basmati - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Wheat dosa recipe | instant wheat flour dosa | godhuma dosa or godhi dose

Vegan Lentil Shepherd’s Pie – Mushroom Lentil Shepherdless Pie

Masala pasta recipe | indian style pasta | indian pasta recipes

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basmati vegetarian recipes

Vegan Red Lentil Dal With Spinach (Gluten-Free)

August 30 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Something Vegan has created a super easy recipe for vegan dal. Red lentils, spinach, and delicious spices combined to create this epic meal! Dal is a traditional Indian dish and goes great with basmati rice and roti (flatbread). It’s perfect for making in a big batch and keeping some for leftovers. Check out the video below to learn how to make your very own dal! Read the full recipe in the video description here. The post Vegan Red Lentil Dal With Spinach (Gluten-Free) appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India + Giveaway

May 17 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India + Giveaway My first experience with South Indian fare was in Toronto, in a buzzing, cafeteria-style restaurant that looked like a food court in any American mall, but instead of fast food, the offering consisted of the most mind-blowing, bold-flavored South Indian dishes that weren’t like anything I’d ever tasted before. That ended up being one of the most memorable meals of my life. Since then, I’ve continued to seek out restaurants that specialized in South Indian cuisine, but rarely considered trying my hand at any of the dishes at home. Chitra Agrawal’s debut cookbook Vibrant India changed all of that for me. Chitra has spent years documenting her family’s traditionally vegetarian South Indian recipes on her blog, as well as adapting them to use the local, seasonal produce that she comes across in Brooklyn, where she lives. Her cookbook is a stunning collection of modern recipes, which honor her mother’s South Indian heritage, rooted in the ayurvedic tradition. The cookbook truly opens up a whole new world of cooking to those of us used to a more Western approach to food (and we are giving away a copy, see below :D ). In a her intro, Chitra explains the difference between North and South Indian cooking, and chances are, the Indian food you’ve tried likely originated in the North – think naan, samosas and curries. Cuisine from the South is generally characterized by the use of lentils, rice and specific spice mixtures in dishes like dosa and sambar – delicious stuff that doesn’t get nearly as much attention in the West. The book is filled with Chitra’s super comprehensive explanations of Indian cooking techniques like tempering spices, etc., which takes the intimidation factor out of the recipes. Turns out, making flavorful and authentically rooted South Indian dishes at home is totally doable. I’ve already made the Dosa, Lemony Lentil Soup, Banana, Coconut and Cardamom Ice Cream, as well as a few of the rices, and each one came out explosive in flavor, as well nourishing to the core. One of my favorite chapters turned out to be the Rice and Bread chapter, which offers a ton of ideas on preparing rice to be enjoyed as a main dish. Who would have thought that basmati rice could be so flavorful and substantial?! There are recipes for Lemon Peanut Rice, Fragrant Eggplant and Green Pepper Rice, Coconut Rice with Cashews, and Yogurt Rice with Pomegranate and Mint, but my favorite one of all turned out to be the Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios, which I’m sharing here. Chitra talks about often getting a hefty bunch of dill from her farm share and not knowing what to do with the volume, which sparked the idea for this recipe that uses up plenty of dill. The result is rice so fragrant that it’s nothing short of heavenly. Chitra explains that she aims to achieve a balance of sweet, sour, bitter, spicy, and savory flavors in her recipes, which is what I mean when I describe her dishes as explosive, and that very much applies to this rice recipe as well. Other chapters within the book include Breakfast and Light Meals, Salads and Yogurts, Stir-Fries and Curries, Soups, Stews and Lentils, Festive Bites and Snacks,  Sweets and Drinks, Chutneys and Pickles – basically a ton of deliciousness packed into a beautiful cookbook. Well done, Chitra! In case you are wondering, the book does call for specialty Indian ingredients that you might not be able to find at your mainstream supermarket. However, if you enjoy cooking and learning about new ingredients, it’s SO worth seeking out a local Indian market in your area. I rely on our nearby Indian market for stocking up on ghee, fresh spices, rice and a variety of lentils, all at an affordable price. All the ingredients are also available online. Giveaway: To enter to win a copy of Vibrant India, leave a comment here letting us know if you would be interested in seeing weekly plant-based meal plans, complete with recipes and shopping lists as a new series on this site. We are thinking of starting up a conversation about meal prep, and would love to gauge your interest! The winner will be selected at random on Wednesday, May 24th. Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the turmeric rice 1 cup basmati rice (makes about 4 cups cooked) ⅛ teaspoon turmeric powder for the lime and dill rice with pistachios 4 cups cooked turmeric rice 2 tablespoons mild-flavored oil such as canola (I used coconut) ½ teaspoon black mustard seeds pinch of asafetida (hing) powder 1 teaspoon chana dal 1 teaspoon urad dal 5 fresh curry leaves 1 dried red chile, broken in half 1 large shallot or ½ medium yellow onion - finely chopped small bunch of dill - tough stalks removed, chopped ½ to ¾ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon sambar powder (optional) ¼ cup shelled pistachios - lightly toasted and coarsely chopped juice of half a lime (about 1½ tablespoons), plus more as needed serving options raita or plain yogurt hot pickle or Brooklyn Delhi (Chitras company!) achaar Instructions to make the turmeric rice Wash the rice in several changes of water until the water runs clear. Soak the rice in water, generously covered, for at least 30 minutes. Drain thoroughly, using a fine-mesh sieve. Place rice and 1¾ cups water in a medium saucepan. Mix in the turmeric powder. Place the saucepan over high heat and bring to a boil. Once the water is boiling, cover the saucepan and turn the heat to the lowest setting on your stove. Cook until the rice in tender and there is no water left in the pan, about 15 minutes. Turn off the heat. Remove the saucepan from the stove and leave it covered for 10 minutes, to allow the grains to separate. Fluff with a fork. to make the lime and dill rice with pistachios Coat the bottom of a wok (I used a large sauté pan w/­­ a lid) with the oil and place over medium heat. When the oil is hot and shimmering, add one black mustard seed. When the seed sizzles and pops, add the rest of the mustard seeds and asafetida. Keep a lid handy to cover the pan while the mustard seeds are popping. When the popping starts to subside (a few seconds), immediately add the chana dal and urad dal. Stir to coat with oil, and turn the heat to medium-low. Continue to stir the dals so they evenly roast, until they turn a reddish golden brown and smell nutty, less than a minute. Rub the curry leaves between you fingers a little to release their natural oils, and drop them and the dried red chile into the oil. Cover immediately, as moisture from the curry leaves will cause the oil to spatter. Then stir to evenly coat everything with oil, a few seconds. Add the shallot to the wok and fry over medium heat until softened, less than a minute. Add the dill, ¼ teaspoon of the salt, and a couple tablespoons of water. Turn the heat to medium-low, cover, and cook for 10 to 15 minutes. Stir from time to time. When cooked, the dill should be darker in color and not have as strong a flavor as raw dill. Add the sambar powder. Fry for another minute. Stir in the cooked rice and season with ¼ to ½ teaspoon salt. Stir-fry for 1 to 2 minutes. Mix in the pistachios, reserving a few for garnish. Turn off the heat. Stir in the lime juice and garnish with the reserved pistachios. Taste for salt and adjust as needed. Serve hot with yogurt and hot pickle. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Nasi Lemak

March 15 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

Nasi Lemak In the five weeks that I spent exploring Malaysia, Singapore, and Borneo there were a few dishes that I just had to try whenever I had the chance. Nasi Lemak is a national favorite - and one of my favorites, too! The name technically means “fatty rice” but “creamy rice” sounds a least a little bit better. Traditionally, as with this recipe, Nasi Lemak is rice cooked in creamy, coconut milk - often along with fresh herbs and spices such as pandan (which you can replace with bay leaves if that’s what you’ve got.) The bright yellow hue comes from turmeric. Though it’s a breakfast dish, it can be eaten at any time of the day, and many variations cross firmly into Savory Culinary Territory. I eat this all times of the day: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Snack, whatever! I tried Nasi Lemak in lots of places: Kuala Lampur, Penang, Malacca, and Singapore. Inspired by those dishes and their accompaniments - and my own imagination, I’ve created a complete meal set: Coconut Pandan Rice served with stir-fried Lemongrass Ginger Tofu, crunchy, charred Spicy Nuts, and a delicious sweet-chili sauce known as Sambal Belacan. These are actually four different recipes from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA which I’ve put together in this one post. You can of course substitute or simplify the dishes for a less involved meal set designed how you like it. Nasi Lemak is equally awesome even when it’s just served with the fresh cucumber, lime slices, and nuts. I love going all out and doing the Lemongrass Tofu cubes, too. Also, I find the hot, spicy Samabal Belecan completes the dish fantastically. How to eat it? Mix it up and eat it with your hands! Serve this meal set up on a banana leaf, wash your hands, mix everything together, and dive in… wild and forkless. (By the way, frozen banana leaves are often available at your local Asian import grocery shop. Just thaw them, rinse them, and eat off of them.) If you prefer a more modern approach: Make it all, arrange it perfectly on plates, eat it with a fork and spoon. It’s up to you! Nasi Lemak Malaysian Coconut Pandan Rice with Lemongrass Ginger Tofu, Spicy Nuts & Sambal Belacan recipes from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA serves 3 to 4 /­­ time 60 min Coconut Pandan Rice: - 2 cups (375 g) broken jasmine rice or basmati rice - 1 2/­­3 cup (400 ml) water - 1 2/­­3 cup (400 ml) coconut milk - 1/­­2 tsp sea salt - 1/­­2 tsp turmeric ground - 2 pandan leaves or bay leaves - fried onions for garnish - 1/­­2 small cucumber sliced - lime slices for garnish - Rinse and drain rice thoroughly. - Bring water and coconut milk to low boil in a medium pot with good lid. Stir in rice, salt, turmeric, and pandan (or bay leaves). Return to simmer. Cover and steam until most liquid is absorbed, 12-15 min. Remove from heat. Stir a few times. Cover and let sit 10 min. Remove and discard leaves before serving. - Garnish with fried onions, cucumber, and lime slices. Lemongrass Ginger Tofu: - 14 oz (400 g) firm tofu cut in cubes or strips - 1 1/­­2 cups (200 g) pineapple chopped - 1 Tbs oil - 2 shallots finely chopped - 2 cloves garlic finely chopped - 2 stalks lemongrass finely chopped - 3/­­4 in (2 cm) fresh ginger finely chopped - 1 tsp coriander ground - 1 Tbs lime juice or lemon juice - 1 Tbs soy sauce (Shoyu) - 1/­­4 tsp sea salt - fresh coriander or parsley leaves chopped, for garnish - Cut tofu in slabs and wrap in clean kitchen towel. Weight with a heavy cutting board and press out extra moisture, 15-20 min. Unwrap and cut in cubes or strips. - Heat oil in a large frying pan or wok on medium high heat. Add chopped shallots, garlic, lemongrass, ginger, and ground coriander. Fry, stirring constantly, until shallots being to soften and brown, 2-3 min. - Add tofu cubes. Mix well. Fry, stirring regularly, until tofu cubes are golden brown and crispy on the edges, 5-8 min. - Add chopped pineapple, lime (or lemon) juice, soy sauce, and salt. Fry, stirring regularly, another 5-10 min. Remove from heat. Spicy Nuts: - 1/­­2 cup (50 g) peanuts - 1/­­2 cup (50 g) cashews - 1/­­2 tsp chili powder or paprika ground - 2 tsp coconut sugar - 1/­­4 tsp sea salt - Heat a medium frying pan on medium heat. Dry roast peanuts and cashews, stirring regularly, until light golden brown and dark spots begin to appear, 4-7 min. Do not burn. - Add chili powder (or paprika), sugar and salt. Mix well. Continue to cook another 2-3 min, stirring constantly, until sugar has melted and nuts are well coated. Remove from heat. Allow to cool. Sambal Belacan: - 2-3 Tbs vegetable oil - 5 large (90 g) red chilies chopped - 2 cloves garlic chopped - 1 Tbs soy sauce (Shoyu) - 1 Tbs rice vinegar - 1 Tbs lime juice or lemon juice - 1 Tbs coconut sugar - 1/­­4 tsp sea salt - Blend all ingredients in a small food processor or blender until smooth, adding more oil (or some water) as needed. - Heat a small frying pan on medium heat. Add blended spice paste to pan and fry, stirring regularly, until sauce darkens, thickens, and oil separates, 8-12 min. vegan recipes from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA (available as printed cookbook & ebook in English & German) The post Nasi Lemak appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices

January 5 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices This post was created in partnership with Amira. This month we are focusing on recipes that will hopefully be helpful to those wanting to hit the reset button after all the holiday eating and drinking. I wanted a very manageable weekday dinner to be the first in the series, because we haven’t had one up in a while, and because I myself have been on the hunt for some new but trustworthy, quick and wholesome meal ideas. Most of my focus right now is on completing the kitchen renovation, a good part of which my husband and I have been doing ourselves. It’s been dragging on much longer than we expected – a common theme when it comes renovations, as I hear. We are finally down to the small finishing touches, but they somehow seem to be the hardest to complete. Cooking up large batches of un-elaborate, nourishing dishes like this stew to have on hand during the week has been one of my strategies for staying sane throughout this whole process. It’s amazing how helpful a home-cooked meal can be during times of stress. When looking for inspiration for balanced winter weeknight meals, I often turn to South Indian cuisine for its array of delicious vegetarian dishes and Ayurveda-approved ingredients. This particular stew is based on a recipe for sambar – a mung dal (yellow split mung beans that are protein-rich and affordable) stew that comes in hundreds of variations. The base for sambar is most commonly made up of mung dal that’s been cooked down to a porridge-like consistency and spiced, after which almost anything goes. You can include one or many stew-friendly vegetables in season, as well as other fun add ins like desiccated coconut. I love the versatility of this dish and usually just add in whatever vegetables or greens I have on hand. For this version, I kept things simple and only added chopped butternut squash and dried coconut – it can be as simple or as involved as you’d like. The ingredient list might seem long, but it’s mostly composed of spices, which play a huge role in building flavor in this otherwise modest stew. Each spice also brings its unique healing properties to the table – fennel helps aid digestion, turmeric is anti-inflammatory, fenugreek helps with blood sugar balance and much, much more. Like many Indian dishes, sambar is traditionally served over rice, and I’ve been truly enjoying serving it over Amira’s fragrant Thai Jasmine Brown Rice. Amira sent me a few of their premium long grain rice varieties to try, and I was consistently impressed with their quality and how distinctly different each kind tasted. Besides the jasmine brown rice, the variety that stood out to me is their Smoked Basmati Rice, which has a very unique smoked flavor and is really good in salads, and as a base for all kinds of veggie bowls. I’m crazy about smoked foods, so that one really hit the spot. If you see Amira rice in your grocery store, give it a try, I think you’ll really enjoy it! Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients 3 cups water ½ cup mung dal ¼ teaspoon turmeric ¼ teaspoon cumin ¼ teaspoon whole fenugreek seeds (optional) 3 sprigs fresh curry leaves (optional) 1 small yellow onion - chopped ½ medium butternut squash - peeled and cubed ¼ cup desiccated coconut sea salt 1 tablespoon red chili powder 2 tablespoons ghee or coconut oil ¼ teaspoon whole black mustard seeds 1 whole dried red chili - torn in half ⅛ teaspoon whole fennel seeds 1 tablespoon fresh lemon or lime juice 1½ cups cooked rice of your choice - for serving cilantro - for garnish (optional) coconut milk or yogurt - for garnish (optional) Instructions Bring 3 cups of water to a boil in a medium pot. Have a tea kettle or another pot with about 1 more cup of hot water ready, in case you need more water later in the process. Once 3 cups of water in the pot are boiling, add mung dal, turmeric, cumin, fenugreek and curry leaves (if using). Lower heat to establish a steady simmer and cook, covered, for 20 minutes. Mix periodically to ensure the mung dahl doesnt stick to the pan. Discard curry sprigs, if using. Add onion, squash, desiccated coconut, and salt to the pot. If it seems like there isnt enough liquid in the pot, add a little more hot water from the tea kettle until the vegetables have room to simmer in the water, keeping the dal consistency like a soupy porridge. Continue simmering, covered, for another 20 minutes or until the vegetables are cooked through. Stir in chili powder at half time. Mix periodically to prevent any sticking. Once the vegetables are around 5 minutes away from being done, warm ghee/­­oil in a medium pan over medium heat. Add mustard seeds and let toast for about 30 seconds, tossing all the while. Add the chili and fennel seeds and toast for another 30 seconds or until fennel is toasted in color and fragrant. Add the toasted spices along with the ghee/­­oil from the pan into the pot with the stew, mix it in and let simmer, covered, for another 5 minutes. Once stew is done cooking, discard the pepper and mix in the lemon/­­lime juice. Taste and adjust the salt. Serve stew over rice, garnished with cilantro and coconut milk/­­yogurt if desired. Notes 1. You can add any vegetables/­­greens you have on hand in place of the butternut squash here and simmer until done, thats what makes this stew so versatile. 2. Curry leaves are completely optional here, but if you can get your hands on some, add them - their unique flavor works very well in this stew. 3. Traditional sambar calls for hing and tamarind. If you have one or both, add ⅛ teaspoon of hing to the pan with the toasting spices, towards the end and add to the stew with the rest of the toasted spices and ghee/­­oil. Add 2 teaspoons tamarind paste in place of the lemon/­­lime juice and simmer stew for another 5 minutes to let the flavor incorporate. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Turmeric Spinach Lentil Dal – Red Lentil Soup

June 8 2016 Vegan Richa 

Turmeric Spinach Lentil Dal – Red Lentil SoupTurmeric Spinach Lentil Dal – Red Lentil Soup. Easy Lentil Soup with turmeric and greens. No garlic no onion Dhal. Golden Lentil Dal with Bengali Panch phoron spices. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Recipe. Pin this Recipe.  This easy dal comes together in minutes. I use nigella and fenugreek seeds to add the onion-garlic flavor profile so this soup is great for anyone avoiding alliums. Add veggies and baby greens of choice and let it simmer. Serve as soup with crackers or papadums or over cooked basmati rice or other grains.  Temper the whole spices in oil. Once the spices start to pop or change color considerably, add turmeric and mix in. Add the lentils and water and cook until done to preference. Fold in spinach or greens of choice. Add veggies of choice and add in some fresh turmeric! How do you Dal? Continue reading: Turmeric Spinach Lentil Dal – Red Lentil SoupThe post Turmeric Spinach Lentil Dal – Red Lentil Soup appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Mango Rice

March 10 2016 Manjula's kitchen 

Mango Rice Mango rice is just one style of South Indian rice dishes among many different variations. Mango rice has a very unique flavor due to the tartness of the mangoes, the sweetness of the coconut, and the heat of the chilies all being mixed together. This is a simple but flavorful and satisfying light lunch! Ingredients: For Rice - 1 cup long grain rice, I am using basmati rice - 1 tablespoon oil - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 2 cups water For mango seasoning - 2 cups raw mango peeled and shredded - 3 tablespoons oil - 1/­­2 teaspoon mustard seeds, rai - About 10 curry leaves - 2 tablespoons peanuts - 2 tablespoons roasted chana, optional - 1 tablespoon ginger sliced, adrak - 2 green chili seeded and sliced lengthwise - 1/­­4 teaspoon turmeric, haldi - 1/­­4 teaspoon red chili powder - 1 teaspoons salt - 1/­­4 cup coconut freshly shredded, I am using frozen shredded coconut - 1 tablespoon sugar - 2 teaspoons lemon juice, use as needed Method - Wash and soak the rice in about 3 cups of water for at least 15 minutes. - Drain the rice. In the sauce pan cook, the rice with 2 cups of water, salt, and oil over medium high heat, bring rice to boil then turn the heat to low, cover the pan and cook rice for about 15 minutes, or until the rice is tender and the water has evaporated. Turn off the heat and fluff the rice with a fork. Note: Cooked rice expands to about 4 times its original size, so be sure to use the proper size pan. - Heat the oil in a saucepan over medium heat, oil should be moderately hot, add mustard seeds. - When the seeds cracks add peanuts, and roasted chana, stir fry for one minute until peanuts are lightly brown. - Add green chili, curry leaves, and ginger, stir for few seconds. - Next add coconut, mango, sugar, salt, turmeric, and red chili mix it well and cook over low heat for 3-4 minutes until mango is just tender, do not overcook the mango. - Gently fold the rice with mango and turn off the heat. Mango rice is ready to serve. - Turn off the heat if needed drizzle some lemon juice.   You will  also like some more rice dishes.  they are easy to make  good for lunch box as a complete meal.  Yogurt Rice, Chickpea Pulav, Quinoa Vegetable Pilaf Enjoy! The post Mango Rice appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Jeera Rice (Cumin Rice)

December 10 2015 Manjula's kitchen 

Jeera Rice (Cumin Rice) Jeera rice is a simple rice dish flavored with cumin seeds. Jeera Rice or Cumin Rice makes a delicious side dish which can be served with any meal and makes it festive. This recipe will serve 4. Ingredients: - 1 cup rice I preferred basmati rice - 2 tablespoons oil - 1 teaspoon cumin seeds (jeera) - 4 whole dried red chili (sabut lal mirch) - 1inch piece of cinnamon stick (dal chini) - 2 cardamoms crushed (ilachi) - 2 bay leaves (tajpat) - 1/­­4 teaspoon salt - 1/­­4 cup cilantro chopped (hara dhania) - 2 cups water - 2 tablespoons ghee clarified butter for garnishing Preparation - Wash the rice gently and soak in lukewarm water for about 15 minutes. Drain the water and set aside. - Heat the oil in a saucepan moderately. Oil is the right temperature when one cumin seed dropped into the oil cracks immediately. - Add the cumin seeds. When they crack, add all the spices red chili, cinnamon, bay leaves, and cardamom, stir for few seconds. - Add the rice. Stir-fry one minute. - Add the water and salt bring to a boil, and turn the heat to low. Cover the pan. - Cook 15 minutes, or until the rice is tender and the water has evaporated. Turn off the heat add cilantro and fluff the rice. Jeera rice is ready, serve hot. Garnish the rice with ghee but this is optional. Jeera rice is very aromatic and delicious. This can enhance any meal. The pan I cooked the rice is my favorite pan I use this for my every day cooking. Enjoy! The post Jeera Rice (Cumin Rice) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Shahi Pulao (Vegetable Pulao)

September 2 2015 Manjula's kitchen 

Shahi Pulao (Vegetable Pulao) Shahi Pulao or Vegetable Pulao is an exotic rice dish that combines spicy and aromatic vegetables served over rice. Rich with flavor, this is an extraordinary dish. You may also call this Biryani. This dish is made in two parts. First I prepare the rice with cumin seeds and cilantro. Then the vegetables are cooked separately with tomatoes, cashews, beans, green peas, cauliflower, and paneer. Top these vegetables over the rice and you have a mouth-watering dish! Recipe will serve 4. Ingredients: For rice - 1 cup rice preferred basmati rice available in Indian grocery stores - 2 tablespoons clarified butter or ghee - 1/­­2 teaspoon cumin seeds (jeera) - About 1 inch piece cinnamon stick (dal chini) - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - About 1/­­4 cup cilantro finely chopped (hara dhania) - 2 cups water For vegetables - About 3 cups mix vegetables I am using cauliflower cut into small floret, green beans cut into small pieces, bell pepper cut into cubes, and frozen green peas, - 1/­­2 cup paneer cut into about 1/­­2 inch cubes - 4 cups tomatoes chopped - 1 green chili cut into pieces - About 2 tablespoons ginger cut into small pieces - 3 tablespoons oil - 1 teaspoon cumin seeds (jeera) - 1/­­8 teaspoon asafetida (hing) - 2 tablespoons coriander powder (dhania) - 1/­­2 teaspoon turmeric - 1/­­2 teaspoon red chili powder - 1-1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1 teaspoon sugar - 1/­­4 cup cashew powder - 1/­­4 cup cilantro chopped - 1/­­4 teaspoon garam masala Method Rice: - Wash rice gently changing water several times until the water appears clear. - For fluffier rice, the rice should be soaked for at least 15 minutes prior to cooking. - Heat the oil in a saucepan. Oil is the right temperature when one cumin seed dropped into the oil cracks immediately. - Add the cumin seeds. When they crack, add the cinnamon stick and stir for a few seconds. Add the rice, cilantro, and salt. Stir-fry one minute. - Add the water and bring to a boil, turn the heat to low. Cover the pan, and Cook 15 minutes, or until the rice is tender and the water has evaporated. Turn off the heat and fluff the rice with a fork. Vegetables - Blend tomatoes, green chilies and ginger to make a puree. If you prefer mild take the seeds out of green chili before blending. - Heat the oil in a saucepan. Over medium high heat oil should be moderately hot, add the cumin seeds, and asafetida, as seeds crack add tomato puree, coriander, turmeric, sugar and salt. - Lower the heat to medium, stir the spice paste occasionally when it start thickening add cashew powder and cook until paste become the thick and start leaving the oil from side. - Add all the vegetables and 1/­­4 cup of water, mix it well. Cover the pan and let it cook for about 5-6 minutes over medium heat stir few times in between. Add paneer mix and cover the pan, cook for another 3-4 minutes. Vegetables should be tender not mushy. - Turn off the heat add garam masala and cilantro, stir and cover the pan for few minutes before serving. - Serve the vegetable over hot rice. Hyderbadi mirchi ka salan goes well with this Shahi Pulao Hyderabadi Mirchi Ka Salan (Spicy Pepper Curry) The post Shahi Pulao (Vegetable Pulao) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Brown Rice Mung Bean Kitchari – Mung Bean Stew

August 8 2015 Vegan Richa 

Brown Rice Mung Bean Kitchari – Mung Bean Stew Kitchari/­­khichdi is a one pot rice and lentil meal with many variations and the ways it is served. Often is it a light cleansing food made for days you want to rest your digestion, or just a one pot dish for a quick meal. Depending on the region, it can be an elaborate preparation, comfort food or a gourmet meal as well. Khichdi means a mess and thats what the dish generally is. A well cooked mess or mixed up rice and lentils (and vegetables if using) The lighter version of khichdi with mung dal (split mung bean) and basmati rice can be found in my book. That version has been in the family for generations, and takes just a few minutes in the pressure cooker.  For the version today I use whole green mung beans and brown basmati rice. You can cook it just till the beans and rice are tender  for a stew or longer for a creamier kitchari. Do you use a pressure cooker? If not, why not? Pressure cooking has been used for Indian food for ages with the basic stove top pressure cookers. Pressure Cookers these days are safer and easier to use, programmable and versatile with functions to use as slow-cooker, making yogurt etc. Continue reading: Brown Rice Mung Bean Kitchari – Mung Bean StewThe post Brown Rice Mung Bean Kitchari – Mung Bean Stew appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegetable Biryani

May 18 2015 Meatless Monday 

Biryani is an Indian dish usually made with spiced lamb, raisins, eggs and vegetables layered with perfectly cooked basmati rice and steamed together in a sealed pot. This version is meatless but still just as flavorful, seasoned with cinnamon , cloves, ginger and garlic. Look for ginger-garlic paste in Indian markets or make it yourself with a mortar and pestle and equal parts peeled ginger and garlic. This recipe was created by Riddhima, who writes the blog Culinary Vibes. Serves 6 To make the basmati rice: - 1 green chili - 2 whole cardamom pods - 2 whole cloves - 1 cinnamon stick - 1 teaspoon salt - 2 cups basmati rice, rinsed To complete the Vegetable Biryani: - 6 hard-boiled eggs, shelled - 4 green chilies, divided - 1/­­2 cups plain Greek-style yogurt - 1 teaspoon ginger-garlic paste - 1 teaspoon red chili powder - 1 teaspoon salt - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground turmeric - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground allspice - 2 tablespoons canola oil - 4 onions, sliced - 1/­­4 cup fresh mint leaves - 1/­­2 cup chopped fresh cilantro - 1 teaspoon ghee or unsalted butter - 2 bell peppers, cut into strips - 1 cup frozen peas, thawed - 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice To make the basmati rice: Cut a 1 inch slit along one side of the green chili. In a large pot over medium-high heat, bring 3 cups water with the cardamom pods, cloves, cinnamon stick, salt and 1 of the green chilies to a boil. Add the rice to the pot, reduce heat to medium-low and cook, uncovered, 10 minutes or until the rice is about halfway cooked. Drain and set aside. To complete the Vegetable Biryiani: Cut a 1 inch slit along one side of each of the hard-boiled eggs and the remaining 4 green chilies. In a medium bowl, whisk together yogurt, ginger-garlic paste, red chili powder, salt, turmeric and allspice. Add the hard boiled eggs; stir gently to coat eggs completely. Cover and let stand at room temperature for 45 minutes. Heat the oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add onions and cook 10-15 minutes, stirring occasionally, or until browned. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the onions to a medium bowl. Stir in the mint, coriander and 2 more of the remaining chilies. In a Dutch oven over medium-high heat, melt the ghee or butter. Add the pepper strips and cook 5 minutes, or until softened. Reduce heat to medium-low. Add the peas, marinated eggs and onions in layers. Sprinkle with lemon juice and top with the parboiled rice. Cover and cook for about 30-40 minutes, or until the rice is fully cooked. Stir to combine ingredients before serving. The post Vegetable Biryani appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Top 10 Pantry Staples for Veg Home Cooks

November 6 2014 Vegetarian Times 

Top 10 Pantry Staples for Veg Home Cooks A well-stocked pantry means a nourishing meal is never more than a cupboard (or freezer!) away. Short on shelf space? We asked cookbook authors and nutrition experts ?to help us narrow down our list of the most versatile veg ingredients. Here are 10 must-haves--in no particular order--for your kitchen. 1. Chickpeas Not just for hummus, these protein-packed beans also make satisfying scrambles and can be mashed and used in place of canned tuna for chickpea salad sandwiches. Joni Marie Newman, author of Fusion Food in the Vegan Kitchen, loves roasting chickpeas with olive oil, spices, and salt for a snack. Spread chickpeas on a baking sheet, and bake at 400°F for 40 minutes, or until crispy. 2. Oats Rolled oats are great ?for making your own granola or blending into DIY oat flour for cookies and scones. Save chewier steel-cut oats for oatmeal: Oats contain soluble fiber and beta-glucans, ?which may lower total cholesterol and control blood pressure, says Matthew Ruscigno, MPH, RD, author of Superfoods for Life: Cacao. They are one ?of the best breakfast foods for keeping you feeling fuller longer. 3. Brown Rice Sure, brown rice doesnt cook as quickly as its white counterpart, but its richer in fiber thanks to an intact bran. Terry Hope Romero, author of Salad Samurai, favors aromatic brown basmati: If Im going to take the time for brown rice, why not make it a nutty, hearty grain that smells like buttered popcorn? Basmati rice isnt just for Indian cooking--add it to burritos, veggie bowls, and stir-fries too. 4. Coconut? Milk Swirled into soups or mashed into sweet potatoes, a little creamy coconut milk goes a long way. Newman uses it for everything from curry to coconut cream pie, saving the thick cream at the top of the can as a rich dessert topping. Worried about fat content? Although coconut milk is high in saturated fat, some of this fat helps to raise good HDL cholesterol, says Ginny Messina, RD, author of Never Too Late to Go Vegan. 5. Miso Think beyond miso soup: this fermented bean paste, a traditional Japanese staple brimming with antioxidants and beneficial bacteria, adds depth and umami to everything from spaghetti to stew, says Miyoko Schinner, author of Artisan Vegan Cheese. Use it in pad Thai instead of fish sauce, sub for Parmesan cheese in pesto, or stir into homemade salad dressing for a rich, salty kick. Kept in the fridge, miso will last up to a year. 6. Quinoa Truly a culinary powerhouse, nutty-tasting quinoa takes to many flavor profiles, from Indian to Mediterranean. Add it to salads and stir-fries for protein and crunch. To avoid mushy quinoa, try baking it: mix two parts water and one part quinoa in a casserole dish, cover, and bake at 350°F for 20 minutes, or until the liquid absorbs and the tails pop out. Comes out nice and fluffy every time, says Newman. 7. Nuts More than an energy-boosting snack, nuts are ideal for bringing crunch, creaminess, or bulk to any meal. ?They can be turned into a sauce, or ground to provide a meaty texture, says Schinner. Before using in recipes, try lightly toasting nuts in a cast-iron skillet. Or make your own healthful substitute for heavy cream: soak cashews in water for two hours or overnight, then blend with an equal amount of water until smooth. 8. Almond Butter Tired of peanut butter? Give almond butter a try: it has less saturated fat and more iron and calcium. Plus, its subtle flavor makes it the perfect addition to baked goods. To swap ?for oils and other fats, use a 1:1 mixture of almond butter and unsweetened applesauce for the full amount of fat ?in your favorite muffin, quick bread, ?and cookie recipes. Look for almond butter without added sugars or hydrogenated fats. 9. Lentils Any lentil variety makes a tasty soup standby, but inexpensive, easy-to-find green lentils are hard to beat. Cook, lightly mash, and try them in sloppy Joes, lasagna, and tacos. Lentils may be small, but they pack a powerful punch: theyre nearly 30 percent protein. Schinner keeps them handy ?for practical reasons. Lentils are the fastest legume to cook, so we eat them a lot when Ive forgotten to soak other beans, she says. 10. Frozen Blueberries Blueberries have such a short season, says Romero. Once past their explosion in July and August, they command a steep price. Your best bet? Go for frozen. Toss a few into muffin and pancake batter, swirl into oatmeal with almonds and cinnamon, or use in smoothies instead of ice. Romero likes to let the berries partially thaw, then mix them into plain coconut yogurt for ?a sweet antioxidant boost. Isa Chandra Moskowitz writes cookbooks, travels the world to Instagram food, and recently opened Nebraskas first vegan restaurant.

5 Easy and Colorful Veggie Stir-Fries

October 18 2014 VegKitchen 

5 Easy and Colorful Veggie Stir-FriesStir-Fried Tofu with Spring Greens is easy to make and versatile. See the note in the recipe for suggestions on which leafy greens to use; you can vary it each time. My favorite is baby bok choy! Orange-Glazed Tofu and Broccoli is simple to make and enlivened by the easy, orange-flavored sauce. For a tempting Asian-style meal, pair this with  Vegetable Lo Mein ,  and serve with a platter of raw vegetables on the side. Mixed Vegetable Stir-Fry (“Buddhist’s Delight”) is easy to make at home, and always a treat for anyone who loves Asian-style meals.  Serve over hot cooked brown rice or Asian noodles, along with a simple slaw-type salad or a mixed greens salad with orange sections and toasted almond slices. For protein, choose your favorite simple tofu, tempeh, or seitan preparation to serve alongside or atop this dish. Easy and colorful, Broccoli and Baby Corn Stir-Fry makes a great side dish to accompany Asian noodle main dishes. Its especially good with just-picked broccoli from the garden or farm stand. Sweet-and-Sour Stir-Fried Vegetables with Seitan or Tempeh has several steps but can be made easily and at a leisurely pace. Best of all, it results in a delicious and nourishing meal. This is especially good served over bean-thread noodles or Asian brown rice vermicelli, but soba or udon work well, too. Long-grain brown rice and brown basmati rice are good choices as well. - For lots more features on healthy lifestyle, explore VegKitchens Healthy Vegan Kitchen  page.

Sweet-and-Sour Stir-Fried Vegetables with Seitan or Tempeh

August 11 2014 VegKitchen 

Sweet-and-Sour Stir-Fried Vegetables with Seitan or Tempeh This sweet-and-sour stir-fry, featuring high-protein seitan or tempeh along with colorful vegetables and pineapple, has several steps but can be made easily and at a leisurely pace. Best of all, it results in a delicious and nourishing meal. This is especially good served over bean-thread noodles or Asian brown rice vermicelli, but soba or udon work well, too. Long-grain brown rice and brown basmati rice are good choices as well. Recipe from   Plant Power: Transform Your Kitchen, Plate, and Life with More Than 150 Fresh and Flavorful Vegan Recipes by Nava Atlas. (C)2014, published by HarperOne, reprinted by permission. Photos by  Hannah Kaminsky.    Serves: 4 to 6 Sauce: - 1/­­2 cup fruit juice (pineapple juice works best -- use reserved juice from canned pineapple if using; mango juice or nectar is good, too) - 2 1/­­2 tablespoons arrowroot or cornstarch - 1/­­2 cup vegetable broth or water - 1/­­4 cup rice vinegar - 2 tablespoons reduced-sodium natural soy sauce or tamari, or to taste - 2 tablespoons agave nectar - 1 to 2 teaspoons grated fresh or jarred ginger - - 1 tablespoon safflower or other high-heat oil, or 1/­­4 cup vegetable broth or water - 1 pound seitan, cut into bite-size chunks, or one 8-ounce package tempeh, diced - 1 medium onion, quartered and thinly sliced - 2 to 3 cloves garlic, minced - 2 large broccoli crowns, cut into bite-size pieces - 2 medium red bell peppers, cut into 1-inch pieces - 1 medium zucchini or yellow squash, halved lengthwise and cut into 1/­­2-inch chunks - 2 medium ripe fresh tomatoes, diced - 2 cups fresh pineapple chunks (about 3/­­4 inch thick) or one 20-ounce can unsweetened pineapple chunks in juice, drained and liquid reserved - Hot cooked rice, quinoa, or noodles Heat half the oil, broth, or water in a stir-fry pan or wok. Add the seitan or tempeh and stir-fry over medium-high heat until lightly browned, stirring frequently, about 5 minutes. Transfer to a plate and set aside. Heat the remaining oil, broth, or water in the pan. Add the onion and sauté over medium heat until golden. Turn up the heat; add the garlic, broccoli, and bell peppers and stir-fry for 5 minutes. Stir in the zucchini and stir-fry just until everything is tender-crisp, about 2 minutes longer, then stir in the tomatoes and pineapple chunks. Stir in the sauce and cook until it thickens. Taste and adjust the sweet-sour balance with more agave and/­­or vinegar (as called for in the sauce recipe) to your liking. Serve at once over hot cooked grains or noodles. Pass around any of the optional items for topping individual portions. Note: Why a pound of seitan but just 8 ounces of tempeh? Seitan is more moist and less dense; a pound of tempeh would be quite intense in this dish. But if youre a big fan of tempeh and want a higher-protein dish, go for it--use two 8-ounce packages. Nutrition information: Per serving with seitan: ICalories: 264; Total fat: 7g; Protein: 22g; Carbohydrates: 32g; Fiber: 4g; Sodium: 516mg Per serving with tempeh: Calories: 237; Total fat: 9g; Protein: 10g; Carbohydrates: 34g; Fiber: 6g; Sodium: 237mg - Here are more easy vegetable stir-fries.

WEEKNIGHT COCONUT CURRY W/ SWEET POTATO, RED PEPPER & SHIITAKE

August 26 2016 That's Food Darling 

WEEKNIGHT COCONUT CURRY W/ SWEET POTATO, RED PEPPER & SHIITAKE Hello there! It was and is a stormy and intense time over here. The last year Ive been subject to constant change. After lifelong struggles, I finally I got the name of my up until then 'mysterious' disease (thank god!), underwent a dire needed belly surgery and now, Im in to rest and recover. My physical condition yet matches a roller coaster ride, whereas everything you want is being healthy and living a life of easiness and abundance after all. Keeping up is far from easy but I wanna get better more than ever. Lets hit the 'reset button', yaaas? Im ready to embrace the new, its time to optimistically move on. Are you with me? Well, lets start with a tasty coconut curry recipe! Curries simply are soul food to me. Especially, I like to make them from scratch and savor them on a weekday evening. Slowly savoring a bowl of curry really calms me down. Curries are nourishing, hugely satisfying meals that, however, are light enough to not weigh you down at the same time, you know? This curry is one of my favorites as the flavors are pretty well balanced. Youll see! I really recommend you preparing the vegetables and the coconut curry base separately, so that the vegetables remain tasty and wont become mushy (what happens quickly!). I prefer to separately roast the vegetables for the curry in the oven, while simmering the coconut curry base on the stove simultaneously. The outcome is way tastier than itd be when cooking everything in one pot. I promise! Btw, I yet haven't met anyone who doesn't like a good curry, it's quite happy food, so invite friends for weeknight dinner and cook for them.   WEEKNIGHT COCONUT CURRY W/­­ SWEET POTATO, RED PEPPER & SHIITAKE   |2 servings|   INGREDIENTS 2 tbsp coconut oil 1 sweet potato, peeled and cut into medium dices 10-12 shiitake mushrooms, cut into slices 1 red bell pepper, cut into slices sea salt to taste 1/­­2  can (200ml) full-fat coconut milk 1 heaped tsp moringa powder (optional) thumb-sized piece of ginger, grated and squeezed 1 garlic clove, grated a pinch of cayenne pepper 1 heaped tsp homemade curry powder (see recipe below) 1 tbsp brown miso paste 1 tsp rice vinegar juice of half a lime   serve with:   a handful of cashews, toasted and chopped a handful fresh mint, chopped  basmati rice for 2 persons, cooked homemade curry powder:   1 tsp turmeric 1/­­2  tsp of each fennel, coriander and cumin seeds 1/­­4  tsp fenugreek seeds 1/­­4  tsp cinnamon   HOW TO MAKE   For the curry powder slightly toast all the seeds in a pan, then put all ingredients into a mortar, and ground until you have a fine curry powder mix. For the vegetables, preheat oven to 200°C. Collect sweet potatoes, shiitake mushrooms and red peppers on a large baking tray that's lined with baking paper. Drizzle the melted coconut oil and sea salt. Toss to coat well and spread in a single layer. Bake in the upper third of the oven for about twenty minutes, or until the vegetables are slightly browned and crisp.     While the vegetables roast, both cook the basmati rice and the coconut curry sauce. For the curry, warm the coconut milk over medium heat. Add the moringa powder, ginger juice, grated garlic, curry powder, cayenne pepper and miso paste, and stir to mix.  Let everything simmer on low for 5 minutes. Stir in the rice vinegar and lime juice. Taste for seasoning. It should be somewhat thick, but still thin enough to pour over the rice and vegetable mix, you know? Add broth if needed.  For serving, serve each bowl with a scoop of basmati rice, divide roasted vegetables onto bowls, and pour over the coconut curry sauce. Garnish with cashews and mint. Serve warm and enjoy!

Turmeric Lemon Rice Recipe

May 13 2016 Vegan Richa 

Turmeric Lemon Rice RecipeTurmeric Lemon Rice Recipe. 10 minute Golden Rice with turmeric, lemon and mustard seeds. Indian Lemon Rice. Use cooked brown rice, quinoa, millet or couscous or cauliflower rice for variation. Easy side. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Recipe. Pin this post.  This super easy flavorful rice is a great side with simple dals, veggie curries or anything really. I posted a bowl with the Mango Dal, Bengali Veggies with the turmeric rice last week and got many requests for the turmeric lemon rice recipe. So here goes.  TGIF! Make this 10 minute lemony turmeric rice. Or use other cooked grains or cauliflower. I usually use Basmati Rice or a mix of white and brown basmati. Add veggies along the way or just make the plain rice and serve in a bowl of choice. Curry leaves are available in Indian Stores or online on amazon. The fresh leaves can be frozen for months in an airtight container. Use fresh or frozen right out of the freezer.  Heat the oil. Once the oil is hot, add mustard seeds and let them really start to pop. If the mustard seeds don’t pop, they don’t release their amazing flavor into the food. This is one of the reasons, people often want to add more spices and flavors to the food, esp Indian food, as it feels like there isn’t enough in the dish. If the recipes call for roasting the spices with or without oil, the spices need to be roasted well for the flavor to really bloom into the dish.  See video below and notice those popping mustard seeds! Continue reading: Turmeric Lemon Rice RecipeThe post Turmeric Lemon Rice Recipe appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Indian Curried Cauliflower & Chickpea Burritos

February 17 2016 Oh My Veggies 

Spicy, saucy curried cauliflower and chickpeas are teamed up with rich coconut infused basmati rice in these flavorful Indian-inspired burritos.

Does Arsenic in Rice Make it Totally Off Limits?

October 21 2015 Vegetarian Times 

Does Arsenic in Rice Make it Totally Off Limits?     Headlines screaming poisonous rice might have you ixnaying the widely eaten grain from your meals, but it can still be a beneficial part of your dietary repertoire. Arsenic is found naturally in the environment, but it can also enter the air, water, and soil from mining and arsenic-containing pesticides. Plants take up arsenic as they grow, and eventually it works its way into your grocery cart. Long-term exposure to high levels of arsenic has been correlated with greater risk of cancer and heart disease. For most people, food is the primary source of arsenic exposure. Rice seems especially efficient at absorbing arsenic from water and soil, and leaving the bran intact, as with brown rice, increases the grains arsenic content. A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention investigation linked higher intakes of rice and rice products, such as rice cakes and rice milk, with increased urinary arsenic levels. Still, there is no federal limit for arsenic in rice, and without hard evidence associating rice intake with poor health, the FDA has yet to recommend that Americans change their consumption habits. In fact, a study involving more than 200,000 people published this year in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition failed to find an increased risk for heart disease in those consuming up to five servings of white or brown rice weekly. Additionally, Harvard researchers determined that eating brown rice twice a week can help protect against type 2 diabetes. The benefits of consuming whole-grain rice, such as increased intakes of minerals and fiber, could outweigh the risks of arsenic exposure. Opt for brown basmati rices from California, India, or Pakistan, which a Consumer Reports investigation found have lower arsenic levels than other brown rices. And rinsing rice before cooking and boiling it in a larger volume of water--6 cups water to 1 cup rice--can help slash arsenic levels. Because babies, infants, and toddlers can be more susceptible to arsenic, parents are advised to limit their childrens consumption of rice drinks and also to frequently offer alternatives to rice cereal. Good Grains Rotate these nutrient-packed (and gluten-free!) grains with rice to further limit your potential arsenic exposure. Buckwheat Toast the hulled, crushed kernels of this rhubarb relative in a skillet until golden, and then sprinkle over salads for some nutritious crunch. Check out our Buckwheat recipes. Amaranth These tiny grains cook up into a gelatinous consistency, perfect to try as a porridge. Check out our Amaranth recipes. Millet This type of cereal grass adds a toothsome, nutty flavor to soups and veggie burgers. Check out our Millet recipes. THE REALITY Just how much arsenic-containing rice youd have to eat for it to negatively affect your long-term health remains unknown. The FDA is in the midst of conducting a risk assessment to try to answer that question. Until those numbers are in, theres no compelling reason to banish rice from your diet. But do vary the grains you consume in order to keep your arsenic intake in check. Investigative Nutritionist Canada-based Matthew Kadey, RD, sets us straight on misleading nutrition claims.

Hyderabadi Biryani (Vegetable Pulao)

September 2 2015 Manjula's kitchen 

Hyderabadi Biryani (Vegetable Pulao) (deployads = window.deployads || []).push({}); Hyderabadi Vegetable Pulao is an exotic rice dish that combines spicy and aromatic vegetables served over rice. Rich with flavor, this is an extraordinary dish. You may also call this Biryani. This dish is made in two parts. First I prepare the rice with cumin seeds and cilantro. Then the vegetables are cooked separately with tomatoes, cashews, beans, green peas, cauliflower, and paneer. Top these vegetables over the rice and you have a mouth-watering dish! Recipe will serve 4. Ingredients: For rice - 1 cup rice preferred basmati rice available in Indian grocery stores - 2 tablespoons clarified butter or ghee - 1/­­2 teaspoon cumin seeds (jeera) - About 1 inch piece cinnamon stick (dal chini) - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - About 1/­­4 cup cilantro finely chopped (hara dhania) - 2 cups water For vegetables - About 3 cups mix vegetables I am using cauliflower cut into small floret, green beans cut into small pieces, bell pepper cut into cubes, and frozen green peas, - 1/­­2 cup paneer cut into about 1/­­2 inch cubes - 4 cups tomatoes chopped - 1 green chili cut into pieces - About 2 tablespoons ginger cut into small pieces - 3 tablespoons oil - 1 teaspoon cumin seeds (jeera) - 1/­­8 teaspoon asafetida (hing) - 2 tablespoons coriander powder (dhania) - 1/­­2 teaspoon turmeric - 1/­­2 teaspoon red chili powder - 1-1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1 teaspoon sugar - 1/­­4 cup cashew powder - 1/­­4 cup cilantro chopped - 1/­­4 teaspoon garam masala Method Rice: - Wash rice gently changing water several times until the water appears clear. - For fluffier rice, the rice should be soaked for at least 15 minutes prior to cooking. - Heat the oil in a saucepan. Oil is the right temperature when one cumin seed dropped into the oil cracks immediately. - Add the cumin seeds. When they crack, add the cinnamon stick and stir for a few seconds. Add the rice, cilantro, and salt. Stir-fry one minute. - Add the water and bring to a boil, turn the heat to low. Cover the pan, and Cook 15 minutes, or until the rice is tender and the water has evaporated. Turn off the heat and fluff the rice with a fork. Vegetables - Blend tomatoes, green chilies and ginger to make a puree. If you prefer mild take the seeds out of green chili before blending. - Heat the oil in a saucepan. Over medium high heat oil should be moderately hot, add the cumin seeds, and asafetida, as seeds crack add tomato puree, coriander, turmeric, sugar and salt. - Lower the heat to medium, stir the spice paste occasionally when it start thickening add cashew powder and cook until paste become the thick and start leaving the oil from side. - Add all the vegetables and 1/­­4 cup of water, mix it well. Cover the pan and let it cook for about 5-6 minutes over medium heat stir few times in between. Add paneer mix and cover the pan, cook for another 3-4 minutes. Vegetables should be tender not mushy. - Turn off the heat add garam masala and cilantro, stir and cover the pan for few minutes before serving. - Serve the vegetable over hot rice. Hyderbadi mirchi ka salan goes well with this pulao The post Hyderabadi Biryani (Vegetable Pulao) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Weekly Plant-Based Dinner Plan, July 20-24, 2015

July 20 2015 VegKitchen 

Weekly Plant-Based Dinner Plan, July 20-24, 2015Now past the mid-way point in July, this week finds many of us under a blanket of heat. The better news is that summer produce is abundant and inexpensive. Here are this weeks meals, which are both economical and quick, getting you from the kitchen to the table in about 30 minutes. Dont forget to serve plenty of summer fruit for dessert or evening snack! Pinto Bean and Quinoa Sloppy Joes, above, are a great favorite of VegKitchen readers. Serve with any slaw-style salad -- make extra for tomorrows meal! Fresh corn on the cob, now in season is a great addition as well. The black bean base of these Garlicky Black Bean and Summer Squash Soft Tacos has a delectable garlicky and smoky flavor. Yellow squash, chili peppers, and dried tomatoes add even more flavor and color. Theyre easy to make and even easier to serve, as everyone assembles their own tacos at the table. Whatever kind of slaw you made for yesterdays meal will enhance this dinner as well. The simplicity of the classic Neopolitan recipe, Pasta Puttanesca, belies its luscious flavor. Studded with green and black olives and a generous helping of ripe tomatoes, this is a quick pasta dish thats perfect for a summer evening. Serve with a green vegetable and a big salad of mixed greens tossed with chickpeas or other beans. Indonesian-Style Gado-Gado Inspired Salad is a composed platter combining raw and lightly cooked vegetables. There are different regional variations, but some of the constant veggies include carrots, cauliflower, and green beans. Simply cooked brown rice (try brown Basmati), a traditional accompaniment, is a good way to embellish the meal. The whole thing pulls together with a luscious peanut sauce. Hummus Wraps with Grains and Greens are chock-full of flavor and a good use of leftover grains of all kinds (like last nights rice). The recipe also doubles easily. For a relaxing way to end the meal, serve with fresh corn and/­­or a refreshing cold soup.

BEETROOT, ORANGE & COCONUT SOUP

November 21 2014 That's Food Darling 

BEETROOT, ORANGE & COCONUT SOUP soups, soups, soups. there's nothing like the well-being that soups and stews are provoking during the colder months of the year. warm soups and stews are pretty good comfort food. they're so easy and quick to make. i love soups both for social gatherings with people i love and for making myself a lunch/­­dinner for several days that i can warm through quickly and serve with whatever i want to, like some slices of bread or leftover rice, millet, grains, etc.  beetroot soup is my favorite one by far. this one impresses with its touch of both orange and coconut flavor. served with basmati rice it works best. just the smell of basmati rice whilst cooking it, i love it. basmati is the king of rice varieties, haha.  that soup is both the ideal make ahead lunch/­­dinner and a great recipe for hosting guests as you can prepare it previously. so invite friends - or just be good to yourself - and prepare this soup for you. it won't need you more than 30-35 minutes to prepare this tasty soup. BEETROOT, ORANGE & COCONUT SOUP |serves 4| ingredients 2 tbsp. coconut oil 1 yellow onion, finely chopped 1 tbsp. ginger, finely grated  1 tsp. cumin 1 tsp. turmeric 500g beetroot (3-4 beets), peeled + cut into 1/­­4-inch pieces   500 ml vegetable broth 300 ml coconut water 100 ml freshly squeezed orange juice a pinch of cayenne pepper   sea salt to serve basmati rice, cooked avocado, cut into slices + drizzled with lemon juice sesame oil (optional) instructions in a large pot, heat coconut oil over medium heat. a dd cumin and turmeric and stir constantly to prevent from burning. fry until fragrant, 1 minute. next add onion and ginger, sautée until soft, stirring occasionally, about 2 minutes. now, add beets, vegetable stock and orange juice. bring to a boil, then lower the heat and simmer until beets are fork-tender, 25-30 minutes. add coconut water and salt & pepper to the beetroot soup. blend the soup with an immersion blender, add more hot water or vegetable broth if needed and adjust seasoning to taste.  serve in bowls. place basmati rice in each bowl first, next pour in beetroot soup and finally drizzle with sesame oil (optional). serve with more basmati rice and avocado slices, and enjoy! lisa 

INDIAN YELLOW LENTIL DHAL WITH BUTTERNUT SQUASH + BABY SPINACH

October 25 2014 That's Food Darling 

INDIAN YELLOW LENTIL DHAL WITH BUTTERNUT SQUASH + BABY SPINACH lentil dhal is soul food at its best. badly needed these days, isn't it? that's why I share a recipe for a yellow lentil dhal with you today.  this indian yellow lentil dhal is spiced with garam masala, an indian spice blend that is made of cumin, cardamom, coriander, cinnamon, clove, black pepper and bay leaves. garam masala is made for rice and vegetable dishes, chickpeas and any kind of lentils. so it works brilliant with this yellow lentil dhal.  instead of yellow lentils you could also use red lentils as the cooking time is the same. you could make lentil dhal out of yellow or red lentils only or add some vegetables as I did. I added butternut squash cause squash is in season. you could also use sweet potatoes since they have similar textures after cooking. I love to add baby spinach leaves at the finish, you also could go for baby chard or baby kale. dhal works best with pita bread or basmati rice. don't be timid! by the way, dhal is the most easiest and quickest dish and the most comforting at that. hell yeah! INDIAN GARAM MASALA SPICED YELLOW LENTIL DHAL WITH BUTTERNUT SQUASH + BABY SPINACH  |serves 2| ingredients 1 tbsp. ghee or coconut oil 1 small yellow onion, peeled + finely chopped 1 clove of garlic, peeled + finely chopped 1 tsp. fresh ginger, peeled + very finely minced 1 tsp. garam masala 1/­­2 tsp. turmeric a pinch of cayenne pepper 120 g yellow lentils (or red lentils), washed + drained 400 ml vegetable broth 100 ml coconut milk 150 g butternut squash (or sweet potato), peeled, cut into small cubes  a squeeze of lemon juice 2 handful of baby spinach (alternatively baby kale or baby chard, washed + drained salt + pepper  steamed basmati rice or bread (naan, pita) to serve instructions heat the ghee in a medium soup pot over medium heat. add onions and cook slowly, lowering heat if necessary. cook until soft about a minute. add garam masala and ground turmeric, and cook, stirring often, for one more minute. add garlic, ginger and cayenne pepper to the pot. stir and cook until fragrant, constantly stirring to avoid burning. add butternut squash to the pot and stir. season with lots of salt and pepper. add the yellow lentils and stir it around another minute. at this point, add vegetable stock and coconut milk. stir the pot, place a lid on top, and bring to a boil, lower the heat and let simmer on low heat, just until the yellow lentils are tender but still hold their shape, about 15-20 minutes. if the dhal is too thick, add a little extra water and if it is too thin simply cook for a little longer to reduce. remove pot from heat, add a aqueeze of lemon juice and stir in baby spinach until wilted. check the dhal pot for seasoning, adjust, and serve with hot steamed basmati rice or bread (such as pita or naan).  enjoy, lisa

Aloo Gobi (Gluten Free)

October 6 2014 VegKitchen 

Aloo Gobi (Gluten Free)This recipe is slightly adapted from a recipe by cookbook author Anupy Singla. I have always adored aloo gobi, and this version is pure deliciousness. Its a one-pot wonder, with fragrantly spiced cauliflower, onions, tomatoes, and potatoes. Reprinted with permission from Vegan Casseroles* (C)2014 by Julie Hasson, Running Press, a member of the Perseus Books Group. Serves: 4 - 1 to 2 tablespoons canola oil - 2 teaspoons cumin seeds - 1 teaspoon ground turmeric - 1 large yellow or red onion, diced - 1 teaspoon plus pinch of fine sea salt, divided - 2 heaping tablespoons grated or minced fresh ginger - 4 cloves garlic, minced or pressed - 1 medium to large potato, peeled and diced - 1 jalape?o, finely sliced (optional) - 1 medium head cauliflower, trimmed and cut into small florets - 2 teaspoons garam masala - 1 teaspoon ground coriander - 1 cup undrained canned diced tomatoes, preferably organic - 1/­­4 cup hot water, plus more as needed - 1 heaping tablespoon minced fresh cilantro  In a Dutch oven or 4-quart sauté pan with a lid, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Once warm, add the cumin and turmeric. Cook until the seeds sizzle and turn reddish-brown, about 40 seconds. Add the onion and pinch of salt. Cook 2 to 4 minutes, until the onions brown slightly, stirring occasionally. Add the ginger and garlic. Cook another 40 seconds, stirring occasionally. Add the potato and jalape?o, if using, and cook 1 to 2 minutes, until the potato softens slightly. Add the cauliflower, garam masala, coriander, and 1 teaspoon salt. Mix well until all the florets are yellow from the turmeric. Cook about 2 minutes and then add the tomatoes and water. Cover the pan, turn the heat down to medium-low, and cook for 20 to 25 minutes, or until the vegetables are soft, stirring occasionally. Cook a little less if you want a tiny bit of crunch, and cook a little longer if you want the vegetables to be a little softer. Add up to 1/­­2 cup additional water if the vegetable mixture is too thick. Remove from the heat, add the cilantro, and put the lid back on. Let the aloo gobi sit for 3 to 5 minutes before serving to help the flavors all come together. Serve with roti, naan, or basmati rice. - Browse more of VegKitchens  vegan casserole recipes. *This post contains affiliate links. If the product is purchased by linking through this review, VegKitchen receives a modest commission, which helps maintain our site and helps it to continue growing!

Chickpea Pulav (Chola Biryani)

June 10 2013 Manjula's kitchen 

Chickpea Pulav (Chola Biryani)Click here to view the embedded video. This dish is a delicious combination of rice, chickpeas, with vegetables and of course spices. This is a great, hearty, and healthy meal. This is a one dish and one pot meal. This recipe will serve 3. Ingredients: - 1 cup rice (I use basmati rice) - 15oz chickpeas/­­chola/­­garbanzo/­­kabule chana canned or cooked - 2 tomatoes medium size chopped will make about 1-1/­­2 cup chopped tomatoes - 4. 1 potato medium size peeled and cubes bite size pieces will make about 3/­­4 cup - 6 oz spinach chopped frozen or 3 cups of chopped fresh spinach - 1 cup bell pepper cubed in bite size pieces - 3 tablespoons oil - 1 teaspoon cumin seeds/­­jeera - 1/­­8 teaspoon asafetida/­­hing - 1 bay leafs/­­tajpat - 1 tablespoon ginger finely shredded - 1 green chili finely chopped - 1-1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1/­­4 teaspoon turmeric/­­haldi - 1/­­2 teaspoon mango powder/­­amchoor - 1/­­4 teaspoon garam masala - 1-1/­­2 cups water  Method - Wash and soak the rice in about 2 cups of water at least for 10 minutes. - Drain the liquid out of the can of chickpeas and wash the chickpeas well. - Heat the oil in a saucepan. Test the heat by adding one cumin seed to the oil; if seed cracks right away oil is ready. - Add cumin seeds as seeds crack add the ginger, and green chili, stir for few seconds. - Add tomatoes and salt cook until tomatoes are tender, about 2 minutes. - Add chickpeas and potatoes after it comes to boil cover the pen and let it cook for about 8 minutes over medium low heat, stir occasionally. - Add rice, spinach, bell pepper and water. Mix and bring it to boil. Cover the pan and let it cook for about 12-15 minutes over low heat. Dont stir the rice in between they will get mushy check the rice in about 12 minutes. Cook Pulav until the rice is tender and the water has evaporated. - When Pulav is ready add mango powder and garam masala mix gently. - Serve alone or with side of yogurt or pickle if you want to spice it up more. Enjoy!   Related RecipesVegetable Rice (Pulav)Vegetable BiryaniChole Chaat (Spicy Chickpeas)Quinoa Vegetable Pilaf (Pulav)Poha (Flattened Rice)Chola (Chana Masala)Punjabi CholaVeggie Hash BrownsSamosaChola Tikki (Chickpeas Patties)


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