barley - vegetarian recipes

barley vegetarian recipes

Quick Three-Grain Brown Bread

September 28 2018 VegKitchen 

Quick Three-Grain Brown Bread Pop this easy vegan quick bread into the oven while your favorite soup is simmering on the stove. It’s made with wheat and rye flours, plus cornmeal. Or, serve it with jam to accompany your favorite warm beverage -- coffee, tea, or cocoa. You’ll love this moist loaf! This makes one loaf, about 10 to 12 slices. Photos by Hannah Kaminsky. Save Print Quick Three-Grain Brown Bread Author: Nava Recipe type: Quick bread Cuisine: Vegan /­­ healthy Prep time:  15 mins Cook time:  40 mins Total time:  55 mins Serves: 10 to 12   Pop this easy vegan quick bread into the oven while your favorite soup is simmering on the stove. Its made with wheat and rye flours, plus cornmeal. Ingredients 1 cup whole wheat pastry flour ¾ cup rye flour ½ cup cornmeal 1½ teaspoons baking soda ½ teaspoon salt 1 cup plain nondairy yogurt, preferably coconut ⅔ cup unsweetened nondairy milk, or as needed ⅓ cup maple syrup, molasses, or barley malt syrup 2 tablespoons safflower oil Instructions Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Combine the first 5 (dry) ingredients in a large mixing bowl and stir together. Combine the remaining ingredients in another mixing bowl and whisk together until smoothly blended. Make […] The post Quick Three-Grain Brown Bread appeared first on VegKitchen.

Simply Vibrant, Our New Cookbook!

September 18 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Simply Vibrant, Our New Cookbook! It’s been around three years since we started working on this cookbook, so finally telling you about it today feels monumental, exhilarating, and terrifying all at the same time. Our new cookbook is called Simply Vibrant: All-Day Vegetarian Recipes for Colorful Plant-Based Cooking, and it’s available for pre-order now! It’s written by me, Anya, and photographed by Masha – the same mother/­­daughter team that’s behind this blog. Today, we are sharing some key details about the book, accompanied by a book trailer (above), sneak peak photos and ways to pre-order. We’ll also be talking about the pre-order bonus recipe bundle, which is a free gift that we created for anyone who pre-orders the book. SO excited to share all of this with you :) About the Book -- Simply Vibrant will be released on February 6th, 2018, but it’s available for pre-order now. Anyone who pre-orders the book will have access to a free bonus recipe bundle, consisting of 10 brand new, plant-based recipes, which won’t be published anywhere else. Just save your receipt! This is our way of thanking you for your support :) More on the bonus below. -- There are 129 recipes in the book, all of which are vegetarian, 124 of them are vegan, and 109 of them are gluten-free or gluten-free adaptable. My goal was to create healthful, everyday recipes that require accessible, whole food ingredients – mainly vegetables, fruit, herbs, spices, grains, and legumes. The recipes are very much influenced by the seasons, too. Our hope is that you’ll be able to find whatever good-looking produce you picked up at your market or store in the index of the book, and get some ideas on preparing it. -- I used comfort food classics from around the world as inspiration for the recipes in the book, which also influenced the book’s organization. The chapters are as follows: Morning Porridges and Pancakes – this chapter contains breakfast recipes for every season, both savory and sweet. Salads and Bowls – this one has a grain bowl recipe for every season, as well as plenty of vibrant salads for every occasion. Wraps and Rolls – this chapter celebrates the wrapping techniques seen in cuisines all around the world. There are recipes for summer rolls, enchiladas, burritos, maki (sushi), collard green wraps, and more. Soups and Stews – the recipes in this chapter range from hearty winter stews to refreshing and light summer soups. Risotto, Paella and Pilaf – for this chapter, I took the format of well-loved rice dishes from around the world, and reinvented them with the use of different vegetables and grains (there are even a couple of completely grain-free risottos!). Noodles, Pasta and Pizza – this one is all about the coziest foods out there, reimagined to be more vegetable-forward – there are recipes for homemade pasta and dumplings, but also for noodles and pizza crusts made with vegetables. Fritters and Veggie Burgers – this chapter has a veggie burger recipe for every season, as well as plenty of lacy, plant-packed fritters. Just Veggies – this chapter is here to prove that seasonal vegetables only need a simple nudge to taste amazing – there are techniques for marinating, pickling, braising, stewing, and glazing that will take your produce to the next level. Sweets for Every Season – the title of this chapter speaks for itself – there are brownies, galettes, pies, cakes, and pots de creme, made with unrefined sweeteners, fruit, and even some vegetables. Basics and Sauces – a foundational chapter, which will supply you with ammunition for creating vibrant meals quickly – from mind-blowing sauces to broth that will cost you $0 in extra groceries. -- I’ve been thinking a lot about the amount of waste we produce as humans, and I’ve been working on developing techniques for using up all parts of the produce I buy. I present some of these ideas in this book, from the aforementioned veggie scrap broth, to a watermelon rind marmalade, broccoli stem risotto, and more. -- The introduction has a story about my shoemaker grandfather, which has basically become folklore in our family. I was very excited to immortalize it in a book. -- If you have our first cookbook, The Vibrant Table, this book is a follow-up to that. While The Vibrant Table focused on creativity in plant-based cooking, Simply Vibrant is much more focused on the everyday. It’s all about putting breakfast, lunch and dinner on the table. -- The book is 328 pages long, hardcover, and 7.5″ x 10″ in size. Every recipe is accompanied by a beautiful photograph, with the exception of a few sauces. Praise Here are some kind words we’ve heard about the book from people and publications we greatly admire. “Simply Vibrant captures the kind of accidentally-vegetarian food we want to eat right now.” --Bon Appetit Simply Vibrant is intuitively organized and brilliantly executed. It illustrates how many of us are striving to eat these days: crave-able, template-style recipes with seasonal touches, simple techniques, and an underlying nourishing essence that reads as encouraging, rather than prescriptive. Anyas approach starts with a deep-rooted reverence for what nature provides in all of its seasons--and in all of its sometimes neglected or wasted forms. The thoughtful uses for carrot tops, chickpea soaking liquid, and barley cooking water--like the rest of the books delicious plant-based recipes--speak to both virtue and pure enjoyment. This book inspires me to cook (and live!) with a deeper sense of care and appreciation. --Laura Wright, author of The First Mess Cookbook Anyas approach to food and the seasons always stands out as creative, inventive, and colorful. Simply Vibrant contains an abundance of inspiring recipes and clever tricks to add more nourishment and adventure to your everyday meals. --Amy Chaplin, James Beard award-winning author of At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen Anya has the incredible ability to inspire her readers to cook, but more importantly, she helps them tap into their own intuition to create delicious meals in a more relaxed way. I love her emphasis on seasonality, and her creative approach to leaf-to-root cooking, using every ingredient to its fullest potential without wasting a single seed! This recipe collection is bursting with global flavors, unique ingredient combinations, and of course, vibrancy on the highest level. --Sarah Britton, holistic nutritionist and author of My New Roots and Naturally Nourished   We are longtime fans of Golubka Kitchen and Anyas creative and beautiful plant-based recipes. Her new book is jam-packed with healthy, flavorful, and simple recipes and lots of interesting suggestions on how to cook with the odds and ends of produce that usually are discarded--like making marmalade from watermelon rinds and risotto using broccoli stems. So clever! --David Frenkiel and Luise Vindahl, creators of the blog Green Kitchen Stories “Exciting, vegetable led food.” -- Anna Jones, author of A Modern Way to Cook, A Modern Way to Eat and columnist for The Guardian “What made me want to cook from Simply Vibrant is its more relaxed approach to plant-based cooking” --Toronto Star Pre-Order Here’s where you can pre-order Simply Vibrant. Many of these outlets are selling the book at a discounted price while it’s still in the pre-order stages. Amazon Barnes & Noble Roost Powell’s IndieBound Book Depository (ships worldwide for free) Amazon Canada Indigo Pre-Order Bonus Recipe Bundle To show our immense gratitude to anyone who pre-orders the book, we made a little thank you gift in the form of a free Bonus Recipe Bundle PDF. It’s sort of like a mini e-cookbook, complete with 10 brand-new, plant-based recipes that won’t be published anywhere else. The style of the recipes is very similar to that of the recipes in the actual book – everyday meals to make your home cooking more delicious and vibrant. Click here for instructions on how to claim your pre-order bonus and see a preview of the recipes within. Thank You This book only exists because of this blog, and this blog exists because of you – your support, kindness, and curiosity in visiting this space, cooking from our recipes, and reading our stories. Seriously, none of this would be here without YOU. So thank you! Truly, from the bottom of our hearts. – Anya and Masha The post Simply Vibrant, Our New Cookbook! appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

August 29 2018 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on KickstarterThe Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA just launched on Kickstarter! watch the video: PRE-ORDER the ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2NrnNXl This year I traveled to Ethiopia in the weeks before Easter - one of several special times of fasting, when the majority of the country eats entirely vegan! I explored the central cities, traveled overland to the north, went trekking in the highlands and stayed with families in remote villages. As with all my travels and culinary research, I am extremely grateful for the privilege to learn, share & exchange, and be guided & supported by many families and professional cooks who invited me in their kitchens and shared amazing meals with me. Since returning to Berlin, I’ve been cooking Ethiopian and Eritrean food practically non-stop, recreating recipes and dishes, constantly inviting friends and guests to my cooking studio for lunch and dinner parties. Abebech showing me traditional village cooking in the Ethiopian Highlands. Making Injera for the first time in Ethiopia The Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA is my newest cookbook with original recipes, artwork, photography and stories inspired by these latest culinary adventures. It includes over 70 recipes based on the mouth-watering meals in bustling cities & towns, at road-stop eateries, and in rural highland villages. As with my previous 5 cookbooks, I have written, illustrated, cooked, photographed, and designed this book myself. The Lotus and the Artichoke is the ultimate combination of my passions: art, travel, vegan cooking, and photography. The ETHIOPIA Cookbook at a glance: - My 6th cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide - 140 pages with 70+ recipes and over 60 full-page color photos - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by my travels and culinary adventures in East Africa - Also based on experiences with international communities of Europe (London, Paris, and Berlin) and North America (Philadelphia, New York, and Washington D.C.) and over 25 years of vegan cooking - Ethiopian & Eritrean classics, familiar restaurant & family favourites, delicious delights, wonders & surprises, and creative culinary experiments - Discover new flavors, tasty spices, and cooking skills - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients (Cook everything, anywhere!) - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Doro Wat – spicy seitan stew Spinach Dinach Butecha – Chickpea “Egg” Salad Minchet Abish – spicy soy mince & walnuts Duba Wot – pumpkin stew Shimbra Asa – chickpea “fish” Asa (Jackfruit) Tibs Fosolia – green beans & carrots Pizza Lalibela Ingudai Tibs – spicy mushrooms Shepherd’s Pie – lentil filling & mashed potato topping Ambasha – sweet bread Recipes in The Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA - Traditional Berbere spice mix (simple + advanced) - Nitir Qibe – spiced butter/­­oil - Mitmita – extra hot spice mix - Yewot Qimen – black pepper spice mix - Shiro – chickpea/­­bean spice mix - Data (Yekarya Delleh) – roasted chili, garlic, onion & herb sauce - Traditional Injera – Ethiopian sourdough crepe - Quick Injera - Ambasha - sweet raisin bread - Doro Dabo – baked stuffed bread - Difo Dabo - spiced bread - Pizza Lalibela - with tomato sauce & roasted potato topping - Sambosa – savory pastry with lentil filling - Senig Karia – roasted spicy stuffed chilies - Injera Firfir – traditional flatbread with spicy tomato sauce - Yesuf Fitfit – chopped injera & lemon sunflower seed dressing - Kita (Injekita) – sweet breakfast flatbread & jam - Chornake /­­ Pasty – fried bread - Genfo – roasted wheat & barley porridge - Selata - super simple salad - Selata Delux - with mango, dates, avocado mixed greens & lentils - Butecha - chickpea “egg” salad - Selata Timtim - tomato salad - Selata Dinich - potato salad - Selata Bekarot - carrot salad - Telba - roasted flax dressing - Shiro Wot - chickpea puree - Misir Wot – red lentils - Doro Wot – spicy seitan - Soy Tibs - spicy soymeat strips - Ingudai Wot - spicy mushrooms - Bamia - spicy okra - Minchet Abish - spicy soy mince & walnuts - Shimbra Asa – spicy chickpea “fish” - Kik Alicha – yellow lentils - Atakilt Alicha – cabbage, carrots & potatoes - Keysir - beet root - Duba Alicha - pumpkin stew - Tikr Gomen - greens with garlic - Spinach Dinich - spinach & roasted potatoes - Fosolia – green beans & carrots - Asa Tibs – lemon pepper jackfruit fritters - Tofu Alicha - batter fried tofu in mild garlic & onion sauce - Ingudai Alicha – mushrooms w/­­ creamy cashew, lemon, pepper, thyme, parsley - Peppers & Potatoes - garlic ginger stir-fry - Inkulal Firfir – spicy tofu scramble & tomatoes - Ful – fava beans - Ayib – cottage cheese - Bedergan – roasted eggplant - Vegetable Lentil Soup - Vegetable Pasta – spaghetti with mixed chopped vegetables - Macaroni Firfir – noodles with garlic onion tomato sauce on injera - Shepherd’s Pie – lentil filling & mashed potato topping - Ethiopian Mashed Potatoes - Traditional Coffee Ceremony - Spiced Black Tea - Roiboos tea with lemon, ginger &cardamon - Mango Moringa Banana Smoothie - Injera w/­­ dates - Banana Bread - Fasting Muffins - Rooibos Tea Ice Cream Video: Justin P. Moore Music: Nils Kercher Nanfulle from Ancient Intimations (live) (C)2016 Ancient Pulse Music PRE-ORDER the ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2NrnNXl The post ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Roasted Veggie Grain Platter

March 27 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Roasted Veggie Grain Platter Hi, David here. I’ll get to the recipe soon but first I just wanted to share a little scene from last night. Isac was watching a baking program for kids and as I was tucking him in, he thoroughly explained the whole process of making croissants to me. You have so much butter in croissants, dad. Like, a lot. You put it on the dough and fold it over the butter like this. And you hit it with the rolling pin like this, bam bam bam. When it comes to numbers and letters, he can be a little clueless, but the fact that our three year-old had memorized all the details in croissant baking from just watching it once on tv, made me all happy and proud. I’m not saying that mastering a croissant is more important than math, but teaching our kids how to cook has been one of the things I’ve really looked forward to as a dad. And he is really into it. The little kids stove has long been his favorite toy both at home and in kindergarten an he often serves imaginary pancakes to all his friends. I’ve promised him that we will make croissants together tonight so I’m off to prep a dough right after this (making the rye croissants from Green Kitchen Travels). I’ll report back with how it goes. Today’s recipe doesn’t have anything to do with croissants but Isac does play a little part as kitchen helper in the video below. So, the recipe. There is one obvious reason why grain bowls have become so popular in the last couple of years. Their looks. If you don’t know what a grain bowl is, it’s basically a mix of roasted and raw vegetables on a bed of grains and herbs arranged in a bowl. The mix of vegetables often make these bowls super colorful and therefore also very popular on instagram. Grain bowls are however more then just pretty. They are hearty and provide a variety of textures and flavors. They are also very easy to adapt to what you have at home and what’s in season. We often make grain bowls for lunch, with any cooked grain, millet or quinoa as the bed, adding leftover vegetables from the fridge on top. In this recipe, we have taken the grain bowl concept and turned it into a platter. It’s topped with roasted and fresh spring vegetables, feta cheese, egg halves and hazelnuts. It’s a beautiful dish and a great one to make for Easter dinner. If you want to take the Easter concept even further, you could add roasted asparagus as well. We use an organic five-grain mix (emmer wheat, barley, gamut, brown rice and oat groats) from Zeta as the grain base but if you can’t find something similar, go with your favorite grain. Grains thrive with flavor friends, so we have paired these with a quick salsa made from marinated bell peppers, olives, capers, herbs and lemon. And stirred in a bit of feta cheese and toasted hazelnuts as well. It’s all there, flavours, looks and textures. Roasted Veggie Grain Platter with Bell Pepper Salsa Serves 4 To make this vegan, you can simply skip the eggs and feta cheese. 1 x 250 g bag Zeta 5-grain mix (or grains of choice) Roasted vegetables: 1 bunch carrots 3 purple spring onions or 2 red onions 2 small zucchini 1 tbsp olive oil sea salt Bell pepper & olive salsa: 100 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup grilled marinated bell pepper 100 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup Lecchino olives 3 tbsp capers 5-6 stalks fresh parsley and mint 1/­­2 lemon, juice 4 tbsp olive oil Topping: 2-3 medium soft boiled eggs 150 g feta cheese 100 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup hazelnuts, toasted and chopped 2 handfuls mache lettuce 6 heirloom cherry tomatoes, halved 1 bunch radishes Preheat the oven at 200°C /­­ 400°F and cover a baking tray with baking paper. Peal or clean the carrots and trim off the outer layer of the onion. Cut the onion lengthwise and the zucchini in bite-size pieces. Place the vegetables on the tray. Drizzle with oil and salt and roast for 15-20 minutes. Cook the grains in a large bowl of salted water according to the instructions on the package and drain in a sieve once they are ready. Make the salsa by chopping all the ingredients finely. Place in a bowl, squeeze over lemon juice and drizzle with oil. Fold the salsa into the grains, reserving some of it for serving. Crumble 2/­­3 of the feta cheese into the grains and half of the hazelnuts. Toss so everything is mixed. Pour the grains onto a platter, top with the roasted vegetables, lettuce, tomatoes, radishes, egg halves, feta cheese and hazelnuts. Drizzle with olive oil and serve with the remaining salsa and some sourdough bread on the side. Disclosure: We were compensated by Zeta for creating this recipe and video using some of their products. All words are our own. 

12 Tasty, Healthy Vegan Farro Recipes

October 16 2017 VegKitchen 

12 Tasty, Healthy Vegan Farro Recipes Here are a dozen tasty and healthy vegan farro recipes. This nutty, hearty grain has joined other recently revived ancient grains like quinoa, einkorn, ka?iwa, and teff in the modern kitchen. Filled with fiber and high in iron, you’ll want swap it in for rice and barley in all kinds of dishes. Make sure to see our […] The post 12 Tasty, Healthy Vegan Farro Recipes appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegan Molasses Muffins

August 29 2017 VegKitchen 

Vegan Molasses Muffins Inspired by traditional Pennsylvania Dutch shoo-fly pie, molasses and a crumb topping team up in delectably wholesome vegan molasses muffins. Barley malt syrup works just as well as molasses and produces a slightly milder flavor. Since these aren’t overly sweet, they make a great breakfast muffin, and are welcome in the lunchbox as well; delicious […] The post Vegan Molasses Muffins appeared first on VegKitchen.

Mushroom Barley Pilaf

March 26 2017 Oh My Veggies 

This hearty pilaf is made with tender barley and a savory mix of cremini and shiitake mushrooms.

Upside Down Citrus Polenta Cake

March 8 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Upside Down Citrus Polenta CakeThis post was created in partnership with North Coast. March is tricky. It’ll throw out a few of those luxuriously warm days in a row, which cause collective memory loss about the fact that it’s still winter, and you’ll suddenly see a few dazed people out on the street wearing shorts. And then it gets cold again, and it might even snow soon, and the warm coat you so optimistically tucked away into your closet has to come back out. By this time, you might also be really tired of root vegetables and stews, and all things earthy and hearty. I am. Thankfully, there is citrus. Bright, sweet, lush, like little suns in fruit form. I’m continually amazed by the variety of citrus fruit available at the grocery store this time of year. Based on my last scan of the citrus section, there are at least three types of oranges, the blood variety being the star, about as many kinds of grapefruits (red, pink, white), and don’t even get me started on the numerous hybrids, smooth-skinned, wrinkled and everything in between. I wanted to make a treat that really captures that brightness and abundance, so an upside down cake was in order. It looks involved to those not in the know, but it’s actually the easiest kind of cake to make. For the cake itself, I wanted a batter that would come out of the oven moist and fluffy, and I aimed for gluten-free and vegan, since that is what most of you guys seem to enjoy. There was a large jar of polenta in my pantry – there always is, since my eight year old is a polenta fiend – and I had the idea to go the corncake route. I’m really happy I did, and the cake was gone within a day as proof of its success. It’s sweetened with dates, apple sauce and orange juice, so nothing too sugary here. The mellow sweetness and crumbly texture of the cake combines really well with the fragrant, bright notes of the blanket of citrus on top. I like keeping the skin on the citrus slices, since its oils contribute lovely, complex notes to the overall flavor, but if you or your kids are not fond of a little bitterness, you can cut the skin off the slices. One of the main challenges of vegan baking is coming up with the correct combination of ingredients for a moist batter that doesn’t fall apart, without eggs. I’ve found apple sauce to be the essential ‘secret’ ingredient that makes all of the above possible, while adding a bit of its subtle sweetness to the mix. It also seamlessly integrates into sweet baked goods, so you won’t be tasting apple sauce in the finished product. Plus, it’s a healthy, clean, plant-based ingredient, and we all love those here. I was excited to work with North Coast on this recipe, since their apple sauce is the best I’ve ever tasted and contains no preservatives and no added sugar, all the while being made with real, organic, non-GMO ingredients. Their sauce tastes incredibly fresh and crisp, and they offer well-considered flavor options, like plain, berry, apricot, pumpkin spice and more, made with all U.S. grown fruit. Besides this cake, I’ve been using North Coast apple sauce in so much of my cooking lately, from these brownies, to my morning oats, atop a cup of coconut yogurt and even in smoothies. The brand also offers apple cider vinegar, cider and juice, so there is a definite mastery of wholesome apple products, which I absolutely love. Upside Down Citrus Polenta Cake   Print Serves: one 9-inch cake Ingredients for the cake 1 cup non-GMO polenta 1 cup brown rice flour 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon baking powder sea salt zest of 2 organic oranges 10-12 soft Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in warm water for 10 minutes, soaking liquid reserved 1 cup freshly squeezed orange juice ⅓ cup apple sauce 2 tablespoons coconut oil, plus more for oiling the pan 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar 2-3 oranges - sliced ½-inch thick (You can use a variety of different kinds for a more colorful presentation. I used navel, cara cara and blood oranges.) Instructions to make the cake Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Cut out a parchment paper circle to cover the bottom of a 9-inch spring form or cake pan. Thoroughly oil the sides of the pan with coconut oil. In a large bowl, combine the polenta, brown rice flour, baking soda, baking powder, a pinch of salt, and orange zest, and mix thoroughly. Reserve 1/­­2 cup of the date soaking water and add it to an upright blender along with the dates and orange juice, blend until smooth. Add the apple sauce, coconut oil and apple cider vinegar and pulse to combine. Pour the wet mixture into the bowl with the dry ingredients and stir to just combine. Arrange the orange slices to cover the parchment paper-lined bottom of your pan and pour the batter over them. Even the batter out with a spoon. Lift and drop the pan gently a couple of times to get rid of any possible air bubbles. Bake for 40-45 minutes, or until an inserted toothpick comes out clean. Let cool for at least 20 minutes before inverting the cake onto a plate or a cake stand and peeling off the parchment paper. Slice and serve with plain yogurt or coconut yogurt. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Strawberry Milkshake Vegan Cobb Salad with Watermelon Bacon Fruit Leather Puzzle Barley Tomato Salad .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Upside Down Citrus Polenta Cake appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Barley Salad with Pan-Roasted Carrots and Chickpeas

December 12 2016 Vegetarian Times 

This recipe works well with any pearled barley.  1  Bring barley and 4 cups water to a boil in medium saucepan. Reduce heat to medium-low and cook 20 minutes, or until barley is al dente. Rinse under cold water, drain, and set aside. 2  Heat 2 tsp. oil in large skillet over medium-high heat. Add carrots and cumin, and stir to coat. Cook 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, or until carrots are deep brown but still firm. Add pistachios, and cook 2 to 3 minutes more. Transfer to large bowl, and stir in barley, chickpeas, green onions, mint, lemon juice, and remaining 2 Tbs. olive oil. Season with salt and pepper, if desired. Cover, and refrigerate 2 hours, or overnight.  3  Taste and adjust seasonings by adding more lemon juice, olive oil, salt, and pepper before serving. Serve on a bed of baby greens or arugula, dusted with cumin. 

Savory Vegetable Crumble with Eggplant, Zucchini, Tomatoes and Mushrooms

September 7 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Savory Vegetable Crumble with Eggplant, Zucchini, Tomatoes and Mushrooms I’ve found a new favorite weeknight meal that allows me to pack in as many different vegetables as I want, and, after the initial chopping, pretty much cooks itself. I’ve been needing for something like this to come along, since we’ve been having some very busy times around here. Going through house renovations, book edits and a third grader’s school homework all at the same time is no piece if cake, while food easily becomes that much needed escape from daily stress. There have been too many no-food-all-day-then-pizza-at-night days for me, and I knew it had to stop. It goes without saying, I’m very excited to share this lifesaver of a recipe with you today! I’ve been making lots of sweet skillet crumbles this summer, with any and all fruit I’d come across, from cherries and strawberries, to peaches and plums. It’s kind of the perfect lazy man’s dessert – so easy to prepare (chop, mix, bake) and very delicious. It’s really no wonder I’ve gotten hooked on whipping one up almost every week. This is where I got the curiosity to try out a savory crumble – what if the same breezy and flavorful preparation could be applied to vegetables? Well, turns out that it can, and it’s really good. For this particular savory crumble, I used the vegetables that are most abundant right now – zucchini, eggplant and tomatoes, with an addition of mushrooms for their meatiness and substance, and complete with warming curry spice. That being said, this recipe is highly customizable – use any vegetable in season (squash soon!), and any spice mix you prefer, keeping the crumble topping the same. After about an hour of slow-baking in the oven, you will have an amazingly comforting and nourishing meal. The leftovers are really tasty, too. Now you might be wondering what that beautiful wooden appliance gracing some of the photos is. Pleasant Hill Grain, a supplier of high-quality kitchen equipment, sent me one of their grain mills made by KoMo for grinding dry grains and beans, and I am in love! I wrote a lot about the advantages of freshly grinding your own flour in my book – it’s more affordable (whole grains are generally cheaper than flour), more nutritious, and so much more flavorful. It’s an especially great strategy for gluten-free baking, where a mix of various flours is often required. Before this mill, I did all my grinding in my high-speed Belndtec, but the way the KoMo mill is different and better for grinding flours is through its use of stones. Stone grinding is the most ancient form of pulverizing grain, and creates the most nutritious flour, simply because the flour never gets heated up too much while milling, allowing it to retain all the nutrition of the grains. KoMo also uses state of the art stones, made of a combination of corundum and ceramic, which basically never get worn down, and can produce very fine to coarse flour, based on your setting. I can genuinely say that fresh, stone-ground flour is absolutely the best, most flavorful flour you’ll ever cook with. Lastly, can we talk about the minimal design of this mill – is it not the most beautiful appliance you’ve ever seen? It’s designed in Germany and made in the Austrian Alps, and there’s not a single detail that doesn’t have function. The housing is made of Beechwood, and those meticulously crafted finger joints at the corners make me swoon. Once my kitchen is renovated, this guy will be on display, front and center. The most exciting news, though, is that we will be giving away one KoMo mill next week, so a hot tip – stick around for that :) Savory Vegetable Crumble with Eggplant, Zucchini, Tomatoes and Mushrooms   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the vegetables 1-2 eggplants - cubed 2 zucchini - diced into thick half-rounds ½ lb crimini or baby bella mushrooms 3-5 tomatoes - roughly chopped 1 yellow onion - chopped 3-5 garlic cloves - sliced 1-2 tablespoons curry powder, preferably homemade (I use recipe from this book) sea salt and freshly ground black pepper - to taste 2 tablespoons vegetable oil (I used untoasted, unrefined pure sesame oil, a new discovery, excellent for cooking and oil pulling) or ghee for the crumble topping 1 cup old fashioned rolled oats ½ cup freshly ground barley, or cornmeal/­­polenta ½ cup ground almonds sea salt and freshly ground black pepper - to taste 1 teaspoon baking powder ¼ cup ghee or neutral coconut oil - cold and solid (I prefer using ghee for this recipe as it goes really well with the curry spice) ¼ cup unsweetened, cold almond milk or other plant milk Instructions Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Combine all the vegetables and mushrooms in a large bowl. Add curry powder, salt, pepper and oil and toss to coat. Transfer the mixture into a 10-inch cast iron pan and set aside. Combine oats, barley flour/­­cornmeal, almonds, salt, pepper and baking powder in the same bowl. Cut the cold ghee or coconut oil into pieces and add to the bowl. Use your hands to mix the ghee/­­oil into the dry ingredients thoroughly. Add milk and mix to incorporate. Scatter the topping over the vegetables in the skillet and place into the oven. Bake for 1 hour. Serve garnished with fresh herbs, if desired. Reheat leftovers in a pan over low medium heat. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Temaki-zushi Broccoli Stem Riceless Risotto Gluten-Free Winter Squash Gnocchi Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes and Black Rice .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Savory Vegetable Crumble with Eggplant, Zucchini, Tomatoes and Mushrooms appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

10 Tasty Vegan Dishes to Share at Summer Barbecues

June 30 2016 VegKitchen 

10 Tasty Vegan Dishes to Share at Summer Barbecues Whether youre hosting or invited to a summer cookout, barbecue, or potluck, you’ll need a stash of easy-to-prepare and colorful cold dishes to share -- and to help lure your friends to the plant-based side! Featuring plenty of summer produce, these room-temperature dishes are designed to impress the guests while keeping it easy on the cook. All of these are fantastic accompaniments to our

Beet Tahini Snack Bars

April 4 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Beet Tahini Snack Bars Every weekend, I try to make time for preparing snacks for the week, along with a few other essentials like a big batch of green juice, homemade almond milk, a pot of grains or beans, some kind of sprouted seed or legume, and a sauce to top quick salads and bowls. I don’t always have time to check all those items off my list, but having a head start on things like that helps immensely when it comes to sticking to healthy, homemade meals throughout the week. I made these beet snack bars last weekend, and they’ve been great to have throughout a busy week to give to Paloma, and as an emergency snack or meal replacement for my husband and I. Aside from preparing for a big cookbook photoshoot next weekend, I’ve been watching the figure skating championship in Boston. Both my parents were athletes, and I grew up in a household that very closely followed most sports. Ever since I was a little kid, I’ve loved to watch ice skating, and that love has not faded one bit. A few of my favorite skaters took the pedestal, and I’ve been left a happy fan. These bars are chewy in texture, with juicy pockets of raisins and a nice crunch from cacao nibs. Beet, tahini and almond butter make them filling and nourishing, and cacao nibs contribute energizing properties. Paloma likes them, mostly due to how colorful they are – and the drizzle of chocolate on top does not hurt. I’ll go ahead and put these bars into the kid-approved category as well. Enjoy! Beet Tahini Snack Bars 1 small beet – baked, steamed or boiled, and peeled 1/­­2 cup soft dates – pitted 1/­­3 cup unsweetened canned coconut milk 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 tablespoons brown rice syrup or maple syrup, optional 2 1/­­2 cups regular rolled oats – coarsely ground in a food processor 2 cups barley puffs, quinoa puffs or other whole grain puffs 1/­­2 cup sesame tahini 1/­­2 cup almond butter handful cacao nibs 1/­­2 cup raisins pinch sea salt melted dark chocolate for drizzling (I use these dairy free chocolate chips) 1. Blend beet, dates, coconut milk, vanilla extract and syrup in a blender until smooth. 2. Combine oats, puffs, sesame tahini, almond butter, cacao nibs, raisins, salt, and beet mixture in a large bowl. Mix to combine thoroughly. 3. Line an 8″ x 8″ baking dish with parchment paper, extending the paper up the sides of the dish. Distribute the mixture into the dish in a flat, even layer. Place into the freezer to firm up, for at least 1 hour. Take out of the freezer and remove the firm block out of the baking dish, using the extended ends of the parchment paper. Place onto a cutting board and cut into bars of your desired shape. Drizzle with melted chocolate. 4. Keep in the freezer, in an air-tight container (the bars will never be frozen solid). Remove from the freezer a few minutes before eating.

Barley Fried Rice

February 22 2016 Meatless Monday 

This healthy spin on fried rice features the nutritious whole grain barley in place usual white rice. Edamame adds protein to the dish while eggs, peas and carrots take up their traditional role in this popular dish. This recipe comes to us from Amber of Homemade Nutrition. Serves 4 – 6 - 1 teaspoon unsalted butter - 2 large eggs, cracked and mixed in a small bowl - 1 tablespoon canola oil or light olive oil, separated - 1/­­2 medium red onion, chopped - 2 cloves garlic, chopped - salt and pepper to taste - 1 cup frozen edamame (shelled) - 1 cup frozen peas and carrots - 3 1/­­2 cups cooked barley (or brown rice) - 1/­­4 cup + 1 tablespoon low sodium soy sauce - 1 teaspoon sesame oil - red pepper flakes to taste (optional) - chopped cilantro for garnish (optional) Heat a large cast iron or nonstick skillet over medium low heat. Melt the butter, and cook the eggs until they are scrambled and just barely cooked through. Remove the eggs from the skillet and set aside. Turn the heat up to medium high, add 1 teaspoon of the oil, then add the onion, garlic, salt and pepper. Cook for about 5 minutes or until the onion begins to soften. Add the edamame and peas and carrots and cook for about 2 more minutes. Add the remaining 2 teaspoons of oil, then add the barley. Stir the mixture, then let it sit for about 1 minutes, then stir again and let it sit for another minute (this is to allow the barley to brown). Repeat 2-3 more times. Finally, add the soy sauce, sesame oil, red pepper flakes (if using) and cooked egg and mix to combine everything. Remove from heat. Top with chopped cilantro for garnish. The post Barley Fried Rice appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Gingersnap Eggnog Ice Cream Sandwiches

December 22 2015 My New Roots 

Gingersnap Eggnog Ice Cream Sandwiches Dear friends, Ive been hit with the Christmas spirit! Perhaps a little slow on the uptake, this recipe was the absolute magic that knocked me sideways, and its better late than never. Especially in this case. To keep this level of deliciousness to myself would be decidedly Scrooge-like indeed. Two treats come to my mind when I think about Christmas: gingersnaps and eggnog. I thought about just posting a raw vegan egg nog ice cream or just gingersnap cookies, but then I realized that combining these two things would be utterly insane in the best way possible. So I did just that, and the first bite I took actually caused me to laugh out loud. These ice cream sandwiches are so delectable that I beg you to make them. This ice cream is everything. Its super rich, creamy, decadent with plenty of warming nutmeg spiciness to conjure up egg nog memories without any egg to speak of. Or cream. Or milk. Its vegan and raw believe it or not, but you tastebuds wont know that – they will only thank the dear heavens for being born in a body that gets to eat this gorgeous stuff. The Gingersnap cookies are also vegan, gluten-free, and delicious on their own, or embracing a giant scoop of egg nog ice cream (obviously). They cleverly employ rolled oats that are turned into flour right in your food processor, creating a satisfyingly-textured treat that Im sure you will make over and over again. The brown rice syrup is worth finding if youre into a super crisp cookie, where the barley malt syrup can be used in its place but the results will be chewier.  Because the flavours in this recipe rely heavily on spices, I thought the following reminder would be helpful. Most people assume that spices are just inanimate powders that they can keep forever, but they are actually very delicate creatures that change both flavour-wise and nutritionally over time. Buying spices whole will ensure that they will keep their taste and nutritional potency for up to twelve months, while ground spices will last for only six months. If youre like my mom and have had the same dusty jar of chile powder kicking around since 1992, do yourself a favour and discard it, buy some fresh, and enjoy. Life is too short for stale spices!  There are times when ground spices are appropriate, especially for convenience sake. Cinnamon, ginger, paprika, cayenne, turmeric, cumin and cardamom are the ones I usually have ground since I go through quite a lot of each of these over the course of half a year. Spices that I always keep whole include nutmeg, clove, allspice, coriander, fenugreek, star anise and peppercorns.  Although it is commonplace for people to store spices next to the stove for easy access, this is not the best place. Spices should be kept away from heat and light and be tightly sealed in a glass or ceramic container. Metal canisters may contain compounds that can interfere with the spices chemically, while plastic containers encourage condensation, which leads to spoilage. Keep spices in a cool, dark place, and put a date label on the jar to remind yourself when to toss any remaining product after it has expired. The Eggnog Ice Cream recipe calls for nutmeg, which I will implore you to grate fresh, because it is a revelation! Ground nutmeg loses its flavour very quickly that the results of this recipe will be completely different. If pre-ground nutmeg is all you have then you may need to increase the amounts Ive called for. And in that case, ask for a couple whole nutmegs for Christmas.      Print recipe     Raw Vegan Eggnog Ice Cream Makes 1 quart /­­ 1 liter Ingredients: 2 heaping cups /­­ 300g cashews 2 ripe bananas 1 vanilla bean 1/­­8 tsp. sea salt 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml maple syrup 1 tsp. freshly-squeezed lemon juice 1 tsp. freshly grated nutmeg, to taste 1/­­4 tsp. ground cinnamon, to taste Directions: 1. Soak cashews for a minimum of 4 hours or overnight. Drain, rinse well and place in a blender (a high-speed blender is recommended) with all other ingredients. 2. Blend on high until completely smooth. Taste and adjust spices to suit your taste. 3. Pour mixture into a metal or glass container and place in the freezer to set, for at least 4 hours. Once frozen, place plastic wrap directly on top of ice cream to prevent it from absorbing any other flavours in the freezer. Let thaw 15-20 minutes before serving so that it is easy to scoop. Enjoy! Gingersnap Cookies Makes 20 cookies Ingredients: 2 1/­­2  cups /­­ 250g rolled oats 1/­­2 cup /­­ 75g coconut sugar 1 1/­­2 Tbsp. ground ginger 1 tsp. ground cinnamon 1/­­2 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1/­­2 tsp. baking soda 1 tsp. baking powder 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80 ml coconut oil 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80 ml brown rice syrup or barley malt 2 Tbsp. water 1 tsp. vanilla extract Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 350°F /­­ 175°C. 2. In a small saucepan over low-medium heat, melt coconut oil. Whisk in brown rice syrup, water and vanilla. Remove from heat and set aside. 3. In a food processor blend oats until you have a rough flour. Add to a large bowl with all other dry ingredients. Stir to combine. 4. Add wet ingredients to dry ingredients and fold to combine. 5. Spoon out dough into balls onto a lined baking sheet – give them plenty of room because they spread a lot! ( I use at 2-3 baking sheets to bake the whole batch) Bake for 10 minutes until golden brown. Remove from oven, let sit for five minutes, then transfer to a cooling rack. Store in a tightly sealed container for 5 days. Assembly 1. Remove Eggnog Ice Cream from the freezer at least 15-20 minutes before serving. 2. Scoop a generous ball of ice cream and place on top of a cookie. Add another cookie to the top and press to set. Enjoy immediately, or wrap sandwiches in plastic wrap and place in the freezer until ready to eat. Assembled ice cream sandwiches will keep for 1 month in the freezer. I wish all of you out there a delicious, magical, safe, healthy, and abundant holiday. And I want to thank each and every one of you for your love and support this year in making my dreams a reality. From the blog, to my cookbook and the My New Roots app, your ongoing enthusiasm for what I’m doing really motivates me to keep going. Big love to you all. Peace, blessings, and happy holidays! Sarah B. Show me your ice cream sandwiches on Instagram: #MNRicecreamsandwiches

One Pan Brussels Sprout and Red Lentil Pie with a Root Vegetable Crust

December 27 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. Since this is our last recipe of 2017, we wanted to make sure that it’s a special one. It needed to check all the boxes we usually try to check with our recipes: nourishing, delicious, seasonal, beautiful, convenient, and a little bit unexpected. This veggie and lentil-centered one pan pie is all of those things. It’s very cozy and fun to prepare, too. If I had a choice, most of my savory dishes would be one-pan dishes :) Convenience is hard to beat. That little bit of initial effort you put into assembling all the ingredients for a single-pan dish pays off incredibly well when you end up with a big meal, plus a ton of leftovers for the week, having only used one pan or pot in the process. This one-pan dish is something like a vegetable pot pie, but the crust is made up of thinly mandolined winter roots – potatoes, sweet potatoes, and celery root. The filling is shredded Brussels sprouts, mushrooms, and red lentils (you can add barley, too, for a grain component) that cooks in a mixture of healing spices and coconut milk. The whole thing is packed with a great variety of plants. It’s perfect for those looking to up their intake of vegetables after the holidays, but still wanting to keep their cooking hearty and cozy. The ingredient that takes this dish into the complete meal category are the red lentils. Vegetable dishes are great on their own, but adding any kind of pulses (lentils, beans, chickpeas, dry peas) to your plant-centric meals will up their nutrition and ability to satisfy quite a bit. Pulses are incredibly nutrient-dense, like superfoods, but they are also very affordable, unlike most other superfoods, so it’s a win-win all around. Try adding about a half a cup of pulses to your meals a few times a week – your cooking will greatly benefit from them, and you’ll be on your way to discovering a whole new world of deliciousness (of you haven’t already, of course). Head here for more of our recipes using pulses, and be sure to check out Half Cup Habit. Happy New Year! Thank you so much for visiting GK, trying out our recipes, and reading up on the self-care series. It all means so much to us .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post One Pan Brussels Sprout and Red Lentil Pie with a Root Vegetable Crust appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans

August 30 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. I have a major weakness for anything marinated, especially vegetables and beans or lentils, probably because of where I grew up. Though Russian cuisine is known for straightforward foods like meat, potatoes, and mayonnaise-heavy salads, I come from a special pocket in the southwest of Russia, where the foods of many cultures intersect. We have culinary influence from Armenia, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Karachay-Cherkessia – all Southern nations that are known for their use of spices and herbs that make their food much brighter than traditional Russian fare. The region is also known for delicious, marinated foods, which I grew up eating lots of – marinated eggplant, peppers, mushrooms, green beans and so on. You name it, and chances are that they marinate it. That might be why I’m so excited to share this light, summery, fennel-marinated zucchini and mung bean dish. It’s comfort food to me, and I think you’ll really like it as well :) What brings this whole dish together is the lemony fennel marinade. I usually reach for cumin when putting together marinades for vegetables, but I had the epiphany to use fennel here, and I’m so happy I did. It has the perfect, bright and summery anise flavor, which is also quite unique. Another amazing thing about fennel is that it’s a digestion aid. In parts of India, fennel seeds are chewed after a meal precisely for that purpose, and also as a breath freshener. So cool! The preparation here is quite low maintenance, and we’ve got a video up top to show the whole process. The zucchini is not cooked, just ribboned and marinated, which makes it softer, but with a pleasant, crisp bite. It’s served over marinated mung beans (I mixed in some lentils as well), with lots of herbs, microgreens and avocado. This dish can serve as an excellent, summery side or an addition to salads, but honestly, I’ve been eating it as a light meal most of the time. It’s nourishing and filling enough because of the inclusion of fiber and protein-rich mung beans and lentils. Both mung beans and lentils fall under the nutritious category of pulses, together with all other beans, chickpeas and dried peas, which might just be the most affordable superfoods out there. This year, we are working with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada on creating some simple, weekday-friendly pulse recipes, as part of their Half-Cup Habit program. Making a habit of incorporating at least 1/­­2 cup of cooked pulses in your cooking a few days a week always leads to some sustainable, nourishing and affordable meals. For more recipes, check out our Red Lentil Gazpacho, White Bean Tuna Sandwich, Smoky Chickpea Croutons, Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans, or any recipes on the Pulses website. Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 cup mung beans or French lentils, or a combination of both - soaked in purified water overnight sea salt 4 small zucchini - sliced into thin ribbons lengthwise, preferably on a mandolin ⅓ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice ⅓ cup olive oil ½ tablespoon fennel seeds - toasted and freshly ground 1 garlic clove - minced pinch of red pepper flakes about 1 cup minced fresh herbs, such as dill, mint, parsley, basil, cilantro freshly ground black pepper avocado - for serving (optional) microgreens - for garnish (optional) Instructions Drain and rinse the mung beans/­­lentils and place them in a medium soup pot. Cover with plenty of water, bring to a boil, lower the heat to a simmer and cook for about 7 minutes. Taste for doneness and cook longer if needed, until fully cooked, but not mushy. Add salt at the end. Drain, transfer to a medium bowl or shallow dish and set aside. If cooking both mung beans and lentils, cook them separately, as they have different cooking times. Place the ribboned zucchini in a colander and generously sprinkle with salt. Let soften and release excess liquid for up to 30 minutes. In a small bowl, combine the lemon juice, olive oil, fennel seeds, garlic and red pepper flakes, mix until well combined. Add half of the marinade, half of the herbs, salt and pepper to the dish with the cooked mung beans/­­lentils and stir to coat. Rinse the zucchini, pat it dry with paper towels, and transfer to a medium shallow dish. Add the remaining marinade, herbs, salt and pepper to the zucchini, and toss to coat. Roll the zucchini slices and put them into the dish with the mung beans/­­lentils. Drizzle any remaining marinade over top. Alternatively, you can simply combine the beans, zucchini, all of the marinade, herbs, salt and pepper in a dish or bowl, and toss to coat thoroughly, skipping the rolling of the slices (that step is just for looks). Cover the dish and let marinate in the refrigerator for a few hours or days - the longer, the better. Serve garnished with avocado and microgreens, if using. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Barley Tomato Salad Raw Rutabaga and Crispy Sage Pizza Creamy, Garlicky Fettuccine with Roasted Green Vegetables Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India + Giveaway .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Quick Rhubarb Soft Serve

April 23 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Quick Rhubarb Soft Serve Have you ever heard of the quick soft serve ice cream technique, where you freeze coconut milk in ice cube trays and then blend the cubes with fruit, sweetener, etc. into into a perfectly spoonable frozen treat? It’s been on my radar for a while, but I have an ice cream maker, which I’m very faithful to, so I’ve been slow to warm up to the idea. I finally gave the whole thing a shot recently, and now I see what the big deal is about. This is entirely different from the typical ice-cream making experience. When I set out to make ice cream, I know that it will be a process, and I’m quite fond of the little bit of fuss that it takes. This soft serve is its own thing – delightfully quick and easy and with little fuss to speak of, especially if you already have the coconut ice cubes ready to go. The rhubarb component is a breeze to put together as well. You just stew the rhubarb with maple syrup until jammy, spread it out onto some parchment paper in a thin layer, and let it freeze before blending it with the frozen coconut milk. All the freezing can be done the night before or in the morning/­­afternoon to have it ready for dessert time in the evening. It’s all perfectly lazy :) There’s so much you can do as far as the flavorings go with this sort of technique, but this particular combination is so so lovely. The slight sourness of the rhubarb is softened by the fattiness of the coconut milk, and the kiss of maple syrup rounds everything out into a mind-blowing treat. And the color! Visual color therapy right there. There are some great links below, have a nice Sunday! Leo Babauta (of Zen Habits) on the Rich Roll Podcast 43 Self-Care Practices for the Highly Sensitive Person – we both happen to be highly sensitive people, so Renee’s post really resonated with us. So many great tips there. The Other Mr. President (This American Life) – what it’s really like to live in Putin’s Russia. While I feel like Russians are constantly misrepresented in the American media, this was a refreshingly multifaceted view at the complexity of our home country. #Vanlife – ‘what began as an attempt at a simpler life quickly became a life-style brand’ Seeded Gluten Free Sourdough Bread – thinking about resurrecting my sourdough baking habit, can’t wait to try out this gluten-free recipe. Green Kitchen at Home – excited for this book, loved the book trailer too. Quick Rhubarb Soft Serve   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients 1 13.5 oz can full fat coconut milk ¼ cup + 2 tablespoons maple syrup, divided about 3 cups chopped rhubarb (1 pieces) splash of vanilla extract poppy seeds - for garnish (optional) Instructions In a blender, combine the coconut milk with 2 tablespoons maple syrup. Pour the coconut milk into an ice cube tray and freeze for a few hours or overnight. In a medium saucepan, combine the rhubarb with ¼ cup maple syrup and a splash of vanilla extract. Bring to a boil over medium hight heat, then lower the heat and simmer for 7-10 minutes, until rhubarb is soft and jammy. Spread the stewed rhubarb on a parchment paper-covered baking sheet in a thin layer and place in the freezer for a few hours or overnight, until completely frozen. Put the coconut ice cubes in the blender and blend on high until just broken down. Remove the frozen rhubarb from the freezer, peel away the baking sheet and break the rhubarb into manageable pieces, then put in the blender with the coconut milk. Blend everything on high to achieve a soft serve consistency. You might have to stop and scrape the walls of the blender periodically, or if you have a Vitamix, the tamper is really helpful here. Enjoy right away, garnished with poppy seeds, if using. If you have leftovers, they will freeze into a solid block in the freezer because this ice cream hasnt been properly aerated. My suggestion is to freeze the leftovers in an ice cube tray and re-blend into soft serve once ready to eat again. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... Simple Spicy Strawberry Gazpacho Beet Tahini Snack Bars Barley Tomato Salad Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Quick Rhubarb Soft Serve appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways

March 22 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Quick Blender Pancakes, Three WaysThis post was created in partnership with Revol. So excited to share this recent discovery with you today. If you follow us on instagram, you may have seen me posting an abnormal number of pancake photos recently. That would be because Ive been cooking some variation of blender pancakes almost every morning for the past couple of weeks. Seriously obsessed. Blender pancakes start out with whole grains instead of flour, which get soaked overnight in purified water. Soaking not only softens the grains and makes them more blend-able, but also awakens the life within each individual grain and rids them of phytic acid, making them more bioavailable and easier to digest. You could use a number of grains here, but I find raw buckwheat to be the perfect neutral base. Buckwheat is also incredibly nutritious, and is actually not a grain at all, but a fruit/­­berry of the buckwheat plant (related to rhubarb!). In the morning, simply combine your soaked grains with a liquid and other add-ins in a blender, whirl everything into a smooth batter and you are ready to fry up your pancakes. Its all super quick, easy and so tasty, and there is a lot of room to get creative, too. The whole process kind of reminds me of making a smoothie because the flavor combo possibilities are endless, and because you can just throw a bunch of ingredients into the blender and expect totally delicious results (almost) every time. I offer three of my favorite flavor combinations here, two sweet and one savory. The orange, sweet potato pancakes are subtly sweetened with maple syrup and jazzed up with spices. They are hearty, warming, and very kid-friendly. The green ones are flavored with matcha and studded with sesame seeds that add tiny pops of crunch throughout. Matcha is the star in this variation, youll be able to taste its lovely, grassy and sweet notes very well. The pink, savory pancakes, combine beet with spices, ginger and greens, making them a great option for those who favor a non-sugary breakfast. I love them with our avocado mayo, but you can employ pretty much any one of your favorite, creamy sauces as an accompaniment. Whichever variation you try, you will love how easily they come together and how forgiving the recipes are in terms of add-ins. I know by now youve noticed the beautiful plates/­­cups /­­enamel board in the photos. They are from Revol, a French cookware and bakeware brand with a newly launched website. They sent me a few items of my choice from their Color Lab and Crumple collections, and I was blown away by the quality of their wares. The half-glazed dinner plates are handmade in France and feel incredibly sturdy. They stack up perfectly when you store them in the cupboard and are just a true pleasure to eat off of. I couldnt resist the pink crumple cups because they are adorable, and because I was missing vessels of that size in my kitchen. They are the ideal size for espresso or cappuccino, if thats your thing, but I will be using them for my occasional morning ginger-turmeric shots. The little cheese plate/­­presentation board is hand-dipped in enamel, and will make for a perfect snack board at any get-together. All the pieces are refined and minimal, yet they still feel warm and welcoming, and you can definitely sense the hand in all of them. Everything is oven and dishwasher safe, too, so there’s a perfect balance of beauty and utility. Spiced Sweet Potato Blender Pancakes   Print Serves: about 12 pancakes Ingredients 1 medium sweet potato coconut oil for roasting sweet potato and frying ¾ cup raw buckwheat groats - soaked in purified water overnight 1 tablespoon sesame tahini or other nut/­­seed butter 1 cup almond milk or water 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar ½ teaspoon baking powder pinch of sea salt 1 teaspoon cinnamon ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg 4 cardamom pods - green shells removed (optional) ½ teaspoon ground ginger (optional) 1 tablespoon maple syrup, plus more for serving 1 tablespoon ground flax or chia seeds (optional) 2 tablespoons hemp seeds (optional) Instructions Preheat oven to 400°F (200° C). Prick the sweet potato with a fork several times and place it on a parchment paper-covered baking tray. Roast for 40-50 minutes or until tender throughout. Let cool, then peel. Alternatively, peel the sweet potato and roughly chop it into cubes. Place onto a parchment paper-covered baking tray and roast for 30-40 minutes, until tender. Mash the sweet potato pieces a bit with a fork when you are measuring out 1 cup of the flesh in the next step. Drain the buckwheat over a colander and rinse very well. Combine it with 1 cup sweet potato flesh, sesame tahini, almond milk/­­water, apple cider vinegar, baking powder, salt, spices and maple syrup in an upright blender, and blend until smooth. Add flax/­­chia and hemp seeds, if using, pulse to combine. Warm ½ tablespoon of coconut oil in a medium non-stick frying pan over medium heat. The pan should be very hot, but not smoking. Pour ¼ cup of the batter per pancake into the pan and spread each one out slightly with the back of a spoon, into roughly a 4-inch pancake. Fry as many pancakes as the pan can hold, I did 3 at a time. Fry until the edges turn dry and bubbly, for at least 2 minutes, flip and cook for 1-2 minutes, until the underside is golden brown. Continue with the rest of the batter, keeping the cooked pancakes covered and warm. You should not need to add any more oil, and you may need to lower the heat a bit once youve fried up your first batch to keep the pan from smoking. Enjoy right away with fresh fruit, maple syrup/­­honey, yogurt and/­­or cacao nibs. These pancakes are best eaten fresh, but you can also reheat them on low temperature in the oven or toaster, in case you have leftovers. 3.5.3226 Matcha Sesame Blender Pancakes   Print Serves: about 8 pancakes Ingredients ½ cup raw buckwheat groats - soaked in purified water overnight ½ cup almond milk or water 1 teaspoon matcha powder 1-2 tablespoons maple syrup, plus more for serving 1 tablespoon sesame seeds (I used black) Instructions Drain the buckwheat over a colander and rinse very well. Combine it with almond milk/­­water, matcha, and maple syrup in an upright blender, and blend until smooth. Add sesame seeds and pulse on low to mix the seeds into the batter. Warm ½ tablespoon of coconut oil in a medium non-stick frying pan over medium heat. The pan should be very hot, but not smoking. Pour ¼ cup of the batter per pancake into the pan. Fry as many pancakes as the pan can hold, I did 3 at a time. Fry until the edges turn dry and bubbly, for at least 2 minutes, flip and cook for 1-2 more minutes, until the underside is golden brown. Continue with the rest of the batter, keeping the cooked pancakes covered and warm. You should not need to add any more oil, and you may need to lower the heat a bit once youve fried up your first batch to keep the pan from smoking. Enjoy right away with more sesame seeds, coconut flakes, fresh fruit, maple syrup/­­honey, yogurt, etc. These pancakes are best eaten fresh, but you can also reheat them on low temperature in the oven or toaster, in case you have leftovers. 3.5.3226 Savory Beet Blender Pancakes   Print Serves: about 9 pancakes Ingredients ½ cup raw buckwheat groats - soaked in purified water overnight ½ cup whole sorghum groats or more buckwheat/­­barley/­­quinoa etc. - soaked in purified water overnight ½ small cooked beet 1 tablespoon sesame tahini ½ cup water 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar 1 teaspoon tamari or more to taste ½-inch piece ginger ¼ teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon smoked paprika ½ teaspoon cumin ⅛ teaspoon red pepper flakes 1 tablespoon chia or flax seeds (optional) 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast (optional) 1 tablespoon dulse (optional) large handful chopped spinach/­­kale leaves or small handful sliced scallions avocado mayo - for serving (optional) Instructions Drain and rinse the buckwheat and sorghum very well. Combine the grains with the beet, sesame tahini, water, apple cider vinegar, tamari, ginger, baking powder, smoked paprika, cumin, red pepper flakes, and chia/­­flax, nutritional yeast, dulse, if using, in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Add chopped spinach/­­kale/­­scallions and pulse to mix in. Warm ½ tablespoon of coconut oil in a medium non-stick frying pan over medium heat. The pan should be very hot, but not smoking. Pour ¼ cup of the batter per pancake into the pan and spread each one out slightly with the back of a spoon, into roughly a 4-inch pancake. Fry as many pancakes as the pan can hold, I did 3 at a time. Fry until the edges turn dry and bubbly, for at least 2 minutes, flip and cook for 1-2 minutes, until the underside is golden brown. Continue with the rest of the batter, keeping the cooked pancakes covered and warm. You should not need to add any more oil, and you may need to lower the heat a bit once youve fried up your first batch to keep the pan from smoking. Enjoy right away with avocado mayo/­­plain yogurt/­­any sauce of choice and more sliced scallions. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Celebrate National Nutrition Month with Meatless Monday!

March 6 2017 Meatless Monday 

Celebrate National Nutrition Month with Meatless Monday!March is always one of our favorite times to sit down at the table. Its National Nutrition Month , where good food and food thats good for you are served on the same plate. This year, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends that you Put Your Best Fork Forward, encouraging parents to teach healthy eating habits to their children. At Meatless Monday, we couldnt agree more. The academy also suggests filling half your plate with fruits and vegetables. Of course, we believe in filling the whole plate with tasty veggies, fruits, nuts and whole grains. In fact, the nutrients in particular foods can actually help with certain health issues. So in celebration of National Nutrition Month, were going to spotlight specific foods each week that have a direct link in helping to reduce the risk of a chronic preventable disease. First up: Whole grains!   Heart Disease - Leading Cause of Death Among Women You may remember hearing about this last month during the American Heart Associations Wear Red event. Its a serious health issue . Cardiovascular disease is listed as the underlying cause of nearly 801,000 deaths in the U.S. each year (about one of every three).   Whole Grains and Veggies Lower the Risk of Heart Disease In a research study , health experts concluded an inverse association between dietary whole grains and cardiovascular disease. In other words, by eating more whole grains, you have less risk of developing heart disease. In a separate study , experts found that a higher consumption of fruit and vegetables is linked to a lower risk of all causes of death, particularly heart disease. Long story, short, whole grains and veggies are definitely heart smart.   Eat Healthy - and Tasty Turns out you can have the best of both worlds: nutritious, flavorful veggies and wholesome tasty whole grains. See some of our favorite recipes below: Sweet Potato Sorghum Salad   Tahini Quinoa Bean Salad   Barley Fried Rice The post Celebrate National Nutrition Month with Meatless Monday! appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower

December 11 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower Since winter in the northern hemisphere is most definitely in full swing, we thought it was time for another quick, creamy winter soup recipe that’s nourishing and warming to the core. This one’s got a balance of grounding winter roots like celeriac and parsnip with some brighter, crisper veggies like spinach and fennel, finished off with a kiss of lemon. The roasted cauliflower pieces that stud each bowl are cooked in a special, sweet and spicy dressing that helps create those caramelized edges we are all so fond of. Eating this soup during this time of year just feels right – it’s incredibly cozy and feeds both body and soul. This soup is stunning enough in looks to serve as a starter to a festive meal, so we encourage you to get radical and serve green soup at your holiday party :) There are some weekend links after the jump, have a cozy Sunday. Natalie Weinberger interviewed on Sight Unseen – one of our favorite ceramicists Botanica – a soon to be, vegetable forward restaurant in LA + a lovely online journal with some amazing recipes like Spiced Spaghetti Squash Pancakes, Whole Roasted Cauliflower, Banana Buckwheat Poppyseed Bread The Founders of CAP Beauty interviewed by Ashley Neese – and if you haven’t heard of CAP Beauty, check it out, it’s an amazingly well-curated one stop shop for natural beauty products Pirelli Calendar 2017 Goes Makeup-Free McKel Hill of Nutrition Stripped interviewed on Chris Ducker’s podcast Pulp Pantry – a snack company that utilizes pulp from making juice, which normally gets discarded, to make granola, veggie crisps and more – such a smart idea! GIFs by NASA Gourmet Print Shop – Sarah Britton of My New Roots is now selling some of her beautiful food photographs for making prints Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the cauliflower 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil - melted ½ tablespoon Dijon mustard ½ tablespoon maple syrup ½ tablespoon tamari ½ teaspoon sriracha 1 medium cauliflower head - cut into florets for the soup 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 2 teaspoons whole coriander seeds or 1 teaspoon ground coriander 1 large yellow onion - chopped sea salt - to taste 2 small or 1 medium to large celery root - peeled and roughly chopped 1 medium parsnip - peeled and roughly chopped 1 medium to large fennel bulb - roughly chopped, green fronds reserved 3½ - 4 cups purified water 2-3 bay leaves (optional) few large handfuls arugula or spinach leaves freshly ground black pepper - to taste ½ lemon - juice Instructions to roast the cauliflower Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Combine coconut oil, mustard, maple syrup, tamari and sriracha in a medium bowl and whisk until smooth. Place cauliflower florets onto a parchment paper-covered baking tray, drizzle with the dressing and toss to coat evenly. Roast for 30 minutes or until soft and caramelized at the edges, stirring at halftime. to make soup While the cauliflower is roasting, warm coconut oil in a medium soup pot over medium heat. Add coriander and toast for 1-2 minutes, until fragrant. Add onion and a pinch of salt and let onion sweat for a few minutes. Lower the heat to medium low and sauté for 20-30 minutes, stirring frequently, until onion is soft and caramelized. Add celery root, parsnip, fennel, water, bay leaves, if using, and a few generous pinches of salt to the pot, bring to a boil over medium high heat. Adjust the heat to establish a strong simmer and cook, partially covered, for about 20 minutes, or until vegetables are soft throughout. Remove and discard bay leaves. Combine soup with half of the roasted cauliflower, arugula/­­spinach, fennel fronds (reserve a few for garnish) and black pepper in an upright blender and blend until smooth. You may need to do this in batches, depending on the size of your blender. Use caution when blending hot liquids. Transfer the pureed soup back into the pot, squeeze the lemon juice and mix it in. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Distribute between bowls and serve warm, garnished with the rest of the roasted cauliflower florets and fennel fronds. 3.5.3208 You might also like... 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Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops with a Chocolate Core

July 31 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops with a Chocolate Core This week, I wanted to re-create my favorite Ben & Jerry’s ice cream flavor, making it vegan (though B&J came out with their own non-dairy ice cream, which is so awesome) and nutritious with the addition of a few energizing superfoods. Another thing I know people can’t get enough of in B&J’s ice cream are their decadent cores, so I went ahead and gave these Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops a chocolate core to really drive the point home. If you’re wondering why the pops are minty-colored, it’s due to the addition of spirulina, along with other nutritionally dense ingredients like hemp hearts and cacao nibs. A bonus – no ice-cream maker is needed for these. Moving to the U.S. from small-town Russia in the 90s and going to a Ben & Jerry’s ice cream shop for the first time was completely mind-blowing because a) back home, we did not have dedicated ice cream shops, b) ice cream flavors I grew up with were very basic and I had never seen so many extensive flavor options c) they sold little tubs of ice cream to take home, which was unheard of in Russia at the time d) everything tasted incredibly decadent and delicious. So here’s my B&J tribute, as a thanks for opening my eyes to possibilities I didn’t know existed. Read on for some weekend links and have a peaceful Sunday. Kids Taste-Test the New Ben & Jerry’s Vegan Ice Cream  Essentials – since we get many questions about our chosen kitchen and photography tools, we’ve made a page with links to all our favorite and most-used products – Kitchen Tools here, Photography here (also working on a round-up of favorite health-related books/­­cookbooks and natural beauty!) The Sad, Sexist History of Salad – Americans, in particular, strongly associate healthy or light foods, such as salad, chicken, and yogurt, with women, and unhealthy or heavy foods, such as beef, potatoes, and beer, with men, both men and women preferred unhealthy foods with masculine packaging and healthy foods with feminine packaging. Fascinating. The World’s Most Innovative Companies in 2016 – according to Fast Company Julia Turshen on the One Part Podcast – loved this, especially her point on asking for credit/­­compensation – if you don’t ask, you will never know what the possibilities are. You may know Turshen from co-authoring Gwyneth Paltrow’s cookbook, along with many others. Cannot wait for her own cookbook to come out. Meryl Streep: A League of Her Own, also, Taste of Streep!? Obama After Dark – how one can average only 5 hours of sleep a night AND run the country is beyond me, also Obama Sets the Record Straight on His 7-Almond Habit :) About Us – we’ve updated our about page a bit, with very important info like our zodiac signs ;) Snapchat – follow @golubkakitchen for all behind-the-scenes Superfood Cherry Garcia Pops with a Chocolate Core   Print Serves: 7-10 pops Ingredients for the cherries 1 heaping cup cherries - pitted and halved 1 tablespoon maple syrup 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder 1 tablespoon water for the spirulina mix 1½ cup raw cashews - soaked for 2-4 hours 1 cup canned unsweetened full fat Thai coconut milk 3 tablespoons maple syrup or more to taste ½-1 tablespoon spirulina powder ½ tablespoon vanilla extract ½ teaspoon xanathan gum or 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder (optional) 1 tablespoon shaved dark chocolate or raw chocolate 1-2 tablespoons cacao nibs for the chocolate core ⅓ of the spirulina mix 2 tablespoons shaved dark chocolate or raw chocolate 3 tablespoons raw cacao powder for the pops 7-10 tea cups, small glasses or pop molds neutral coconut oil for oiling the cups spirulina mix (recipe above) chocolate core (recipe above) 7-10 wooden sticks - soaked for 2 hours or overnight hemp hearts cacao nibs Instructions to prepare the cherries Combine cherries with maple syrup and bring to a boil in a small saucepan. Reduce the heat to a simmer and simmer for 2 minutes. Combine arrowroot powder with water in a small bowl and add to the saucepan, while stirring. The cherry compote should thicken slightly. Remove from heat and let cool. to make the pops Make the spirulina mix. Drain and rinse cashews and put into an upright blender, preferably high-speed. Add coconut milk, maple syrup, spirulina, vanilla, and xanathan gum/­­arrowroot powder, if using and blend until smooth. If not using a high-speed blender, optionally strain mixture through a fine-mesh strainer for the most smooth and velvety texture. Spoon about ⅓ of the spirulina mix into a medium, heat-proof bowl and set aside. Add shaved chocolate and cacao nibs to the blender with the remaining ⅔ of the spirulina mix and pulse to combine briefly. Transfer the mixture into a separate bowl, then fold in the cherries. Make the chocolate core. Place the reserved ⅓ of the spirulina mix onto a double boiler, add chocolate and let it melt, stirring to incorporate. Remove from the heat, add in cacao powder, mix to combine and let cool. Make the pops. Oil your cups/­­molds generously with coconut oil and spoon the spirulina-cherry mix in, leaving a well in the center for the core. Spoon the chocolate core into the well. Even out the surface and insert the wooden stick. Repeat with the rest of the pops. Freeze until completely firm. Prepare a plate with cacao nibs and hemp hearts for coating, along with a parchment paper-covered surface for placing pops onto. Take cups with pops out of the freezer and place into a dish with hot water for a minute, for easier removal. Remove popsicles from cups, pulling them out by the sticks. Dip the top of each pop into the prepared hemp/­­cacao nib mixture and press gently to make the pieces stick. Place onto a parchment paper-covered surface and keep frozen until ready to eat. Take the popsicles out of the freezer 5-10 minutes prior to eating. 3.5.3208 You might also like... 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Umami Burgers

May 14 2016 Vegan Dad 

Umami Burgers These burgers came about from trying to use up the cans of chickpeas in my fridge from making batch after batch of Lemon Meringue Tarts. I first turned to my three go to sources of umami: tomatoes, soy sauce, and mushrooms. For texture, I used barley (like my Tourti?re recipe). The end result is a durable (i.e. grillable) and non-mushy burger with plenty of flavour. These burgers freeze well (just thaw them before grilling) and when cooked keep well in the fridge. They taste good cold, or microwaved a few days later. The kids love them for lunch so I grill them up on Sunday and they take them to school throughout the week. INGREDIENTS Makes 12 burgers - 1/­­2 cup pot barley, cooked (in veggie broth or beer) until soft (about 30 mins), cooled - 1/­­4 olive oil - 1 large onion, diced - 2 cloves garlic, minced - 1 celery rib, minced - 3 cups chopped cremini mushrooms (about 8 oz/­­227g) - 1 can chickpeas, drained - 1/­­4 cup tomato paste - 2 tbsp light soy sauce - 1 tbsp Montreal Steak Spice, ground - 1 tsp smoked paprika - 1 tsp chili powder - 1 tsp ground coriander - 1/­­4 cup nutritional yeast - 1/­­2 cup instant oatmeal - 1/­­4 cup flour - 1/­­4 cup instant tapioca - 1 cup fresh bread crumbs (i.e. day old bread ground up in a food processor) - seasoned salt and black pepper to taste METHOD 1. Cook the barley until tender, drain, then set aside to cool in a large bowl. 2. Heat olive oil in a large frying pan over medium heat. Sauté onion, garlic, and celery for 5-7 mins, until soft and onion is translucent. 3. Add mushrooms to the pan and cook for about 5 mins, until mushrooms have released their water and have cooked down a little. 4. Remove from heat and add to the barley. Mix well. 5. Pulse the chickpeas in a food processor. Be careful not to make them into a paste. 6. Add the pulsed chickpeas to the bowl, along with the tomato paste, soy sauce, spices, nutritional yeast, oatmeal, flour, and tapioca. Use a wooden spoon to mix well. 7. Add the fresh bread crumbs and mix well. Season to taste. 8. Let the mixture rest for 5 minutes. 9. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Using a silicone spatula, press the mixture into a crumpet ring (or what have you) to make 12 burgers on the prepared baking sheet. 10. The burgers are more durable when they are cool. Slide the baking sheet into the freezer while you fire up the grill. 11. Grill on a med to med-lo grill (around 400-425 degrees) for about 5 mins per side (so keep the heat moderate so the outside does not burn before the inside cooks). Brush the grill and the burgers with oil to keep them from sticking. The burgers should be firm to the touch and not mushy when they are done.

Mediterranean Five-Grain Rainbow Salad

February 26 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Mediterranean Five-Grain Rainbow Salad I recently read a text by Elisabeth Kirby about how our lives online sometimes can seem so perfectly edited. Luise and I have been talking a lot about that as well. In the world of blogs and instagram, it’s easy to believe that our photos are a perfect reflection of the lives we live. Please know that they are not. We are fortunate enough to work from home creating colourful vegetarian recipes that we also get to eat and take photos of. But if you zoom out from the photo there is often chaos outside the frame. Elsa and Isac building castles of sofa pillows while spilling smoothies on the white carpet, Thai take-away in front of a My Little Pony cartoon on the iPad, flour spilled all over the kitchen floor, failed recipe attempts and the inevitable fights that come from working closely together with the person you love. But also all those sweet moments of falling asleep together with the kids, cooking recipes for fun and not just for work and being silly with friends. Our photos and recipes reflect moments of creativity that balance our otherwise quite crazy and chaotic life as parents to two children. We aim to inspire, mostly by showing how gorgeous and delicious plant based food can be - like the salad above! We will also keep reminding ourselves to share personal stories and photos but many times those parts of life are best just lived. Okey, enough rambling, let’s move on to today’s recipe! We have created this salad in collaboration with Swedish/­­Italian family company Zeta (see our disclosure in the bottom of this post). They are launching a new range of organic whole grain mixes and asked for our help to develop a recipe for them. Since grains can be a little colourless, they asked for a delicious recipe that looked stunning (no pressure, right). Luise and I share a deep love for Italy and Italian flavours and we truly indulged in that while creating this salad. The grains add a nourishing base for this salad and they are tossed in pesto for extra flavour. We add sunchokes that are roasted until buttery soft centers and mix with thinly sliced raw, crunchy chioggia beets (aka candy cane or polka beets) and radishes. Of course we threw in some mozzarella and pine nuts (because, Italy!) and added red grapes for sweetness. All in all, it’s a real beauty of a salad, it is very nourishing and tastes just as good as it looks. The idea of mixing chioggia beets with radishes for a colourful kick is shamelessly inspired by some of the salads in Erin Irelands instagram feed (worth checking out btw!). Mediterranean 5-grain Salad with Sunchokes, Beets & Mozzarella Serves 4-6 The recipe is also available in Swedish here. 1 bag (250 g /­­ 1 1/­­2 cup) Zeta organic 5-grain mix (Farro, Barley, Kamut, Brown Rice and Oat Groats), or grains of choice 500 g /­­ 1 lb sunchoke/­­jerusalem artichoke 2 chunks mozzarella di bufalo 4 polka beets (chioggia) or yellow beets, peeled 1 bunch radishes, rinsed 200 g /­­ 7 oz  red grapes, halved 1 handful pine nuts, lightly toasted 2 handfuls rucola/­­arugula 1 bunch fresh basil Pesto dressing 5 tbsp green pesto 2 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil juice from 1/­­2 lemon Preheat the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F. Rinse and brush the sunchokes (don’t bother peeling them) and cut them in 5-10 mm (1/­­4-inch) slices. Place the slices in a bowl, drizzle over olive oil and toss them until everything is covered in oil. Spread out the slices on a baking sheet covered with baking paper. Roast for 30-40 minutes or until soft with crispy edges. Meanwhile, cook the grains in a large sauce pan filled with salted water, following the cooking time on the package. Drain any excess water and scoop the grains back into the sauce pan. Stir together the pesto dressing and pour over the grains in the sauce pan. Make sure they are all covered and then pour the grains out onto a wide plate or salad bowl. Layer with sunchoke slices and torn mozzarella chunks. Use a mandolin (or sharp knife) to shave the polka beets and radishes very thinly and spread on top of the salad together with pine nuts, grapes, rucola/­­arugula and basil. Disclosure: We wish to be as transparent as possible when it comes to sponsorships and collaborations. We have never had any ads on this site but in order to pay bills and continue doing this work that we love, we do on rare occasions accept collaborations with companies. We were compensated by Zeta for creating this recipe using some of their products. We would never work with products that we don’t believe in and their new range of whole grain-mixes felt like something that we would happily receive money to cook with, as they are all organic with short cooking times and all nutrients still intact. All words are our own and will always be. xx D&L

One Ingredient, Three Ways: Leeks

February 10 2016 Vegetarian Times 

One Ingredient, Three Ways: LeeksWe asked our friends at the Natural Gourmet Institute to weigh in on popular, healthy ingredients and cooking methods. Vegetarian Times has partnered with the renowned New York-based culinary school to create a  comprehensive new online course, Foundations of Plant-Based Nutrition. Whether youre a new vegetarian, an avid cook wanting to expand your skills, or contemplating a career in the food industry, you will find this course helpful. Sign up to receive discounts and information about this awesome course. Leeks provide a host of health and taste benefits, but are often overlooked in favor of their not-so-distant cousins, garlic and onion. All are members of the allium vegetable family, which boast nutrients from B-vitamin folate, to flavonoid kaempferol. Leeks contain many of the same health-promoting compounds as onions and garlic, and are known for their cardio-protective benefits. Tip: Like onions and garlic, leeks should sit for at least five minutes after you slice them, and before you cook them, to enhance their health-promoting qualities. Here are a few simple ways to incorporate leeks into recipes: Leek-squash chickpea pancakes: Who doesnt love a recipe based on a crunchy, traditional potato pancake? To make leek pancakes, use chickpea flour as a base, along with yogurt and peeled squash, and include sautéed leeks to meet the desired flavor. Recipe hack: The leeks and squash can be cooked 2 days in advance; the batter can also be made ahead to save time. Pasta with roasted leek tomato sauce: Forget jarred tomato sauce. Using pasta as the base--either a gluten-free variety, or a spiraled squash to create, say, zucchini noodles--prepare a topping of leeks with other veggies. Brown sliced leeks until soft, then bake them at 400 degrees F for about 30 minutes, along with other chopped produce, such as tomatoes and bell peppers, for a unique and tasty topping. Barley and leek pilaf: Leeks and golden raisins bring a burst of bright green color to this one-pot meal. Slice leeks then combine with raisins, quick-cooking barley, water, herbs and oils to create a 20-minute pilaf thats not short on flavor. Kayleen St. John is the resident nutritionist at NYCs Natural Gourmet Institute. Kayleen has a Masters degree in clinical nutrition from NYU and is a registered dietitian. Her research examines the relationship between diet and inflammatory conditions. Kayleen is an avid runner and believes smart nutrition contributes to optimal athletic performance. Our new course, Foundations of Plant Based Nutrition, led by Kayleen, covers essential plant-centric professional cooking techniques, health-focused topics including allergens and inflammation, and how to separate nutrition fact and fiction in a vegan and veg diet. 

Beet, Raspberry and Vanilla Smoothie Bowl

November 13 2015 My New Roots 

Beet, Raspberry and Vanilla Smoothie Bowl Hey buddy, hows your blood doing these days? Is it healthy and flowing? Full of oxygen and freshly-made red blood cells? Have you ever even thought about this?! The answer is, not likely. And that is nothing to be ashamed about. We are never really taught to think about our blood, how to nourish and take care of it, how to tell if something is missing. When I studied Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) I learned about blood building, a term to describe nourishing the body with the nutrients required for ample and healthy blood. For some reason, I took a particular interest in this field, and have been a passionate blood builder of my own ever since. If this sounds dorky (it is) and a little confusing, think of your blood almost like a muscle. We are more familiar with the idea of muscle building, in that our muscles require specific macro and micro nutrients to grow and thrive. Same as blood. Pretty simple, except you cant do it at the gym – you gotta get in the kitchen.  The role of blood in our body is to transport nutrients, oxygen, immune cells, and hormones, along with removing toxins and waste, and disperse heat. The components that make up our blood are used and disposed of extremely quickly, so there is a high cell turnover, which also means high nutritional requirements. Iron, folic acid, vitamin B-12, and protein are the major building blocks of blood. All of these things work synergistically to make your blood as potent and healthy as possible. Besides folic acid, you can see from the list that most of these nutrients are found abundantly in animal foods, but not so abundantly in the wonderful plant kingdom. So how do vegetarians build blood anyway? First and foremost eating a wide variety of fruits, veggies, legumes, whole grains, nuts, seeds, and superfoods is a good place to start. Hey wait! That sounds like a balanced diet. So if youre already there, great. If youre just starting out, your blood is about to get real strong. More specifically, the best blood building foods are the darkest of dark leafy greens and their powders, such as spinach, kale, beet greens, wheatgrass, barley grass, spirulina and chlorella, and deeply pigmented red foods such as beets, cherries, raspberries, goji berries, raisins, kidney beans, adzuki beans, and blackstrap molasses. I also find that drinking a cup of nettle tea every day, which contains high amounts of iron, is really effective in helping to tone the blood. This smoothie bowl is a one tasty blood builder. Its got a solid dose of greens (think iron, folic acid, and protein) from the spinach and wheatgrass, with beet, raspberry and prunes (lots of deep, dark, iron-rich goody goodies!) plus lemon for a vitamin C boost – since we cant absorb iron from plants unless we have a little help from vitamin C.  Although you may think that putting raw beetroot in a smoothie is a little odd, I was shocked at how utterly DELICIOUS the combination was with the raspberry. Its altogether earthy, sweet and tart, with a divine vanilla kiss that makes me swoon. Plus can we talk about the colour?! I can practically feel it feeding my blood with all of those juicy pigments and nutrients. Gosh. Isnt life grand? Smoothie bowls are a divine invention because you can eat them with a spoon, and you can top the heck out of them for a real meal situation. Although Im sure its just a psychological thing,  I sometimes feel a bit under-fed after a smoothie in a glass. Plus I like chewing a lot, and chewing a beverage can sometimes be boring without some chunks involved. Dont you agree? Ive topped mine here with raspberries, pomegranate, sea buckthorn, bee pollen and almond butter, but get creative with this on your own! Ive listed some other topping ideas in the recipe. And I will also say that taking just one extra minute to decorate your bowl delivers major self-love points and satisfies the creative genius in us all. There are no wrong answers or unattractive smoothie bowls! Go wild, you strong-blooded creature, you!     Print recipe     The Blood Building Beetroot, Raspberry and Vanilla Smoothie Bowl Serves 1 Ingredients: 1 small beet, peeled and chopped 1 cup raspberries, fresh or frozen (I use frozen) 2 cups packed /­­ 45g spinach 3 prunes, soaked in 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water small wedge organic lemon (including the peel!) 1-2 scoops protein powder (I use sprouted brown rice or pumpkin seed protein powders) 1-2 tsp. wheatgrass powder (or spirulina /­­ chlorella) a generous pinch ground vanilla powder (or 1 tsp. vanilla extract) 1/­­2 cup water or milk of choice Toppings pictured: frozen raspberries pomegranate seeds sea buckthorn berries bee pollen raw almond butter Other topping ideas: sliced fresh fruit fresh berries hemp seeds toasted nuts and /­­ or seeds chia unsweetened coconut granola cacao nibs goji berries Directions: 1. Soak prunes overnight in water, or for a minimum of one hour. 2. Pour the soaked prunes and their liquid into a blender. Add all remaining ingredients and blend on high until completely smooth (if you do not have a high-speed blender, this may take a minute or so). Taste and adjust sweetness /­­ vanilla /­­ lemon as desired. 3. Pour contents into a glass or bowl and garnish with desired toppings. Enjoy!   I hope you guys are fired up to build your blood now. Happily, it involves eating and not donning spandex and running on a treadmill. Although, that is important too. The running part. The spandex I’ll pass on, thank you. Cheers to your blood, Sarah B. Show me your smoothies on Instagram! #MNRbeetsmoothie  


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