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basic recipe vegetarian recipes

Pressure Canner Beans in Tomato Sauce

September 7 2017 Vegan Dad 

Pressure Canner Beans in Tomato Sauce My kids like to take these beans in a thermos to school for lunch (often with veggie dogs cut up into them for what we call Beans and Weens). With a pressure canner you can easily make your own at home without having to soak a single bean.  Below is a basic recipe that you can adjust according to your size of jar, the number of jars you want to make, and your tastes. When cooking dried beans in a jar in a pressure canner you want 1 part dried beans to 3 parts liquid. So, in the recipe below, 1 cup of beans is cooked in 3 cups of liquid in a 4 cup (1 quart) jar. If you are using pint jars (2 cup) then use 1/­­2 cup of dried beans to 1.5 cups of liquid. As for the liquid/­­sauce, do whatever suits your tastes. If you are canning 7 one quart jars, you need 21  cups of liquid. Its best to have at least 8 cups of water so the beans cook properly, but you can play around with other ingredients. Less sugar, more tomato, for example. More sugar, less tomato sauce +  a cup or two of ketchup + mustard + chilli powder+ hot sauce = beans in BBQ sauce (as an example). Making the liquid a little on the salty side is OK because the beans will soak it up. Have made a few batches of bland beans that needed salt when served, so I lean towards the 4 tbsp side of things now. Finally, if you have ever canned before then you know that leakage can be a problem. I have found that this problem can be ameliorated by doing 2 things: 1. leaving enough headspace in your jar; 2. realizing that fingertip tight can be pretty darn tight. Inevitably, some sauce will leak out of the jars during processing. Not to worry. Take the rings off and wipe down the entire jar before storing.  INGREDIENTS Makes 7 quart (4 cup) jars - 8oz/­­227g/­­1 cup dried navy beans x 7 - 2 tbsp oil - 1 large onion, small dice - 4 garlic cloves, minced - 2  48 fl oz cans tomato juice - 8 cups water - 2 cups packed brown sugar - kosher salt to taste (2 to 4 tbsp) METHOD Sterilize your jars. Prepare your pressure canner. 1. Heat oil over medium heat in a large pot. Saute onion for 5-7 mins, until translucent. Add garlic and cook for 1 min. 2. Add tomato juice, water, sugar, and salt. Bring to boiling. 3. While sauce is heating, add 8oz/­­227g of dried beans to each sterilized jar. 4. Ladle hot sauce into the jars, leaving a good 1 of head space. If you are short on liquid, top up with boiling water. Top with lids and tighten the rings as much as you can with your fingertips. 5. Process the jars per your pressure canners instructions at 11 lbs of pressure for 90 minutes. Remove canner from the heat and let pressure drop before removing the jars. 

Basic Recipe for Pasta

February 24 2017 Veganpassion 

Basic Recipe for Pasta You really have to try this out! Fresh pasta is one of my favourites. And it takes less time than you might think ;-) Makes 4 portions. For the pasta dough: 2 2/­­3 cup coarse-grained wheat flour 1/­­2 + 2 tbsp. water 4 tbsp. olive oil 1/­­4 tsp. salt 1 pinch curcuma In a mixing bowl mix together coarse-grained wheat flour, salt and curcuma. Add water and oil and mix everything with a wooden spoon. Put the dough crumbs on a worktop and knead about 10-15 minutes until the dough is finely solid. Put the dough into clear film and put that in a airtight box. Let it rest for at least one hour. Sprinkle some wheat flour on your worktop and roll out the dough very thin. To make it a little easier split the dough into two parts. The dough is very solid and it needs some strength. If you have a pasta machine it will be a lot easier. Again sprinkle the pasta dough with flour and roll it. Then cut off fine stripes. Cook the pasta at a rolling boil for about 3 minutes until they are firm to the bite.

Veganize It!

February 8 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Veganize It! My new cookbook is called VEGANIZE IT! Easy DIY Recipes for a Plant-Based Kitchen.  It officially hits the shelves on March 7, so I wanted to give you a sneak peek of whats inside. My goal in writing this book was to provide the ultimate guide for making homemade vegan foods from everyday ingredients — and share great ways to use those ingredients.  Like all my cookbooks, the recipes are geared to busy home cooks who want to get a great dinner on the table but dont want to spend all day in the kitchen.  With VEGANIZE IT, you can be as DIY as you want to be, or not.  For example, if you want to make lasagna completely from scratch, there are recipes for homemade ricotta, a melty mozzarella-like cheese, homemade pasta, and a wonderful baked tomato sauce.  If you dont have time to make all the components, you can simply pick and choose what you want to make from scratch and what you prefer to buy ready-made - such as making homemade ricotta and tomato sauce, but using storebought lasagna noodles and vegan mozzarella. In that sense, VEGANIZE IT is really two cookbooks in one:  all the DIY vegan basics such as dairy-free sour cream, mayonnaise, butter, and plant-based meats and seafood made from wheat, soy, beans, and vegetables.  But what makes this book really special is that each chapter goes one step further to include recipes that incorporate one or more of those basic recipes, all made inexpensively, using simple cooking methods and easy-to-find ingredients — so, for example, you can use the cashew cream cheese to make Spinach-Artichoke Dip or Chocolate Cheesecake.  Make the andouille sausage, and youre just one step away from a great jambalaya. Im really excited about VEGANIZE IT and I hope you will be too.  Sample recipes (and a blog tour!) are coming soon.  For now, though, Id like to give you a brief tour around the recipe chapters with a list of just some of the recipes youll find inside along with a few of the gorgeous photos by William and Susan Brinson. DIY DAIRY-FREE AND EGGLESS... Cheesy Broccoli Soup Spinach and Mushroom-Bacon Quiche Chickpea Flour Omelets Breakfast Nachos with Smoky Queso Sauce Bacon-Topped Mac UnCheese  PLANT-BASED MEATS... BBQ Seitan Ribs Burmese Tofu Iron Kettle Chili Better Made Tacos with Avocado Crema Seitan Oscar with Béarnaise Sauce       FLOUR POWER... Cheesy Crackers Handcrafted Lasagna Perfect Pot Pie Cheesy Sausage Biscuits Benedict Pizza VEGAN CHARCUTERIE... Maple Breakfast Sausage DIY Jerky Banh Mi Sandwich Haute Dogs Wellington Join the Club Sandwich       INSTEAD OF SEAFOOD... Lobster Mushroom Bisque Clam-Free Chowder Vegan Crab Louis Fish-Free Tacos Tof-ish and Chips with Tartar Sauce       SWEETS FROM SCRATCH... Luscious Lava Cakes Strawberry Shortcake Lemon Meringue Pie Tiramisu Bellini Trifle         VEGANIZE IT is available for pre-order now…. The post Veganize It! appeared first on Robin Robertson.

1 Dough - 5 Cookies

November 18 2016 Veganpassion 

1 Dough - 5 Cookies Welcome to the Christmas elves. Where clouds are made out of cotton candy and winter storms smell like cocoa, the hands sink into dough and the noses are smeared with chocolate. I love XMAS time!!! Can´t start early enough thinking about the wildest cookie recipes. It takes a lot of diversity if you want to get your vegan cookie can to dance this year. I don't need many cookies for christmas but at least I need 5 different kinds - to have a choice ;-) for that I have created a quick and special dough this year, with which you can make an exciting variety of cookies. In the blink of an eye you'll have 5 of the most popular kinds of christmas cookies ready to enjoy, while you lean back and relax. The cookies are great to bake with children because the baking tray looks so colorful. By the way every cookie is baked in the same amount of time, so you can pop them all at once in the oven. Have a lot of fun with your christmas bakery! Basic dough Makes aprox. 60 cookies. For the cookie dough: 220 g spelt flour 120 g almonds, blanched and grounded 100 g powdered sugar (raw sugar) one vanilla pod 150 g vegan butter, at room temperature 3 tbsp oat cream or another plantbased cream Mix flour and almonds, sift powdered sugar and vanilla together. Build a little hollow and add cream and butter. With a fork mix the dough until you can form a homogeneous ball. Wrap the dough into clear film and put it in the fridge for at least one hour. Vanilla-Kipferl Makes aprox. 60 cookies. Additional ingredients: 20 g powdered sugar to dust Devide the dough into 3 pieces and work on each part separately. While working on one piece of dough you can put the other pieces back into the fridge. Form dough into 2,5 cm thick roll and cut aprox. 1 cm wide pieces. Now form the piece to a roll with spiky ends and place them like a moon. Put them on a sheet with baking paper and bake about 12 minutes at 180° Celcius (356°F) two-sided heat. Dust powder sugar on the Kipferl while they're still hot. Store them in a metal box at a cool place and they're durable for 2-3 weeks. Chocolate-Angeleyes Makes aprox. 60 cookies. Additional ingredients: 1 tbsp cocoa 1 tsp dairy-free milk (soy-milk) 200 g vegan Chocolate spread (Bionella) Knead 1/­­3 of the dough with cocoa and dairy-free milk. Form 60 balls out of it and push your thumb in the middle of the balls. Put them in some distance on a sheet with baking paper and backe about 12 minutes at 180° Celcius (356°F) two-sided heat. Jelly-Stars Makes aprox. 60 cookies Additional ingredients: 1 tbsp flour 200 g berry jelly Knead flour into the dough for more stability. Cut dough into 3 pieces and work on each dough separately. While working on one piece of dough you can put the other pieces back into the fridge. Form little squares and fill them with a tiny bit of jelly. Then push the ends together. Put them in some distance on a sheet with baking paper and backe sheet about 12 minutes at 180° Celcius (356°F) two-sided heat. Blossom-Cookies Makes aprox. 60 cookies. Additional ingredients: 1 tbsp blossom herbs (Flower Power) Cut dough into 3 pieces and work on each dough separately. While working on one piece of dough you can put the other pieces back into the fridge. Form dough into a roll with a 3 cm diameter. Spread 1/­­3 of blossom herbs on your working area and roll the dough in it. Cut off 1 cm thick pieces on a sheet with baking paper and backe sheet about 12 minutes at 180° Celcius (356°F) two-sided heat. Walnut-Gingerbread-Cookies Makes aprox. 50 small cookies. Additional ingredients: 120 g grounded walnuts instead of grounded almonds 2 tbsp cocoa 1 tbsp gingerbread spice 80 g chocolate chips, delicate Use walnuts instead of almonds for the basic recipe. Knead dough with cocoa, gingerbread spice and chocolate chips. Form dough to balls and push them flat on to a sheet with baking paper and backe sheet about 12 minutes at 180° Celcius (356°F) two-sided heat. If you like, add some walnuts and chocolate chips on top of your cookies before putting them in the oven. Find more wonderful baking ideas for Christmas, cookies and cakes in my book  "Veganpassion - Lieblingsrezepte zum Backen" (awarded by Vebu). Have lots of fun with your Christmas bakery!

8 Tips for Vegan Travelers

February 23 2016 Vegetarian Times 

8 Tips for Vegan Travelers Theres an unfortunate misconception that traveling as a vegan is difficult – making vegans feel that they cant travel (and also causing many travelers to feel they cant go vegan even though they want to, which Ive heard many times). However, its not difficult to travel as a vegan, once you know a few tips and tricks. Youll get to explore a side of local culture that few get to see and meet vegans around the world. Here are 8 tips to make vegan travel not only easy, but enjoyable: 1. Plan ahead The key to having an enjoyable vegan vacation is to make sure you plan ahead. Look up vegan-friendly restaurants in your destination before you go on Happycow, VegGuide and local websites. It’s also helpful to look up some phrases ahead of time such as: I am vegan. I do not eat meat, chicken or pork. I do not eat fish. I do not eat eggs. I do not drink milk, eat butter or cheese, or consume dairy products. Is there chicken/­­beef/­­pork/­­fish stock in this? Is there oyster sauce/­­fish sauce/­­shrimp paste in this? Is there lard in this? Plus, you can look up some common accidentally vegan dishes in your destination – for example in Greece, fava (a hummus-like bean purée) and Greek salad minus feta. 2. If you’re not into planning, make friends. In my book, The Essential Vegan Travel Guide, I talk about what to do if you don’t enjoy planning and don’t want to research all the restaurants in advance. Don’t fear if you don’t like research – it’s not compulsory. I’d suggest instead reaching out to your social network and seeing if they’ve been to your destination or know of anyone who has. Ask your local vegetarian and vegan friends if theyve been to your destination or know anyone there, and ask for advice on social media (post your questions on Facebook or Twitter using the hashtag #vegantravel, for example). 3. Have backups. While you shouldnt have any trouble finding vegan food if you do your planning as described above, its always a good idea to have a few backup options, such as knowing vegan options in chain restaurants if youre staying stateside, or how to order vegan in any restaurant. Or, keep a few emergency fruit and nut bars in your bag. 4. Choose where to stay carefully. You might want to consider staying somewhere with a kitchen, or at least a fridge (so you can have breakfast in your room). If you want somewhere with a kitchen, try to find a holiday apartment, hostel with shared kitchen facilities, Airbnb or VegVisits (an all-new vegetarian & vegan holiday rental listings site). 5. Don’t forget about toiletries! You will also want to make sure the toiletries you bring are vegan-friendly. If youre traveling by plane with a carry-on, youll need to make sure all liquids and gels are in 3.4oz or smaller containers and fit in a 1 quart-sized bag. You can buy empty 3.4oz plastic bottles in most drugstores and fill them with your own shampoo, soap, lotion, etc. You can also buy mini containers of some vegan-friendly products. You might also consider purchasing toiletries in non-liquid form. Lush, for example, make many vegan- and eco-friendly solid soaps, shampoos and toothpaste tabs. Or, go multipurpose: Dr. Bronners makes a liquid soap that can be used a soap, shampoo, toothpaste and laundry detergent. 6. Emergency cooking If youre going to be staying somewhere with a kitchen, you might want to know a few simple recipes you can make just in case, like one-pot pasta. Even if youre staying in a hotel, you can make a few basic recipes in your coffeemaker, like soup or couscous (yes, its really possible, and I have recipes for both in my book!). 7. Don’t starve because it’s Sunday. Be aware of local customs – for example, if most restaurants and businesses close on Sunday or Monday. If this is the case, make sure you look up and make note of some vegan-friendly restaurants that are open on Sunday – or stock your kitchen on Saturday. Be extra conscientious of your first and last meals, too. For example, you might want to make note of a vegan-friendly restaurant or two that are near your hotel and open when you arrive. The last thing you want to do is arrive somewhere tired and hungry (and possibly jet lagged) and then end up wandering the streets in a hungry state, desperate for somewhere to eat and arguing with your partner/­­travel companion/­­self. 8. Enjoy yourself! Lastly – and most importantly – have fun! With a little advance planning, you can have a stress-free vacation – because the last thing you want to do on vacation is be worrying about where to find food. Caitlin Galer-Unti is the author of The Essential Vegan Travel Guide, out now and available for purchase as a paperback or Kindle book on Amazon. Caitlin writes about how to find and make food that is sometimes healthy and always delicious on her blog, The Vegan Word, which has been featured on The New York Times and Yahoo!.

Spicy Currywurst with Mango Curry Sauce

April 20 2015 seitan is my motor 

Spicy Currywurst with Mango Curry SauceThis post is going to be about sausages, and food, and decisions you make as a parent. And it’s probably full of contradictions. But let’s start with something light. What did you eat this weekend? Did you eat out? Did you have takeout? Did you make a meal from scratch? On a typical weekend, I used to shop for groceries and then spent hours in the kitchen cooking. I always considered this very relaxing. It gave me time to unwind and think about stuff. But that was pre-child. These days I am lucky if I can prepare a sandwich without being interrupted. For several reasons there is not much time for quiet and long weekend cooking anymore. The main one is that we try to spend our weekends as a family. We want to go out and do stuff together. And then we get home starving and throw together whatever very quickly. Or we order a pizza. This habit has sneaked into our household since a really wonderful little pizzeria opened in our neighbourhood. They have terrific pizzas, fresh garlic oil,  and a vegan cheese option. It’s quick and it’s super convenient. If we do cook, it is not always very relaxing. Having a three year old person running around in your kitchen can sometimes be a little bit nerve-stretching. You have to think about putting the sharp knife away. You probably don’t want to leave your child unattended next to that pot of boiling spaghetti, and so on.  And then there is always: “Mum, when is the food ready? When? I am starving! Can we eat already?” But sometimes I think I am getting the hang of it. F knows she cannot touch my knife and most of the time she doesn’t.  She wants to take part in our daily activities and she loves to help us cook. She’s taking the tasks I give her super seriously and it’s pretty cute to see her so exited about making her own food.  I won’t let her cut stuff just yet, but she can stand on a chair next to the oven and stir vegetables in a pan. She’s often very close to hot pans and steaming water, but so far she hasn’t burnt herself. Once I let her cut some vegetables but that almost gave me a heart attack. I think she needs to learn handling knifes as soon as possible, but until I am ready for that, we’re concentrating on kneading stuff. Especially seitan sausages. All the food we make at home together is vegan food. Although our daughter is not vegan. Compared to me and P, she is growing up very differently. We live in a city, not a village, the food we eat never comes fresh from a farm. The only farms F ever sees are those idealized little fantasy farms in some of her books. I grew up in a village with lots of farmers around me. My grandparents were farmers, too. Many people told me how they saw someone kill and slaughter an animal when they were kids. They even helped to prepare food made from these animals. This often comes up when people argue that killing animals for food is natural. They say that it is important for children to see where their food comes from and I agree. Food production is very often tied to exploitation of both human and non-human animals. We shouldn’t hide that from our children. But what do we do with it? Do we have to agree with it? Do we have to accept it and just shrug our shoulders? Or shouldn’t we teach our child that exploitation is wrong and that we’re not always powerless about it? My daughter knows how “animal based” sausages are made and what the main ingredient in Haribo gummy bears is. But I am also trying to teach her that it doesn’t have to be like this. That we can change things by doing them just a little bit differently. That you can, for example, eat a sausage or a handful of gummy bears without having to accept that it is “normal” to base those foods on dead animals. And still we are not doing everything right. We are not living a perfect vegan life here. We buy stuff and that stuff is way too often based on exploitation. F is not always able to change things because we make other decisions for her. We agreed to raise F vegetarian and not vegan. We’re taking part in animal exploitation. Right now she’s just accepting things as they are. She’s still so small that she’ll base her decisions on what we tell her. She doesn’t eat meat and isn’t tempted to try it. But she does eat dairy although she knows where it comes from. Her father eats these foods too, so of course it’s okay for her. Although she also knows what I think about cow’s milk or cheese. Some people say this is an easy decision. If you want the best for your family, they should all go vegan. Maybe some would even soay I am not a “real” vegan because we have dairy in our house. I don’t think it is so easy though. For this family parenting and living together with others in a household is based on compromises.When I met my partner ages ago I was a vegetarian. He was a meat eater. I accepted his way of life, he accepted mine. When I went vegan years later, P did not judge me, he supported me the best way he could. When I got pregnant it suddenly felt difficult to have all these different lifestyles under one roof. We talked about how to raise our child, and what kind of food to cook. P knew I would not be able or willing to cook meat. So we settled on compromises. P went vegetarian. His compromise. My compromise: raising the child vegetarian, not vegan. At least not in the long run. At least not, if it wasn’t really doable. In the short run our daughter spent her first year as a vegan. It was really easy, she was with us all day, we cooked for her and there were no animal products in her life. But I knew this would change soon.  I am not a stay at home mother, I never wanted to be one. We don’t live in a very vegan friendly environment, at least not when it comes to childcare. Childcare is the main reason why F is not a vegan. Excuses, excuses, you say. Maybe. Being vegan all by myself is easy. But having a family, a job, and other things to do or to decide together often makes these things difficult. We always agreed on sending F to childcare once she would turn one. At that time it was really hard to find something, so there wasn’t much room for being picky. Our applications for a public daycare space was tuned down, so we looked at childminders. Most of them would serve meat almost every day and I felt very queasy about it. I knew I’d have to bring up the food subject. I was sure I would not be able to tolerate having my child eat meat. But I was willing to make some compromises, the compromises we had agree on before.  The person who finally became our childminder served meat only once a week.  She instantly suggested to make vegetarian food for F on that day. That was more than I had hoped for and I felt grateful. The childminder cooked her own food and fed the kids three times a day. I didn’t want to ask about vegan food and I didn’t. I thought I had already been lucky. And that is how our daughter became a vegetarian. Two years later we applied for a public kindergarten spot. We didn’t get a spot at the daycare we wanted, but we got a spot. I was feeling queasy again. We asked about the food and it tuned out they had a caterer who served meat once per week. The teachers told us to talk to the caterer, maybe they could provide an alternative? They had alternatives for allergy kids and muslims, too. But apparently being vegetarian doesn’t entitle you for an alternative meal. When they refused to provide for our  daughter, the kindergarten staff had no objections to homecooked alternatives. And I was willing to provide them. Once a week, I could do that. F is now the only vegetarian kid in a daycare with about 160 to 180 children. I admit that I would feel overwhelmed if I had to  provide all of her daycare meals. It’s a relief that she gets fed at daycare. The caterer, although stubborn, is a relief, too. I’ve seen other kindergarten menus, with lots of meat. I know we can always do so much better, it’s not perfect, sure. But it’s a start. And F, unlike many of her friends, knows where her food comes from and what’s it made of. I am trying to explain where eggs and milk come from and why I decided not to eat them, too. For now I am trying to make it about personal decisions although I don’t see veganism that way. If we were a family of vegans I probably could (or would) draw clear borders. Make it about them vs. us. But since we’re not I cannot make it that easy. And maybe that is a good thing, because things are never that easy. Well, you are probably still waiting for that recipe! This is another one F and I made together. It’s currywurst, a popular German fast food and maybe you have heard of it. I’ve made it before, you can find my basic recipe of the blog. It’s a fried sausage (bratwurst) smothered in a sauce that is made from ketchup, spices, and curry powder. For this new version I increased the amount of spices, starting with the sausage itself. And I made the sauce a little bit more interesting by using mango puree. (You can find that at Asian grocery stores.) The sausages can be made spicy or mild, depending on your preferences. For a milder version simply use mild smoked paprika powder instead of the chipotle plus a mild curry powder. If you feel that these don’t have enough spice, use one tablespoon of chipotle and reduce the amount of paprika powder to one teaspoon. Also use hot curry powder and double the amount. Note: This recipe calls for mushroom powder. I got the idea to use dried mushrooms from Vegan Yack Attack’s awesome currywurst recipe. The idea to pulverise them is courtesy of Celine Steen who uses mushroom powder in her latest cookbooks. Print Spicy Curry Sausages with Mango Curry Sauce IngredientsFor the currywurst 144 g (1 cup) gluten powder (vital wheat gluten) 16 g (4 tablespoons) nutritional yeast 1 tablespoon mushroom powder* 1 tablespoon Hungarian paprika 1 teaspoon garam masala 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon granulated onion 1 teaspoon chipotle powder 1 teaspoon hot or mild curry powder 1/­­4 teaspoon turmeric 300 ml (1 1/­­4 cups) water 2 tablespoons oil 2 tablespoons tomato paste For the mango curry sauce 80 ml (1/­­3 cup) ketchup 160 ml (2/­­3 cup) mango puree 2 tablespoons soy sauce 1 tablespoon hot sauce 2 teaspoons curry powder, hot or mild 1 teaspoon avage nectar 1 teaspoon white wine vinegar (or apple cider vinegar) oil for frying InstructionsCombine all dry ingredients in a large bowl. Whisk together water, oil, and tomato paste and add to dry mix. Knead well until everything is combined. Have four pieces of parchment paper and for pieces of aluminium foil ready. (About 38 x 21 cm or 15 x 8.3 inch) Divide the batter into four pieces and roll each piece into a 15 cm ( 6 inch) long log. Wrap in parchment and twist the edges, then wrap in foil. Place a steamer basket in a large pot and add water. Bring to a boil and add sausages. Reduce the heat so that the water is simmering and steam the sausges for 50 minutes. Remove and let cool in their packaging. Let the sausages sit in the fridge over night to improve flavour and texture. When ready to serve, whisk together the ingredients for the sauce. Heat a tablespoon of oil in a large pan and cut the sausages into small pieces. Fry for 2-3 minutes on each side, or until crispy. Serve with sauce and fries. Notes*For the mushroom powder simply place one ounce of dried porcini mushrooms in a coffee grinder and pulverise. Store leftovers in a glass jar and use in soups and sauces. 3.1 http:/­­/­­www.seitanismymotor.com/­­2015/­­04/­­spicy-currywurst-with-mango-curry-sauce/­­ Copyright (C)2015 All rights reserved. www.seitanismymotor.com Spicy Currywurst with Mango Curry Sauce is a post from: seitan is my motor

Meatless MondayStaff Picks

December 22 2014 Meatless Monday 

Meatless MondayStaff PicksWhat’s the Meatless Monday team cooking up at home? These cookbook titles will give you a glimpse into their kitchens. You might just like to pick one up for yourself, or as last minute gift idea. Mark Bittmans How to Cook Everything and How to Cook Everything Vegetarian are the encyclopedias of my kitchen and this new installment will surely be joining them on my cookbook shelf. What I love most about the book is the way Bittman incorporates the preparation steps right into the recipe. Although most recipes leave out the prep for brevity, its an essential part of cooking and incredibly important to grasp if youre just learning to cook at home.”-Diana K. Rice, RD, Registered Dietitian & PR Associate “This book was written by a woman named Leanne Brown, who was really bothered by the fact that Americans on a tight budget found themselves restricted to eating fast and processed foods. So she created this well-designed cookbook with really delicious recipes that can be made for just $4 a day, the budget for someone typically in the SNAP program. The recipes are actually really delicious, the book itself is beautiful, and you can download it for free.”-Rachelle Reeder, MPH, Program & Research Associate “The Family Cooks is Laurie Davids follow-up to her first book on family meals, The Family Dinner. While both books are packed with deliciously easy family dinner options, I love that The Family Cooks also includes content on the value of cooking with your kids and designates child-appropriate steps with a special icon. The introduction also includes general cooking tips and strategies to combat picky eating and constant snacking, plus the book contains enough meatless recipes to turn you Meatless Mondays into Kids Cook Mondays, too!-Diana K. Rice, RD, Registered Dietitian & PR Associate “This cookbook also proves that you can eat vegan without sacrificing flavor. Amazing recipes I also want to try them all!”-Vanessa Protass, Associate Director, Marketing “My favorite is Ancient Wisdom, Modern Kitchen. Most of the recipes are plant-based and vegetarian. The dishes are simple and tasty. The book has helped me explore new tastes and try new vegetables. For example, I bought and prepared daikon radish for the first time last week. Also, the book contains interesting stories about the ancient Chinese medicine and culture behind each ingredient and dish.”-Emily Oppenheimer, Program Assistant “In America Farm to Table, Mario Batali highlights not only the importance of the ingredient, but the importance of the small farmer and the farmers relationship with the land. Its a book that offers a lot more than recipes, it might just enliven your relationship with food.”-Steven Good, Copywriter “This cookbook is amazing!!! From the blogger behind ohsheglows.com... Mouthwatering recipes featuring wholesome ingredients...I want to make every recipe in it.”-Vanessa Protass, Associate Director, Marketing Best all-around basic recipe book for people just trying to get into the cooking habit. -Morgan L. Johnson, MPH, Program Development and Research Director “For any skeptics of vegan baking. My friend and I made cupcakes and cookies from this cookbook last weekend and they were LEGIT.”-Vanessa Protass, Associate Director, Marketing           The post Meatless Monday Staff Picks appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Zuckerguss Zine – Free Vegan Holiday Baking Ebook

December 4 2014 seitan is my motor 

Zuckerguss Zine – Free Vegan Holiday Baking Ebook  For us Christmas season starts two or three days before Christmas. Before that we don’t bother with Christmas at all. We know we’re going to be welcomed in perfectly decorated houses and we just have to fall into line with our families’ schedules. We know what’s going to happen and when. There’s not much to be done for us. Except for baking. My family doesn’t bake much and even though my father makes vegan meals during the holidays he leaves the vegan baking to me. Our other relatives also don’t do much vegan baking. So every year before we travel all over Germany I spend the last few days in the kitchen. It’s messy and chaotic and I usually do five things at a time. But in the end I can leave with a suitcase full of homemade treats to share with family and friends. I am thankful for the fact that the people I care about love my food. I know vegans who have a hard time during the holidays and it’s sad to hear that someone refuses your cookie just because you didn’t use butter. I have made those experiences too, but most of the time people go out of their way to whip up a vegan treat for me. And if they can’t they ask about recipes and baking tips. It’s a great way to break the ice and start a conversation about veganism. I try to do the best I can when baking and I try to give out samples to as many people as possible. I know it’s only a little start but I think it’s great when I can convince someone that baking without eggs and butter is not rocket science and that vegan cookies taste as good as every other cookie. This year I thought I’d hand out some recipes with my treats. Of course everything got a little out of hand and as a result I am exited to share my first ebook with you. Zuckerguss means sugar glaze. It’s what makes every cookie even sweeter and more beautiful. For me, it’s the best part about Christmas baking. It makes me happy like maintaining this blog makes me happy. So this book is not only for people who ask me about recipes, it’s also a big “Thank you!” for everyone who reads my blog, takes the time to comment on my entries, and tries out my recipes. I really do appreciate the time you spend here and it always makes me happy to hear back from people from all over Europe, Northern and even South America. The ebook contains 15 baking recipes plus 4 basic recipes for spice blends, a chocolate hazelnut spread, and my favourite spice cookie recipe (spekulatius). I know it’s probably not necessary if you’re a regular reader of this blog but I’m still gonna warn you: Almost all of the recipes do contain white wheat flour, white sugar and soy. Many of the recipes also call for nuts. I mostly use refined coconut oil for baking which is a very cheap staple here and (with some adjustments) a great alternative to margarine made with palm oil. Like everything on this website this ebook is free. I would be very happy if you would spread the word and please feel free to share the link to the Zuckerguss Zine with your family and friends and on social media or your blog. Developing the recipes, taking the pictures, and assembling the contents was great fun but also much work and it took a lot of time. Please do not republish the contents of this ebook without my permission. If you have any questions, suggestions, or problems, please don’t hesitate to leave a comment or contact me through email or on facebook. Let me know what you think, I hope you enjoy! Let me know what you’ve made! Download    Contents: 1. Spekulatius Nutella Bars | Almond Lebkuchen Pull-apart Bread | Peanut Crescents 2. Stollen Waffles | Cashew Fudge | Almond Cinnamon Cookies 3. Spekulatius Tiramisú | Lebkuchen (Pepperkaker) | Elisenlebkuchen 4. Marzipan Jam Cookies | Blackforest Cheesecake | Coconut Spice Mini Cakes 5. Chocolate Almond Pillows | Almond Pistachio Cookies | Mini Apple Cranberry Pies with Walnuts {plus: spekulatius spice blend | lebkuchen spice blend | spekulatius recipe | holiday chocolate hazelnut spread} Zuckerguss Zine – Free Vegan Holiday Baking Ebook is a post from: seitan is my motor

5 Warming Ways to Cook with Kale

September 25 2014 VegKitchen 

5 Warming Ways to Cook with KaleKale, tofu, and peanut butter join forces in Spicy Braised Kale and Tofu to create a tasty, nutrition-packed dish. Serve with brown rice or quinoa and a colorful salad for a great weeknight meal. Recipe above by Dr. Joel Fuhrman. When lots and lots of kale needs to be used up all at once, Sautéed Kale with Tahini-Lemon Sauce might just become one of your favorite go-to recipes. Ellen Kanner’s simple Kale and Quinoa Pilaf,  features two -- no, three -- vegan faves -- quinoa, kale and nutritional yeast. Nutritional yeast provides a big B-12 boost and terrific cheesy flavor.  Kale and Red Cabbage Stir-Fry; photo by Susan Voisin Stir-Fried Sesame Kale and Red Cabbage can be kept really simple, as in the basic recipe, or varied with the additions suggested following the instructions. In Sesame Kale and Broccoli Sauté, two nutritious and delicious green vegetables are a compatible team in this easy recipe featuring Asian flavors. This is a great side dish with other Asian-inspired noodle, rice, or tofu dishes.  -  Here are lots more recipes for Hardy Greens.

3 x Breakfast Oatmeals & Copenhagen

July 9 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

3 x Breakfast Oatmeals & Copenhagen Even though we have posted countless porridge recipes on this blog - baked, soaked and cooked - we recently realized that we never have posted one of our standard breakfast oatmeals. Oatmeal is one of the most common breakfasts for us on early weekday mornings. It’s quick to make and you only need one ingredient for the most basic recipe. But it can also be prepared in endless varieties depending on season and preference. You can cook oats with water, fruit- or vegetable juice or any kind of milk. And you can either stick to just rolled oats or mix them with quinoa flakes, rye flakes, chia seeds, linseeds or any other kind of seed. We have shared three different set-ups here. One with oat and rye flakes cooked on carrot juice, one standard oatmeal cooked with coconut milk and the last one has egg added to the oatmeal for a protein boost. We have also used different toppings on them. Berries, dried fruit, seeds, nibs, compotes, nut butters and even vegetables are often added to our oatmeals. Remember that the actual oatmeal is only 45 percent of the experience. The most important part are the toppings. So don’t be shy, build mountains of different toppings. We’d love to see your oatmeal creations on Instagram. Hashtag it  #gksbreakfast so we wont miss out on anything. To be on the safe side you could also tag either David:  @gkstories or Luise:  @luisegreenkitchenstories.  Were looking forward to see what you come up with! We were inspired to do this post about oatmeals after our recent visit to the Copenhagen porridge restaurant Gr?d. They serve both sweet and savory porridges and going there feels just like coming home, as they share our love for these warm grainy bowls. The carrot oatmeal further down is similar to something we had there. We have also put together a list of our other favorite places in Copenhagen, in case some of you plan a visit during the summer. Copenhagen Eating Guide The A la Menthe - Morroccan cafe with amazing vegetarian lunch or dinner platters and of course fresh mint tea. R?dhusstraede 5 (near Str?get) 1466 Copenhagen K Bang & Jensen - Cool cafe with traditional danish food with a trendy twist. Istedgade 130, 1350 Vesterbro Höst - Beautiful restaurant with a modern nordic cooking style - N?rre Farimagsgade 41, 1364 Copenhagen K 42 Raw - Our favorite Raw food cafe in Copenhagen with great food, breakfast, desserts, smoothies and juices. Pilestraede 32, 1112 Copenhagen K Simple Raw - Cute little Raw food cafe with delicious food. Try their brunch or lentil burger. Oehlenschlaegergade 12, 1663 Vesterbro Morgenstedet - Organic cafe at Christiania, great homemade food! Christania, 1440 Copenhagen K Parterre - Cute little cafe with danish and french pastries, lunches and cakes, beautiful location by the water. Ovengaden Oven Vandet 90, 1415 Christianshavn Gr?d - A cafe that only serves porridges, sweet and savory. Very delicious and top quality. Jaegerborgsgade 50, 2200 N?rrebro or Torvehallerne, Linnésgade 17, 1362 Copenhagen K Atelier September - Old antique store turned into a cafe. The food is simple tasty danish/­­french food. Freshly squeezed juices and good coffee. Gothersgade 30, 1123 Copenhagen K Rist Kaffebar - A coffee shop with a great atmosphere and nice food. Vaernedamsvej 4b, 1619 Vesterbro Café Granola - Charming cafe in the most charming street in Vesterbro. Try their brunch. Vaernedamsvej 5, 1619 Vesterbro Isvaerket - Organic ice cream bar. Stefansgade 15, 2200 N?rrebro Laundromat - A cafe where you can also bring your dirty laundry. They also have a large play corner for kids. Elmegade 15, N?rrebro or ?rhusgade 38, ?sterbro or Gammel Kongevej 96, Frederiksberg C Anne’s Gademad – Homemade take away dinner. Vegetarian option every day. Enghavevej 3, Vesterbro L?L? – Vietnamese restaurant with great vietnamese food with a modern twist. Vesterbrogade 40, 1620 Vesterbro   Oatmeal – 3 ways Protein Boosted Oatmeal Serves 2 1 cup rolled oats (certified gluten-free if you prefer) 2,5 cups water 2 eggs 1/­­2 tsp ground vanilla 1 pinch sea salt Topping: avocado, sliced raspberries, fresh or thawed frozen hemp seeds chia seeds quark yogurt Place oats, water, eggs, vanilla and salt in a small saucepan and bring to a simmer on medium to low heat. Stir to combine. Let simmer until the water is just absorbed and the porridge has thickened, about 3-4 minutes. Serve in bowls with with plant milk and toppings. Carrot & Rye Oatmeal Serves 2 1/­­2 cup old-fashioned rolled oats 1/­­2 cup old-fashioned rolled rye 1,5 cup carrot juice 1 cup water 1 pinch sea salt Topping: raisins flax seeds unsweetened apple sauce with grated fresh ginger (cook chopped apples, a little water and grated ginger until tender) cacao nibs Place oats, rye, carrot juice, water and salt in a small saucepan and bring to a simmer on medium to low heat. Stir until the water is just absorbed and the porridge has thickened, about 3-4 minutes. Serve in bowls with with plant milk and toppings. Sweet Coconut Oatmeal Serves 2 1 cup rolled oats (certified gluten-free if you prefer) 1,5 cup coconut milk 1 cup water 1 pinch sea salt Topping: almond & cacao nut butter (mix nut bitter and cacao powder) toasted desicated coconut toasted pumpkin seeds and sunflower seeds strawberries, fresh or thawed frozen raw hazelnuts, chopped goji berries Place oats, coconut milk, water and salt in a small saucepan and bring to a simmer on medium to low heat. Stir until the water is just absorbed and the porridge has thickened, about 3-4 minutes. Serve in bowls with with plant milk and toppings. Tip: For grain free options use rolled flakes of whole buckwheat, millet or quinoa.

13 Ways to Get Creative with Homemade Cranberry Sauce

November 1 2016 Oh My Veggies 

We’re not ashamed to admit that canned cranberry sauce is pretty delicious, but once you know how easy it is to make homemade cranberry sauce, you’re never going to want to have the canned version again. The basic recipe is liquid, cranberries and sugar, but there are so many ways to switch things up with... Read More »

8 Delicious Vegan Entreés Featuring Peanut Butter

July 30 2015 VegKitchen 

8 Delicious Vegan Entreés Featuring Peanut ButterEverything tastes better with peanut butter! Except, of course, for those with peanut allergies. Luscious and high in protein, peanut butter isnt only for PBJ sandwiches or desserts (though its awesome in both -- see our listing of sweet treats using it) Here are 7 tasty ways to use it in vegan main dishes. First off, heres an easy rendition of Cold Peanut Butter Sesame Noodles (above), with a dollop of tahini and a dash of spice. Delicious as a summer dinner served with an easy tofu dish and a simple salad of tomatoes, cucumbers, and basil. Another noodle dish, Kid-Friendly Peanut Butter Noodles is designed for kids whose preference runs to milder flavors. Adults can enjoy this basic recipe as well by spicing up their portion with hot sauce like Sriracha, or dried hot red pepper flakes, and a sprinkling of scallion. According to Isa Moskowitz, Curried Peanut Sauce Bowl with Tofu and Kale is the peanut sauce of the gods: a gingery peanut sauce with curry powder that will have you licking the spoon, then licking your plate ... Robin Robertsons West African Spinach with Spicy Peanut Sauce is delicious served over rice or couscous. Let your own heat tolerance be your guide on the amount of chiles to use. Admittedly rich, this traditional Southern-style Virginia Peanut Soup has an intensely nutty flavor. Even served in moderate portions, its immensely satisfying, and you can build a meal around it. Another soup you can look forward to that’s especially good for fall (but which can be enjoyed any time of year) is Broccoli-Apple Soup with Cashew or Peanut Butter. So rich and comforting, and filling enough to be a main dish serves with fresh bread and salad. In Dr. Joel Fuhrmans Spicy Thai Braised Kale and Tofu, peanut butter is the key to creating this tasty, nutrition-packed dish. Serve with brown rice or quinoa and a colorful salad for a great weeknight meal. Tempeh is a great source of protein, and peanut butter enhances its fermented flavor in this tasty Tempeh Satay with Asian Greens. Serve with your favorite grain.

5 Minute Tofu “Egg” Salad Sandwich

January 19 2015 Vegan Richa 

5 Minute Tofu “Egg” Salad Sandwich The other day, I wanted a really simple breakfast, so I crumbled up the tofu and added the general spices I would add to a scramble and served it in a sandwich with my spicy mustard dip.  Hubbs tried some and exclaimed.. ooh this is so much like scrambled eggs. I was like, why haven’t we done this before. Hubbs ate the whole bowl by himself and I had to make more. So I took pictures of my sandwich and was hoping to post it today by 11 am. And then this is what happened. It was game day today, so in general the anxiety level in the house was up. After 2 attempts at a walk, chewie finally did make it a few blocks in the crazy thunderstorms. Everyone was soaking wet. Around 10:30, hubbs was irritated at the stuff sitting here and there in the kitchen and living area (remnants from general saturday and cooking), so I postponed the post write up and chewie’s bath and we put things back and cleaned up to ease the rising stress. Then chewie got a warm bath in the kitchen sink and everyone was happy, clean and calmer.  Or so we think. We ate some PB bowls through the disappointing first two quarters. Chewie sensing the energy, promptly went upstairs to catch a calm nap. I had my shower and used conditioner instead of shampoo and realized after I was done, so I had another shower. With the frustration in the house, I couldn’t get myself to do anything else but watch the game. And then everything just turned in the last 3 minutes. Like OMG, that was some game! Overtime was even more fabulous! Super bowl here we come. After all that yelling and jumping, I needed a power nap or two. Now I am back awake with tired eyes which most likely will not be reading much today or tomorrow. Anywho, make this super easy tofu salad! and please excuse ramdom spelling errors that I will correct tomorrow.  This is a basic recipe, add veggies and flavors to taste. Continue reading: 5 Minute Tofu “Egg” Salad SandwichThe post 5 Minute Tofu “Egg” Salad Sandwich appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Zuckerguss Zine -- Free Vegan Holiday Baking Ebook

December 4 2014 seitan is my motor 

Zuckerguss Zine -- Free Vegan Holiday Baking Ebook  For us Christmas season starts two or three days before Christmas. Before that we dont bother with Christmas at all. We know were going to be welcomed in perfectly decorated houses and we just have to fall into line with our families schedules. We know whats going to happen and when. Theres not much to be done for us. Except for baking. My family doesnt bake much and even though my father makes vegan meals during the holidays he leaves the vegan baking to me. Our other relatives also dont do much vegan baking. So every year before we travel all over Germany I spend the last few days in the kitchen. Its messy and chaotic and I usually do five things at a time. But in the end I can leave with a suitcase full of homemade treats to share with family and friends. I am thankful for the fact that the people I care about love my food. I know vegans who have a hard time during the holidays and its sad to hear that someone refuses your cookie just because you didnt use butter. I have made those experiences too, but most of the time people go out of their way to whip up a vegan treat for me. And if they cant they ask about recipes and baking tips. Its a great way to break the ice and start a conversation about veganism. I try to do the best I can when baking and I try to give out samples to as many people as possible. I know its only a little start but I think its great when I can convince someone that baking without eggs and butter is not rocket science and that vegan cookies taste as good as every other cookie. This year I thought Id hand out some recipes with my treats. Of course everything got a little out of hand and as a result I am exited to share my first ebook with you. Zuckerguss means sugar glaze. Its what makes every cookie even sweeter and more beautiful. For me, its the best part about Christmas baking. It makes me happy like maintaining this blog makes me happy. So this book is not only for people who ask me about recipes, its also a big Thank you! for everyone who reads my blog, takes the time to comment on my entries, and tries out my recipes. I really do appreciate the time you spend here and it always makes me happy to hear back from people from all over Europe, Northern and even South America. The ebook contains 15 baking recipes plus 4 basic recipes for spice blends, a chocolate hazelnut spread, and my favourite spice cookie recipe (spekulatius). I know its probably not necessary if youre a regular reader of this blog but Im still gonna warn you: Almost all of the recipes do contain white wheat flour, white sugar and soy. Many of the recipes also call for nuts. I mostly use refined coconut oil for baking which is a very cheap staple here and (with some adjustments) a great alternative to margarine made with palm oil. Like everything on this website this ebook is free. I would be very happy if you would spread the word and please feel free to share the link to the Zuckerguss Zine with your family and friends and on social media or your blog. Developing the recipes, taking the pictures, and assembling the contents was great fun but also much work and it took a lot of time. Please do not republish the contents of this ebook without my permission. If you have any questions, suggestions, or problems, please dont hesitate to leave a comment or contact me through email or on facebook. Let me know what you think, I hope you enjoy! Let me know what youve made! Download    Contents: 1. Spekulatius Nutella Bars | Almond Lebkuchen Pull-apart Bread | Peanut Crescents 2. Stollen Waffles | Cashew Fudge | Almond Cinnamon Cookies 3. Spekulatius Tiramisú | Lebkuchen (Pepperkaker) | Elisenlebkuchen 4. Marzipan Jam Cookies | Blackforest Cheesecake | Coconut Spice Mini Cakes 5. Chocolate Almond Pillows | Almond Pistachio Cookies | Mini Apple Cranberry Pies with Walnuts {plus: spekulatius spice blend | lebkuchen spice blend | spekulatius recipe | holiday chocolate hazelnut spread} Zuckerguss Zine -- Free Vegan Holiday Baking Ebook is a post from: seitan is my motor

CARDAMOM & COCONUT RICE PORRIDGE WITH POMEGRANATE

November 16 2014 That's Food Darling 

CARDAMOM & COCONUT RICE PORRIDGE WITH POMEGRANATE hey folks! first of all i've to mention that oatmeal is one of the  most common breakfasts for me on weekday mornings as it is quick to make and you only need two ingredients for the basic recipe. depending on season and preference i prepare my oatmeal in various different ways . now, when the mornings are colder and gloomier, i love to enjoy a warm bowl of cardamom & coconut rice porridge - absolute deliciousness and comfort. fresh pomegranate seeds put the finishing touch to this porridge, beyond doubt. the composition of rice, coconut, cardamom and pomegranate seeds strongly reminds me of the arab cuisine, one of my favorites as the various dishes makes me entirely happy and deeply satisfied. and best of all, this breakfast is crazily quick to prepare (10 minutes at longest!), calls for a few ingredients only (goes easy on the budget!) and, what it's more, it's fuckin' tasty! by the way, if you want to turn the recipe vegan, you can easily exchange honey for any sweetener of your choice (agave syrup, maple syrup, raw cane sugar etc.) CARDAMOM & COCONUT RICE PORRIDGE WITH POMEGRANATE |serves 1| ingredients 70 g rice flakes 100 ml rice milk 100 ml coconut milk 100 ml water 1/­­3 tsp. ground cardamom 1/­­4 tsp. ground vanilla 1 tsp. wild honey a pinch of sea salt  topping pomegranate seeds instructions place rice flakes, rice milk, coconut milk, water, cardamom, vanilla and salt in a small sauce pan and bring to a simmer on medium to low heat. simmer for 2-3 minutes, stirring often until your porridge has slightly thickened. stir in wild honey (or a vegan alternative), replace from heat and set aside with a lid on it for about 5 minutes. in the meantime, remove the seeds from the pomegranate. if you aren't familiar with deseeding a pomegranate yet, then watch this video - it's my favorite way to deseed it. serve porridge in bowl topped with pomegranate seeds, add more (warm) rice milk if desired and enjoy! lisa   

Stocks and Broths for Vegan Soups

September 15 2014 VegKitchen 

Stocks and Broths for Vegan SoupsAdapted from Vegan Soups and Hearty Stews for All Seasons.   Contrary to culinary myth, the absence of a strong-flavored meat stock does not present a huge challenge to the creation of tasty plant-based soups and stews. Many ethnic cuisines produce classic soups that in their original form are completely vegetarian or vegan. True, almost any soup can benefit from a good stock to boost flavor, but I place fresh and flavorful ingredients and creative seasoning above stock in contributing to the success of a soup. I would venture to say that most vegan soup recipes will work as well using water (with the help of a bouillon cube or two sometimes) as they will with a homemade or store-bought stock. With all the fresh ingredients and flavorings in vegetable-based soups, this is generally sufficient for achieving a good, rich flavor. Once in a while, especially for brothy soups, I suggest using a 32-ounce carton of low-sodium vegetable broth to boost flavor. There are many good natural and even organic brands of this kind of soup starter. Here are a few more options for creating a good soup base: Basic Vegetable Stock: If youre a purist, by all means, make your stock from scratch. You need to allow an extra hour before making the actual soup to prepare and cook this stock. Of course you can make stock ahead of time and even freeze it in portions. There will be cooks who prefer making their own stock, and if that includes you, see the recipe further down in this post. Water with bouillon cubes or soup base: The easiest and most economical option. Look for a no-salt vegan brand. My favorite is Rapunzel Vegan Vegetable Bouillon. It’s packed with flavor, organic, and has no added sodium. Each cube is actually equivalent to two standard-sized cubes. Vegetable broth powder: A tablespoon of this type of stock enhancer goes a long way in a pot of soup. However, I don’t recommend it in the ingredients listings, as it’s more difficult to find a low-sodium variety of this product than either bouillon cubes or prepared broths. Prepared vegetable broth: As mentioned above, I sometimes call for this product for brothy Asian soups. I like to use a 32-ounce aseptic carton (Pacific and Health Valley are two brands to look for, among others), rather than canned broth. But it’s your choice; canned vegetable broth can also be a good option, if it is all natural, and low in sodium or salt-free. Following are a handful of stocks and broths, the first two of which are suitable as soup bases. The remaining ones, in the Asian tradition, make good broths to be eaten on their own or lightly embellished. All are very low in fat and calories -- less than 50 calories and less than 2 grams of fat per cup. Basic Vegetable Stock This is a basic stock that may be used in place of water in most any vegetable soup to give added depth of flavor. It’s also a good way to use up vegetables that are limp or less than perfectly fresh. Makes: About 6 cups - 7 cups water - 1 large onion, chopped - 2 to 3 cloves garlic, minced - 1 large carrot, sliced - 2 large celery stalks, sliced - 1 medium potato, scrubbed and diced - 1 cup coarsely shredded white cabbage - 2 teaspoons salt-free seasoning blend Place all the ingredients in a large soup pot. Bring to a simmer, then cover and simmer gently over low heat for 40 to 45 minutes, or until the vegetables are quite tender. Strain the stock through a fine mesh strainer. Discard the solids or puree them and add to soup for a thicker consistency. Onion and Garlic Broth This broth may be used as an extra-flavorful soup stock or as an alternative, with a little extra kick, to the Basic Vegetable Stock above. It’s also a soothing remedy for the common cold! Makes about 6 cups - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 large onion, chopped - 4 to 6 cloves garlic, minced - 1/­­4 cup dry red wine - 6 cups water Heat the oil in a 2-quart saucepan or small soup pot. Add the onion and sauté over medium heat until golden. Add the garlic and continue to sauté until the onion or leeks brown lightly. Add the wine and water. Bring to a simmer, then cover and simmer gently over low heat for 30 to 40 minutes. You may leave the onions and garlic in if you wish, or strain the stock through a fine strainer. Discard the solids or puree them and add to soup for a thicker consistency. Simple Miso Broth Miso is a nutritious, high-protein product fermented from soybeans and salt (or a combination of soybeans, grains, and salt). Available at all natural food stores and Asian groceries (as is the sea vegetable kombu), pungent-tasting miso is most commonly used to make simple broths. Heres a basic recipe, which can be considered a soup in itself. All you need to complete it are a few simple ingredients. Note that once the miso is stirred into water, it shouldnt be boiled. Otherwise, its beneficial enzymes will be destroyed. Makes about 6 cups - 1 recipe Basic Vegetable Stock (above) or one 32-ounce container low-sodium vegetable broth plus 2 cups water - 2 strips kombu (sea vegetable), each about 3 by 5 inches - 2 to 4 tablespoons miso, to taste Combine the stock with the kombu in a 2-quart saucepan or small soup pot and bring to a simmer. Dissolve the desired amount of miso in just enough warm water to make it pourable. Stir into the broth and remove from the heat. Let stand for 30 minutes or serve at once, removing and discarding the kombu just before serving. VARIATIONS Embellish miso broth with any of the following: - Diced tofu - Cooked Asian noodles (or or shiratake or kelp noodles, which need no cooking) - Finely chopped scallions - Grated fresh daikon radish or white turnip - Crisp cucumber, seeded and grated   Basic Dashi (Japanese Kombu and Shiitake Broth) Like miso broth, dashi is another traditional Japanese stock that may be embellished in a number of ways, or eaten as is. It also makes a good base for certain Asian vegetable soups. Look for the sea vegetable kombu and dried shiitake mushrooms in Asian groceries or in natural food stores. Makes about 6 cups - One 32-ounce container low-sodium vegetable broth plus 2 cups water, or 6 cups water with 2 vegetable bouillon cubes - 2 strips kombu (sea vegetable), each about 3 by 7 inches - 6 to 8 fresh shiitake mushrooms stemmed and thinly sliced Combine the broth and kombu in a 2-quart saucepan or small soup pot. Bring to a simmer. Add the mushrooms to the broth, remove from the heat, and let stand for 30 minutes. Remove the kombu from the broth and discard before serving. VARIATIONS Dashi with noodles: Simply cook a quantity of Asian noodles (like soba) in the broth. Once they are al dente remove the soup from the heat, season to taste with natural soy sauce, and serve immediately. Garnish each serving with some finely chopped scallion. Or you can add cook-free noodles like shiratake or kelp noodles once the broth is done and you set it aside to stand for 30 minutes. Dashi with miso and vegetables: Use the broth to simmer any quantity of thinly sliced vegetables, such as carrot, cabbage, daikon radish, turnip, etc. Once the vegetables are just done, add 2 to 4 tablespoons miso, to taste, dissolved in just enough warm water to make it pourable. Remove from the heat and serve at once. - See more of VegKitchens  Green Kitchen  tips .


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