balsamic vinegar - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Tomato curry recipe | thakkali curry | tomato kura recipe

Tiramisu Chia Seed Pudding

Mullu murukku recipe | mullu thenkuzhal | dal chakli | muthusaram

Garlic naan recipe | homemade garlic naan recipe without yeast










balsamic vinegar vegetarian recipes

Bell Pepper Bisque with Giant Croutons

October 4 2019 My New Roots 

Bell Pepper Bisque with Giant Croutons Hey friends! Im coming in hot, to drop this stellar soup recipe on you, while the weather is still fine and early fall produce is at its peak. The bell peppers in my region are bountiful and beautiful, and because I am the biggest sucker for roasted pepper anything, I came up with this dish to celebrate a seasonal favourite. But first, can we take a moment and please talk about how I just invented giant croutons? I think it might be my personal opportunity to break the internet. How is this not a thing yet?! Sure, I guess you could look at the cheese toast on French onion soup and say that is a giant crouton, but in my opinion, its merely an open-faced grilled cheese sandwich. Pfff. Not even close to this. My crouton is a cube of sourdough (important shape-distinction), kissed with garlicky oil and seared to toasty, golden perfection. The outsides are caramelized and crisp, while the center is fluffy, creamy and studded with nooks and crannies for the soup to slide in to. Guh. Too good to be true! Honestly guys, Im pretty proud of this. But I also need you to know that this soup is darn good too, even without the crouton. The recipe is loosely based on the North African Sun-dried Tomato Soup in my second cookbook, except I left out many of the warming spices, which felt prematurely winter-y. Its still t-shirt weather here, so the ginger and cinnamon had to go. Plus, I doubled the pepper count, added a teeny splash of balsamic (to round out the flavor), and made it bisque-y without the cream. Guess what I used?! Lentils!! Mic drop. But instead of bulking it up and putting the soup on legume-overload, I was conservative in my approach and just used half a cup. This made the soup rich and creamy without the cream, but in a very hush, hush way, so that you literally have no idea that theyre there. But their presence can be felt, because this soup is the real meal deal, not just a bowl of blended up veggies that will leave you hungry again in 20 minutes. With the bonus lentils, youre getting way more protein and fiber that youd normally expect from a pepper soup, and they will fill you up, and keep you energized for hours. This suddenly feels very infomercial-y. Did I mention there is a giant crouton? Moving on! Lets talk about peppers because they are in the nightshade family and that is a hot topic, if I ever heard one. Nightshade vegetables are a part of the Solanaceae family, and include tomatoes, peppers (and chilies), eggplant /­­ aubergine, and all potatoes except for sweet potatoes and yams. Originally cultivated in South America, nightshade vegetables were brought to Europe and Asia by Spanish explorers. Their name supposedly comes from the fact that they grow at night (as opposed to mushrooms, which grow in the shade). You may have heard rumors that Nightshade vegetables are toxic, that they can cause inflammation or that theyre linked to autoimmune disorders. While it is true that edible nightshades contain high levels of glycoalkaloids, specifically solanine, which at very high levels is toxic, it only seems to trigger reactions in individuals who are sensitive to it. Those with pre-existing inflammatory conditions may experience worsening of their symptoms when they consume these foods, but an elimination diet would be the only way to determine if nightshades are in fact, causing the issues. For people who do not suffer from chronic inflammatory ailments, enjoying ratatouille, a pizza, or a baked potato is likely just fine, and certainly not going to cause you to get these conditions. As far as autoimmunity is concerned, alkaloids from edible nightshades have been shown to irritate the gut, since solanine is effectively natural insecticide produced by this plant family. Gut irritation can contribute to intestinal permeability, which can set off an autoimmune reaction when proteins that should remain in the digestive tract leak into the bloodstream. The level of irritation depends on the amount consumed, and how sensitive the individual is. The highest amounts of solanine are found in green potatoes, and sprouted potatoes, but we should avoid eating those anyway.   Lets review: if you have an autoimmune disorder, leaky gut, or you exhibit symptoms of discomfort (digestive or otherwise) after consuming nightshades, try eliminating them from your diet for at least 6 weeks and see if you notice a difference. Then, re-introduce them one at a time and be aware of how you feel within a 24-hour period after eating them. If you dont have these issues, dont worry about it! There is absolutely no reason to limit your intake of these highly nutritious vegetables if they seem to do your body good. Bell peppers contain an astounding amount of vitamin C, high levels of A, and B6, with very good levels of folate, fiber, and vitamin E. They also provide flavonoids, and carotenoids. Remember to buy bell peppers that have fully ripened - anything other than the greens ones, which are typically unripe red, orange, yellow, or purple peppers. Their nutrient profile will be at its peak, and the natural sugars will be fully developed, easing their digestion. Let’s get to the recipe! If youre really pressed for time, skip roasting the peppers in the oven, and just dice them up, and add them to the pot along with the garlic in step 3. The overall flavour will be less rich, but still incredibly delicious. When Im in a crunch, Ill pull this move and have dinner on the table in 30 minutes. If you want to change things up, try orange or yellow peppers instead of the red ones. As far as sun-dried tomatoes go, I like organic, dried ones, instead of the oil-packed ones, but either would work here. With the canned tomatoes, go for whole, since they tend to be of higher quality than the diced ones. Lets talk bread. If you have access to a bakery where they make the real thing (sourdough), please use that. If you dont, find an unsliced loaf at your supermarket; bonus points if its made with wholegrain flour, organic, yeast-free, or all of the above. The bread should be cut into cubes with the serving bowl size in mind (youll want to see some of the soup around it), but if you have a huge bowl, go crazy and make that crouton as gargantuan as you want! And dont throw the offcuts away - I put them in the toaster and slathered them with hummus for my son. He was stoked about the oddly-shaped chunks.       Print recipe     Bell Pepper Bisque with Giant Croutons Makes 8 cups /­­ 2 litres /­­ Serves 4 Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee, divided 2 medium yellow onions, diced 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 3 large garlic cloves, minced 2 tsp. ground cumin 2 tsp. ground coriander 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. hot smoked paprika (depending on how spicy you like it) 4 large red bell peppers (stems, seeds, and ribs removed) 5 - 7 cups /­­ 1 1/­­4 – 1 3/­­4 liters vegetable broth 1 14.5-oz. /­­ 400ml can whole tomatoes 1/­­2 cup /­­ 45g sun-dried tomatoes, roughly chopped 1/­­2 cup /­­ 100g dried red lentils, soaked for 1 – 8 hours, if possible 2 tsp. balsamic vinegar Directions: 1. If you have time, soak the lentils in water overnight, or for up to 8 hours. Drain and rinse very well. If youre starting from dried, that is okay too, just give them a very good wash and drain before using. 2. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Prepare the peppers by cutting each of them in half, scooping out the seeds, and rubbing with a little coconut oil. Place peppers cut-side down on a parchment-lined baking sheet and place in the oven. Roast for 25-30 minutes until the skins are totally wrinkled and charred in places. 3. In a large stockpot, melt the remaining coconut oil over medium heat. Add the onions and salt and stir to coat. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions soften and begin to slightly caramelize, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic, cumin, coriander, and smoked paprika, and cook until fragrant, about 2 minutes. Add a little broth to the pot if the mixture becomes dry. 4. Add the whole tomatoes and their juices along with the sun-dried tomatoes, lentils, and the rest of the broth. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to low, and break up the whole tomatoes with your spoon. Simmer, covered for 15 minutes. Stir once or twice during cooking to prevent sticking. 5. The peppers should be done by now, so take them out of the oven, transfer all of them to a bowl with a lid or plate over the opening, making sure there are no gaps (this technique steams the peppers so that the skins will just slip right off, without using plastic wrap). Once cool enough to handle, remove the skins from the peppers, and place the peeled peppers in a blender. 6. Remove the soup from the heat and take off the lid to let cool just for a minute. Transfer to the blender, and blend on high until completely smooth. Add balsamic vinegar, and broth or water to thin, until your desired consistency is reached. Season to taste. Transfer back to the pot and keep warm. 7. Make the croutons (recipe below). 8. To serve, ladle the soup into bowls, top with fresh herbs, edible flowers, a drizzle of good olive oil, and of course place one giant crouton in the middle of each bowl. Enjoy! Giant Croutons Make as many as you want! Ingredients: 1 loaf of good bread (wholegrain sourdough is preferred) 2 Tbsp. expeller-pressed coconut oil (the unscented kind - very important!) or ghee, divided 1 clove of garlic, finely minced flaky salt, to taste Directions: 1. Cut the bread into 2 1/­­2 (6cm) slices - mine weighed 1.25 oz /­­ 35g per piece. Cut off the edges and make a cube (save the off-cuts for snacks). 2. Spread a little coconut oil on each side. 3. Heat remaining coconut oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic and sauté for a few minutes, just until the garlic is starting to turn golden. 4. Lower the heat to medium-low, and add the bread cube. Rub each side in the oil to coat with some of the garlic and sprinkle lightly with salt. Let cook on each of the six sides for a couple of minutes until golden brown. Remove from heat and enjoy immediately. I hope that wherever you are on this earth, youre enjoying the seasons shifting and embracing the changes that come with that. When I started writing this post, it was a very hot day, and now, just 48 hours later, I can feel a significant shift in temperature and weather. Here we go, fall! Im happy youre here. Big thanks to my friends at Foragers Farms for letting me crash the greenhouse at the crack of dawn to get these pics. Love to all, happy fall! Sarah B The post Bell Pepper Bisque with Giant Croutons appeared first on My New Roots.

Mushroom and Onion Cauliflower Bake from Whole Food Cooking Every Day

October 4 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Mushroom and Onion Cauliflower Bake from Whole Food Cooking Every Day Happy October! Today we’ve got the coziest recipe for ushering in the first full month of fall – a cauliflower bake from Amy Chaplin’s beautiful new cookbook, Whole Food Cooking Every Day. This recipe has everything we ever want in a comforting, fall dish: mushrooms, caramelized onions, chickpeas, and hearty greens, all covered by a fluffy, almost cheesy blanket of vegan cauliflower souffle. We’ve been so excited for the release of this cookbook, being huge fans of Amy’s work. Her first book is a true bible of whole food cooking, filled with kitchen wisdom and an incredible variety of plant-forward recipes. We learned so much from that volume, like the fact that it’s best to cook beans with a sheet of kombu for better digestion and that making a curry spice blend at home is very much worth it for the unbelievable flavor. Much like Amy’s first cookbook, Whole Food Cooking Every Day is monumental and thorough, with beautiful photography woven throughout. The book is organized in a brilliant way – each chapter presents a base recipe, which is then elaborated on with different ingredient variations. The Cauliflower Bake chapter that we worked from features a recipe for a fluffy cauliflower topping, which can go over a number of different fillings. Here are some examples of other base recipe chapters: Genius Whole-Grain Porridges, Gluten-Free Breads, Simple and Healing Soups, Baked Marinated Tempeh, Seeded Crackers, Easy Cakes. Don’t all of those sound amazing? If you’re ever in the market for a trusted resource on colorful, everyday whole food cooking, look no further. We hope you’ll enjoy the cozy bake Mushroom and Onion Cauliflower Bake from Whole Food Cooking Every Day   Print recipe from Whole Food Cooking Every Day by Amy Chaplin Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the cauliflower topping 1 large head (2½ lbs) cauliflower - cut into 1½ florets ½ cup raw pine nuts, cashews, or macadamia nuts 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 3 tablespoons nutritional yeast, plus more to taste ½ teaspoon fine sea salt, plus more to taste for the mushroom and onion filling 3 tablespoons extra-virgin coconut oil 1½ lbs shiitake mushrooms - stems removed and caps thinly sliced 2 tablespoons chopped fresh thyme 3 medium onions - quartered and thinly sliced lengthwise ½ teaspoon fine sea salt, plus more to taste 6 cups (6 oz) sliced Swiss chard - tough stems removed 1½ cups cooked chickpeas (1/­­4 cup cooking liquid reserved) or 1 15 oz can (drained) 1 tablespoon tamari 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar ¼ cups filtered water if using canned chickpeas 2 teaspoons arrowroot powder 1 tablespoon filtered water freshly ground black pepper Instructions to make the cauliflower topping Set up a steamer pot with about 2 inches of filtered water in the bottom (the water shouldnt touch the bottom of the basket) and bring to a boil over high heat. Arrange the cauliflower florets in the steamer basket, cover, and steam for 10-12 minutes, until the cauliflower is cooked through but not falling apart. Remove from the heat and set aside. Put the nuts, olive oil, yeast, and salt in a high-powered blender and add the steamed cauliflower. Starting on low speed and using the tamper stick to help press the cauliflower down, blend, gradually increasing the speed to high, until completely smooth and thick; use the tamper stick to keep the mixture moving and to scrape down the sides as you go. This will take a couple of minutes. Season with more nutritional yeast and salt to taste and blend to combine. to make the mushroom and onion filling, and assemble Preheat the oven to 375°F (190° C). Warm a large skillet over medium-high heat and pour in 1 tablespoon of the oil. Add half the shiitakes and the thyme, stir to coat with oil, and cook for 10-12 minutes, stirring only every minute or two (to allow the mushrooms to brown), until the shiitakes are golden brown. Transfer to a bowl and set aside. Repeat with another tablespoon of oil and the remaining mushrooms. Wash and dry the skillet if there are blackened bits on the bottom. Add the remaining tablespoon oil to the pan, then add the onions and cook over medium heat for 8 minutes, or until beginning to brown. Cover the pan, reduce the heat to low, and cook for 10 minutes, or until the onions are soft and lightly browned. Remove the lid, add the salt, and cook uncovered for another 5 minutes, or until the onions are caramelized. Add the chard, cover, and allow to steam for 3 minutes, or until tender. Add the chickpeas, cooked mushrooms, tamari, balsamic vinegar, and chickpea cooking liquid or ¼ cup water, raise the heat, and bring to a simmer. Dissolve the arrowroot in 1 tablespoon water, stir, and drizzle into the simmering mixture, stirring constantly. When the mixture has returned to a simmer, remove from the heat and season to taste with pepper and more salt. Transfer the mixture to an 8-inch square or equivalent baking dish and smooth the surface. Spread the cauliflower topping evenly over the filling. Bake for 30 minutes, or until the filling is bubbling and the topping has begun to set. Turn on the broiler and broil the bake for 3 to 6 minutes, until the topping is golden and browning in parts. Remove from the oven and allow to sit for a few minutes before serving. Once cooled, leftovers can be stored in the fridge in an airtight container for up to 3 days. To reheat, put the bake in a baking dish, cover, and warm in a 400° F (200° C) oven until heated through. Notes Here are some modifications we made while making the recipe based on what we had on hand. It turned out delicious this way as well. - We used half shiitakes and half crimini mushrooms. Crimini take a little longer to brown but otherwise work well here. - We used sage instead of thyme and also topped the bake with some crispy fried sage. - We used coconut aminos instead of tamari - those two are pretty interchangeable. - When baking, the filling tends to bubble up and drip out of the dish, so its helpful to set the baking dish over a baking sheet, to catch the drippings and avoid a smoking oven. 3.5.3226 The post Mushroom and Onion Cauliflower Bake from Whole Food Cooking Every Day appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Green Bean Salad

July 31 2019 VegKitchen 

Green Bean Salad This simple Green Bean Salad showcases fresh seasonal vegetables and is perfect as a side dish on a BBQ night.   Save Print Green Bean Salad Serves: 8   Ingredients 1 lb green beans 25 cherry tomatoes, cut in half 1 bell pepper 3 French shallots, finely chopped 50 mL olive oil 25 mL balsamic vinegar 1 tsp Dijon mustard 1 tsp honey 1/­­4 cup fresh parsley salt and pepper Instructions Strain the beans and steam for about 6 minutes. The post Green Bean Salad appeared first on VegKitchen.

Onion Marmalade

June 26 2019 VegKitchen 

Onion Marmalade This recipe for onion marmalade is so good, you can put it on all your dishes--well, almost!   Save Print Onion Marmalade Serves: 4   Ingredients 4 onions, finely sliced 1/­­3 cup vegan butter 1/­­2 cup sugar 1/­­4 cup balsamic vinegar salt and pepper, to taste Instructions In a saucepan, soften the onions in the butter over high heat for about 10 minutes. The post Onion Marmalade appeared first on VegKitchen.

Slouvlaki Tofu Skewers

May 22 2019 VegKitchen 

Slouvlaki Tofu Skewers Discover this delicious recipe of souvlaki tofu skewers. Save Print Slouvlaki Tofu Skewers Serves: 6   Ingredients ¼ cup lemon juice ¼ cup olive oil ¼ cup balsamic vinegar 5 garlic cloves, chopped ¼ tsp salt ¼ tsp black pepper 1 block extra film tofu, cubed Instructions In a bowl, whisk all ingredients (except tofu). The post Slouvlaki Tofu Skewers appeared first on VegKitchen.

My Heart Beets Salad

February 11 2019 Meatless Monday 

Cutting the beet into hearts makes this salad appear time consuming, but is so simple, it only takes minutes to make. Red beets get their beautiful crimson color from phytonutrients, which also provides detoxification and anti inflammatory benefits. This recipe was created by Donna Kelly of Apron Springs. Serves 4 - 1/­­4 cup extra virgin olive oil - 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar - salt and pepper, to taste - 4 medium beets, peeled - 1 tablespoon canola oil - 1/­­4 teaspoon salt - 1 head butter lettuce, cleaned and torn bite size - 4 ounces goat cheese, crumbled - 1/­­2 cup roasted almonds Preheat an oven to 425 degrees. Whisk the olive oil and balsamic vinegar together in a small bowl. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Slice the beets 1/­­4 inch thick and cut them into heart shapes using cookie cutters or a knife. Transfer the beet hearts to a baking sheet. Drizzle with the canola oil, sprinkle with the salt and place in the oven. Roast for 30 minutes, or until softened. Dress the lettuce with the balsamic vinaigrette in a large bowl, tossing to ensure the dressing is evenly distributed. Divide into 4 servings and top each with equal amounts goat cheese and almonds. Lay the roasted beet slices artistically on each salad and enjoy! The post My Heart Beets Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Healthier You Series: All-Star Nutritionist Bonnie Taub-Dix Sheds Light on Good Heart Health Practices You Can Use

January 28 2019 Meatless Monday 

Healthier You Series: All-Star Nutritionist Bonnie Taub-Dix Sheds Light on Good Heart Health Practices You Can UseStart smart eating habits on Mondays for a happier and healthier you! February is just around the corner and its American Heart Month . Take a moment on Monday to focus on behaviors that may help you live a longer and healthier life. This is the third article in this months Healthier You Series. Weve discussed making good dietary choices for kidney health and type 2 diabetes . This week, we look at heart health. The American Heart Association recommends making simple changes to your diet to improve heart health, such as limiting red meat. Meatless Monday is an easy and enjoyable way to make smart food choices for your heart . Consuming less red and processed meat and more plant-based foods like whole grains, fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes can benefit cardio-health. Bonnie Taub-Dix is a nutrition consultant, author, and Meatless Monday advocate. We asked her to share some heart-friendly advice. 1. Meatless Monday encourages people to cut out meat one day a week for their health and to try a great variety of plant-based foods. Are there specific plant-based foods that are most beneficial for heart health? Plant-based protein is a hot, trendy topic but these are foods that have been around for centuries, providing fiber and an array of nutrients. Plant proteins like beans, nuts, and seeds are just a few examples of how we can cut back on meat while boosting the value of our diets. Oatmeal is a steamy bowl of goodness for breakfast swirled with almond butter and bananas or as a savory side mixed with a variety of seasonings and spices. Oats and almonds are rich in fiber to help lower cholesterol levels. Beans, the most underrated superfoods, are also rich in soluble fiber to help keep you feeling fuller longer while controlling cholesterol levels. Theyre also a great source of plant-based protein.   2. Are there particular foods to avoid? What about processed foods? Many people say they try to avoid processed food, as if its a kind of poison. Its a well-intentioned goal, but even pre-chopped fruit or vegetables are processed foods! Certain processed foods make our lives more convenient, safer-and in many ways, even more nutritious. The good news is certain processed foods are healthier than some foods found in their natural state, such as: o Plain yogurt, with added cultures, retains the protein and calcium naturally found in dairy products, and it also includes added good bacteria to help boost our gut function and immune systems. o Canned tomatoes contain more lycopene--a powerful antioxidant that reduces inflammation--than fresh tomatoes do, especially when they are eaten simultaneously with a small amount of oil to enhance absorption. Dont judge a food by the front of the package. Flip that bag or box over to read whats really inside!   3. Should people with a family history of heart disease be much more careful than those who dont have a history? What can someone with a family history do to help prevent heart disease? If you knew you could have stopped that balsamic vinegar from splattering on your favorite white sweater, would you have done something to prevent it from happening? Unless youre clairvoyant, its not very easy to prevent something you cant predict. When it comes to your body--whether its potential damage from high blood sugar, blood pressure, or cholesterol levels--this is the time to take charge of your health. You can fight against your family histories by taking a closer look at what youre putting on your plate, moving more , and finding effective ways to manage stress .   4. Whats your go-to food for heart health on Meatless Monday? Id have to say my Spicy Dark Chocolate Chili Bowl ! What I love about this recipe is that you dont really have to follow it exactly -- you can swap out for your favorite ingredients. This recipe contains beans and avocado, as well as a variety of anti-inflammatory spices. Bonnie recently published Read It Before You Eat It – Taking You from Label to Table . You can find more about Bonnie at Better Than Dieting and on Instagram. For an extra bonus, check out heart-friendly Meatless Monday recipes, from pancakes to burgers, in our free comfort food e-cookbook . Use Mondays to make positive change in your life that will do you a world of good. Meatless Monday is a global movement followed by millions who choose not to eat meat one day a week for their health and the health of the planet. Help spread the word about the many benefits of Meatless Monday, such as how reducing meat consumption may improve your heart health. Download our shareable free graphics here . Follow  us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post Healthier You Series: All-Star Nutritionist Bonnie Taub-Dix Sheds Light on Good Heart Health Practices You Can Use appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Green Christmas 2018 - vegan edition

December 19 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Christmas 2018 - vegan edition The tree is already covered with colorful glass balls, small hand drawn paper Santas and tinsels, we have got light strands hanging around the windows, the presents are wrapped and Sinatra is playing from the kitchen speakers. It’s five days left to Christmas Eve and I don’t think we have ever prepared ahead for the holidays like this before. We have even cooked all the Christmas food. Twice! Well, three times actually. One was for our early celebration with David’s family. The other was to shoot these photos. And the third time because David is manic about testing recipes three times. We’ve got this. Sharing Christmas recipe roundups seems almost obligatory when you work with food. This year we asked what type of recipes you were looking for and many mentioned more vegan dishes for your holiday feasts, so that is what we have done here. I am not going to pretend that we are good at organizing big dinner parties, we are truly not. But we do have one method that we live by: Focus on having a good base of dishes and then ask guests to each bring a small side dish, drink, snack or dessert. That way you can have a generous buffet of food without the accompanying stress meltdown. Our cabbage parcels make a beautiful centerpiece with delicious mustard roasted roots and crispy smashed potatoes as warm sides. Because all of these dishes are quite rich, we also like to serve a fresh, tangy and crunchy salad on the side. Along with red cabbage Christmas krauts from our Green Kitchen at Home book. You’ll find the recipes here below. A few other favorites from the archives are our vegan Aubergine Polpette (perhaps with a gravy on the side), our Mushroom & Hazelnut Loaf, this one-tray Hasselback Potatoes with Kale and Pesto, the Pumpkin, Kale and Buckwheat Salad that we had for our wedding, this Black Quinoa & Kale Salad from dinosaur time (we’ve been making this for Christmas almost every year), and this Crispy Red Cabbage & Grape Salad (red cabbage salads are obligatory for all Danes on Christmas). We actually have one more recipe that we haven’t had time to post yet. It’s a really good gingerbread bundt cake and we’ll do our best to post the recipe before Christmas Eve (if you have our app, it is already available on there). Happy holidays! /­­Luise, David and all the kids! Stuffed Cabbage Parcels Makes 8 parcels These pretty little parcels are stuffed with rice, lentils, walnuts and raisins and cooked in a holiday spiced tomato broth. They are a little fiddly to make but super flavorful and well worth the effort. This recipe is vegan but you could also add feta cheese to the parcels if you feel like it. Filling – 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked red rice (see note) – 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked puy lentils – 500 ml /­­ 2 cups water – 1/­­2 tsp sea salt – 1 tbsp olive oil – 1 large red onion, peeled and finely chopped – 1 clove garlic, peeled and finely chopped – 1 cup walnuts, finely chopped – 4 tbsp raisins – 2 tbsp lemon juice – 4 tbsp chopped parsley Tomato Broth – 750 ml /­­ 3 cups vegetable stock – 1 x 400 g /­­ 14 oz tin crushed tomatoes – 1 tsp whole cloves – 1 tsp whole allspice – 2 star anise – 2 cinnamon sticks – 1 pinch sea salt Assembling – 1 savoy cabbage – 8 pieces of cooking string – 1 tbsp olive oil to fry in Instructions 1. Rinse rice and lentils in a sieve under running water. 2. Transfer to a saucepan and add water and salt. Bring to a boil, lower the heat and let simmer until tender, for about 35 minutes or according to the time on the package. 3. Place another sauce pan with the Tomato Broth ingredients on the stove, bring to a boil and then turn the heat down and let it slowly simmer under a lid for 20 minutes on low heat. 4. Meanwhile, add oil to a large skillet and sauté onion and garlic for 10 minutes on medium heat or until soft and translucent. 5. Transfer the onion to a bowl and wipe out the pan (you will use it to fry and cook the parcels in later on). 6. Drain any excess water from the rice and lentils. Add the onion and garlic, walnuts, raisins, lemon juice and parsley and stir to combine. 7. Carefully break off 8 leaves of the savoy cabbage. Trim off the thickest part of the stalk. 8. Blanch the savoy cabbage leaves in a sauce pan with salted boiling water for 2-3 minutes. Drain and lay out on a tea towel. 9. Spoon 3 tablespoons of filling into the center of each cabbage leaf. Fold up and tie with the string. Repeat with the remaining seven. 10. Place all parcels in a heated skillet with a little oil added. Fry on both sides until browned. 11. Pour the broth into the pan with the cabbage parcels (the pan should be half filled). Put a lid on and let simmer for about 30 minutesor until the cabbage feels soft and tender (you can cook the parcels for a shorter time if you prefer them a little crunchier). 12. Serve the parcels with a little broth poured on top. Remove the strings before eating ;) Note – We cook the rice and lentils for the filling together, just make sure that they have similar cooking times. If not, start with the one with the longest time and then add the other accordingly. Or cook in separate pans. Smashed Balsamic Potatoes Serves 4 as a side This rustic potato recipe combine three different potato methods into one - boiled, mashed and roasted. They are crispy on the outside, soft on the inside with a sweet tanginess added from balsamic vinegar. Ingredients – 1 kg /­­ 2 lb small potatoes – 2 tsp salt – 3 tbsp olive oil – 1 1/­­2 tbsp balsamic vinegar – 1 clove garlic, finely chopped – a few sprigs fresh thyme Preparation 1. Set the oven to 225°C /­­ 450°F. 2. Wash the potatoes (keep the skin on) and place in a large sauce pan. 3. Cover with water and add 1 tsp salt. Cook for about 20 minutes (longer if you use bigger potatoes) or until easily pierced with a fork. 4. Drain the water and leave to cool for a bit. 5. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and place the potatoes on it. 6. Smash the potatoes by pressing down on them using the backside of a glass. 7. Whisk together oil, balsamic vinegar and garlic. 9. Drizzle generously over the potatoes, making sure that you get it into all the nooks and crannies. You can use a brush for this as well. 10. Sprinkle with salt and thyme leaves. 11. Place in the oven and roast for 25 minutes or until the potatoes are crispy and golden brown. Tip – This is perfect as a side for 4 persons but you can easily double the recipe if you are cooking for a crowd. Just use two baking sheets and set the oven to fan mode and lower the temp slightly for more evenly distributed heat. Mustard Roasted Roots Serves 4 as a side We love a good tray of roasted roots. Here we have coated the roots in cinnamon, grainy mustard, a little vinegar and maple syrup and roasted them until they start to caramelize. We serve these with a saffron sauce which basically is this turmeric tahini sauce but with saffron instead of turmeric. But a simple yogurt based sauce could be great too. Ingredients – 1 kg /­­ 2 lb mixed roots (parsnip, carrots, swede, sweet potato) Dressing – 3 tbsp olive oil – 2 tbsp grainy mustard – 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar – 1 tsp ground cinnamon – 1 tsp maple syrup – 1 tsp sea salt To Serve – 2 tbsp hemp seeds or finely chopped almonds Preparation 1. Preheat the oven to 180°C /­­ 375°F. 2. Peel the roots and chop into batons (roughly 10 cm long and 1,5 cm thick). 3. Stir together the dressing ingredients in a large mixing bowl. 4. Add the roots and toss until all are covered. 5. Tip out on a baking sheet covered with parchment paper and spread out in an even layer. 6. Place in the oven and roast for 20 minutes. Give the sheet a toss, then crank up the heat to 225°C /­­ 450°F and bake for 20 minutes more or until golden and slightly charred. 7. Transfer the roots to a serving platter and sprinkle with hemp seeds. Tips – This is perfect as a side for 4 persons but you can easily double the recipe if you are cooking for a crowd. Just use two baking sheets and set the oven to fan mode for more evenly distributed heat. – You can use any root for this but swede, carrots, sweet potato and parsnips are our favorites.   Crispy Celery and Orange Salad Serves 4 – 1 head romain lettuce or cosmopolitan – 4 celery stalks (or fennel) – 2 oranges – 4 tbsp toasted hazelnuts Mustard vinaigrette – 2 tbsp olive oil – 1 tbsp vinegar – 1 tsp Dijon mustard – 1 tsp maple syrup 1. Rinse the lettuce in water and chop into 2 inch /­­ 5 cm large pieces, discarding the stem. 2. Thinly slice the celery stalks (or mandolin the fennel of using). 3. Peel the oranges and cut in halves and thinly slice each half. 4. Place all prepped ingredients into a large mixing bowl. 5. Whisk together the vinaigrette ingredients in a small separate bowl. 6. Gently toss the dressing with the salad ingredients. 7. Chop the toasted hazelnuts. 8. Transfer to a serving bowl and scatter with hazelnuts. Serve!

Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Mushrooms (Pasta Alfredo, Minestrone, Gravy)

December 12 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

I’ve noticed a pattern that I fall into every fall. At the very start of it, right as there’s the first serious chill in the air, I get in the mood for all the cozy fall foods. For me, those always involve tons of root vegetables and winter squashes, and I enjoy them very, very thoroughly for the next month or two. That must be why I’m generally already sick of roasted root vegetables and almost can’t look at another squash right around the holidays. Meanwhile, there’s still January, February, and March (maybe even some of April?) to endure. I’m pretty sure I’m not alone in this :) Thankfully, there are mushrooms. They have all the elements needed for fall/­­winter cooking: they are earthy, versatile, satisfying, do well with wintery preparations, and pair well with cozy spices and herbs (and they are decidedly unlike root vegetables or squash). So today we are sharing a meal plan, consisting of 3 distinctly different, umami-bomb mains, centered around a batch of sautéed mushrooms: pasta alfredo, minestrone, and gravy with mash. And as usual, there’s a shopping list and step-by-step prep tips. Hope you guys enjoy this one! Menu - Mushroom Pasta Alfredo - Chickpea Mushroom Minestrone - Mushroom Gravy over Potato-Parsnip Mash *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free if needed, see the recipes for serving sizes Shopping List (Print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, its got all the ingredients youll need for the recipes in this meal plan mini. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Add whatever other ingredients you’ll need for the week here, if doing shopping for the whole week. Produce 2 large yellow onions 2 lbs mushrooms of choice (ex: crimini and shiitake) 1 large head of garlic 2 medium-large Russet or Yukon Gold potatoes 2 large parsnips 2 lemons 1 small bunch kale of choice 1 large bunch of parsley rosemary (2 sprigs) Bulk 1 cup chickpeas 1/­­2 cup cashews Staples/­­Other sea salt olive oil or other oil of choice miso balsamic vinegar kombu (optional) 10-12 oz penne pasta (gluten-free if needed) Basic Prep Complete these three steps on the weekend (or whenever you have the time), and these meals will be a breeze to put together during the week, thanks to all the prepared components. 1) Cook the Mushrooms Here, we are cooking our mushrooms with onions and garlic (don’t worry, 2 lbs of mushrooms cook down quite a bit) to use as a base for all three of our meals. Half of them will be left whole and the other half will be blended into the creamy Mushroom Alfredo sauce. Sautéed Mushrooms   Print Ingredients oil of choice 2 large yellow onions - chopped sea salt 2 lbs any mushrooms of choice (we used a mix of crimini and shiitake) - sliced 3 cloves of garlic - minced Instructions Heat a generous glug of oil in large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the onions and a pinch of salt, and cook for about 10 minutes, until translucent. Add the mushrooms and another pinch of salt. If your large pan is still not large enough to fit all the mushrooms, add them in batches, they will cook down significantly. Cook for another 10-15 minutes, until all the liquid released by the mushrooms evaporates. Store refrigerated in an air-tight container. 3.5.3226   2) Cook the Chickpeas and Vegetables for the Mash + Make Veggie Broth all in one go I love this step so much. Cooking beans (don’t forget to soak them overnight) is such a perfect opportunity to also make delicious, homemade veggie broth, and maybe even to boil a few vegetables for another dish in the process (which only further deepen the broth flavor). Here, we are cooking chickpeas for the Chickpea Mushroom Minestrone, boiling potatoes and parsnips for the Potato-Parsnip Mash and magically making a very flavorful broth in the meantime. The broth will be used in the Mushroom Alfredo Sauce and the Chickpea Mushroom Minestrone. Chickpeas, Potatoes, Parsnips & Broth   Print Ingredients 1 cup chickpeas - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar 2 medium-large potatoes, Russet or Yukon Gold - peeled and cut into large chunks 2 large parsnips - peeled and cut into large chunks 2 cloves garlic - smashed 2 bay leaves 1 sprig of rosemary 1 small sheet of kombu seaweed (optional) any other vegetable scraps that you might have on hand (leek tops, onion skins, etc.) 14 cups purified water sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the chickpeas. Place them in a soup pot, along with the potatoes, parsnips, garlic, bay leaves, rosemary, kombu and any other vegetable scraps, if using. Cover with 14 cups of water. Place the pot over high heat and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook covered, for 30 minutes, or until the chickpeas, potatoes, and parsnips are all cooked. Generously salt the broth towards the end of cooking. Tasting is very important here - the broth should taste very flavorful and well-salted. Remove the potatoes and parsnips with a slotted spoon. Store them away in an air-tight container in the refrigerator, until you are ready to make the Potato-Parsnip Mash. Remove the bay leaves, rosemary, kombu, and any vegetable scraps, if using, and discard. Measure out 9-9½ cups of the broth and leave it in the pot with the chickpeas. This will be your base for the Chickpea Mushroom Minestrone. Store the rest of the broth in a separate airtight container, you will be using it for the Alfredo and gravy and mash. Keep the broth and chickpeas refrigerated right in the soup pot if possible, since youll be using it for minestrone later in the week. Notes Chickpea cooking times vary depending on their age, so you might have to cook them longer than 30 minutes. If you find yourself having to cook the chickpeas much longer, take out the potatoes and parsnips with a slotted spoon to avoid the vegetables getting mushy. 3.5.3226   3) Make the Mushroom Alfredo Sauce This is a play on a creamy pasta sauce, complete with the earthy and sweet flavors of sautéed mushrooms and onions. Other flavor superstars like balsamic, miso, and lemon juice take this vegan ‘Alfredo’ to the next level. We’ll be using this sauce in the Pasta, Minestrone, and the Mushroom Gravy. Mushroom Alfredo Sauce   Print Ingredients half of the sautéed mushrooms and onions (from above, about 2¾ cups) ½ cup cashews - soaked in purified water for 2-4 hours, or boiling water for 10 minutes 1 tablespoon miso 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar 2 tablespoons olive oil juice from ½ lemon salt and pepper - to taste about ¾ cup chickpea broth (from above) - to achieve a saucy consistency Instructions Combine the mushrooms and onions, cashews, miso, balsamic, olive oil, lemon juice, salt, and pepper, in a high-speed blender and pulse until smooth. Stream in the chickpea broth with the blender still running, until you achieve a good sauce consistency. The sauce shouldnt be too thick or too runny, aim for the sweet spot in between. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Store the sauce refrigerated in an air-tight container. 3.5.3226   Recipes This dreamy pasta dish comes together in a flash, thanks to all the weekend prep from above. It’s so cozy and full of deep, wintery flavors from the Mushroom Alfredo and meaty slices of sautéed mushrooms. Lemon juice and fresh parsley provide some necessary brightness, and a dusting of nutritional yeast gives that final, cheesy finish. Mushroom Pasta Alfredo   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients 10-12 oz penne pasta - gluten-free if needed ⅔ of the Mushroom Alfredo Sauce (from above, about 2 cups) ⅔ of the remaining cooked mushrooms and onions (from above) 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast, plus more for sprinkling juice from ½ lemon ½ large bunch of parsley - chopped Instructions Cook the pasta al dente, in a large pot of well-salted water, according to the instructions on the package. Reserve ¼ - ½ cup of pasta water before draining. Meanwhile, place a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the Mushroom Alfredo Sauce, cooked mushrooms and onions, nutritional yeast, and reserved pasta water. Stir to mix and heat through. Once the pasta is done, add it to the pan with the sauce and gently stir to coat. Add the lemon juice and parsley and carefully stir to incorporate. Enjoy right away, reserving 2¼ cups of the mushroomy pasta for the minestrone (recipe below). Keep the reserved pasta refrigerated in an air-tight container. 3.5.3226     This Minestrone gives a second life to the Mushroom Pasta Alfredo from above. Minestrone is traditionally a soup made of whatever ingredients are around, and a perfect fridge-clean-out dish. We are honoring that here by adding some of our reserved mushroomy pasta to the flavorful chickpea broth and chickpeas that we cooked during prep. The sauce from the pasta gives even more depth to the broth, and the pasta makes the dish perfectly filling and satisfying. There’s also rosemary, kale, lemon juice, and black pepper. All simple ingredients that come together to make a layered and comforting soup, perfect for any winter meal. Chickpea Mushroom Minestrone   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 cup cooked chickpeas (from above) 9-9½ cups vegetable broth (from above) 1 tablespoon chopped rosemary 1 bunch kale - stems removed, torn into bite-size pieces 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast, plus more for serving 2¼ cup reserved mushroom pasta (from above) freshly ground black pepper juice from 1 lemon parsley - for serving Instructions Combine the chickpeas and broth in a soup pot (if not already combined). Optionally, add ½ cup of the chickpeas, ½ cup of the broth, and the rosemary to an upright blender and blend until smooth. Pour the mixture back into the soup and mix it in for a creamier consistency. Bring the broth up to a boil and reduce the heat to a simmer. Add the kale to the simmering broth and cook, covered, for about 10 minutes, until soft. Also add the rosemary with the kale if you didnt blend it in earlier. Stir in the nutritional yeast, reserved mushroom pasta, and black pepper to taste, and bring the soup back up to a boil once again. Turn off the heat, stir in the lemon juice, and enjoy, garnished with parsley. 3.5.3226   Continuing on our journey of giving a new life to leftovers, we are turning the Mushroom Alfredo into a gravy and serving it over a potato and parsnip mash. The mash is quickly thrown together with the vegetables we boiled while making the chickpeas and broth during prep day. Easy and so satisfying! Mushroom Gravy over Potato-Parsnip Mash   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients for the potato-parsnip mash olive oil 1 large clove of garlic - minced 2 boiled medium-large potatoes, Russet or Yukon Gold (from above) 2 boiled large parsnips (from above) about ¼ - ½ cup warmed chickpea broth (from above) sea salt and black pepper - to taste for the mushroom gravy remaining Mushroom Alfredo Sauce (from above, ⅓ of the total) remaining cooked mushrooms and onions (from above, ⅓ of the total after sauce) about ¼ cup chickpea broth (from above) salt and black pepper - if needed, to taste parsley - for serving Instructions to make the potato-parsnip mash Warm a generous glug of olive oil on a medium pot over medium heat. Add the garlic and stir around for about 30 seconds, until fragrant. Mash the potatoes and parsnips in the same pot with a masher. Add the broth and more olive oil to taste, and continue mashing to a desired consistency, incorporating the garlic and oil from the bottom of the pot and warming the mash over medium heat. You can make the mash smooth or a bit chunky, however you prefer. Add salt and pepper to taste. Serve right away. to make the mushroom gravy In a small saucepan, combine the Mushroom Alfredo, cooked mushrooms and onions, and just enough of the chickpea broth to achieve a gravy consistency. Warm the gravy over medium heat. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Serve the gravy right away, on top of the potato-parsnip mash, garnished with parsley. Notes Any leftover broth can be frozen for future use. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage No-Recipe Healing Soup Daikon Radish Pasta With Corn and Tomatoes in Creamy Coconut Sauce One Pan Brussels Sprout and Red Lentil Pie with a Root Vegetable Crust .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Mushrooms (Pasta Alfredo, Minestrone, Gravy) appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Lentil and sunflower seed “meatloaf”

December 8 2018 VegKitchen 

Lentil  and sunflower seed “meatloaf” What I like about this kind of recipe is that it is extremely flexible. You can keep the base and make meatballs, burgers, or stuff it into vegetables. Here, I cooked it in a muffin mold, but you can opt for a lentil loaf cooked in a bigger mold. Just dont forget to increase the cooking time! Save Print Lentil and sunflower seed meatloaf Serves: 4-6   Ingredients 2 tbsp. of olive oil 1 1/­­2 cups of onion, finely chopped 2 garlic cloves, crushed ⅔ cup carrots, grated 1 packet (227g) mushrooms, finely chopped 1 cup of lentils, cooked, rinsed and drained 1 1/­­2 cup sunflower seeds 2 slices of whole grain bread, shredded into small pieces ¼ cup ground flaxseed ½ cup of oatmeal 2 tbsp. of tamari 1 tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1/­­4 cup of vegetable broth 1 tbsp. oregano 1/­­2 tsp. thyme 1/­­2 tsp. dry mustard Salt and pepper, to taste 1/­­4 cup of ketchup 1/­­4 cup of unsweetened applesauce 2 tbsp. balsamic vinegar 2 tbsp. tablespoon maple syrup Instructions In a skillet, heat olive oil over medium high heat. Add onion and mushrooms. Cook until the onion has begun to turn a little golden, about 10 minutes. Add the […] The article Lentil and sunflower seed “meatloaf” appeared first on VegKitchen.

Grilled Vegetables and Halloumi Cheese Salad

October 10 2018 Oh My Veggies 

I dont know if you have ever tasted it, but grilled halloumi is absolutely delicious. The flavor remains fresh and delicate with crispy edge. Even alone its great! When added to another dish, like in this recipe, the dish is completely changed--and it only takes a few minutes! Halloumi is an off-white cheese, generally in a rectangular shape and is characterized by a fold in the center. Originally from Cyprus, halloumi has a firm texture, even in cooking--the opposite of mozzarella--and made from sheep’s milk or cow’s milk. It is very unique. Prep time: 10 minutes Cook time: 10 minutes Servings: 2 Ingredients 2 cups salad of your choice 3 tablespoons of olive oil 1 onion 1 red pepper 1 cup of white mushroom 3 cloves of garlic Herbs of Provence 250gr of halloumi 2 tablespoons of balsamic vinegar Preparation Cut the onion and pepper into thin slices and sauté them in a skillet in olive oil. Chop the garlic and add them to the onion. Season with herbs of Provence. Cut the Halloumi block into 5 slices to obtain small scallops. Cook in a non-stick skillet until you obtain a smooth and soft texture. Add the salad to a plate, […]

Caramelized Onion White Lentil Hummus

June 14 2018 My New Roots 

Caramelized Onion White Lentil Hummus If there is one trick Ive learned in all of my years cooking, both at home and in restaurants, it is this: caramelized onions can make almost anything taste amazing. Theyre the ridiculously simple, yet magical ingredient that turns an ordinary dish into something so rich-tasting and satisfying that people go ...oh hi excuse me, this is incredible. I think the simple reason that caramelized onions taste so good, is because they are a labour of love. Not like an all-day stirring the pot kinda deal, but most definitely a food that you cant just leave on the stove and dive into an Instagram vortex. No. Caramelized onions take care and attention, at least for the better part of half an hour, and the results are so worth it I bet youll catch yourself multi-tasking at the stove tonight just to have some on hand to gussy up your omelet this weekend (boss move there, by the way). The more accurate reason that caramelized onions taste so good however, isnt technically caramelization - its called the Maillard reaction. The Maillard reaction is a browning reaction similar to caramelization, but with one distinct difference: caramelization is a chemical reaction between reducing sugars, while Maillard is a chemical reaction between reducing sugars and amino acids (proteins). And yes, there is enough protein in an onion to elicit this response - how thrilling for us! Although the Maillard reaction is very complex and complicated, what we do know is that it requires heat to transform and rearrange sugars and amino acids to create new and fantastic flavour molecules in and on your food, making it even more delicious. If youve ever eaten a golden slice of toast, enjoyed a rich cup of coffee, or nibbled on a grilled vegetable, youve experienced the pure pleasure that all of this this chemical commotion is responsible for. Science! Harnessing the power of the Maillard reaction can make you a better cook, because things that are browned properly taste more intensely, more complex, and well, better. Without even being aware of it, its the reason youll reach for the roasted veggies with the crispiest edges, or the reason that you prefer a fried egg over a boiled one (no judgement!). There are a couple ways of making this spectacular series of chemical reactions work for you, and the first is high heat. Maillard will not occur at very low temperatures, especially in situations where the food is not in direct contact with the heat, like it is on a skillet or grill for instance. When youre roasting veggies, make sure the oven is at least 400°F /­­ 200°C. When youre making pizza, you can crank it up even higher, to get those beautifully blistered crust edges that make your mouth water. The second way is to keep the food youre cooking on the dry side. For instance, have you ever noticed how if you wash mushrooms (which you should actually never do), theyll never really get brown and crusty? Too much moisture! Instead, brush those fungi gently to remove any dirt or debris, then put them in a screeching hot pan with some ghee and dont stir them. I talk more about this technique here. This is the same reason you need a large pan for these caramelized onions, since theyll need the space to allow the water to evaporate around them. If the onions are too close together, theyll only steam each other. Eew. If you’re oven roasting vegetables for dinner, cut them in the morning and leave them out all day uncovered so that the surface water will evaporate, and the veggies will brown more easily. Yes, this seems like a bit of a hassle, but the culinary nerd in me admits that its cool because it works. So, where does the hummus come into this story? Well, hummus is pretty much a food group in my world. Ive made so many variations with so many kinds of legumes, spices, alt seed butters, toppings, and stir-ins, that I could hardly believe I had never tried it with the ingredient that could single-handedly save humanity: caramelized onions. I knew that deep richness of the onions would meld perfectly with the creamy dip, and make the flavour even better. I wasnt wrong! The only thing that I wanted to improve upon, was the protein content - not because Im obsessed with protein, but simply because I thought it could be higher. To do that I simply swapped out the traditional chickpeas for white lentils, or urad dal. We not only get more protein from this change-up, but almost double the fiber, with less sodium, less fat, and less sugar. Sweet. This dip is the perfect, rich compliment to all the crisp and light, early summer veggies popping up. I went to my friends farm and picked some seriously beautiful radishes and young carrots, which paired so well with the caramelized onion flavour. I also had some Life-Changing Crackers on hand, which always make dipping more delicious. One thing I changed from the first version to the third, was the onions on top. Instead of blending all of them into the dip, I used about a third of them on top, which allows you to scoop a few tender morsels up with each bite. This delivers even more caramelized onion flavour and texture, which, let us be reminded, is the whole point of this exercise. Even though this hummus keeps well for at least five days in the fridge (you can even freeze it!), it is best eaten freshly made at room temperature, since the flavour is at its peak then. And because you’re wondering, you can find white or ivory lentils at Indian grocers, Middle Eastern markets, or some natural food stores. They are the skinned and split version of urad dal, which is black, so make sure you buy the huskless version! If you cant find them at all, simply use chickpeas - it will be just as delicious.     Print recipe     Caramelized Onion and White Lentil Hummus Makes about 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup raw white lentils (huskless split black mapte beans /­­ urad dal dhuli), soaked if possible 1 small clove garlic 3 Tbsp. tahini 3 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tsp. balsamic vinegar 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­4 tsp. ground cumin heaping 1/­­4 tsp. freshly cracked black pepper 1 batch caramelized onions (from the recipe below) cold-pressed olive oil, for garnish Directions: 1. Start by cooking the lentils. If youve soaked them beforehand (even an hour helps!) drain and rinse them very well. If youre starting from raw, place the lentils in the cooking pot, cover with plenty of water and vigorously swish them around with your hands. When the water becomes murky, drain and repeat until the water is clear, or mostly clear (this can take 3-4 rounds). Place lentils in the cooking pot and cover generously with water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to simmer and cook partially covered for about 20-30 minutes, depending on whether or not you soaked them. The lentils should be cooked until mushy. If the pot becomes dry during cooking, simply add more water. Once cooked, drain the lentils if there is any remaining water. Set aside to cool. 2. In a food processor pulse the garlic until finely minced. Add the tahini, lemon juice, balsamic, salt, cumin and pepper, then blend until combined. Add the cooked lentils and blend on high until smooth. Lastly, add about two-thirds of the caramelized onions, and pulse to incorporate them into the dip. Taste and adjust seasoning if desired. 3. To serve, spoon the hummus into a serving bowl. Make a small divot in the center of the dip and spoon in the remaining caramelized onions. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with your toppings of choice (I used toasted black sesame and chive flowers for a splash of colour, but this is totally optional). Serve with crispy fresh veggies and crackers or toasted flatbreads. Enjoy. Caramelized Onions Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. neutral-tasting coconut oil or ghee 1 lb. /­­ 500g yellow onions 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt Directions: 1. Peel the onions and slice them as evenly as possible into half-rounds. 2. Melt coconut oil or ghee over medium heat in the largest skillet you have. Add the onions, then salt, and stir well to coat. Once the onions are coated, turn the heat down to a medium-low, stirring occasionally - more often towards the end - until theyve fully caramelized, about 25-30 minutes. If the pot becomes too dry during cooking, reduce the heat a tad, or add a teeny bit of water adn stir well. In the end, youre looking for soft, silky, and golden brown goodness! Store leftovers in the fridge for up to four days, or freeze for 3 months. If it’s your first time caramelizing onions and you’re feeling intimidated, here is a stellar step-by-step tutorial from Bon Appétit. It varies ever so slightly from my method, but you’ll get the picture! Big love and happy hummus, Sarah B. Show me your hummus on Instagram: #mnrcaramelizedonionhummus  *   *   *   *   * Hello dear friends! There are only a few spots left for our January 2019 Wild Heart High Spirit retreat and we’d love to see you in Bali!  Join us along with 15 other women to unwind, reconnect, and find the inspiration to ignite you on your health journey. Our thoughtfully-designed program will awaken and nourish your entire being – body, mind, and spirit! This is a true celebration of life, and we get to do it together in paradise! Come see what all the magic is about.  Much love, Sarah B, Mikkala and the Golden Circle Retreats team The post Caramelized Onion White Lentil Hummus appeared first on My New Roots.

Roasted Pumpkin Orange Quinoa Salad

January 1 2018 Meatless Monday 

Quinoa is infused with fresh squeezed orange juice and vegetable stock, while pumpkin is tossed with shallots, orange wedges and chickpeas. Tangy feta cheese stands out on a warm backdrop of toasted walnuts and slow roasted orange, all dressed with a reduced balsamic. This recipe comes from Trudy of veggie.num.num. Serves 6 - 1 cup quinoa, rinsed - 1 1/­­2 cups low sodium vegetable stock - juice from 1 orange - 1 orange, peeled and cut into wedges - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 2 pounds pumpkin, diced into 1 centimeter cubes - 1 cup chickpeas, cooked or canned and rinsed - 5 shallots, quartered - 1/­­4 cup walnuts, roughly chopped - 1/­­2 cup balsamic vinegar - 2 cups rocket lettuces - 7 ounces feta cheese*, crumbled *optional Preheat an oven to 400 degrees. Place the quinoa, vegetable stock and juice from one orange into a medium pot over medium-high heat and bring to a boil. Turn heat down to medium-low, cover, and simmer for 10-15 minutes, or until the liquid has been absorbed. Set aside. Cut the remaining orange into wedges. Toss the orange wedges, pumpkin pieces, chickpeas and shallots with the olive oil. Place on a baking sheet and put in the oven. Cook for 20-25 minutes, or until chickpeas are crisp and pumpkin is tender. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool slightly. Place a sauté pan over medium-high heat. Toast the walnuts for 2-3 minutes, or until golden. Remove to a bowl and set aside. Place the balsamic vinegar in a small saucepan and heat over medium heat. Allow the vinegar to come to a simmer. Whisk for 4-5 minutes, or until the balsamic has reduced by half and the vinegar is syrupy. Set aside to cool. Place the quinoa in a large bowl. Add the roasted orange pumpkin mixture, toasted walnuts and rocket lettuces. Crumble the feta cheese on top, if using. Dress the salad with 2-3 tablespoons of balsamic reduction, or to taste, and toss well to combine. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Place equal portions in 4 bowls atop extra rocket lettuce. Sprinkle with a little more balsamic reduction if desired and enjoy. The post Roasted Pumpkin Orange Quinoa Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 1

November 1 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 1 This summer, we set out to share one practical, budget-friendly, and non-boring plant-based meal plan per season. Here is our meal plan for the Fall of 2017! We are really excited about the recipes in this one. It all starts out with cooking a pot of lentils and a pot of rice, roasting some winter squash, and prepping some kale. Those foundations then make their way into breakfast, lunch and dinner recipes that will take you through a whole week of nourishing and cozy fall meals. As usual, we are splitting this meal plan into two parts. This first part will focus on weekend prep, as well as breakfast and lunch recipes. Part 2 is here, and it’s all about dinner and dessert recipes. Here we go! Menu (see Part 2 for dinner and dessert recipes) Breakfast Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins Lunch Grain Bowl with Marinated Delicata Squash, Coconut Kale, and Lentil Hummus Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup Dinner Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers w/­­ Any Fixings of Choice Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew Dessert Rosemary-Roasted Plums with a Cardamom Sprinkle *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free and will make enough for a week, for 2-3 people Shopping List (print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, its got all the ingredients youll need for the recipes in this meal plan. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Produce Vegetables - 1 large and 1 medium butternut squashes - 2 medium delicata squashes - 1 lb Brussels sprouts - 2 bunches kale (or 1 very large bunch) - 4 cups baby spinach - 1 jalape?o pepper - 1 lb crimini mushrooms - 2 medium carrots - 3 large yellow onions - 2 heads of garlic Fruits - 2-3 green apples - 1 lemon - 1-2 limes (if using in place of brown rice vinegar for the marinated delicata) - 8 ripe plums Herbs  - rosemary - sage - green onions (optional) - thyme (optional) Other - 3 cups almond milk or other plant milk of choice - 1 13.5 oz can unsweetened Thai coconut milk - 1 28 oz can or box crushed tomatoes - 1 cup brown rice flour or other gluten free flour - sesame tahini - white sweet miso - burger fixings like buns, lettuce, or anything else you like w/­­ your veggie burgers - vanilla ice cream or plain yogurt to serve with the roasted plums (optional) - crackers to snack on with the hummus or sourdough bread to eat with the hummus, soup or stew (optional) Bulk - 2 1/­­4 cups dried green lentils - 3/­­4 cup millet - 1 1/­­2 cups brown rice (2 cups if using rice for the grain bowl) - 1 cup other grain of choice for the grain bowl, or 1/­­2 more cup of brown rice - 5-7 Medjool dates - 2 cups pumpkin seeds – toasted - unsweetened coconut flakes (optional) - cacao nibs (optional) Pantry /­­ Refrigerator Staples - neutral coconut oil - apple cider vinegar - brown rice vinegar (if not using limes for delicata marinade) - balsamic vinegar (optional) - tamari - olive oil - toasted sesame oil - tomato paste - coconut sugar - sea salt - maple syrup or honey - sriracha/­­chili sauce of choice - baking soda - baking powder Spices - whole cumin seeds - whole coriander seeds - green cardamom pods - smoked paprika - black peppercorns - turmeric - red pepper flakes - bay leaves (optional) Day by Day Prep List Saturday Night (Night Before Main Prep Day): These are just quick tasks that need to be done the day before your main prep day. Soaking grains and lentils helps rid them of phytic acid, which makes them easier to digest. It also kickstarts the germination process, making the grains and lentils more nutritious. - Soak 3/­­4 cup of dried millet overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. - Soak 2 1/­­4 cups of lentils overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. - Soak 1 1/­­2 cups of brown rice (2 cups if you are using it for the grain bowl) overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. - If not using brown rice for the grain bowl, soak 1 cup of another grain of choice for the grain bowl in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. Sunday (Main Prep Day): This is your main prep day, which you can also split into multiple days, depending on your schedule. You will find all the recipes for this prep day in this post, which includes two breakfast options and two lunch options for the whole week, as well as some simple prep for the dinners for the coming week. - Roast the butternut and delicata squashes to be used in Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash, Apple and Squash Muffins, Lentil and Squash Hummus, Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup, Veggie Burgers, and Grain Bowl. - Cook the lentils to be used in the Lentil and Squash Hummus, Veggie Burgers, and the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew. - Cook the brown rice to use in the Veggie Burgers and the Grain Bowl, if that’s your grain of choice for the bowl. - If you chose another grain for the grain bowl, cook it now as well. - Cook the kale and coconut kale to be used in the Grain Bowl and Veggie Burgers. - Make the Lentil and Squash Hummus to be used in the Grain Bowl, on the Veggie Burgers, and on crackers/­­bread as a snack throughout the week. - Marinate the roasted delicata squash to use in the Grain Bowl. - Make the Simple Butternut Squash and Apple Soup. - Bake the Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins. - You can also cook the Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash for your breakfasts ahead of time, but I suggest making it in the morning. It’s pretty quick. Monday Night: Make the Veggie Burgers to have for dinner on Monday, Tuesday, and possibly Wednesday nights. This will be fairly quick, since you’ve already cooked the squash, rice, kale and lentils that are called for in the recipe during prep day. Roast the plums for dessert on Monday or Tuesday night, it’s quick and you will have enough for dessert for the rest of the week. The recipes for the Veggie Burgers, Brussels Sprout Stew and the Roasted Plums are in Part 2.  - Make the Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers. - Make the Rosemary-Roasted Plums with Cardamom Sprinkle. Wednesday/­­Thursday night: Once you’ve finished eating the Veggie Burgers, prepare the Brussels Sprouts Stew for dinner starting Wednesday or Thursday night and until the end of the week. The recipe for the stew is in Part 2.  - Make the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew.   Prep 1. Winter squash is a beautifully versatile vegetable that can be used in millions of ways in both sweet and savory dishes. It’s always a great idea to roast a bunch of squash on the weekend, to use in all kinds of dishes throughout the week. In this meal plan, we use Butternut and Delicata Squashes in the Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash, Apple and Squash Muffins, Lentil and Squash Hummus, Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup, Veggie Burgers, and Grain Bowl. See what I mean? It really is a super-vegetable. Roasted Butternut and Delicata Squashes   Print Ingredients 1 large and 1 medium butternut squash - cut in half lengthwise and seeded 2 medium delicata squashes - seeded and sliced into ½-inch rings neutral coconut oil - soft sea salt freshly ground black pepper Instructions Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare 2-3 parchment paper-lined baking sheets. Arrange all the squashes on the baking sheets in a single layer. Oil them with the coconut oil and sprinkle with salt and paper. Roast the delicata squash for 10 minutes, then flip all the rings and roast for another 15-20 minutes, until cooked through and golden on both sides. Delicata squash skins are edible, so no need to peel off the skin. Roast the butternut squashes at the same time, for about 40 minutes or until soft throughout. You should end up with about 3 cups of roasted mashed squash flesh from the large butternut squash, which you will use for the hummus, muffins, porridge and burgers. The remaining 1 medium butternut squash will be used for the Simple Squash and Apple Soup. 3.5.3226   2. A pot of lentils, cooked on the weekend, can easily take you through a week of meals. They are nourishing, affordable, and can work as a base for so many meals. In this meal plan, we use French lentils in the Lentil and Squash Hummus, Veggie Burgers, and the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew. Pot of Lentils   Print Ingredients 2¼ cups dried French lentils - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the lentils. Place them into a medium-large pot, cover with purified water, and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook for about 15-20 minutes, or until soft, but still intact. Add salt at the last 5 minutes. Drain and use in recipes right away or store in an airtight container for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   3. Similarly to lentils, a pot of rice or any other grains, prepared on the weekend, can help you pave the way to quicker and better meals throughout the week. In this meal plan, we use brown rice in the Veggie Burgers and the Grain Bowl (if that’s the grain you chose for your bowl). Serve any leftover rice with the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew. If you chose a different grain for your grain bowl, cook it now as well. Pot of Brown Rice   Print Ingredients 1½ cups brown rice (2 cups if using rice for your grain bowl) - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar 2½ cups filtered water (3½ cups if cooking 2 cups of rice) sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the rice. Combine it with the water and plenty of sea salt in a medium pot, cover with a lid and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 25-40 minutes, until all the water is absorbed and the rice is cooked. Use in recipes right away or store refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   4. Blanching kale is one of my favorite, low maintenance ways of prepping a whole bunch of it for the week. In this meal plan, it will be used for the Coconut Kale and the Veggie Burgers. I also like to use the leftover kale cooking water for soups, stews, etc. In this meal plan, you can use the leftover kale broth for the Coconut Kale, the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew and even the Simple Squash and Apple Soup. Half of this blanched kale gets stored away for later use in the Veggie Burgers, while the other half becomes the Coconut Kale for our grain bowl lunch. You’re going to love the coconut kale – it’s velvety, creamy, and keeps well throughout the week. Blanched Kale and Coconut Kale   Print Ingredients 2 bunches (or 1 very large bunch) kale of choice sea salt 1 can unsweetened Thai coconut milk Instructions Separate the kale leaves from the stems. Wash and tear the leaves into roughly bite-sized pieces. Reserve the stems to use in homemade vegetable broth in the future, if desired. Place the torn kale leaves in a large pot and cover with purified water. Add salt and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes. Drain the kale, reserving the cooking liquid for the Coconut Kale and the Brussels Sprouts Tomato Stew. Return half of the kale to the same pot. Squeeze the other half of the kale dry and store it away in an air-tight container, in the refrigerator, to use later in the veggie burgers. Add ½ cup of the reserved kale cooking liquid and 1 can of coconut milk to the pot. Bring to a strong simmer and cook for 10-20 minutes, until creamy. Add more of the kale cooking liquid throughout the cooking time, if needed. Taste for salt and adjust, if needed. Eat right away or store refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   5. The good news is, you already have all the important ingredients prepared for this hummus – you’ve cooked the lentils and roasted the squash, which you’re going to puree with autumn herbs, garlic, tahini, lemon juice, and olive oil. Though for efficiency’s sake, we use lentils instead of the traditional chickpeas here, the spread still very much tastes like hummus. And not just any hummus – it’s fresh, savory, earthy hummus that’s better than anything you can get at the store. Use it throughout the week in the Grain Bowl, on top of the Veggie Burgers, or as a quick snack with some crackers. Lentil and Squash Hummus   Print Ingredients ¼ cup plus 2 tablespoons olive oil - divided 4-5 cloves of garlic - peeled and sliced 1-2 tablespoons chopped herbs, such as rosemary, sage and thyme 1 cup roasted mashed butternut squash (from the large butternut squash from above) sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1½ cups cooked green lentils (from above) juice from 1 lemon ¼ cup sesame tahini 3-4 tablespoons cold water toasted pumpkin seeds - for garnish (optional) Instructions Warm 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a small sauté pan over medium heat. Add garlic and herbs and sauté for about a minute, until garlic is fragrant and cooked, but not burnt. Add the squash, salt and pepper, and toss to coat. Stir around for a minute or so for the flavors to mix. Add the mixture to a food processor or a high-speed blender like a Vitamix. Add the lentils to the food processor/­­blender, followed by the lemon juice, sesame tahini, and more salt, to taste. Process until smooth, scraping the walls if needed. With the motor still running, pour in ¼ cup of the olive oil through the funnel, followed by the cold water. Pour in the water 1 tablespoon at a time until you achieve a desired, creamy consistency. Sprinkle the hummus with the toasted pumpkin seeds when serving, if using. Store the hummus in the refrigerator in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   6. Marinating vegetables is one of my favorite preparations, especially if I’m cooking ahead. It’s as easy as mixing up a marinade, and the veggies will only get more flavorful with each passing day. This miso-marinated delicata squash has got it all – it’s a little sweet, a little savory, and a bit spicy. It’s the perfect, powerful component to a memorable grain bowl, which is how it’s utilized in this meal plan. If you are planning on eating this squash at work/­­social settings, you might need to be cautious with the garlic – the squash is still really good without it! Miso-Marinated Delicata Squash   Print Ingredients 2 sliced and roasted delicata squashes (from above) 2 tablespoons white sweet miso paste 1 tablespoon maple syrup or honey (not vegan) 2 teaspoons chili sauce, such as sriracha 4 tablespoons brown rice vinegar or lime juice 1 tablespoon tamari 2 teaspoons sesame oil 1 garlic clove - minced (optional) 1 tablespoon finely chopped green onion (optional) Instructions Place the sliced and roasted delicata squash in a shallow dish. In a small bowl, combine the miso with the maple syrup and sriracha, and mix until smooth. Add the rice vinegar/­­lime juice, tamari, and sesame oil, and mix until smooth. Mix in the sesame seeds, garlic and green onion, if using. Pour the marinade over the delicata squash and toss to coat. Cover and let marinate at room temperature for 1-3 hours. Keep refrigerated for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   Recipes 1. These gluten-free muffins make for a great breakfast or snack. They are very subtly sweet – sweetened only with dates – and get their soft, crumbly texture from the roasted squash that’s hiding in the batter. There are pockets of cubed apple throughout, and the pumpkin seeds on top add a nice bit of crunch. Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins   Print Serves: 10 medium-sized or 12 small muffins Ingredients 1½ tablespoons neutral coconut oil, plus more for oiling the pan ¾ cup brown rice flour or other gluten-free flour pinch of sea salt 1 teaspoon baking powder ½ teaspoon baking soda 5-7 soft Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in 1 cup of hot water for 10 minutes ½ cup roasted mashed butternut squash (from the large butternut squash from above) 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar 1-2 Granny Smith apples - peeled and finely cubed (optionally slice some of the apple to decorate the tops of muffins) 2 tablespoons chopped sage leaves (optional) pumpkin seeds - for sprinkling Instructions Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Prepare a muffin pan by thoroughly oiling the holes or lining it with paper muffin liners. Combine the flour, salt, baking powder and baking soda in a medium bowl. Put the dates in an upright blender, together with their soaking water. Add the squash and blend until smooth. Add the coconut oil and vinegar and pulse to combine. Pour the wet mixture into the bowl with the dry ingredients and quickly stir to mix. Fold in cubed apples and sage, if using. Fill the muffin holes with the batter until each hole is about ⅔ full. Sprinkle each muffin with pumpkin seeds and decorate with apple slices, if using. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until a toothpick comes out clean. Let cool a little, then remove the muffins from the pan and let them cool on a cooling rack. Enjoy right away or store in an air-tight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   2. This millet porridge is warming, cozy, satisfying, and overall perfect for chilly fall mornings. Millet is a humble and affordable gluten-free grain, but it has the potential to be quite creamy and luxurious when cooked in plant milk with turmeric and squash. The porridge is pictured here topped with some of the roasted plums from Part 2 of this meal plan, which makes it even more special. Turmeric Millet Porridge   Print Ingredients 2 tablespoons coconut oil or ghee (not vegan) 1 teaspoon turmeric a few grinds of black pepper (to activate the turmeric) ¾ cup millet - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar 1½ tablespoons coconut sugar pinch of sea salt 4 cups almond milk or other plant milk (or 3 cups milk and 1 cup water) - divided 1 cup roasted butternut squash (from the large butternut squash from above) toasted pumpkin seeds and coconut flakes - for serving (optional) Instructions Warm the oil/­­ghee in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the turmeric and black pepper, and stir around for about a minute. Add the millet, coconut sugar, salt and 3 cups of plant milk (or 2 cups of milk and 1 cup of water). Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 20 minutes. Stir periodically to prevent the porridge from sticking to the bottom. In the meantime, blend the squash and the remaining 1 cup of plant milk in a high-speed blender. Mix the blended mixture into the porridge after the 20 minutes of cooking and stir to combine. Simmer everything for another couple of minutes. (Alternatively, skip blending the squash and the remaining plant milk in a blender and add both the squash and the rest of the milk to the porridge, stirring to warm everything through. This will result in a less smooth porridge with some pockets of squash, which I like as a nice change from a smooth porridge). Serve the porridge topped with toasted pumpkin seeds and coconut flakes, if desired. Store in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. Reheat gently over medium low heat with more ghee/­­coconut oil and a splash of plant milk or water. 3.5.3226   3. This grain bowl will come together very quickly during a weekday lunch, since you’ve already gotten all the components ready during prep day. As an alternative to the bowl, you can spread the hummus on some sourdough bread and top that with the squash for an open-faced sandwich, with the coconut kale on the side. Marinated Delicata Squash, Coconut Kale, and Lentil Hummus Grain Bowl   Print Ingredients cooked brown rice or another grain of choice (from above) coconut kale (from above) miso-marinated delicata squash (from above) lentil and squash hummus (from above) toasted pumpkin seeds Instructions Heat up the rice and coconut kale in a pan or saucepan with a bit of oil or water. You can also gently heat the miso-marinated squash, but be careful not to heat it too much because of the miso. Serve all the components together in a bowl, sprinkled with toasted pumpkin seeds. 3.5.3226   4. Our second lunch option is a very lovely and very simple pureed fall soup, with flavors of butternut squash, green apple, and autumn herbs. Simple Butternut Squash and Apple Soup   Print Ingredients 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped 1 green apple - peeled, cored and chopped 2 garlic cloves - sliced 1 teaspoon coriander seeds - preferably freshly ground about 1 tablespoon chopped sage and rosemary sea salt freshly ground black pepper flesh from 1 medium roasted butternut squash (from above) Instructions Warm the oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion, apple, garlic, coriander and herbs, if using, and sauté everything for 10 minutes. Scoop the flesh out of the roasted squash and add it to the saucepan, followed by the sea salt, pepper and 3 cups of purified water. Bring to a boil and simmer for 10 minutes, until all the flavors are combined well. Carefully blend everything in an upright blender until smooth. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve right away or store in an airtight container for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226 Continue to Dinner and Dessert Recipes > > >  You might also like... Moroccan Stew and Sunshine Crackers from The First Mess + a Giveaway Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies Squash Noodle Soup with Healing Turmeric-Ginger Broth, Roasted Carrots... Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 2 .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 1 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

How to Roast Summer Vegetables

June 17 2019 Oh My Veggies 

We’ve listed the most common summer veggies here along with instructions for preparation and approximate cooking times. You can season these vegetables with salt and pepper alone, or use our suggested additions to fancy things up a little. All of these veggies should be roasted on rimmed baking sheets. We like to coat them with non-stick cooking spray or olive oil from a mister too because sometimes vegetables have a tendency to stick even after being tossed in olive oil. Most additions can be added either before or after the vegetables are done roasting, although garlic is usually best when added before, while tapenades, basil, cilantro, parsley and marinara sauce are best added after. Summer Squash (Zucchini, Crookneck Squash, etc.) Start by: Trimming ends, cutting into thick slices and tossing with olive oil, salt, and pepper. Cook at: 400 degrees for 25 minutes, stirring halfway through cooking time. Try adding: Pesto and pine nuts, fresh herbs, garlic, balsamic vinegar, sun-dried tomato tapenade. Tomatoes Start by: Cutting into 1-inch pieces and tossing with olive oil, salt, and pepper. Cook at: 375 degrees for 30 minutes, stirring halfway through cooking time. Try adding: A few pinches of brown sugar, garlic, capers, kalamata olives, […]

Zucchini, Tempeh and Mushroom Bolognese

April 3 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Zucchini, Tempeh and Mushroom Bolognese This might be our favorite recipe so far this year! We were craving bolognese, but were also mindful of the fact that it’s spring, which generally has people cooking lighter, greener fare. So we compromised and came up with a vegetable-packed bolognese that doesn’t depend on canned tomatoes. Instead, we start with fresh cherry tomatoes, bell pepper, zucchini, and tons of basil. Tempeh and mushrooms bring savoriness and meatiness, while some pantry staples help build the deep flavors that you’d generally expect from bolognese. The result is super flavorful and amazing on pasta, but it also feels lighter and more spring-appropriate than your traditional bolognese. We’ll be showing how to make this recipe step-by-step on our Instagram Stories later today, so check that out if you’re interested in trying it :) If you’re doubtful about including zucchini in bolognese, give it a chance! When roasted, it has a nice, meaty texture that goes perfectly with the mushrooms and tempeh. In addition to that, some of the zucchini gets blended into the sauce, which makes the whole thing super creamy. This recipe is also great for tempeh skeptics. The tempeh just takes on the flavors of the sauce and aromatics here and contributes a meaty bite, without any other foreign flavors. We’re having a bit of a tempeh obsession right now and it’s so good in this dish. That’s pretty much it! Hope you try this one and thanks so much for all your comments on last week’s giveaway. Zucchini, Tempeh and Mushroom Bolognese   Print Serves: 6 Ingredients 8 oz tempeh 2 tablespoons tamari 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar ⅓ cup cashews ⅓ cup sun dried tomatoes (dry, not oil-packed) 10 oz cherry tomatoes - halved 2 zucchini - cut in half lengthwise 1 red bell pepper - cored and quartered 1 lb crimini mushrooms - quartered sea salt freshly ground black pepper avocado oil or other roasting oil of choice 1 yellow onion - chopped 3 cloves of garlic - minced 1 tablespoon tomato paste splash of red wine (optional) ¼ cup nutritional yeast 12 oz pasta or more - for serving 1 bunch of basil - chopped, plus more for garnish Instructions In a bowl, crumble the tempeh and drizzle with the tamari and balsamic, toss to coat. Soak the cashews and sun dried tomatoes in hot water. Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare 2 parchment paper-covered baking trays. Arrange the tomatoes, zucchini, bell pepper, and mushrooms on the trays. Sprinkle everything with salt and pepper, drizzle with oil, and mix to coat. Place the trays in the oven and roast for 35-45 minutes, until all the vegetables are soft and all the liquid thats been released by the mushrooms cooks off. Meanwhile, heat oil to a large pan set over medium heat (if you dont have a large pan, consider using a soup pot here). Add the onion and sauté for 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the marinated tempeh, stir once, and then let sit without stirring for a good 3-4 minutes, so that it thoroughly browns. Stir and sauté for another 3-4 minutes, until completely browned. Stir in the garlic at the end. Add the tomato paste and a splash of wine, if using, and stir to coat. Once the vegetables are done roasting, in an upright blender, combine 1 roasted zucchini half, all of the bell pepper, all the tomatoes, about ⅓ of the amount of the mushrooms, the drained cashews and sun dried tomatoes, nutritional yeast, and about 3 cups of water or broth. Blend until smooth, taste for salt and adjust if needed. Cube the remaining roasted zucchini. Add the sauce to the pan with the tempeh, along with the cubed zucchini and remaining mushrooms and bring up to a simmer. Let the sauce reduce for 10-15 minutes. Meanwhile, cook the pasta. Once the sauce is done cooking, stir in the basil. Serve the bolognese over pasta, garnished with more basil. Notes This bolognese keeps really well, so we suggest cooking as much pasta as youre planning on eating that day and serving it with the sauce bit by bit. That way, you can enjoy properly cooked, al dente pasta every time. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Salsa-Style Nectarine Panzanella from Cook Share Eat Vegan Mediterranean Dolma Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette Simple Mango Gazpacho .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Zucchini, Tempeh and Mushroom Bolognese appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Glazed Tempeh Steaks with Rosemary Mushroom Gravy

February 6 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Glazed Tempeh Steaks with Rosemary Mushroom Gravy Hi friends! Checking in really quickly with a favorite dinner as of late. I think tempeh is one of those things that people either love or hate, but there’s a few ways of cooking it that I’m pretty sure would make anyone like it. ‘Glazing’ it is one of those. It’s a decadent method that leaves you with irresistibly golden tempeh ‘steaks’ with crispy edges. Today we’ve got a cozy rosemary, mushroom and white bean gravy to top it with. I thought I’d also share something that’s been helping me stay on track with eating the foods that make me feel good after an indulgent December and January. I noticed myself falling into some not-so-great eating patterns ever since the holidays. Things like treats after dinner almost every night, or buying salty processed snacks more often than I like (have you tried Hippeas?!). None of them are a big deal, but it’s things that don’t contribute to me feeling 100%. So I’ve been aiming to gently steer my focus towards the food that gives me the most energy: whole plant foods. I like the idea of Dr. Michael Greger’s daily dozen checklist, which is his proposed list of the most nourishing plant foods to try to fit into your daily routine. It goes as follows: beans, berries, other fruit, cruciferous vegetables, greens, other vegetables, flax seeds, nuts and seeds, herbs and spices, whole grains, beverages (water), along with the suggested number of servings. So, I’ve been aiming to check off most of the items with my meals every day. At first it becomes a fun game, and then turns more and more into a habit. Of course, it’s not realistic to expect yourself to eat that way every single day, and some days I don’t even eat half of the things listed, but it’s also easier than you might think to get these things in. These tempeh steaks, for example, check off 4 of the items! I make sure to use this tool as a gentle reminder, definitely not as a way to control my eating or stress myself out in any way. There’s a daily dozen app that lets you check off the items, which I used at first, but now I just think about the checklist when buying groceries for the day/­­week, and it helps so much with building out nourishing meals. Just wanted to share this, in case anyone else finds it helpful. Have a great rest of your week! Glazed Tempeh Steaks with Rosemary Mushroom Gravy   Print Serves: 4 medium portions or 2 large Ingredients for the tempeh steaks 8 oz tempeh (we used 3-grain tempeh) 1 teaspoon sesame oil 1½ tablespoons tamari or coconut aminos 1 tablespoon brown rice vinegar or mirin 1 teaspoon maple syrup 1 tablespoon avocado oil or olive oil for oiling the pan for the rosemary mushroom gravy avocado or olive oil 1 yellow onion - diced sea salt 1 lb crimini mushrooms - sliced 2 cloves of garlic - minced 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 2 cups or 1 can of cooked white beans (any variety) 1 tablespoon white miso 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard splash of Sriracha/­­chili sauce or a pinch of red pepper flakes 1 tablespoon chopped rosemary freshly ground black pepper ¼ cup white bean broth (if cooking white beans from scratch), veggie broth or water parsley, cilantro, or other herbs - for serving Instructions to make the tempeh steaks Slice the tempeh in half crosswise and then slice each half in half lengthwise, so that you end up with 4 thin, square or slightly rectangular pieces. In a shallow dish, whisk together the sesame oil, tamari/­­coconut aminos, vinegar, maple syrup, and oil. Place the tempeh pieces into the shallow dish with the marinade and let it marinate while you make the gravy. To cook the steaks, heat oil in a large pan over medium heat. Remove the tempeh from the shallow dish, leaving the marinade in the dish. Place the tempeh in the pan and cook for 2-3 minutes on each side, until golden. Pour the remaining marinade over the tempeh, letting it bubble up and create a glaze over the tempeh. Serve right away with the mushroom rosemary gravy. to make the rosemary mushroom gravy Heat some oil in a large pan over medium heat. Add the onion and a pinch of salt and cook for about 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the mushrooms, stir once, and then let them sit without stirring for a minute or two. Cook for another 7 minutes, or until all the liquid, released by the mushrooms evaporates. Add the garlic and stir for about 30 seconds, until fragrant. Add the balsamic and cook for another few minutes, until the vinegary flavor of the balsamic cooks off. Add about a ¼ of the amount of the mushrooms to an upright blender. Add half of the white beans, miso, mustard, chili sauce/­­red pepper flakes, rosemary, black pepper, more sea salt, and broth/­­water. Blend until smooth, adding more broth if needed. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Add the blended gravy back to the pan with the mushrooms, along with the remaining white beans. Heat everything through, adding more broth if necessary to achieve a gravy-like consistency. Serve the gravy over the tempeh steaks, garnished with herbs. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Green Christmas 2018 -- Vegan Edition

December 19 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Christmas 2018 -- Vegan Edition The tree is already covered with colorful glass balls, small hand drawn paper Santas and tinsels, we have got light strands hanging around the windows, the presents are wrapped and Sinatra is playing from the kitchen speakers. It’s five days left to Christmas Eve and I don’t think we have ever prepared ahead for the holidays like this before. We have even cooked all the Christmas food. Twice! Well, three times actually. One was for our early celebration with David’s family. The other was to shoot these photos. And the third time because David is manic about testing recipes three times. We’ve got this. Sharing Christmas recipe roundups seems almost obligatory when you work with food. This year we asked what type of recipes you were looking for and many mentioned more vegan dishes for your holiday feasts, so that is what we have done here. I am not going to pretend that we are good at organizing big dinner parties, we are truly not. But we do have one method that we live by: Focus on having a good base of dishes and then ask guests to each bring a small side dish, drink, snack or dessert. That way you can have a generous buffet of food without the accompanying stress meltdown. Our cabbage parcels make a beautiful centerpiece with delicious mustard roasted roots and crispy smashed potatoes as warm sides. Because all of these dishes are quite rich, we also like to serve a fresh, tangy and crunchy salad on the side. Along with red cabbage Christmas krauts from our Green Kitchen at Home book. You’ll find the recipes here below. A few other favorites from the archives are our vegan Aubergine Polpette (perhaps with a gravy on the side), our Mushroom & Hazelnut Loaf, this one-tray Hasselback Potatoes with Kale and Pesto, the Pumpkin, Kale and Buckwheat Salad that we had for our wedding, this Black Quinoa & Kale Salad from dinosaur time (we’ve been making this for Christmas almost every year), and this Crispy Red Cabbage & Grape Salad (red cabbage salads are obligatory for all Danes on Christmas). We actually have one more recipe that we haven’t had time to post yet. It’s a really good gingerbread bundt cake and we’ll do our best to post the recipe before Christmas Eve (if you have our app, it is already available on there). Happy holidays! /­­Luise, David and all the kids! Stuffed Cabbage Parcels Makes 8 parcels These pretty little parcels are stuffed with rice, lentils, walnuts and raisins and cooked in a holiday spiced tomato broth. They are a little fiddly to make but super flavorful and well worth the effort. This recipe is vegan but you could also add feta cheese to the parcels if you feel like it. Filling – 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked red rice (see note) – 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked puy lentils – 500 ml /­­ 2 cups water – 1/­­2 tsp sea salt – 1 tbsp olive oil – 1 large red onion, peeled and finely chopped – 1 clove garlic, peeled and finely chopped – 1 cup walnuts, finely chopped – 4 tbsp raisins – 2 tbsp lemon juice – 4 tbsp chopped parsley Tomato Broth – 750 ml /­­ 3 cups vegetable stock – 1 x 400 g /­­ 14 oz tin crushed tomatoes – 1 tsp whole cloves – 1 tsp whole allspice – 2 star anise – 2 cinnamon sticks – 1 pinch sea salt Assembling – 1 savoy cabbage – 8 pieces of cooking string – 1 tbsp olive oil to fry in Instructions 1. Rinse rice and lentils in a sieve under running water. 2. Transfer to a saucepan and add water and salt. Bring to a boil, lower the heat and let simmer until tender, for about 35 minutes or according to the time on the package. 3. Place another sauce pan with the Tomato Broth ingredients on the stove, bring to a boil and then turn the heat down and let it slowly simmer under a lid for 20 minutes on low heat. 4. Meanwhile, add oil to a large skillet and sauté onion and garlic for 10 minutes on medium heat or until soft and translucent. 5. Transfer the onion to a bowl and wipe out the pan (you will use it to fry and cook the parcels in later on). 6. Drain any excess water from the rice and lentils. Add the onion and garlic, walnuts, raisins, lemon juice and parsley and stir to combine. 7. Carefully break off 8 leaves of the savoy cabbage. Trim off the thickest part of the stalk. 8. Blanch the savoy cabbage leaves in a sauce pan with salted boiling water for 2-3 minutes. Drain and lay out on a tea towel. 9. Spoon 3 tablespoons of filling into the center of each cabbage leaf. Fold up and tie with the string. Repeat with the remaining seven. 10. Place all parcels in a heated skillet with a little oil added. Fry on both sides until browned. 11. Pour the broth into the pan with the cabbage parcels (the pan should be half filled). Put a lid on and let simmer for about 30 minutesor until the cabbage feels soft and tender (you can cook the parcels for a shorter time if you prefer them a little crunchier). 12. Serve the parcels with a little broth poured on top. Remove the strings before eating ;) Note – We cook the rice and lentils for the filling together, just make sure that they have similar cooking times. If not, start with the one with the longest time and then add the other accordingly. Or cook in separate pans. Smashed Balsamic Potatoes Serves 4 as a side This rustic potato recipe combine three different potato methods into one - boiled, mashed and roasted. They are crispy on the outside, soft on the inside with a sweet tanginess added from balsamic vinegar. Ingredients – 1 kg /­­ 2 lb small potatoes – 2 tsp salt – 3 tbsp olive oil – 1 1/­­2 tbsp balsamic vinegar – 1 clove garlic, finely chopped – a few sprigs fresh thyme Preparation 1. Set the oven to 225°C /­­ 450°F. 2. Wash the potatoes (keep the skin on) and place in a large sauce pan. 3. Cover with water and add 1 tsp salt. Cook for about 20 minutes (longer if you use bigger potatoes) or until easily pierced with a fork. 4. Drain the water and leave to cool for a bit. 5. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and place the potatoes on it. 6. Smash the potatoes by pressing down on them using the backside of a glass. 7. Whisk together oil, balsamic vinegar and garlic. 9. Drizzle generously over the potatoes, making sure that you get it into all the nooks and crannies. You can use a brush for this as well. 10. Sprinkle with salt and thyme leaves. 11. Place in the oven and roast for 25 minutes or until the potatoes are crispy and golden brown. Tip – This is perfect as a side for 4 persons but you can easily double the recipe if you are cooking for a crowd. Just use two baking sheets and set the oven to fan mode and lower the temp slightly for more evenly distributed heat. Mustard Roasted Roots Serves 4 as a side We love a good tray of roasted roots. Here we have coated the roots in cinnamon, grainy mustard, a little vinegar and maple syrup and roasted them until they start to caramelize. We serve these with a saffron sauce which basically is this turmeric tahini sauce but with saffron instead of turmeric. But a simple yogurt based sauce could be great too. Ingredients – 1 kg /­­ 2 lb mixed roots (parsnip, carrots, swede, sweet potato) Dressing – 3 tbsp olive oil – 2 tbsp grainy mustard – 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar – 1 tsp ground cinnamon – 1 tsp maple syrup – 1 tsp sea salt To Serve – 2 tbsp hemp seeds or finely chopped almonds Preparation 1. Preheat the oven to 180°C /­­ 375°F. 2. Peel the roots and chop into batons (roughly 10 cm long and 1,5 cm thick). 3. Stir together the dressing ingredients in a large mixing bowl. 4. Add the roots and toss until all are covered. 5. Tip out on a baking sheet covered with parchment paper and spread out in an even layer. 6. Place in the oven and roast for 20 minutes. Give the sheet a toss, then crank up the heat to 225°C /­­ 450°F and bake for 20 minutes more or until golden and slightly charred. 7. Transfer the roots to a serving platter and sprinkle with hemp seeds. Tips – This is perfect as a side for 4 persons but you can easily double the recipe if you are cooking for a crowd. Just use two baking sheets and set the oven to fan mode for more evenly distributed heat. – You can use any root for this but swede, carrots, sweet potato and parsnips are our favorites.   Crispy Celery and Orange Salad Serves 4 – 1 head romain lettuce or cosmopolitan – 4 celery stalks (or fennel) – 2 oranges – 4 tbsp toasted hazelnuts Mustard vinaigrette – 2 tbsp olive oil – 1 tbsp vinegar – 1 tsp Dijon mustard – 1 tsp maple syrup 1. Rinse the lettuce in water and chop into 2 inch /­­ 5 cm large pieces, discarding the stem. 2. Thinly slice the celery stalks (or mandolin the fennel of using). 3. Peel the oranges and cut in halves and thinly slice each half. 4. Place all prepped ingredients into a large mixing bowl. 5. Whisk together the vinaigrette ingredients in a small separate bowl. 6. Gently toss the dressing with the salad ingredients. 7. Chop the toasted hazelnuts. 8. Transfer to a serving bowl and scatter with hazelnuts. Serve!

Green Christmas 2018

December 19 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Christmas 2018 The tree is already covered with colorful glass balls, small hand drawn paper Santas and tinsels, we have got light strands hanging around the windows, the presents are wrapped and Sinatra is playing from the kitchen speakers. It’s five days left to Christmas Eve and I don’t think we have ever prepared ahead for the holidays like this before. We have even cooked all the Christmas food. Twice! Well, three times actually. One was for our early celebration with David’s family. The other was to shoot these photos. And the third time because David is manic about testing recipes three times. We’ve got this. Sharing Christmas recipe roundups seems almost obligatory when you work with food. This year we asked what type of recipes you were looking for and many mentioned more vegan dishes for your holiday feasts, so that is what we have done here. I am not going to pretend that we are good at organizing big dinner parties, we are truly not. But we do have one method that we live by: Focus on having a good base of dishes and then ask guests to each bring a small side dish, drink, snack or dessert. That way you can have a generous buffet of food without the accompanying stress meltdown. Our cabbage parcels make a beautiful centerpiece with delicious mustard roasted roots and crispy smashed potatoes as warm sides. Because all of these dishes are quite rich, we also like to serve a fresh, tangy and crunchy salad on the side. Along with red cabbage Christmas krauts from our Green Kitchen at Home book. You’ll find the recipes here below. A few other favorites from the archives are our vegan Aubergine Polpette (perhaps with a gravy on the side), our Mushroom & Hazelnut Loaf, this one-tray Hasselback Potatoes with Kale and Pesto, the Pumpkin, Kale and Buckwheat Salad that we had for our wedding, this Black Quinoa & Kale Salad from dinosaur time (we’ve been making this for Christmas almost every year), and this Crispy Red Cabbage & Grape Salad (red cabbage salads are obligatory for all Danes on Christmas). We actually have one more recipe that we haven’t had time to post yet. It’s a really good gingerbread bundt cake and we’ll do our best to post the recipe before Christmas Eve. Otherwise we’ll just call it a post-Christmas cake ;) Happy holidays! /­­Luise, David and all the kids! Stuffed Cabbage Parcels Makes 8 parcels These pretty little parcels are stuffed with rice, lentils, walnuts and raisins and cooked in a holiday spiced tomato broth. They are a little fiddly to make but super flavorful and well worth the effort. This recipe is vegan but you could also add feta cheese to the parcels if you feel like it. Filling – 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked red rice (see note) – 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked puy lentils – 500 ml /­­ 2 cups water – 1/­­2 tsp sea salt – 1 tbsp olive oil – 1 large red onion, peeled and finely chopped – 1 clove garlic, peeled and finely chopped – 1 cup walnuts, finely chopped – 4 tbsp raisins – 2 tbsp lemon juice – 4 tbsp chopped parsley Tomato Broth – 750 ml /­­ 3 cups vegetable stock – 1 x 400 g /­­ 14 oz tin crushed tomatoes – 1 tsp whole cloves – 1 tsp whole allspice – 2 star anise – 2 cinnamon sticks – 1 pinch sea salt Assembling – 1 savoy cabbage – 8 pieces of cooking string – 1 tbsp olive oil to fry in Instructions 1. Rinse rice and lentils in a sieve under running water. 2. Transfer to a saucepan and add water and salt. Bring to a boil, lower the heat and let simmer until tender, for about 35 minutes or according to the time on the package. 3. Place another sauce pan with the Tomato Broth ingredients on the stove, bring to a boil and then turn the heat down and let it slowly simmer under a lid for 20 minutes on low heat. 4. Meanwhile, add oil to a large skillet and sauté onion and garlic for 10 minutes on medium heat or until soft and translucent. 5. Transfer the onion to a bowl and wipe out the pan (you will use it to fry and cook the parcels in later on). 6. Drain any excess water from the rice and lentils. Add the onion and garlic, walnuts, raisins, lemon juice and parsley and stir to combine. 7. Carefully break off 8 leaves of the savoy cabbage. Trim off the thickest part of the stalk. 8. Blanch the savoy cabbage leaves in a sauce pan with salted boiling water for 2-3 minutes. Drain and lay out on a tea towel. 9. Spoon 3 tablespoons of filling into the center of each cabbage leaf. Fold up and tie with the string. Repeat with the remaining seven. 10. Place all parcels in a heated skillet with a little oil added. Fry on both sides until browned. 11. Pour the broth into the pan with the cabbage parcels (the pan should be half filled). Put a lid on and let simmer for about 30 minutesor until the cabbage feels soft and tender (you can cook the parcels for a shorter time if you prefer them a little crunchier). 12. Serve the parcels with a little broth poured on top. Remove the strings before eating ;) Note – We cook the rice and lentils for the filling together, just make sure that they have similar cooking times. If not, start with the one with the longest time and then add the other accordingly. Or cook in separate pans. Smashed Balsamic Potatoes Serves 4 as a side This rustic potato recipe combine three different potato methods into one - boiled, mashed and roasted. They are crispy on the outside, soft on the inside with a sweet tanginess added from balsamic vinegar. Ingredients – 1 kg /­­ 2 lb small potatoes – 2 tsp salt – 3 tbsp olive oil – 1 1/­­2 tbsp balsamic vinegar – 1 clove garlic, finely chopped – a few sprigs fresh thyme Preparation 1. Set the oven to 225°C /­­ 450°F. 2. Wash the potatoes (keep the skin on) and place in a large sauce pan. 3. Cover with water and add 1 tsp salt. Cook for about 20 minutes (longer if you use bigger potatoes) or until easily pierced with a fork. 4. Drain the water and leave to cool for a bit. 5. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and place the potatoes on it. 6. Smash the potatoes by pressing down on them using the backside of a glass. 7. Whisk together oil, balsamic vinegar and garlic. 9. Drizzle generously over the potatoes, making sure that you get it into all the nooks and crannies. You can use a brush for this as well. 10. Sprinkle with salt and thyme leaves. 11. Place in the oven and roast for 25 minutes or until the potatoes are crispy and golden brown. Tip – This is perfect as a side for 4 persons but you can easily double the recipe if you are cooking for a crowd. Just use two baking sheets and set the oven to fan mode and lower the temp slightly for more evenly distributed heat. Mustard Roasted Roots Serves 4 as a side We love a good tray of roasted roots. Here we have coated the roots in cinnamon, grainy mustard, a little vinegar and maple syrup and roasted them until they start to caramelize. We serve these with a saffron sauce which basically is this turmeric tahini sauce but with saffron instead of tahini. But a simple yogurt based sauce could be great too. Ingredients – 1 kg /­­ 2 lb mixed roots (parsnip, carrots, swede, sweet potato) Dressing – 3 tbsp olive oil – 2 tbsp grainy mustard – 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar – 1 tsp ground cinnamon – 1 tsp maple syrup – 1 tsp sea salt To Serve – 2 tbsp hemp seeds or finely chopped almonds Preparation 1. Preheat the oven to 180°C /­­ 375°F. 2. Peel the roots and chop into batons (roughly 10 cm long and 1,5 cm thick). 3. Stir together the dressing ingredients in a large mixing bowl. 4. Add the roots and toss until all are covered. 5. Tip out on a baking sheet covered with parchment paper and spread out in an even layer. 6. Place in the oven and roast for 20 minutes. Give the sheet a toss, then crank up the heat to 225°C /­­ 450°F and bake for 20 minutes more or until golden and slightly charred. 7. Transfer the roots to a serving platter and sprinkle with hemp seeds. Tips – This is perfect as a side for 4 persons but you can easily double the recipe if you are cooking for a crowd. Just use two baking sheets and set the oven to fan mode for more evenly distributed heat. – You can use any root for this but swede, carrots, sweet potato and parsnips are our favorites.   Crispy Celery and Orange Salad Serves 4 – 1 head romain lettuce or cosmopolitan – 4 celery stalks (or fennel) – 2 oranges – 4 tbsp toasted hazelnuts Mustard vinaigrette – 2 tbsp olive oil – 1 tbsp vinegar – 1 tsp Dijon mustard – 1 tsp maple syrup 1. Rinse the lettuce in water and chop into 2 inch /­­ 5 cm large pieces, discarding the stem. 2. Thinly slice the celery stalks (or mandolin the fennel of using). 3. Peel the oranges and cut in halves and thinly slice each half. 4. Place all prepped ingredients into a large mixing bowl. 5. Whisk together the vinaigrette ingredients in a small separate bowl. 6. Gently toss the dressing with the salad ingredients. 7. Chop the toasted hazelnuts. 8. Transfer to a serving bowl and scatter with hazelnuts. Serve!

Vegan Lentil and Sunflower Seed Meatloaf

December 8 2018 VegKitchen 

Vegan Lentil and Sunflower Seed Meatloaf What I like about this kind of recipe is that it is extremely flexible. You can keep the base and make meatballs, burgers, or stuff it into vegetables. Here, I cooked it in a muffin mold, but you can opt for a lentil loaf cooked in a bigger mold. Just dont forget to increase the cooking time! 5.0 from 2 reviews Save Print Lentil and sunflower seed meatloaf Serves: 4-6   Ingredients 2 tbsp. of olive oil 1 1/­­2 cups of onion, finely chopped 2 garlic cloves, crushed ⅔ cup carrots, grated 1 packet (227g) mushrooms, finely chopped 1 cup of lentils, cooked, rinsed and drained 1 1/­­2 cup sunflower seeds 2 slices of whole grain bread, shredded into small pieces ¼ cup ground flaxseed ½ cup of oatmeal 2 tbsp. of tamari 1 tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1/­­4 cup of vegetable broth 1 tbsp. oregano 1/­­2 tsp. thyme 1/­­2 tsp. dry mustard Salt and pepper, to taste 1/­­4 cup of ketchup 1/­­4 cup of unsweetened applesauce 2 tbsp. balsamic vinegar 2 tbsp. tablespoon maple syrup Instructions In a skillet, heat olive oil over medium high heat. Add onion and mushrooms. Cook until the onion has begun to turn a little golden, about […] The article Vegan Lentil and Sunflower Seed Meatloaf appeared first on VegKitchen.

Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Black Beans, Sweet Potatoes, Harissa

November 7 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Black Beans, Sweet Potatoes, Harissa We finally pulled together another meal plan! This ‘mini’ is very simple, seasonally-inspired, and will leave you with a bunch of nourishing food for the week. Everything starts out with a pot of black beans, a batch of roasted sweet potatoes, and a jar of homemade harissa (so easy to make, and such a flavor bomb ingredient!), which will then make their way into three interconnected savory meals and one snack. Ready? Menu - Roasted Sweet Potato and Black Bean Soup - No-Huevos Rancheros - Curried Cauliflower Rice and Beans - Harissa Black Bean Dip *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free, see the recipes for serving sizes Shopping List (Print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, its got all the ingredients youll need for the recipes in this meal plan mini. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Add whatever other ingredients you’ll need for the week here, if doing shopping for the whole week. Produce - 1 large head of garlic - 3 medium sweet potatoes - 3 large yellow onions - 1 large carrot - 2-4 celery ribs - 1 bunch kale (2 packed cups) - 3 limes - 2 lemons - 1 large bunch of cilantro - 2-3 avocados - 1/­­2 lb crimini mushrooms - 1 small head of red cabbage - 1 large head of cauliflower Bulk - 4 cups black beans - 2 cups Basmati rice - 3 large prunes Spices - black pepper - curry powder (1 tablespoon) - bay leaves - 8 dried chipotle chilis - whole caraway seeds - whole coriander seeds - whole cumin seeds - harissa paste – if not making your own Staples - neutral coconut oil or avocado oil - red wine vinegar - sea salt - tahini - kombu (optional) - balsamic vinegar (optional) Other - corn tortillas or other tortillas of choice - 8 sun-dried tomatoes Basic Prep 1) Cook the Black Beans Pot of Black Beans   Print Ingredients 4 cups black beans 2-3 garlic cloves - smashed 2-3 bay leaves 1 sheet of kombu (optional) sea salt Instructions Soak the beans overnight or up to 24 hours in plenty of purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar. Drain and rinse the beans. Place them in a large soup pot with plenty of purified water (about 10 cups). Add the garlic cloves, bay leaves and kombu, if using. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 30 minutes. Taste for doneness. If the beans are not completely soft and buttery inside, continue to cook until fully done. Salt at the last 10 minutes. Drain, saving the cooking liquid. Discard the bay leaves and kombu, if using. 3.5.3226   2) Cook the Rice Pot of Basmati Rice   Print Ingredients 2 cups basmati rice Instructions Cook 2 cups of basmati rice according to the instructions on the package (if your rice came in a package). Or cook the rice according the this method, or any other rice cooking method you prefer, like in a rice cooker, etc. You should end up with about 5-6 cups of cooked rice. 3.5.3226   3) Roast the Sweet Potatoes Roasted Sweet Potatoes   Print Ingredients 3 medium sweet potatoes avocado oil or other neutral oil of choice sea salt freshly ground black pepper Instructions Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare 2 parchment paper-covered baking trays. Peel and cube two of the sweet potatoes and place them on the trays. Sprinkle with avocado oil, salt and pepper, toss to cover and spread into a single layer. Leave the third sweet potato whole, just scrub it and prick with a fork, and place on one of the baking trays. Roast the sweet potatoes for 20-30 minutes, until the cubed ones are soft and browned in places. Toss at half time. The whole sweet potato will take a little longer to bake. Cook it until its easily pierced with a knife. Store the potatoes in an airtight container in the refrigerator. 3.5.3226   4) Make the Harissa (you can also buy harissa paste) Harissa   Print Adapted from Vibrant Food Serves: about 1 cup Ingredients 8 dried chipotle chilis 8 sun-dried tomatoes 1 tablespoon whole caraway seeds 1 tablespoon whole coriander seeds 1 tablespoon whole cumin seeds 1 large garlic clove - minced ¼ cup olive oil juice from ½ lemon 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 1 teaspoon sea salt Instructions Place the chipotle chilis and sun dried tomatoes in a medium bowl and cover with boiling water. Cover the bowl and let soften for about 30 minutes. Toast the caraway, coriander, and cumin seeds in a dry pan over medium heat until fragrant, about 2 minutes, stirring regularly. Grind the seeds using a spice grinder, dedicated coffee grinder, or mortar and pestle. Drain the chilis and sun-dried tomatoes. Remove the seeds and stems from the chilis (wear gloves to protect your hands if sensitive to spice). Place the chilis and sun-dried tomatoes in a food processor, add the toasted and ground spices, garlic, olive oil, lemon juice, vinegar, and salt. Process into a slightly chunky paste. Refrigerate in an air-tight container for up to 1 month. 3.5.3226   Recipes This soup is cozy and incredibly quick to put together once you’ve done all the prep. It gets its rich, earthy flavor from the black bean broth and harissa. Roasted sweet potatoes bring more depth and nourishment to the table, and kale provides a dose of dark leafy green magic. Roasted Sweet Potato and Black Bean Soup   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil or avocado oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped 1 large carrot - sliced 2-4 celery ribs - sliced thin 3 large prunes - chopped sea salt 3 garlic cloves - minced 3 cups cooked beans (from above) 3 teaspoons harissa or more to taste (from above) 5-6 cups black bean broth (from above) 2 cups packed chopped kale leaves 2 cups roasted sweet potatoes (from above) splash of balsamic vinegar (optional) juice of 1 lime cilantro - for garnish Instructions Warm the oil in a medium soup pot over medium heat. Add the onion, carrot, celery and prunes, and sauté for 8 minutes, until the vegetables are soft. Add salt and garlic, stir around for 1 minute. Add the beans, harissa and black bean broth, and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 30 minutes, until all the vegetables are completely cooked. Add the kale, sweet potatoes, splash of balsamic vinegar, if using, and more black bean broth, if needed. Bring back to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for another 10 minutes. Add the lime juice. Taste for salt and spice and adjust if needed. Serve over the prepped rice, garnished with cilantro. This soup freezes very well. 3.5.3226   This huevos rancheros-inspired dish utilizes crimini mushrooms, together with the already prepped black beans, sweet potatoes, and harissa, to make a delicious topping for warm tortillas. Everything comes together in a flash, and it’s a meal that can be easily eaten for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. No-Huevos Rancheros   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil or avocado oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped sea salt ½ lb crimini mushrooms - sliced 1½ cups cooked black beans (from above) harissa - to taste (from above) roasted sweet potatoes (from above) corn tortillas or other tortillas of choice - warmed or charred avocado - sliced or cubed shredded red cabbage - for garnish lime - for serving cilantro leaves - for garnish Instructions Warm the oil in a medium pan over medium heat. Add the onion and salt and sauté for 7 minutes, until translucent. Add mushrooms and sauté for 8-10 minutes, until all the liquid released by the mushrooms evaporates. Add the beans, harissa, and prepped sweet potatoes (amount to taste), and stir to incorporate and warm everything through. Serve the mushrooms and beans over tortillas, topped avocado, shredded red cabbage, a squeeze of lime, and cilantro. 3.5.3226   This re-imagined rice and beans recipe gets its bright flavor from the addition of curry, which is always great at providing a shortcut to flavor. It’s also full of cruciferous goodness from cauliflower, a little zing from lime, and some serious freshness from the essential topping of cilantro. Curried Cauliflower Rice And Beans   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil or avocado oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped 1 large cauliflower - chopped into small florets sea salt 5 garlic cloves 1 tablespoon curry powder, or more to taste 3 cups cooked black beans (from above) 3 cups cooked basmati rice (from above) juice of 1 lime cilantro - to garnish Instructions Warm the oil in a large saucepan. Add the onion, cauliflower and salt, and sauté for about 15-20 minutes, until the cauliflower is soft. Splash some water in the pan if things begin to stick. Add garlic and curry powder, and stir around for 1 minute. Add the beans and rice, and stir to mix everything together until warmed through. Pour the lime juice over top and stir to incorporate. Serve, garnished with cilantro. 3.5.3226   A flavorful dip is a great thing to have on hand at all times. It saves the day during snacking emergencies, but can also be spread on sandwiches and dolloped into bowls. Homemade dips are usually cheaper, healthier, and more flavorful than store-bought ones, and they’re easy to make. All of that is definitely the case with this black bean dip, which is made with the remaining, prep day black beans and whole baked sweet potato. If you happen to have any chipotle in adobo, those are a great addition to this dip as well. Harissa Black Bean Dip   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients the rest of the cooked black beans (from above, about 4 cups) 1 whole roasted sweet potato (from above) - peeled ¼ cup tahini juice from 1 lemon harissa (from above) - to taste sea salt black bean broth (from above) - for thinning, if needed Instructions Combine the beans, sweet potato, tahini, lemon juice, harissa, and sea salt to taste in a food processor and blend until smooth. Add some black bean broth if necessary to thin the dip out. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve, garnished with more harissa, toasted sesame seeds, and a drizzle of good olive oil. This dip freezes well if you end up with leftovers. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Sweet Potato and Kale Salad Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower Coconut-Ginger Eggplant Fried Rice Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Black Beans, Sweet Potatoes, Harissa appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Beets and Mint Tartar

September 19 2018 VegKitchen 

Beets and Mint Tartar Today, the recipe that I propose is a tartar of beetroot with mint. Its an entree that is both pretty and very light. But beware not to use canned, but fresh beet! In fact, this beetroot tartar and mint is more of a salad. What we are going to do is cut the cooked beetroot into small pieces, then season with mint vinaigrette. Beetroots are rich in B vitamins, iron, manganese, copper, magnesium, and potassium. A diet rich in these things is believed to result in improved blood pressure, improved cognition, and reduce accumulation in your liver. Prep Time: 45 minutes Cook Time: 20 to 40 minutes Servings: 8 Ingredients 2 lb yellow and red beets (6 or 8) 2 small cloves garlic minced 2 tsp dried mint 1/­­4  tsp salt and pepper 1 tbsp balsamic vinegar 1/­­3 cup extra virgin olive oil Preparation Dip the unpeeled beets in a large pot of salted boiling water and cook until tender--20 to 40 minutes. While still warm, remove them with a cloth or paper towel, remove the stem, and remove the skin by simply sliding. Slice the hot beets into rings and arrange them on a serving platter. Before they cool, sprinkle […] The post Beets and Mint Tartar appeared first on VegKitchen.

Green Pancakes - Three Ways

May 10 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Pancakes - Three Ways We love green pancakes (aka spinach cr?pes) in our family and are constantly exploring more ways to incorporate them into various meals. We have got lots of examples and ideas in our cookbooks but here are three new favorites: 1. Add mustard, lentils, sliced tomato and cheese to you pancakes. Fold them up, bake them quickly until the cheese melts and serve with a fresh lentil and melon salad. 2. Fill them with sweet potato, spinach, feta, yogurt and zaatar. Then roll them up and slice them into picnic rolls. 3. Make a banana split pancake bowl with some whipped cream, yogurt, raspberries, nut butter and chocolate. We are sharing all of these recipes below. You can either make the pancakes from scratch or use fridge cold leftover pancakes for these recipes. They are not vegan but if you use our vegan chickpea pancakes as base, you can easily modify the fillings to suit a vegan diet. Hummus, pesto, ajvar or coconut yogurt are excellent creamy toppings on vegan pancakes instead of yogurt and cheese. The recipe for the batter comes from our Green Kitchen at Home cookbook and we have included it in the bottom of this post. They are the most easy flippable gluten free pancakes we know. Pancakes work as a quick dinner in our family as the batter literally takes 30 seconds to mix together so we can have the first pancakes on the table within 5 minutes (admittedly I don’t always let the batter rest even if I recommend it). Gruyere, Mustard & Lentil Pancake Melt Serves 4 as a lunch This is the pancake equivalent to melted cheese sandwiches. It’s a great way to give old pancakes new life. We love it with lots of mustard (obviously use less for kids) and a crunchy salad for balance. 4 green pancakes (see recipe below) 8 slices gruyere cheese (or another cheese) 4 large teaspoons mustard 8 cherry tomatoes 200 g /­­ 1 cup cooked lentils (store bought are fine) 1 bag mixed lettuce 1 avocado 1 galia melon (or other melon) 10 cm /­­ 4 inches cucumber olive oil balsamic vinegar salt & pepper Make the batter and fry the pancakes if you haven’t done so already. Place two slices cheese in the middle of each pancake. Spread a layer of mustard on the cheese, slice the tomatoes thinly and lay them on top of the mustard along with a small handful lentils. Fold the pancakes into quarters and place in a baking dish with a drizzle of olive oil on top. Bake at 200°C/­­400°F for 10-12 minutes or until the cheese has melted. Meanwhile, chop up lettuce, avocado, melon and cucumber and place in a salad bowl. Add the remaining lentils. Drizzle with olive oil, balsamic vinegar, salt and pepper and toss. Serve the pancake warm with salad on the side. Sweet Potato & Za’atar Pancake Picnic Rolls Makes 20 rolls You can use almost any veggies in pancake rolls. Just make sure you have something creamy and sticky as base to bind them together. For a vegan version, use hummus instead of yogurt and tofu instead of feta cheese and sprinkle with nutritional yeast. Next time, we’ll add some crushed walnuts for crunch, pomegranate seeds for extra tanginess and maybe a couple of mint leaves for a fresh flavor twist. 4 green pancakes (see recipe below) 1 large sweet potato cinnamon 1 tbsp lemon juice 1 cup full-fat Turkish yogurt 200 g feta cheese 2 handfuls spinach, chopped 1 cup cooked chickpeas 2 tbsp za’atar (an awesome spice blend that you can find in Middle Eastern stores) 2 tsp chili flakes (optional) Set the oven at 200°C/­­400°F. Cut a sweet potato in half lengthwise, brush each cut side with a little oil and cinnamon. Place on a tray and bake for 40 minutes or until the flesh is soft and golden. If you haven’t prepared the batter and fried the pancakes, now is the time to do so. When the sweet potato is ready, use a fork to mash the flesh (you can mash it in its own skin to save some dishes). Squeeze over lemon juice and extra cinnamon while mashing. Spread out sweet potato mash on one half of each pancake and thick yogurt on the other half. Cut the feta cheese into 1 cm /­­ 1/­­3 inch thick sticks and place them in the centre of each pancake. Add a small handful chopped spinach, a couple of chickpeas, a generous drizzle za’atar and some chili flakes (if using). Roll up the pancakes as tightly as possible and slice into 2 inch /­­ 5 cm rolls. Sweet Pancake Banana Split Serves 4 4 green pancakes (see recipe below) 1 cup whipped cream 1 cup greek yogurt 4 bananas 1 cup raspberries 4 tbsp nut butter 4 tsp honey 30 g /­­ 1 oz dark chocolate 1 handful hemp seeds or slivered almonds Place each pancake in the bottom of a small bowl. Add dollops of whipped cream and yogurt. Cut the bananas into bite-sized pieces and spread out in the bowl. Add raspberries and drizzle with peanut butter and honey. Sprinkle with finely chopped dark chocolate, hemp seeds and top with a few mint leaves. Spinach Cr?pes (in our house they are know as Green Pancakes) Makes 10-14, depending on the size of your pan and thickness of your pancakes 5 eggs 150 g /­­ 1 cup rice flour (both light or wholegrain works, as does spelt flour) 500 ml /­­ 2 cups oat milk, or milk of choice a large handful spinach a small handful herbs (basil, mint or parsley) sea salt Crack the eggs into a blender or food processor. Add the rest of the ingredients and blend on high speed until smooth. Leave to rest for 20 minutes before starting to fry them (you can fry them right away but they will be a little harder to flip). For frying, add a little butter or coconut oil to a 20 cm /­­ 8 inch non-stick frying pan/­­skillet on medium heat. Once hot (this is important or else it will stick), whisk the batter then ladle 80 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup into the pan. Let fry for 1-2 minutes or until small bubbles form on the surface and the base is golden. Run a spatula around the edges to make sure it has detached from the pan, before carefully flipping it over and frying the other side for another minute. Transfer to a plate and repeat with the rest of the batter (you may need to reduce the heat slightly after the first cr?pes). To store the cr?pes, keep them in an air-tight wrap in the fridge and they will be good for 3-4 days.

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 2

November 2 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 2 Here comes Part 2 of our Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, complete with cozy dinner and dessert recipes for the week. There are stellar homemade veggie burgers, a nourishing stew, and beautifully simple roasted plums for dessert. To see the breakfast and lunch recipes, as well as the grocery shopping list for the entire meal plan, head to Part 1. We hope you’ll find this entire thing useful, and we’d love to hear any feedback you have, as always :) Menu (see Part 1 for breakfast and lunch recipes) Breakfast Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins Lunch Grain Bowl with Marinated Delicata Squash, Coconut Kale, and Lentil Hummus Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup Dinner Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers w/­­ Any Fixings of Choice Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew Dessert Rosemary-Roasted Plums with a Cardamom Sprinkle *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free and will make enough for a week, for 2-3 people Day by Day Prep List Monday Night: Make the Veggie Burgers to have for dinner on Monday, Tuesday, and possibly Wednesday nights. This will be fairly quick, since you’ve already cooked the squash, rice, kale and lentils that are called for in the recipe during prep day. Roast the plums for dessert on Monday or Tuesday night, it’s quick and you will have enough for dessert for the rest of the week. - Make the Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers. - Make the Rosemary-Roasted Plums with Cardamom Sprinkle. Wednesday/­­Thursday night: Once you’ve finished eating the Veggie Burgers, prepare the Brussels Sprouts Stew for dinner starting Wednesday or Thursday night and until the end of the week.  - Make the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew.   Recipes 1. These veggie burgers utilize the lentils, brown rice, squash, and kale that you already cooked during prep day. They are nourishing, satisfying, and cooked in the oven, which means that you won’t have to spend any time frying them on the pan. The flavors are earthy and warming, and the burgers develop really nice, crispy edges as they bake. Enjoy them for dinner with any fixings of choice, on burger buns, inside lettuce wraps, or even alongside a green salad. Make sure to try them with the Lentil and Squash Hummus from Part 1 as well. Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers   Print Serves: 9 veggie burgers Ingredients 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped ½ teaspoon red pepper flakes about 2 tablespoons chopped sage, rosemary and thyme (optional) 4 garlic cloves - minced blanched kale (from part 1) - chopped roughly sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1 cup toasted pumpkin seeds 1½ cups cooked brown rice (from part 1) 1½ cups cooked lentils (from part 1) remaining ½ cup roasted butternut squash (from part 1) 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar or apple cider vinegar Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Warm the coconut oil in a medium pan over medium heat. Add the onion, red pepper flakes and herbs, if using, and sauté for 7 minutes, until the onions are translucent. Add the garlic and cook for another minute, then add the kale, salt and pepper, and stir around for another minute. Add the tomato paste and toss to mix well. Remove the pan from heat. Transfer the pumpkin seeds to a food processor and pulse into small pieces. Add the rice, lentils, squash, vinegar, and the sautéed onion and kale mixture to the food processor. Pulse until well-mixed and combined into a chunky mixture. Taste for salt, add more if needed. Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Use a ½ cup measurement to form burger patties and finish shaping each patty with your hands. Arrange the patties on the prepared baking sheet. Bake for 25-35 minutes, until the burgers look nicely toasted. Serve on burger buns, lettuce wraps, or alongside salad with any burger fixings of choice. Store in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. These burgers also freeze very well. 3.5.3226   2. A pot of good stew is such a great solution to the weekday dinner problem, especially during the colder months. It doesn’t take too long to make and lasts a while in the fridge, only getting better with time. This one is made with so many star ingredients of warming fall fare: mushrooms, carrots, garlic and onion, as well as jarred tomatoes, brussels sprouts and lentils. There’s smoked paprika, too, which ensures a bit of piquancy and depth of flavor. Serve this stew with crusty sourdough bread or over any brown rice, left over from the veggie burgers. Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew   Print Ingredients 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 teaspoon whole cumin seeds 1 large yellow onion - chopped sea salt 1 lb crimini mushrooms - sliced freshly ground black pepper 6 garlic cloves - sliced 1 jalape?o - seeded and chopped 2 medium carrots - sliced 1 lb Brussels sprouts - trimmed and halved (quartered for larger ones) 1 teaspoon smoked paprika kale cooking water from part 1, veggie broth or purified water 2-3 bay leaves (optional) remaining cooked lentils from part 1 - about 1½ cups 28 oz box or can crushed tomatoes 4 cups baby spinach Instructions Warm the coconut oil in a medium saucepan. Add the cumin and sauté for about 1 minute, until fragrant. Add the onion and salt and sauté for 5 minutes, until translucent. Add the mushrooms and black pepper and cook for about 8 minutes, until all the liquid thats released by the mushrooms evaporates. Add the garlic, jalapeno, carrots, Brussels sprouts and paprika, and stir to coat for about 2 minutes. Add enough of the reserved kale cooking liquid (from part 1), veggie broth, or purified water to achieve a thick stew consistency (keep in mind that youll also be adding crushed tomatoes). Add the bay leaves at this point too, if using. Bring to a simmer. Cook, partially covered, for 10 minutes. Add the cooked lentils and crushed tomatoes, bring everything back to a simmer and cook for another 10 minutes. Discard the bay leaves, if using. Add the spinach at the end, and stir it in until wilted. Taste for salt and pepper, adjust if needed. Serve over rice or with crusty sourdough bread. 3.5.3226   3. Roasting up a sizable batch of fruit is a great way to ensure that you’ll have beautiful, healthy dessert for the week. Add a little dollop of ice cream or yogurt (have you tried this coconut one?!), and you’re in business. These plums are roasted with coconut sugar, which brings out their sweetness, and rosemary, which contributes its piney, earthy notes. Besides ice cream/­­yogurt, I love serving the plums with a sprinkling of toasted pumpkin seeds, cardamom and cacao nibs. Another idea: try topping the millet porridge from Part 1 with some of the roasted plums for one of your breakfasts. If you can’t find plums, try a similar roasting technique with apples or pears (and include cinnamon in your sprinkle). Rosemary-Roasted Plums with a Cardamom Sprinkle   Print Ingredients 8 ripe plums - sliced in half and pitted 2 tablespoons coconut sugar 2 tablespoons chopped rosemary ¼ cup toasted pumpkin seeds - roughly chopped 2-3 cardamom pods - shells discarded, ground in a mortar and pestle 1 tablespoon cacao nibs (optional) vanilla ice cream or plain yogurt - for serving Instructions Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Place the plums on the baking sheet, cut side up. Generously sprinkle each plum with the coconut sugar and rosemary. Put in the oven and roast for 20-30 minutes, until soft throughout. Meanwhile, combine the pumpkin seeds, cardamom and cacao nibs in a small bowl. Serve the plums with ice cream/­­yogurt, sprinkled with the pumpkin seed cardamom mixture. 3.5.3226   < < .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 2 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Four-Mushroom Risotto with Parsley Salad and Sun-Dried Tomatoes

October 16 2017 Meatless Monday 

You can add just about anything you fancy to risotto, which makes it a creative cooks dream. This recipe relies on four different kinds of mushroom (you could use different mushrooms or only cook two or three types as long as the amounts stay the same) and if you forget about the risotto part of the recipe, youre left with an exotic mushroom dish. This recipes comes to us courtesy of Fabio Viviani and is featured in his book, Fabios 30-Minute Italian. Makes 4 servings - 8 tablespoons butter, divided in half - 1 large onion, finely chopped -  1/­­2 cup torn cremini mushrooms -  1/­­4 cup torn oyster mushrooms -  1/­­2 cup torn shiitake mushrooms -  1/­­4 cup sliced button mushrooms -  1/­­2 cup Arborio rice - 1 cup dry white wine - 5 cups vegetable stock -  1/­­2 cup grated Grana Padano - 2 teaspoons white balsamic vinegar -  1/­­4 cup chopped sun-dried tomatoes -  1/­­2 cup Italian parsley leaves - Salt and pepper  Melt the butter in 2 heavy saucepans on medium high. Gently saute the oinons in one until softened, about 3 minutes. In the other, cook the mushrooms until caramelized, about 6-8 minutes. Season lightly with salt and pepper. Turn off mushroom pan. Stir in the rice to the onions and cook, stirring all the time, for about 2 minutes until the mix becomes translucent. Add the wine and cook for around 6-7 minutes until the wine is absorbed. Season with salt and pepper. Add 2 cups of the stock to the pan and simmer gently until the stock is absorbed, stirring every minute or so to prevent sticking! Gradually add more stock, a ladleful at a time, until the rice is tender, about 15-18 minutes. Adjust seasoning in the risotto with salt and pepper and add the mushrooms. Turn heat to low and stir in cheese. In a small bowl, combine the vinegar, sun-dried tomatoes and parsley. Use this as a garnish on top of risotto when served. From Fabios 30-Minute Italian by Fabio Viviani; published by St. Martins Press. Copyright (C)2017 by Fabio Viviani. All Rights Reserved. Used with Permission. Page 114-115. Photo by Matt Armendariz. The post Four-Mushroom Risotto with Parsley Salad and Sun-Dried Tomatoes appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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