive to embody these characteristics every day. Each contestant has a personal platform that she promotes and advocates for, and each contestant is very involved in her community. The program expects a high level of academic achievement, and in turn makes available more than $45 million in scholarships each year. In addition, contestants work on a talent that they perform. All of the women that compete for the job of Miss Connecticut and Miss America are well-rounded role models who make a difference in the world around them. The Miss Connecticut Scholarship Program has given me so much as a contestant, and as a young woman determined to succeed in the “real world.” The connections I have made, relationships I have formed, and opportunities I have been given have helped prepare me for college, internships, and a professional career. MM: Why did you choose to run on The Monday Campaigns: A Guide to a Healthier World? And can you tell us your top goal for Meatless Monday and your top goal for Move It Monday? AC: I chose to promote “The Monday Campaigns: A Guide to a Healthier World” as my platform because I want to be a part of changing the way we approach the concept of health. I am very aware of the obesity epidemic in the United States and have observed that there is an extreme disconnect between the farm and the plate--eating has become mindless and routine. I personally do not eat meat and am very active, but I love the Monday Campaigns because they advocate for small, easy-to-adopt changes that can make it easier for people to implement in their everyday lives. My top goal for Meatless Monday right now is to create a citywide Meatless Monday resolution in both Hartford and New Haven, two of Connecticut’s biggest cities. I have followed the development of a similar initiative in Philadelphia, PA, and I believe that eatless Monday could be incredibly successful here in CT.  I am excited to see what we can do and how I might leave this as one of my legacies as Miss Connecticut 2014. For Move It Monday, I am working on planning various fundraising events throughout the state of Connecticut that will encourage exercise and physical activity. Zumba fundraisers, walks, and runs all have provided an opportunity to raise funds and to spread the word about Move It Monday. I also understand the power of social media in creating a weekly Monday challenge for followers and potential followers. I am very passionate about sharing Meatless Monday and Move It Monday, and the tremendous benefits of both campaigns. MM: Can you share your favorite recipe for a Meatless Monday dish? AC: My mom makes an unbelievable kale and bean soup! It’s just a tablespoon of olive oil, chopped garlic, onion, kale, and tomatoes, vegetable stock, navy beans, and some seasoning. It’s easy, filling, healthy, and vegan! MM: How do you move it on Mondays? AC: Dancing is my favorite way to “move it on Mondays!” I am a classically trained ballerina (ballet en pointe will be my talent for Miss America!), but I also study jazz, musical theater, and international ballroom. I always suggest dance classes to those looking for ways to incorporate Move It Monday into their daily lifestyle because it is so fun that it often doesn’t feel like exercise. Dancing is a great way to express yourself, meet new people, and stay fit and healthy. MM: Where do you see yourself in five years? AC: My dream job is to be a sports broadcaster specializing in horse racing. In five years I see myself working for NBC Sports Network as a broadcaster and trackside analyst in the horse racing industry. In addition, I also plan to continue promoting Meatless Monday and Move It Monday as a speaker and ambassador, sharing my commitment to the creation of a healthier world. The post A Visit from Acacia Courtney, Miss Connecticut appeared first on Meatless Monday.

This Week’s Meatless Meal Plan | 05.19.14

May 16 2014 Oh My Veggies 

This Week’s Meatless Meal Plan | 05.19.14On the menu this week: Mushroom and Kale Grilled Cheese, Creamy Broccoli-White Bean Soup, Vegetable Lo Mein, Quinoa White Chili with Roasted Poblanos, and Huevos Rancheros Enchiladas.

8 Quick Weeknight Meals for the Busy Holiday Season

December 19 2016 Meatless Monday 

8 Quick Weeknight Meals for the Busy Holiday SeasonSpend Less Time Cooking and More Time Savoring This time of year, youve already got plenty to do. So dont let long, complicated recipes slow you down. Weve rounded up our tastiest recipes for the busiest of nights. Whip up one of these flavorful meatless meals in just minutes. And make your evening merry and bright. Cheesy Brown Rice Vegetable Casserole | Homemade Nutrition Teriyaki Bowls | Vegan Gretchen One Pot Chili | Made by Luci Udon Stir Fry with Bok Choy and Vegetables | Bok Choy and Broccoli 5 Ingredient Black Bean Soup | Sarcastic Cooking Veggie Miso Tofu Soup | The Happy Health Freak Black Bean Pasta Bowl | The Saucy Southerner Mexican Breakfast Scramble | Jackie Newgent The post 8 Quick Weeknight Meals for the Busy Holiday Season appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Minestrone – Veggies Pasta & White Bean Soup

December 5 2016 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Minestrone – Veggies Pasta & White Bean SoupVegan Minestrone – White Bean Soup with Elbows, Veggies, Basil and vegan parmesan. Can be gluten-free, nut-free. Soy-free Vegan Dairy-free Recipe Winter greys were bringing me down, so I decided it was time to whip up my minestrone.  One pot, tomatoey bowl of goodness filled with veggies, beans and pasta. Use any beans or combination of beans and pasta of choice. Use up any leftover veggies. The soup inevitably becomes everything but the kitchen sink soup, except probably okra. No okra for me in soup. I like my minestrone less tomatoey. Some canned tomatoes work out great instead of paste. Add some tomato paste for a thicker soup or for flavor if needed. Garnish with basil and vegan parmesan. Serve with crusty bread, garlic rolls or crackers. It snowed a bit today in Seattle and my playlist is on holiday song repeats. It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas….. Time to whip up cookies and gingerbread things. Continue reading: Vegan Minestrone – Veggies Pasta & White Bean SoupThe post Vegan Minestrone – Veggies Pasta & White Bean Soup appeared first on Vegan Richa.

12 Vegan Emergency Dinners for Your Busiest Days

September 2 2015 VegKitchen 

12 Vegan Emergency Dinners for Your Busiest DaysWe all have nights when even the thought of making a last-minute dinner is exhausting, but the idea of blowing our food and calorie budget by eating out (yet again) is even less appealing. Everyone needs a stash of emergency dinner options -- meals that can be made in minutes with minimal or no cooking, and appeal to most any palate. Some of the 12 meals here are simple recipes to build a meal around; others are just meal ideas that come together quickly with convenient ingredients you pick up at the store on your way home from work. All of these meals can be completed with a colorful salad, and in keeping with the emergency theme, you can use veggies that need no prepping and cutting, including baby greens, baby spinach, pre-shredded carrots, cherry tomatoes, and the like. Lets start with three recipes that play with the concept of pizza. Vegan Pizzadillas, above, are a  fast and fun dinner idea is a mash-up of pizza and quesadillas. Next up on the pizza theme are Pizza Potatoes. Marinara sauce, melted vegan cheese, and simple steamed vegetables on a baked potato add up to an irresistible pizza-flavored vegetable dish. Potatoes make for a healthy crust thats low in fat and naturally gluten-free. The kids will love this! Layer on the Southwestern flavors in this playful Mexican Pizza that uses only 5 ingredients. Boost this meal with a simple salad. Here are super-tasty Fully Loaded Vegan Nachos that can be made with pantry and refrigerator staples in a matter of minutes. Nachos are fun fare no matter what, and though they often serve as an appetizer or party snack, they make a great emergency dinner, too. One more with a Southwestern theme, Super-Easy Tortilla Casserole involves throwing together a lot of convenient ingredients like canned beans and tomatoes, and frozen corn, but its unbelievably good when you need dinner in a pinch and the fridge is nearly bare. Its rare to be able to make a satisfying main dish soup like this Very Quick Black Bean Soup almost instantly, but organic canned black beans do the trick perfectly. Theyre packed in a nice thick base, rather than the  usual briny liquid that needs to be rinsed away. BBQ-Flavored White Beans with Sausage and Spinach is the epitome of a good emergency dinner. Its spicy, hearty, high in protein, and best of all, ready for the table in about 20 minutes. For a Pasta and Antipasto dinner, there are no recipes to follow, just a suggestion for putting together the kind of comforting meal that most people love. In the time it takes to cook the pasta, an antipasto platter of fresh vegetables and other items that need little or no prep can be arranged. For this Instant Middle Eastern Feast, pick up some hummus, pita, tabbouli (or if you have some cooked grain on hand it’s not hard to make your own Tabbouli), olives, and grape leaves at the supermarket for a fraction of the cost of take-out mezze platters when you need to feed a whole family. A Tortilla Fiesta needs just a few key ingredients, including tortillas, refried beans, nondairy cheese, and other embellishments. It’s a simple and satisfying Southwestern meal in which everyone assembles their portion right at the table. Tofuna Salad or Sandwich Spread needs just three basic ingredients (two ingredients are optional), to become the centerpiece for a kind of  brunchy-y evening meal. To warm things up, you can also add some quickly microwaved potatoes or sweet potatoes. This veggie burger meal might be the laziest of all of these dinner ideas, so no need to link through to any further explanation or recipes! Look for all-natural vegan veggie burgers and organic sweet potato fries. Add big batch of wilted baby spinach and you have a tasty and easy meal thats hardly any work at all.

Travel and Restaurant Survival Tips for Your Plant-Based Diet

August 20 2015 VegKitchen 

Travel and Restaurant Survival Tips for Your Plant-Based DietExcerpted from The Plant-Based Journey: A Step-by-Step Guide for Transitioning to a Healthy Lifestyle and Achieving Your Ideal Weight* by Lani Muelrath (BenBella Books (C) Sept. 2015, reprinted by permission). See the pre-order promotion for this book, and enjoy bonuses!  The workplace and travel both bring up the question of restaurant dining. Restaurant menus, it seems, are designed to thwart your best-laid plans for healthy eating. Oil, butter, and cheese are slammed into everything imaginable to increase food seduction, pushing you to keep eating. Is it any wonder Julia Childs cookbooks are such big sellers? Put gobs of butter in anything and it will taste good. When it comes to restaurant menus, here are a few simple strategies for navigating the options. How to Put a Restaurant Plate Together Restaurants listed as vegetarian, vegan, or natural foods may be friendly houses of food for your journey--but then again, perhaps not. Vegetarian implies no meat products; vegan items are devoid of all animal products. Vegetarian and vegan, however, do not necessarily mean healthy. They dont tell you anything about how the food is prepared, how much fat or sugar is added to the fare, or--in the case of vegetarian--even if dairy products or eggs are used. That doesnt mean these restaurant venues arent workable; it just means that you will need to be specific about exactly what you want when ordering. The best strategy is to do an internet search on the restaurants menu--and even make a phone call in advance to inquire about options. Detect which items on the menu might be most plant-eater friendly. Most restaurants have a dinner salad on the menu. When ordering your salad, clearly underscore what you do want: lettuce, tomatoes, carrots, cucumber--any and all raw vegetables. Next, politely be specific about what you do not want on your salad--cheese, eggs, bacon, meat chunks, anchovies--Ive been surprised by every one of these on one occasion or another. Dont be afraid to use the words allergy or doctor if it will help. Mention no croutons as well--they are usually fried in oil and often cheese saturated. Finally, ask for dressing on the side. You can also say no dressing and ask for a shaker of vinegar, which many restaurants serve with salads. You want the waiter or waitress to be your friend, and as you are asking them to go out of their way a bit for you, being gracious is a smart move. More and more often, veggie burgers are being featured as sandwich or entrée menu choices. Ask that yours be baked and not fried, and ask for ketchup and mustard instead of mayo or butter on the bun. If there is a vegetarian sandwich listed, simply ask that yours be served without mayo, cheese, or butter. If not, you can probably order a custom sandwich. In addition to salads and veggie burgers, your best restaurant bet might be in the sides section of the menu, where you will often find baked potatoes and other vegetables. If you dont see it listed, ask about the vegetable of the day, often served with the restaurant entrées as part of the main menu--frequently asparagus, green beans, or broccoli. You can ask that your serving be steamed and prepared without frying or oily dressing. If you say low fat, all bets are off as to how butter-drenched your plate will arrive, so be specific. Fruit salads are usually either in the sides or listed somewhere else on the menu; clarify to serve without yogurt or cheese. Breakfast is usually easy because oatmeal is almost always on the menu. Ive started to have increasing good luck with asking for soy milk or almond milk on the side, too. Our recent stop at a Mexican eatery is an example of getting good choices at restaurants. On the face of it, the menu looked like a dietary disaster. But I know I can pull together something pretty good at most Mexican restaurants--as long as they have a batch of beans cooked sans lard. I had phoned ahead about the beans, so I knew that they had two pots of beans in the kitchen: one of them plain boiled pintos. When we arrived, I knew exactly what to do. I ordered a big bowl of the boiled beans, a stack of soft, fresh corn tortillas, garden salad without dressing, extra bowls of salsa (for dressing and for my tacos), and some lime or lemon wedges. When it all arrived, I created multiple tacos by piling the beans, greens, and chunky house salsa on the corn tortillas. Combined with the greens and tomato on the salad, I crafted a hearty lunch. If the only in-house beans had been cooked in a pot of lard, I would have simply passed on beans in my tacos and done just fine with the fresh corn tortillas, tomatoes, green salad, and house salsa. Big Chain Bites When it comes to the fast-food chains, a little creativity can get you some eats in a pinch. The problem is all the mystery ingredients. Careful scrutiny usually uncovers dairy products, eggs, or oils on the lists of what, on the face of it, may appear to be plant-friendly fare--such as beans and veggie burgers. Ingredients seem to also be in a constant state of flux. You cant always trust that the servers are in the know when it comes to ingredients, so its worth checking with management or headquarters online if you want to get the facts. The best resource I have found on fast-food restaurant menus is listed at Urban Tastebuds, which has ferreted out and listed Forty-Eight Vegan Chain Restaurant Menus--the closest thing to plant-based currently available. See the list at www.urbantastebuds.com/­­43-vegan-chain-restaurant-menus -every-vegan-needs-know. The list starts with Atlanta Bread Company and runs all the way through Wendys. Each listing is linked to a page elaborating upon which items can be ordered without animal products. Keep in mind that it doesnt add the processed food filter, so items may include oils and other processed products. Fast-food meals are best left as last-resort options. Still, its nice to know where you might be able to find emergency fare. Planes, Trains, and Automobiles What about the challenges posed by airplane and other long-distance travel? The tips regarding workplace readiness may be all you need. Yet travel involving greater distances and extended chunks of time presents its own set of challenges. This year my husband and I took five trips involving international travel. Add to that the dozen or so excursions made in country for speaking engagements, and were talking about lots of hours logged on planes, in airports, and even a boat or two. The same pack-and-plan system works for all of them. Scout the Location in Advance The first thing I do for airplane travel is some reconnaissance regarding food options at the destination. First stop is the internet, where Ill search the hotel or rental location for nearby plant-food-friendly options, such as a produce market, a natural foods store, or a familiar chain--places where Ive found a good meal in the past, and where I know I can replenish my travel food stash. I then search the area for restaurants under the categories of vegetarian, vegan, or natural foods. A search at www.happycow.net can often turn up several appropriate vendors for eats in urban areas. Outbound Its easy to prepare and pack food when you are heading out on plane travel. Heres an example of how I do it. With an international junket coming up in a few days from this writing--in addition to the in-transit needs of spare clothing and a toothbrush--Ill pack in my carry-on the following: four hummus sandwiches, two peanut butter sandwiches, four apples, cold baked potatoes, peeled carrots, sugar snap peas, and a couple of baggies of rolled oats along with some dried fruit, nuts, and seeds. All of these easily pass at airline security--Ive never had a question asked yet. This food cache translates to two substantial meals for both my husband and me. The hummus sandwiches are eaten first due to their perishable nature. The carrots and snap peas will serve as filling and fibrous portable fare--instant salad, just not in the usual bowl. The peanut butter sandwiches pass the durability test and Ive served them good as new-- though slightly reshaped depending on the rigors of travel--up to forty-eight hours later. The apples last indefinitely. So do the nuts and seeds. Potatoes are best eaten within a few hours, depending on the heat to which your luggage is exposed, but Im always impressed by the way these hold up. The rolled oats can be emptied into a cup, covered with water, and after a few minutes of soaking, ready to eat. If your fruit stockpile has run out, you can find apples, bananas, and other fruit at most airports, even in the coffee shops. Another option for carry-on is soups-in-a-cup that simply require hot water. Let them sit, and in five minutes you can have split pea or black bean soup. Inbound Returning from a destination creates a slightly different situation because you dont have the luxury of being able to stock up from home. If youve been staying with friends or family, a house rental, or a hotel with a fridge, you can pack fruit and durable sandwiches for the return trip. Rolled oats, dried fruit, and nuts packed as part of your outbound preparations can hitch up with airport salads and fruit for sustenance. *This post contains affiliate links. If the product is purchased by linking through this review, VegKitchen receives a modest commission, which helps maintain our site and helps it to continue growing!

Veg Celeb: Cartoonist/Illustrator Harry Bliss

December 2 2014 Vegetarian Times 

Veg Celeb: Cartoonist/Illustrator Harry BlissPhoto and art all by Harry Bliss I admit that when I come across an issue of The New Yorker, I first flip to the cartoons. So I was happy to discover that an artist whos contributed to the iconic publication is vegetarian. Here, cartoonist/­­illustrator/­­childrens book author Harry Bliss responds to a few questions. Check back later in the week for a Q&A with another New Yorker contributor whos veg. Youve said youre vegetarian for ethical reasons. How did that aha moment happen? For me, it was simply education. The more I learned about the needless suffering of animals involved in eating meat, the more I became an advocate for being vegetarian. My older sister, Rachel, a vegan most of her life, had a lot to do with my understanding of factory faming, slaughterhouses, agro-business, etc. Also, it made no sense to me why we eat some animals and adore others as pets; I still find this perplexing. Youve written and illustrated two childrens books featuring the character of Bailey. Is Bailey an alter ego? Whats his inspiration? So many of my New Yorker cartoons have dogs in them that my editor at Scholastic and my agent both suggested a childrens book featuring a dog. Bailey is a character I created who is sweet and kind, but his doggy nature gets him into trouble. I suppose in some ways I see children this way: theyre innocent--Im generalizing--yet its their nature to push the envelope, test boundaries, and get into trouble. Yes, I see myself in Bailey, only I was a terrible child, a true juvenile delinquent. I like to say, if it werent for art, Id be incarcerated. Im serious. Your illustrations display a sly humor. Who or what makes you laugh? My wife and daughter make me laugh; their brainy wit has just the right pinch of stupidity in it, which I love. I find many things absurd, like civilization, so Im always seeing humor. Ideas are everywhere! Do you cook? Any signature dishes? I cook all the time; its a meditation for me as is drawing. I make a dynamite Russian borscht, veggie chili, black bean soup (a touch of good port wine brings it home), puttanesca (with tamari in place of anchovies), Asian veggie wraps, stuffed peppers, and veggie lasagna. Once you understand the art in preparing meals, the landscape is endless.

Green Kitchen Travels + Ribollita

September 16 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Kitchen Travels + Ribollita Our new book has finally been released in the UK and Australia! And already next week it will be available throughout the US. We really hope that you will find it an inspiring and helpful tool in the kitchen and also something beautiful that you want to keep in your home. And who knows, it might even trigger you to save up some money (actually, most of our travels have been done on very low budget) and bring the family or friends on your own travel adventures. To celebrate the occasion, we have created this book video. We filmed one half of the video in Marrakesh last winter and the rest quite recently with a little baby boy dangling on David’s shoulder while he was filming. So if you find the video shaky, Isac is to blame. Enjoy! Apart from all the recipes (more than 90 of them), we are also quite fond of the personal stories behind many of the recipes. Just like on this blog, the stories give the recipes extra flavour. You will find insights in our escapades that we haven’t shared on the blog before. Like the time in Sicily when we spent a night in a car to save money after a few too hefty restaurant bills. Or the look on David’s face when we visited a Californian Avocado farm and were told to watch out for the rattle snakes… The chapter about traveling with kids is also not to be missed. You can order the book within the UK from Waterstones (at the moment they have a ?5 discount) or Amazon.co.uk. In Australia from Booktopia. And in the US from Amazon.com. Or just pick up a copy from your local book seller. If you already have received the book and like it, please leave a review on the book sellers site. Thank you!!! *********** The giveaway is closed. Big congrats to Sonja from Vancouver for winning a signed copy of the book!!! Thank you to ALL of you who entered the giveaway and shared your favorite cuisine. We loved reading through all of the 1047 comments! Mediterranean food seems to be a favorite among many of you. Big love!!! /­­David, Luise, Elsa & Isac Giveaway!  To make things extra fun, we are also giving away a signed copy of the book. The giveaway is open worldwide! Simply leave a comment with your name, where you are from and what your favorite cuisine from around the world is. We will pick one winner using random.org. The giveaway closes on Thursday at midnight and will be announced on Friday. *********** We are sharing one recipe from the book today. This rustic bread and bean soup sums up all the things I love about the italian way of cooking. Even if many italians themselves are very fashionable, with high heels, sunglasses and expensive clothes, their cooking is the opposite; simple, rustic and down to earth. They dont need any fancy accessories to cook up the most delicious and beautiful meals. A few good-quality vegetables, fresh herbs and beans are quickly turned into a warm and comforting soup. In Tuscany it is common to add some day-old bread and a few slices of Parmesan to it, but if you are vegan or gluten intolerant they can be left out. Zuppa di Ribollita 2 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil, plus extra for serving 1 onion, chopped 4 garlic cloves, finely chopped 2 carrots, diced a pinch of dried chilli flakes 10 sage leaves a handful flat leaf parsley, leaves picked 1 tomato, diced 1 courgette (zucchini), halved lengthwise and sliced 300 g (101/­­2 oz) cavolo nero green kale or Savoy cabbage 100 g (3/­­1/­­2 oz/­­1/­­2 cup) dried cannellini beans, soaked and cooked (or a 400g/­­14 oz can, drained) about 1 litre (34 fl oz/­­4 cups) vegetable stock or water sea salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste To Serve 4 slices wholegrain sourdough bread, cubed or torn in pieces a piece of Parmesan cheese, shaved Heat the oil in a saucepan. Add the onion, garlic, carrots, chilli and sage and cook over a low heat for 20 minutes until softened but not browned. Add the parsley, tomato and courgette and cook for a couple of minutes. Add the cavolo nero and beans and cover with stock or water. Bring to the boil, reduce the heat and simmer for 30 minutes. Season to taste. The soup should be the consistency of a thick stew with a little broth. Serve in bowls and arrange bread cubes, shaved Parmesan cheese and a drizzle of olive oil over each.

A Visit fromAcacia Courtney, Miss Connecticut

July 21 2014 Meatless Monday 

A Visit fromAcacia Courtney, Miss ConnecticutOn June 28th, Acacia Courtney was crowned Miss Connecticut. Her personal platform is “The Monday Campaigns: A Guide to a Healthier World,” a platform were completely behind. Last week, Acacia stopped by Monday Campaigns HQ to answer questions, take some photos, and meet the staff. Acacia Courtney, Miss Connecticut 2014, meets Sid Lerner, Chairman of The Monday Campaigns and Peggy Neu, President of The Monday Campaigns Meatless Monday: First, congratulations on a winning the Miss Connecticut Crown. How did it feel, what was going through your head at the time? Acacia Courtney: Thank you! It was a very surreal moment. This was my fourth year competing at the state level in the Miss America Organization, and even though I felt that I was ready to do the job of Miss Connecticut, I didn’t know what was going to happen. When I heard my name called, it was a beautiful instant full of shock, joy, and an overwhelming sense of excitement and gratitude. It felt very surreal, and yet, at the same time it also felt right. I am someone who has grown up through the Miss America Organization, and I am beyond honored to have the chance to serve my state. MM: Calling the Miss Connecticut Scholarship Program a pageant isnt really enough is it? Its more: for one, its a scholarship program and its also a forum for you to give voice to the issues (regional or global) that concern you. Beyond the ‘pageantry’, can you tell us a bit about what the Miss Connecticut Scholarship Program is all about? AC: While we only see the contestants onstage during the final night of competition, so much of what the Miss America Organization truly is actually takes place in the months leading up to the pageant. The organization has labeled the four points of the crown as service, scholarship, success, and style, and we all strive to embody these characteristics every day. Each contestant has a personal platform that she promotes and advocates for, and each contestant is very involved in her community. The program expects a high level of academic achievement, and in turn makes available more than $45 million in scholarships each year. In addition, contestants work on a talent that they perform. All of the women that compete for the job of Miss Connecticut and Miss America are well-rounded role models who make a difference in the world around them. The Miss Connecticut Scholarship Program has given me so much as a contestant, and as a young woman determined to succeed in the “real world.” The connections I have made, relationships I have formed, and opportunities I have been given have helped prepare me for college, internships, and a professional career. MM: Why did you choose to run on The Monday Campaigns: A Guide to a Healthier World? And can you tell us your goal for Meatless Monday and your goal for Move It Monday? AC: I chose to promote “The Monday Campaigns: A Guide to a Healthier World” as my platform because I want to be a part of changing the way we approach the concept of health. I am very aware of the obesity epidemic in the United States and have observed that there is an extreme disconnect between the farm and the plate--eating has become mindless and routine. I personally do not eat meat and am very active, but I love the Monday Campaigns because they advocate for small, easy-to-adopt changes that can make it easier for people to implement in their everyday lives. My top goal for Meatless Monday right now is to create a citywide Meatless Monday resolution in both Hartford and New Haven, two of Connecticut’s biggest cities. I have followed the development of a similar initiative in Philadelphia, PA, and I believe that eatless Monday could be incredibly successful here in CT.  I am excited to see what we can do and how I might leave this as one of my legacies as Miss Connecticut 2014. For Move It Monday, I am working on planning various fundraising events throughout the state of Connecticut that will encourage exercise and physical activity. Zumba fundraisers, walks, and runs all have provided an opportunity to raise funds and to spread the word about Move It Monday. I also understand the power of social media in creating a weekly Monday challenge for followers and potential followers. I am very passionate about sharing Meatless Monday and Move It Monday, and the tremendous benefits of both campaigns. MM: Can you share your favorite recipe for a Meatless Monday dish? AC: My mom makes an unbelievable kale and bean soup! It’s just a tablespoon of olive oil, chopped garlic, onion, kale, and tomatoes, vegetable stock, navy beans, and some seasoning. It’s easy, filling, healthy, and vegan! MM: How do you move it” on Mondays? AC: Dancing is my favorite way to move it on Mondays! I am a classically trained ballerina (ballet en pointe will be my talent for Miss America), but I also study jazz, musical theater, and international ballroom. I always suggest dance classes to those looking for ways to incorporate Move It Monday into their daily lifestyle because it is so fun that it often doesn’t feel like exercise. Dancing is a great way to express yourself, meet new people, and stay fit and healthy. MM: Where do you see yourself in five years? AC: My dream job is to be a sports broadcaster specializing in horse racing. In five years I see myself working for NBC Sports Network as a broadcaster and trackside analyst in the horse racing industry. In addition, I also plan to continue promoting Meatless Monday and Move It Monday as a speaker and ambassador, sharing my commitment to the creation of a healthier world. The post A Visit from Acacia Courtney, Miss Connecticut appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Easy Cannellini Bean Soup

May 29 2014 Fatfree Vegan Recipes  

Easy Cannellini Bean Soup I originally made this soup trying to recreate the side of white beans at Zoe’s Kitchen, which is too high in oil to my liking. I skipped the oil and added more broth to turn the side dish into a soup, and it came out delicious and satisfying. Despite of its simplicity, it is one of the most popular soup recipes on my blog. Serve it sprinkled with parsley flakes along with a nice chunk of homemade bread. ~ Alina from Vegan Runner Eats Ingredients: 2 cans cannellini or other white beans, drained and rinsed (or 3 cups cooked white beans) 2 carrots, diced 2 celery stalks, diced 1 medium onion, diced 3 garlic cloves, minced 1 1/­­2 inch piece kombu – an Asian sea vegetable (optional) Water or vegetable broth – the amount equal to 2 empty bean cans (here’s an easy way to make your own veggie broth) 1 bay leaf 1/­­2 Tbsp dried thyme 1/­­2 Tbsp rubbed sage 1/­­2 Tbsp chopped fresh rosemary Salt, pepper to taste Instructions: 1. In a medium-sized Dutch oven or other thick-bottomed soup pot, heat up 1-2 Tbsp water or broth on medium heat until bubbly. Add chopped onion, celery and carrot. Cook for about 5 min, stirring occasionally, adding more water to prevent vegetables from sticking to the pot. Add minced garlic and cook for another 1 min. 2. Add the rest of the soup ingredients except for salt, pepper, and fresh rosemary (if using dried rosemary, halve the amount and add at this time with the rest of the ingredients). Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to medium-low, and simmer for 20-25 min. Taste the soup to check if all the flavors have blended together. If not, simmer for another 5 min. 3. Take out about 1/­­3 of the soup into a bowl, mash with a potato masher until the components of the soup are broken down and look like gravy (this can also be done with an immersion blender). Return the mashed soup to the pot, add salt, pepper and fresh rosemary, stir well, simmer for another 3-5 min. 4.  Just before taking the soup off the heat, check for seasoning. Take out bay leaves and kombu. Let cool for 5-10 min before serving. (C) alinaz1 for Fatfree Vegan Recipes, 2014. | Permalink | 4 comments | Add to del.icio.us Post tags: Eat To Live, gluten-free


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