balsamic vinegar - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!










balsamic vinegar vegetarian recipes

Roasted Pumpkin Orange Quinoa Salad

January 1 2018 Meatless Monday 

Quinoa is infused with fresh squeezed orange juice and vegetable stock, while pumpkin is tossed with shallots, orange wedges and chickpeas. Tangy feta cheese stands out on a warm backdrop of toasted walnuts and slow roasted orange, all dressed with a reduced balsamic. This recipe comes from Trudy of veggie.num.num. Serves 6 - 1 cup quinoa, rinsed - 1 1/­­2 cups low sodium vegetable stock - juice from 1 orange - 1 orange, peeled and cut into wedges - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 2 pounds pumpkin, diced into 1 centimeter cubes - 1 cup chickpeas, cooked or canned and rinsed - 5 shallots, quartered - 1/­­4 cup walnuts, roughly chopped - 1/­­2 cup balsamic vinegar - 2 cups rocket lettuces - 7 ounces feta cheese*, crumbled *optional Preheat an oven to 400 degrees. Place the quinoa, vegetable stock and juice from one orange into a medium pot over medium-high heat and bring to a boil. Turn heat down to medium-low, cover, and simmer for 10-15 minutes, or until the liquid has been absorbed. Set aside. Cut the remaining orange into wedges. Toss the orange wedges, pumpkin pieces, chickpeas and shallots with the olive oil. Place on a baking sheet and put in the oven. Cook for 20-25 minutes, or until chickpeas are crisp and pumpkin is tender. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool slightly. Place a sauté pan over medium-high heat. Toast the walnuts for 2-3 minutes, or until golden. Remove to a bowl and set aside. Place the balsamic vinegar in a small saucepan and heat over medium heat. Allow the vinegar to come to a simmer. Whisk for 4-5 minutes, or until the balsamic has reduced by half and the vinegar is syrupy. Set aside to cool. Place the quinoa in a large bowl. Add the roasted orange pumpkin mixture, toasted walnuts and rocket lettuces. Crumble the feta cheese on top, if using. Dress the salad with 2-3 tablespoons of balsamic reduction, or to taste, and toss well to combine. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Place equal portions in 4 bowls atop extra rocket lettuce. Sprinkle with a little more balsamic reduction if desired and enjoy. The post Roasted Pumpkin Orange Quinoa Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 2

November 2 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 2 Here comes Part 2 of our Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, complete with cozy dinner and dessert recipes for the week. There are stellar homemade veggie burgers, a nourishing stew, and beautifully simple roasted plums for dessert. To see the breakfast and lunch recipes, as well as the grocery shopping list for the entire meal plan, head to Part 1. We hope you’ll find this entire thing useful, and we’d love to hear any feedback you have, as always :) Menu (see Part 1 for breakfast and lunch recipes) Breakfast Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins Lunch Grain Bowl with Marinated Delicata Squash, Coconut Kale, and Lentil Hummus Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup Dinner Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers w/­­ Any Fixings of Choice Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew Dessert Rosemary-Roasted Plums with a Cardamom Sprinkle *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free and will make enough for a week, for 2-3 people Day by Day Prep List Monday Night: Make the Veggie Burgers to have for dinner on Monday, Tuesday, and possibly Wednesday nights. This will be fairly quick, since you’ve already cooked the squash, rice, kale and lentils that are called for in the recipe during prep day. Roast the plums for dessert on Monday or Tuesday night, it’s quick and you will have enough for dessert for the rest of the week. - Make the Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers. - Make the Rosemary-Roasted Plums with Cardamom Sprinkle. Wednesday/­­Thursday night: Once you’ve finished eating the Veggie Burgers, prepare the Brussels Sprouts Stew for dinner starting Wednesday or Thursday night and until the end of the week.  - Make the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew.   Recipes 1. These veggie burgers utilize the lentils, brown rice, squash, and kale that you already cooked during prep day. They are nourishing, satisfying, and cooked in the oven, which means that you won’t have to spend any time frying them on the pan. The flavors are earthy and warming, and the burgers develop really nice, crispy edges as they bake. Enjoy them for dinner with any fixings of choice, on burger buns, inside lettuce wraps, or even alongside a green salad. Make sure to try them with the Lentil and Squash Hummus from Part 1 as well. Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers   Print Serves: 9 veggie burgers Ingredients 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped ½ teaspoon red pepper flakes about 2 tablespoons chopped sage, rosemary and thyme (optional) 4 garlic cloves - minced blanched kale (from part 1) - chopped roughly sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1 cup toasted pumpkin seeds 1½ cups cooked brown rice (from part 1) 1½ cups cooked lentils (from part 1) remaining ½ cup roasted butternut squash (from part 1) 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar or apple cider vinegar Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Warm the coconut oil in a medium pan over medium heat. Add the onion, red pepper flakes and herbs, if using, and sauté for 7 minutes, until the onions are translucent. Add the garlic and cook for another minute, then add the kale, salt and pepper, and stir around for another minute. Add the tomato paste and toss to mix well. Remove the pan from heat. Transfer the pumpkin seeds to a food processor and pulse into small pieces. Add the rice, lentils, squash, vinegar, and the sautéed onion and kale mixture to the food processor. Pulse until well-mixed and combined into a chunky mixture. Taste for salt, add more if needed. Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Use a ½ cup measurement to form burger patties and finish shaping each patty with your hands. Arrange the patties on the prepared baking sheet. Bake for 25-35 minutes, until the burgers look nicely toasted. Serve on burger buns, lettuce wraps, or alongside salad with any burger fixings of choice. Store in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. These burgers also freeze very well. 3.5.3226   2. A pot of good stew is such a great solution to the weekday dinner problem, especially during the colder months. It doesn’t take too long to make and lasts a while in the fridge, only getting better with time. This one is made with so many star ingredients of warming fall fare: mushrooms, carrots, garlic and onion, as well as jarred tomatoes, brussels sprouts and lentils. There’s smoked paprika, too, which ensures a bit of piquancy and depth of flavor. Serve this stew with crusty sourdough bread or over any brown rice, left over from the veggie burgers. Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew   Print Ingredients 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 teaspoon whole cumin seeds 1 large yellow onion - chopped sea salt 1 lb crimini mushrooms - sliced freshly ground black pepper 6 garlic cloves - sliced 1 jalape?o - seeded and chopped 2 medium carrots - sliced 1 lb Brussels sprouts - trimmed and halved (quartered for larger ones) 1 teaspoon smoked paprika kale cooking water from part 1, veggie broth or purified water 2-3 bay leaves (optional) remaining cooked lentils from part 1 - about 1½ cups 28 oz box or can crushed tomatoes 4 cups baby spinach Instructions Warm the coconut oil in a medium saucepan. Add the cumin and sauté for about 1 minute, until fragrant. Add the onion and salt and sauté for 5 minutes, until translucent. Add the mushrooms and black pepper and cook for about 8 minutes, until all the liquid thats released by the mushrooms evaporates. Add the garlic, jalapeno, carrots, Brussels sprouts and paprika, and stir to coat for about 2 minutes. Add enough of the reserved kale cooking liquid (from part 1), veggie broth, or purified water to achieve a thick stew consistency (keep in mind that youll also be adding crushed tomatoes). Add the bay leaves at this point too, if using. Bring to a simmer. Cook, partially covered, for 10 minutes. Add the cooked lentils and crushed tomatoes, bring everything back to a simmer and cook for another 10 minutes. Discard the bay leaves, if using. Add the spinach at the end, and stir it in until wilted. Taste for salt and pepper, adjust if needed. Serve over rice or with crusty sourdough bread. 3.5.3226   3. Roasting up a sizable batch of fruit is a great way to ensure that you’ll have beautiful, healthy dessert for the week. Add a little dollop of ice cream or yogurt (have you tried this coconut one?!), and you’re in business. These plums are roasted with coconut sugar, which brings out their sweetness, and rosemary, which contributes its piney, earthy notes. Besides ice cream/­­yogurt, I love serving the plums with a sprinkling of toasted pumpkin seeds, cardamom and cacao nibs. Another idea: try topping the millet porridge from Part 1 with some of the roasted plums for one of your breakfasts. If you can’t find plums, try a similar roasting technique with apples or pears (and include cinnamon in your sprinkle). Rosemary-Roasted Plums with a Cardamom Sprinkle   Print Ingredients 8 ripe plums - sliced in half and pitted 2 tablespoons coconut sugar 2 tablespoons chopped rosemary ¼ cup toasted pumpkin seeds - roughly chopped 2-3 cardamom pods - shells discarded, ground in a mortar and pestle 1 tablespoon cacao nibs (optional) vanilla ice cream or plain yogurt - for serving Instructions Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Place the plums on the baking sheet, cut side up. Generously sprinkle each plum with the coconut sugar and rosemary. Put in the oven and roast for 20-30 minutes, until soft throughout. Meanwhile, combine the pumpkin seeds, cardamom and cacao nibs in a small bowl. Serve the plums with ice cream/­­yogurt, sprinkled with the pumpkin seed cardamom mixture. 3.5.3226   < < .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 2 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 1

November 1 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 1 This summer, we set out to share one practical, budget-friendly, and non-boring plant-based meal plan per season. Here is our meal plan for the Fall of 2017! We are really excited about the recipes in this one. It all starts out with cooking a pot of lentils and a pot of rice, roasting some winter squash, and prepping some kale. Those foundations then make their way into breakfast, lunch and dinner recipes that will take you through a whole week of nourishing and cozy fall meals. As usual, we are splitting this meal plan into two parts. This first part will focus on weekend prep, as well as breakfast and lunch recipes. Part 2 is here, and it’s all about dinner and dessert recipes. Here we go! Menu (see Part 2 for dinner and dessert recipes) Breakfast Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins Lunch Grain Bowl with Marinated Delicata Squash, Coconut Kale, and Lentil Hummus Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup Dinner Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers w/­­ Any Fixings of Choice Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew Dessert Rosemary-Roasted Plums with a Cardamom Sprinkle *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free and will make enough for a week, for 2-3 people Shopping List (print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, its got all the ingredients youll need for the recipes in this meal plan. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Produce Vegetables - 1 large and 1 medium butternut squashes - 2 medium delicata squashes - 1 lb Brussels sprouts - 2 bunches kale (or 1 very large bunch) - 4 cups baby spinach - 1 jalape?o pepper - 1 lb crimini mushrooms - 2 medium carrots - 3 large yellow onions - 2 heads of garlic Fruits - 2-3 green apples - 1 lemon - 1-2 limes (if using in place of brown rice vinegar for the marinated delicata) - 8 ripe plums Herbs  - rosemary - sage - green onions (optional) - thyme (optional) Other - 3 cups almond milk or other plant milk of choice - 1 13.5 oz can unsweetened Thai coconut milk - 1 28 oz can or box crushed tomatoes - 1 cup brown rice flour or other gluten free flour - sesame tahini - white sweet miso - burger fixings like buns, lettuce, or anything else you like w/­­ your veggie burgers - vanilla ice cream or plain yogurt to serve with the roasted plums (optional) - crackers to snack on with the hummus or sourdough bread to eat with the hummus, soup or stew (optional) Bulk - 2 1/­­4 cups dried green lentils - 3/­­4 cup millet - 1 1/­­2 cups brown rice (2 cups if using rice for the grain bowl) - 1 cup other grain of choice for the grain bowl, or 1/­­2 more cup of brown rice - 5-7 Medjool dates - 2 cups pumpkin seeds – toasted - unsweetened coconut flakes (optional) - cacao nibs (optional) Pantry /­­ Refrigerator Staples - neutral coconut oil - apple cider vinegar - brown rice vinegar (if not using limes for delicata marinade) - balsamic vinegar (optional) - tamari - olive oil - toasted sesame oil - tomato paste - coconut sugar - sea salt - maple syrup or honey - sriracha/­­chili sauce of choice - baking soda - baking powder Spices - whole cumin seeds - whole coriander seeds - green cardamom pods - smoked paprika - black peppercorns - turmeric - red pepper flakes - bay leaves (optional) Day by Day Prep List Saturday Night (Night Before Main Prep Day): These are just quick tasks that need to be done the day before your main prep day. Soaking grains and lentils helps rid them of phytic acid, which makes them easier to digest. It also kickstarts the germination process, making the grains and lentils more nutritious. - Soak 3/­­4 cup of dried millet overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. - Soak 2 1/­­4 cups of lentils overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. - Soak 1 1/­­2 cups of brown rice (2 cups if you are using it for the grain bowl) overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. - If not using brown rice for the grain bowl, soak 1 cup of another grain of choice for the grain bowl in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. Sunday (Main Prep Day): This is your main prep day, which you can also split into multiple days, depending on your schedule. You will find all the recipes for this prep day in this post, which includes two breakfast options and two lunch options for the whole week, as well as some simple prep for the dinners for the coming week. - Roast the butternut and delicata squashes to be used in Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash, Apple and Squash Muffins, Lentil and Squash Hummus, Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup, Veggie Burgers, and Grain Bowl. - Cook the lentils to be used in the Lentil and Squash Hummus, Veggie Burgers, and the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew. - Cook the brown rice to use in the Veggie Burgers and the Grain Bowl, if that’s your grain of choice for the bowl. - If you chose another grain for the grain bowl, cook it now as well. - Cook the kale and coconut kale to be used in the Grain Bowl and Veggie Burgers. - Make the Lentil and Squash Hummus to be used in the Grain Bowl, on the Veggie Burgers, and on crackers/­­bread as a snack throughout the week. - Marinate the roasted delicata squash to use in the Grain Bowl. - Make the Simple Butternut Squash and Apple Soup. - Bake the Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins. - You can also cook the Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash for your breakfasts ahead of time, but I suggest making it in the morning. It’s pretty quick. Monday Night: Make the Veggie Burgers to have for dinner on Monday, Tuesday, and possibly Wednesday nights. This will be fairly quick, since you’ve already cooked the squash, rice, kale and lentils that are called for in the recipe during prep day. Roast the plums for dessert on Monday or Tuesday night, it’s quick and you will have enough for dessert for the rest of the week. The recipes for the Veggie Burgers, Brussels Sprout Stew and the Roasted Plums are in Part 2.  - Make the Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers. - Make the Rosemary-Roasted Plums with Cardamom Sprinkle. Wednesday/­­Thursday night: Once you’ve finished eating the Veggie Burgers, prepare the Brussels Sprouts Stew for dinner starting Wednesday or Thursday night and until the end of the week. The recipe for the stew is in Part 2.  - Make the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew.   Prep 1. Winter squash is a beautifully versatile vegetable that can be used in millions of ways in both sweet and savory dishes. It’s always a great idea to roast a bunch of squash on the weekend, to use in all kinds of dishes throughout the week. In this meal plan, we use Butternut and Delicata Squashes in the Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash, Apple and Squash Muffins, Lentil and Squash Hummus, Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup, Veggie Burgers, and Grain Bowl. See what I mean? It really is a super-vegetable. Roasted Butternut and Delicata Squashes   Print Ingredients 1 large and 1 medium butternut squash - cut in half lengthwise and seeded 2 medium delicata squashes - seeded and sliced into ½-inch rings neutral coconut oil - soft sea salt freshly ground black pepper Instructions Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare 2-3 parchment paper-lined baking sheets. Arrange all the squashes on the baking sheets in a single layer. Oil them with the coconut oil and sprinkle with salt and paper. Roast the delicata squash for 10 minutes, then flip all the rings and roast for another 15-20 minutes, until cooked through and golden on both sides. Delicata squash skins are edible, so no need to peel off the skin. Roast the butternut squashes at the same time, for about 40 minutes or until soft throughout. You should end up with about 3 cups of roasted mashed squash flesh from the large butternut squash, which you will use for the hummus, muffins, porridge and burgers. The remaining 1 medium butternut squash will be used for the Simple Squash and Apple Soup. 3.5.3226   2. A pot of lentils, cooked on the weekend, can easily take you through a week of meals. They are nourishing, affordable, and can work as a base for so many meals. In this meal plan, we use French lentils in the Lentil and Squash Hummus, Veggie Burgers, and the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew. Pot of Lentils   Print Ingredients 2¼ cups dried French lentils - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the lentils. Place them into a medium-large pot, cover with purified water, and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook for about 15-20 minutes, or until soft, but still intact. Add salt at the last 5 minutes. Drain and use in recipes right away or store in an airtight container for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   3. Similarly to lentils, a pot of rice or any other grains, prepared on the weekend, can help you pave the way to quicker and better meals throughout the week. In this meal plan, we use brown rice in the Veggie Burgers and the Grain Bowl (if that’s the grain you chose for your bowl). Serve any leftover rice with the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew. If you chose a different grain for your grain bowl, cook it now as well. Pot of Brown Rice   Print Ingredients 1½ cups brown rice (2 cups if using rice for your grain bowl) - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar 2½ cups filtered water (3½ cups if cooking 2 cups of rice) sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the rice. Combine it with the water and plenty of sea salt in a medium pot, cover with a lid and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 25-40 minutes, until all the water is absorbed and the rice is cooked. Use in recipes right away or store refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   4. Blanching kale is one of my favorite, low maintenance ways of prepping a whole bunch of it for the week. In this meal plan, it will be used for the Coconut Kale and the Veggie Burgers. I also like to use the leftover kale cooking water for soups, stews, etc. In this meal plan, you can use the leftover kale broth for the Coconut Kale, the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew and even the Simple Squash and Apple Soup. Half of this blanched kale gets stored away for later use in the Veggie Burgers, while the other half becomes the Coconut Kale for our grain bowl lunch. You’re going to love the coconut kale – it’s velvety, creamy, and keeps well throughout the week. Blanched Kale and Coconut Kale   Print Ingredients 2 bunches (or 1 very large bunch) kale of choice sea salt 1 can unsweetened Thai coconut milk Instructions Separate the kale leaves from the stems. Wash and tear the leaves into roughly bite-sized pieces. Reserve the stems to use in homemade vegetable broth in the future, if desired. Place the torn kale leaves in a large pot and cover with purified water. Add salt and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes. Drain the kale, reserving the cooking liquid for the Coconut Kale and the Brussels Sprouts Tomato Stew. Return half of the kale to the same pot. Squeeze the other half of the kale dry and store it away in an air-tight container, in the refrigerator, to use later in the veggie burgers. Add ½ cup of the reserved kale cooking liquid and 1 can of coconut milk to the pot. Bring to a strong simmer and cook for 10-20 minutes, until creamy. Add more of the kale cooking liquid throughout the cooking time, if needed. Taste for salt and adjust, if needed. Eat right away or store refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   5. The good news is, you already have all the important ingredients prepared for this hummus – you’ve cooked the lentils and roasted the squash, which you’re going to puree with autumn herbs, garlic, tahini, lemon juice, and olive oil. Though for efficiency’s sake, we use lentils instead of the traditional chickpeas here, the spread still very much tastes like hummus. And not just any hummus – it’s fresh, savory, earthy hummus that’s better than anything you can get at the store. Use it throughout the week in the Grain Bowl, on top of the Veggie Burgers, or as a quick snack with some crackers. Lentil and Squash Hummus   Print Ingredients ¼ cup plus 2 tablespoons olive oil - divided 4-5 cloves of garlic - peeled and sliced 1-2 tablespoons chopped herbs, such as rosemary, sage and thyme 1 cup roasted mashed butternut squash (from the large butternut squash from above) sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1½ cups cooked green lentils (from above) juice from 1 lemon ¼ cup sesame tahini 3-4 tablespoons cold water toasted pumpkin seeds - for garnish (optional) Instructions Warm 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a small sauté pan over medium heat. Add garlic and herbs and sauté for about a minute, until garlic is fragrant and cooked, but not burnt. Add the squash, salt and pepper, and toss to coat. Stir around for a minute or so for the flavors to mix. Add the mixture to a food processor or a high-speed blender like a Vitamix. Add the lentils to the food processor/­­blender, followed by the lemon juice, sesame tahini, and more salt, to taste. Process until smooth, scraping the walls if needed. With the motor still running, pour in ¼ cup of the olive oil through the funnel, followed by the cold water. Pour in the water 1 tablespoon at a time until you achieve a desired, creamy consistency. Sprinkle the hummus with the toasted pumpkin seeds when serving, if using. Store the hummus in the refrigerator in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   6. Marinating vegetables is one of my favorite preparations, especially if I’m cooking ahead. It’s as easy as mixing up a marinade, and the veggies will only get more flavorful with each passing day. This miso-marinated delicata squash has got it all – it’s a little sweet, a little savory, and a bit spicy. It’s the perfect, powerful component to a memorable grain bowl, which is how it’s utilized in this meal plan. If you are planning on eating this squash at work/­­social settings, you might need to be cautious with the garlic – the squash is still really good without it! Miso-Marinated Delicata Squash   Print Ingredients 2 sliced and roasted delicata squashes (from above) 2 tablespoons white sweet miso paste 1 tablespoon maple syrup or honey (not vegan) 2 teaspoons chili sauce, such as sriracha 4 tablespoons brown rice vinegar or lime juice 1 tablespoon tamari 2 teaspoons sesame oil 1 garlic clove - minced (optional) 1 tablespoon finely chopped green onion (optional) Instructions Place the sliced and roasted delicata squash in a shallow dish. In a small bowl, combine the miso with the maple syrup and sriracha, and mix until smooth. Add the rice vinegar/­­lime juice, tamari, and sesame oil, and mix until smooth. Mix in the sesame seeds, garlic and green onion, if using. Pour the marinade over the delicata squash and toss to coat. Cover and let marinate at room temperature for 1-3 hours. Keep refrigerated for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   Recipes 1. These gluten-free muffins make for a great breakfast or snack. They are very subtly sweet – sweetened only with dates – and get their soft, crumbly texture from the roasted squash that’s hiding in the batter. There are pockets of cubed apple throughout, and the pumpkin seeds on top add a nice bit of crunch. Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins   Print Serves: 10 medium-sized or 12 small muffins Ingredients 1½ tablespoons neutral coconut oil, plus more for oiling the pan ¾ cup brown rice flour or other gluten-free flour pinch of sea salt 1 teaspoon baking powder ½ teaspoon baking soda 5-7 soft Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in 1 cup of hot water for 10 minutes ½ cup roasted mashed butternut squash (from the large butternut squash from above) 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar 1-2 Granny Smith apples - peeled and finely cubed (optionally slice some of the apple to decorate the tops of muffins) 2 tablespoons chopped sage leaves (optional) pumpkin seeds - for sprinkling Instructions Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Prepare a muffin pan by thoroughly oiling the holes or lining it with paper muffin liners. Combine the flour, salt, baking powder and baking soda in a medium bowl. Put the dates in an upright blender, together with their soaking water. Add the squash and blend until smooth. Add the coconut oil and vinegar and pulse to combine. Pour the wet mixture into the bowl with the dry ingredients and quickly stir to mix. Fold in cubed apples and sage, if using. Fill the muffin holes with the batter until each hole is about ⅔ full. Sprinkle each muffin with pumpkin seeds and decorate with apple slices, if using. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until a toothpick comes out clean. Let cool a little, then remove the muffins from the pan and let them cool on a cooling rack. Enjoy right away or store in an air-tight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   2. This millet porridge is warming, cozy, satisfying, and overall perfect for chilly fall mornings. Millet is a humble and affordable gluten-free grain, but it has the potential to be quite creamy and luxurious when cooked in plant milk with turmeric and squash. The porridge is pictured here topped with some of the roasted plums from Part 2 of this meal plan, which makes it even more special. Turmeric Millet Porridge   Print Ingredients 2 tablespoons coconut oil or ghee (not vegan) 1 teaspoon turmeric a few grinds of black pepper (to activate the turmeric) ¾ cup millet - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar 1½ tablespoons coconut sugar pinch of sea salt 4 cups almond milk or other plant milk (or 3 cups milk and 1 cup water) - divided 1 cup roasted butternut squash (from the large butternut squash from above) toasted pumpkin seeds and coconut flakes - for serving (optional) Instructions Warm the oil/­­ghee in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the turmeric and black pepper, and stir around for about a minute. Add the millet, coconut sugar, salt and 3 cups of plant milk (or 2 cups of milk and 1 cup of water). Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 20 minutes. Stir periodically to prevent the porridge from sticking to the bottom. In the meantime, blend the squash and the remaining 1 cup of plant milk in a high-speed blender. Mix the blended mixture into the porridge after the 20 minutes of cooking and stir to combine. Simmer everything for another couple of minutes. (Alternatively, skip blending the squash and the remaining plant milk in a blender and add both the squash and the rest of the milk to the porridge, stirring to warm everything through. This will result in a less smooth porridge with some pockets of squash, which I like as a nice change from a smooth porridge). Serve the porridge topped with toasted pumpkin seeds and coconut flakes, if desired. Store in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. Reheat gently over medium low heat with more ghee/­­coconut oil and a splash of plant milk or water. 3.5.3226   3. This grain bowl will come together very quickly during a weekday lunch, since you’ve already gotten all the components ready during prep day. As an alternative to the bowl, you can spread the hummus on some sourdough bread and top that with the squash for an open-faced sandwich, with the coconut kale on the side. Marinated Delicata Squash, Coconut Kale, and Lentil Hummus Grain Bowl   Print Ingredients cooked brown rice or another grain of choice (from above) coconut kale (from above) miso-marinated delicata squash (from above) lentil and squash hummus (from above) toasted pumpkin seeds Instructions Heat up the rice and coconut kale in a pan or saucepan with a bit of oil or water. You can also gently heat the miso-marinated squash, but be careful not to heat it too much because of the miso. Serve all the components together in a bowl, sprinkled with toasted pumpkin seeds. 3.5.3226   4. Our second lunch option is a very lovely and very simple pureed fall soup, with flavors of butternut squash, green apple, and autumn herbs. Simple Butternut Squash and Apple Soup   Print Ingredients 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped 1 green apple - peeled, cored and chopped 2 garlic cloves - sliced 1 teaspoon coriander seeds - preferably freshly ground about 1 tablespoon chopped sage and rosemary sea salt freshly ground black pepper flesh from 1 medium roasted butternut squash (from above) Instructions Warm the oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion, apple, garlic, coriander and herbs, if using, and sauté everything for 10 minutes. Scoop the flesh out of the roasted squash and add it to the saucepan, followed by the sea salt, pepper and 3 cups of purified water. Bring to a boil and simmer for 10 minutes, until all the flavors are combined well. Carefully blend everything in an upright blender until smooth. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve right away or store in an airtight container for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226 Continue to Dinner and Dessert Recipes > > >  You might also like... Moroccan Stew and Sunshine Crackers from The First Mess + a Giveaway Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies Squash Noodle Soup with Healing Turmeric-Ginger Broth, Roasted Carrots... Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 2 .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 1 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Four-Mushroom Risotto with Parsley Salad and Sun-Dried Tomatoes

October 16 2017 Meatless Monday 

You can add just about anything you fancy to risotto, which makes it a creative cooks dream. This recipe relies on four different kinds of mushroom (you could use different mushrooms or only cook two or three types as long as the amounts stay the same) and if you forget about the risotto part of the recipe, youre left with an exotic mushroom dish. This recipes comes to us courtesy of Fabio Viviani and is featured in his book, Fabios 30-Minute Italian. Makes 4 servings - 8 tablespoons butter, divided in half - 1 large onion, finely chopped -  1/­­2 cup torn cremini mushrooms -  1/­­4 cup torn oyster mushrooms -  1/­­2 cup torn shiitake mushrooms -  1/­­4 cup sliced button mushrooms -  1/­­2 cup Arborio rice - 1 cup dry white wine - 5 cups vegetable stock -  1/­­2 cup grated Grana Padano - 2 teaspoons white balsamic vinegar -  1/­­4 cup chopped sun-dried tomatoes -  1/­­2 cup Italian parsley leaves - Salt and pepper  Melt the butter in 2 heavy saucepans on medium high. Gently saute the oinons in one until softened, about 3 minutes. In the other, cook the mushrooms until caramelized, about 6-8 minutes. Season lightly with salt and pepper. Turn off mushroom pan. Stir in the rice to the onions and cook, stirring all the time, for about 2 minutes until the mix becomes translucent. Add the wine and cook for around 6-7 minutes until the wine is absorbed. Season with salt and pepper. Add 2 cups of the stock to the pan and simmer gently until the stock is absorbed, stirring every minute or so to prevent sticking! Gradually add more stock, a ladleful at a time, until the rice is tender, about 15-18 minutes. Adjust seasoning in the risotto with salt and pepper and add the mushrooms. Turn heat to low and stir in cheese. In a small bowl, combine the vinegar, sun-dried tomatoes and parsley. Use this as a garnish on top of risotto when served. From Fabios 30-Minute Italian by Fabio Viviani; published by St. Martins Press. Copyright (C)2017 by Fabio Viviani. All Rights Reserved. Used with Permission. Page 114-115. Photo by Matt Armendariz. The post Four-Mushroom Risotto with Parsley Salad and Sun-Dried Tomatoes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Grilled Artichokes

May 15 2017 Meatless Monday 

These grilled artichokes are fragrant, crispy and packed with nutrition! This recipe comes to us from Sharon Palmer, the Plant-Powered Dietitian. Serves 2     - 2 large artichokes - 1 1/­­2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil - 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar - 2 cloves garlic, minced - 1 1/­­2 teaspoons Herbes de Provence (or any herbs you like) - Salt and pepper to taste Prepare artichokes by rinsing, then trimming 1 inch off tops and 1/­­2 inch off stems. Slice in half lengthwise. With metal spoon, scoop out blossom portion (the choke). Place artichokes in medium pot with water and cook 10 minutes, until almost tender. Drain, then place artichokes in baking dish. Whisk together extra-virgin olive oil, balsamic vinegar, garlic, Herbes de Provence, and salt and pepper. Drizzle vinaigrette over artichokes and allow to marinate about 30 minutes. Place artichokes cut side up on hot grill (or grill pan) for 2-3 minutes, then turn over and grill 5 minutes, until golden brown. Serve immediately. The post Grilled Artichokes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Cauliflower Rice with Zingy White Beans and Kale

January 26 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Cauliflower Rice with Zingy White Beans and Kale There’s something very powerful about turning a pile of vegetables into a proper meal. The satisfaction/­­general victorious feeling that I get from finding a place for produce in our daily meals is one of the main reasons I’m attracted to cooking with plants, besides the more obvious nourishment factor. Another powerful feeling is finding a way to whip up a solid, plant-centric meal when you seemingly have no food left in the house. For me, that usually involves surveying the bottom of my crisper and pulling heavily from my pantry. That was the case with the recipe I have for you today, which took me from panicking about not having enough groceries to being well-fed and quite satisfied. I had a head of cauliflower I’d been ignoring, kale that was getting dangerously old, a bag of random Florida citrus, and mushrooms that didn’t make it into a stew (which are also optional in this recipe). The rest of the ingredients came straight from my pantry. We eat a lot of cauliflower around these parts in the fall and winter months, and at this point, everyone under my roof is pretty tired of the roasted-cauliflower-with-one-spice-or-another scenario. So cauliflower ‘rice’ is a good option when roasted cauliflower fatigue hits – it makes for a great, neutral bed for whichever ingredients you choose to serve with it and can be flavored so many different ways. It’s also a nice option for those trying to stay away from grains and looking for a sub that’s still tasty and comforting. I wanted to give a zingy, citrusy flavor kiss to the whole dish, since nature is awesome enough to supply us with the brightness that is citrus in the dark of winter. The ‘rice’ is cooked simply with onions and garlic, then finished off with some lemon juice. Served on top there’s a humble mix of sautéed kale, white beans and mushrooms if you have them. The white beans are also a base for the sauce, which involves orange juice and zest to get more of the sunny factor into the dish. This meal comes together pretty quickly, even more so if you make the cauliflower rice ahead of time. It’s a good candidate for a weekday meal, especially if you too happen to have all the ingredients on hand :) Cauliflower Rice with Zingy White Beans and Kale   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients for the white bean sauce 1 cup cooked white beans (butter, navy, etc.) ¼ cup + 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed orange juice (from about 2 small oranges) 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar 1½ tablespoons tamari 2 tablespoons olive oil sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste zest of 1 orange for the cauliflower rice with zingy white beans and kale 1 head cauliflower - roughly chopped into florets 3 tablespoons coconut oil - divided 1 shallot - diced 2 cloves garlic - minced ½ teaspoon red pepper flakes ½ cup water juice of ½ lemon sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste 8 oz crimini mushrooms - sliced (optional) 1 medium bunch kale - stemmed and chopped ½ tablespoon balsamic vinegar ½ tablespoon tamari 1 cup cooked white beans (butter, navy, etc.) white bean sauce (from above) Instructions to make the white bean sauce Combine all the ingredients, except orange zest, in a blender until smooth. Mix in the orange zest on the lowest blender speed setting or by hand with a spoon. to make the cauliflower rice with zingy white beans and kale Make the cauliflower rice. Divide your roughly chopped cauliflower florets into two even portions. Place the first portion into a food processor and pulse a few times, until you have pieces that are approximately the size of rice grains. Take care not to over-chop, you dont want your cauliflower to turn to mush. Transfer to a large bowl and repeat with the second half. Heat 2 tablespoons of coconut oil in a large sauté pan on medium heat. Add the shallot and sauté for 5 minutes, until soft and translucent. Add the garlic and red pepper flakes and sauté for another 2 minutes until fragrant. Add the chopped cauliflower, then mix in the water, lemon juice, salt and pepper. Cook for 8 minutes until the liquid absorbs and the rice becomes cooked but not mushy. Take care not to overcook. Transfer to a large bowl, keep warm and covered. Wipe the pan clean with a paper towel. Warm the remaining 1 tablespoon coconut oil over medium heat. Add the mushrooms, mix, then let them sit for about a minute to start releasing liquid. Add a pinch of salt to the mushrooms, mix and sauté for another 4 minutes, until all the liquid released by the mushrooms evaporates. If not using mushrooms, proceed with the kale. Add the kale, balsamic and tamari. Mix and sauté until the kale starts wilting. Add the white beans and let them warm through until the kale is completely wilted. Add the sauce, starting with ¼ - ½ cup and tasting as you go. Add more if needed. Let the sauce warm through and turn off the heat. Serve the kale and white beans over the cauliflower rice, garnished with more orange zest and more sauce, if desired. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Savory Vegetable Crumble with Eggplant, Zucchini, Tomatoes and Mushroo... Gluten-Free Winter Squash Gnocchi Sprouted Almond Romesco Pasta with Roasted Cauliflower and Blistered T... Asian Flavoured Veggie Burgers with Asparagus Fries .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Cauliflower Rice with Zingy White Beans and Kale appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Baked Persimmon - Red Cabbage Salad

December 20 2016 Veganpassion 

Baked Persimmon - Red Cabbage Salad And here we are again, the christmas eating continues. For all the phonys inside us I have baked this super easy and very delicious salad. Yes, you heard it right! The red cabbage gets really aromatic in the oven. The salad gets its tastyness with maple sirup. Makes 4 portions. Ingredients: 1 red cabbage (about 600 g) 3 tbsp. olive oil 2 tbsp. maple sirup salt, pepper 1 sharon fruit 1 pomegranate 1 handful walnuts 1 tbsp. balsamic vinegar Slice red cabbage very finely and spread it on a baking sheet with baking paper. Sprinkle with olive oil and maple sirup and spice it. Roast at 180°C (356°F) for about 15 minutes until the cabbage is done. Be careful it may not decompose. So keep an eye on your cabbage, because every cabbage is a litte different ;-) Cut sharon fruit into slices and get the pits out of the pomegranate. Take the cabbage out of the oven and put it in a mixing bowl with the sharon fruit, the pomegranate and the walnuts. For the sourness sprikle with some balsamic vinegar or some lemon juice. Serve with love

Plant-Powered Sloppy Joes

November 28 2016 My New Roots 

Plant-Powered Sloppy Joes When I was in elementary school I ate in the cafeteria. It was the cool thing to do after all, since homemade brown bag lunches were sooo kindergarten. At the time, I thought that the highly processed offerings behind the sneeze guard were a dream come true: pizza, burgers, chicken fingers, fish sticks, mac n cheese. But the very best thing of all in my first-grader opinion? Sloppy Joes. For those of you who dont know what Im talking about (ahem, mostly everyone outside North America), a Sloppy Joe is like a stew-y, wet hamburger. Ive also heard it been called a loose meat sandwich. Stay with me, people – I realize how riduclously unappetizing this sounds. As a kid, eating a Sloppy Joe was like getting permission to make a mess - a rare, sanctioned moment to smear sauce all over your face, drip on your plate, and have your whole meal basically deteriorate into a pile of savoury, saucy, deliciousness that you were allowed to eat with your hands?! Isn’t this every kid’s dream? Because eating a Sloppy Joe is just that: its sloppy. And that is why its awesome. Sloppy Joes are definitely not on top of the sophisticated food list, but that does not mean that they should be discriminated against. When made with plant-based, whole food ingredients, they are in fact quite the respectable meal. Perfect for chilly autumn and winter nights when all you want to do is tuck into something super cozy and comforting, Sloppy Joes are a one-way ticket to the land of savoury satisfaction. Since the temperatures have dropped here in Copenhagen, Ive been craving this kind of meal like crazy, so Im more than happy to have a healthy solution at hand, and of course to share it with you. The classic Sloppy Joe recipe includes ground beef cooked with onions and garlic, crushed tomatoes, ketchup, sugar and some spices. Sometimes there are some token carrots and celery tossed in, sometimes vinegar, mustard, or chilies, but the basic idea is a moist mixture that you pile on top of a bun. But! In my vegan Plant-Powered version, Ive replace the ground beef with black lentils and mushrooms. I suggest using this type of lentil for this recipe since they are very small, and they maintain their shape and texture while cooking. And if you care about appearances, or perhaps fooling someone, they look the most like ground beef. Just sayin. The flavouring elements of the Plant-Powered Sloppy Joe mix are diverse and potentially strange-sounding, but trust me, altogether just right. Balsamic for a sweet hit of acidity, Sriracha for a little heat, and cumin and paprika add smoky complexity. I also tossed in some walnuts because I am a firm believer in texture, and all that mushiness needed buffering! I toasted them lightly before giving them a rough chop and a stir through the thick lentil mixture. I love how their nuttiness comes through the rich sauce and adds even more deliciousness. I also made a simple slaw from red cabbage to add more crunch and freshness, plus some token sprouts. These items are optional, but I really love the bright contrast they provide against the rich lentil filling. Fill up on Folate Lentils are one of the yummiest sources of folate. Just one cup of cooked lentils provides you with almost 90% of your daily recommended intake! And why is folate so important? Youve probably heard about this vital B-vitamin in regards to pregnancy, as it is critical in the prevention of birth defects, but folate also functions to support red blood cell production and help prevent anemia, allows nerves to function properly, helps prevent osteoporosis-related bone fractures, and helps prevent dementias including Alzheimers disease. Folate received its name from the Latin word folium, meaning foliage, so its not wonder that other excellent sources of folate are dark leafy greens (yum, your favorite!) - kale, romaine lettuce, spinach, asparagus, turnip greens, beet greens, mustard greens, parsley, and collards to name a few. This may explain why North American diets seem to be on the deficient end of things when it comes to this B-vitamin, as folate is available from fresh, unprocessed food. The good news is it is easily absorbed, used, and stored by the body. Folate is also manufactured by intestinal bacteria (remember those probiotics?), so if colon flora is healthy, we have another good source of this important vitamin. Find the most high-vibe buns or bread you can get your hands on for this recipe. I used wholegrain sourdough buns from my local organic bakery, then toasted them lightly before drowning them in vegan sloppy goodness. You can also eat these open-faced if youd like to cut back on the bread. Or pull an alt-bread move and wrap it in socca, a cabbage leaf, or use it to top a crispbread (although, lets be honest: the bun rules). I should also mention that the sloppy joe filling was totally delicious on its own as a stew, and thinned with a little water to make soup! Bonus.     Print recipe     Plant-Powered Sloppy Joes Makes 6-8 sandwiches Ingredients: 6-8 wholegrain sourdough buns 1 batch Simple Cabbage Slaw (recipe follows) 1/­­2 small red onion, thinly sliced sprouts for topping, if desired 1 cup /­­ 230g black lentils 1 Tbsp. coconut oil 1 medium onion, diced 1 tsp. fine grain sea salt 3 cloves garlic, minced 135g brown button mushrooms, chopped 1 red bell pepper, diced 2 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­4 tsp. smoked paprika (hot or sweet, your choice) 1/­­2 tsp. freshly ground black pepper 2 Tbsp. Sriracha 1 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar 1 14oz. /­­ 400ml can crushed organic tomatoes 1/­­2 cup /­­ 60g walnuts, roughly chopped Simple Cabbage Slaw 2 cups shredded red cabbage 2 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1/­­2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup a couple pinches sea salt Directions: 1. Soak lentils overnight if possible. Drain, rinse, and place in a medium saucepan. Cover with about 3 cups /­­ 750ml water, bring to a boil and reduce to simmer until tender, about 15-20 minutes (cook time will depend on whether or not youve soaked them). 2. While the lentils are cooking, melt the coconut oil in a large skillet. Add the onions and salt, stir to coat, and cook for about 15 minutes until starting to caramelize. Add the garlic, mushrooms and red pepper and cook for about 5 minutes or so until fragrant. Next add the cumin, paprika, black pepper and stir to coat. Stir in the Sriracha, balsamic, and can of tomatoes. 3. Drain and rinse the lentils, add them to the pan with the veggies and spices. Give it all a stir and let simmer for a few minutes for the flavours to meld. 4. In a separate skillet over medium heat, lightly toast the walnuts until golden in places and fragrant. Give them a rough chop and add them to the lentil mixture. 5. Have a taste and adjust the seasoning to suit you. Add more salt if necessary, more balsamic for sweet-tartness, or Sriracha for heat. 6. Toast your buns and ladle and a generous amount of the sloppy joe filling over the top of one half. Top with the red cabbage slaw, red onion and some sprouts, if desired. Top with the other half of the bun, and tuck in! Show me your Sloppy Joes on Instagram: #MNRsloppyjoes The post Plant-Powered Sloppy Joes appeared first on My New Roots.

Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower

November 2 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower This post was created in partnership with San-J. Happy November! It’s so hard to believe that the year is almost over. November in the U.S. means Thanksgiving, and for the rest of the world, those December and January holidays are not so far off as well. We are here to give you some ideas to consider for those festive family dinners, friendsgivings and potlucks, with an emphasis on vegetables, fruit and whole food ingredients. The holidays can be a little tough if you are trying to stay on track with eating well or even simply keeping away from meat/­­dairy/­­gluten. If you aren’t participating in one or more of those categories, chances are, you might feel excluded at a holiday table. And even if you are totally fine with eating those veg-centered sides only, others might find it offensive or feel as though they are not being good hosts, etc. The point is, there is usually a main event to a holiday table, and although to me it’s always been the pie, to most it’s the bird, or another grand platter of some sort of meat. There is a ceremony to getting that platter on the table – it takes time and care to pick out and prepare, which creates anticipation and excitement. Here, I applied that kind of thinking to cauliflower, a whole cauliflower, prepared in a way that feels ritualistic, celebratory and fun, and delicious enough to be a holiday table centerpiece. This cauliflower is slowly stewed whole in a rich, tomato-based sauce with greens, carrots, onions, mushrooms, spices and autumn herbs. Tamari, balsamic and prunes help create body, depth and complexity in flavor. In the end, the cauliflower comes out incredibly tender and cuts like butter – ‘carving’ it is quite a pleasure. It’s incredibly good served over anything starchy, which should be easy since many holiday tables will likely include some sort of potato/­­root mash in their setting. The cauliflower is pictured here served with a delicious celeriac and parsnip mash with crispy sage, which makes for a perfect accompaniment. We will be posting the recipe for the mash this coming weekend, so make sure to stop by for that, it’s a real winner. Tamari, the gluten free soy sauce, is such a staple ingredient in my kitchen, that I feel at a loss whenever I run out. It’s a basic requirement in many Japanese and Asian-inspired dishes, but I use it in all kinds of meals, way beyond Japanese. It’s an essential flavor builder in this cauliflower, for example. I find tamari to be especially great for vegan and vegetarian cooking – it helps immensely with developing flavor depth and complexity when added to vegetables, and of course, it’s an amazing addition to sauces. When it comes to tamari brands, San-J is a classic that’s been around for eight generations, and the brand you will likely see when you search for gluten-free soy sauce in your store. The difference between San-J tamari and regular soy sauce is that tamari contains no wheat, just organic fermented soybeans, while soy sauce usually has 40%-60% wheat. The higher concentration of soybeans in tamari also contributes to its richer flavor and smoother texture. San-J tamari contains no artificial preservatives or additives, the soybeans are non-GMO, and are brewed for up to six months according to traditional Japanese techniques. It really is the best, and I’m so happy to have partnered with San-J on this festive recipe. Enjoy :) Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower   Print Serves: 1 cauliflower head Ingredients 5 prunes - roughly chopped 3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil 1 large yellow onion - sliced 2 medium carrots - diced about 6 cups roughly chopped collard greens about 3 tablespoons tamari - divided 1 lb crimini mushrooms - quartered 5 garlic cloves - sliced 1 chili pepper - seeded and chopped 3-4 sprigs thyme - chopped about 2 tablespoons chopped rosemary handful sage leaves - chopped freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon tomato paste two 28 oz boxes/­­cans of crushed tomatoes 1 large cauliflower head - outer leaves trimmed Instructions Drizzle prunes with balsamic vinegar in a small bowl and set aside. Warm coconut oil in a large pot over medium high heat. Add onion, carrots, collard greens and a splash of tamari and sauté for 10 minutes, until onion is translucent and collard greens are wilted. Add mushrooms and sauté for about 8 minutes, until all their liquid is evaporated. Add garlic, chili, thyme, rosemary, sage and black pepper and saute for 2-3 minutes. Add prunes together with balsamic vinegar, followed by 2 tablespoons tamari and tomato paste and stir around until the liquid evaporates, about 1 minute. Add crushed tomatoes, stir to combine and bring to a near boil. Carefully drop cauliflower into the sauce and spoon plenty of sauce on top of the cauliflower to coat it completely. Stir some of the vegetables out from under the cauliflower to ensure that its covered with the sauce as much as possible. The top of the cauliflower may peek out a little and thats ok. Bring the sauce back to a boil, adjust the heat to a slow simmer, cover and cook for 40-50 minutes, until the cauliflower is completely cooked and soft throughout. Scoop the simmering sauce over the cauliflower every now and then while its cooking. Remove the cauliflower from the pot, slice and serve it warm with plenty of sauce, over vegetable mash or any grains of choice. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Black Bean Chocolate and Fig Cookies Banana Toffee Tart Butternut Squash Spaghetti with Creamy Almond Butter Sauce Lemongrass Mango Curry with Toasted Pumpkin Seeds .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette

September 29 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette This post was created in partnership with Infinity Jars. Having recently finished a cookbook manuscript with the backbone of seasonality, I turn to seasons more than ever when coming up with recipes. It’s hard not to sound like a broken record when talking about the topic, but I find just as much romance as I do practicality in eating what grows at any given time of the year. I grew up in a place, where the season completely dictated what we ate, which at times led to scarcity and deprivation, but made the periods of abundance that much sweeter. Nowadays, I fall back on that feeling, having made peace with waiting a year for the sweetest summer tomato or the plumpest fig. Of course, I will also buy boxed tomatoes for stews and roast up well-traveled California cherry tomatoes when a craving hits out of season – frankly I’m grateful for such options, having experienced what it’s like to have no options during my Soviet childhood. But I also know that the wait for the real deal will be well worth it in the end, so why not embrace it? Another thing I’m constantly encouraged by, when it comes to cooking with nature’s rhythms, is how well a lot of a given season’s ingredients fit together. Let’s take this bowl as an example. I started with the fig – the ultimate fruit of indulgence in the late summer and early fall. Figs are jammy and sweet, especially when broiled, and make easy friends with dense sweet potato and buttery eggplant. Sturdy-leafed kale, known to do well in the cold, together with a hearty grain and lentils make a nice bed for the vegetables. Sage is an evergreen and can be harvested well into the fall months, and coincidentally has that intoxicating, deep, piney flavor that pairs so well with autumn produce. It’s all quite seamless and effortless – the ingredients fit together as if they have been sharing a place under the sun, which, theoretically speaking, is true. This bowl is the opposite of boring, full of those complementary flavors and a variety of textures, from chewy kale and grains, velvety eggplant and sweet potato, to juicy figs and crunchy hazelnuts. It’s a complete meal, and, like any bowl is highly customizable. The hazelnut vinaigrette here is quite special – an interesting twist on a classic dressing, with the addition of well-toasted hazelnuts and sage. It keeps well in the refrigerator, and will improve any one of your bowls or salads. I would very much like to hear your thoughts on cooking with the seasons – do you follow them? do you find it helpful to have them as a guide? or do you find it overwhelming? Whatever it is, I would love to open a conversation. Infinity Jars sent me a variety of their airtight and lightproof ultraviolet glass jars, and I have nothing but great things to say about them. I’m kind of a stickler for storing ingredients in glass whenever possible, and keep a lot of uncommonly refrigerated things in the fridge, from matcha to tamari, to certain nuts and spices. It makes a lot of sense to me to take care of my ingredients and try to preserve their freshness as log as possible, especially for those pricier items. Infinity Jars go above and beyond when it comes to keeping things in top shape – the glass is thick and pigmented to block any harmful UV light, and the seal is scent-proof and airtight. I’ve transferred my loose leaf teas and a few spice mixes, along with some homemade lotions and oils to their screw-top jars. I’ve also been using their oil bottle for basil oil and dressings like the vinaigrette here, all to impressive results. The jars are so pretty too, I love having the uniform black glass on my shelves. Infinity Jars is offering GK readers 15% off all orders, just use code GOLUBKAKITCHEN at checkout until October 28th, 2016 :) Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients for the salad 1 medium sweet potato - cubed 1 medium eggplant - sliced into ½-inch rounds, halved if large 2 tablespoons neutral coconut or untoasted sesame oil sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste 1 tablespoon smoked paprika 8-12 fresh figs - cut in half 1 tablespoon chopped sage leaves 1 bunch kale - stems removed, leaves chopped 1 tablespoon olive oil 1½ cup cooked faro, freekeh or other grain of choice 1½ cup cooked puy lentils or other legumes of choice ¼ cup toasted hazelnuts for the hazelnut vinaigrette ¼ cup toasted hazelnuts - divided 5 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar ½ tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 teaspoon maple syrup a few sage leaves (optional) ⅓ cup olive oil Instructions to make the salad Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Place cubed sweet potato and sliced eggplant into a large bowl, drizzle with oil, add salt, pepper and paprika. Toss to coat and arrange on one or two baking trays - the trays shouldnt be too crowded. Roast for 20 minutes, then mix and roast for another 15 minutes, until soft and golden. Remove from the oven and set aside. Turn on the broiler to high. Broil figs for 4-5 minutes. Remove from the oven and sprinkle with 1 tablespoon chopped sage. Broil for another 1-2 minutes, until caramelized and golden brown at edges. Remove from the oven and set aside. Place chopped kale into a large bowl, add 1 tablespoon olive oil and a pinch of salt, and massage until darkened and wilted. Add cooked farro and lentils to the bowl with kale, top with roasted sweet potato and eggplant. Distribute between bowls, top with figs, drizzle with hazelnut vinaigrette, and garnish with toasted hazelnuts. to make the hazelnut vinaigrette Combine hazelnuts, lemon juice, balsamic vinegar, mustard, maple syrup and sage leaves, if using, in an upright blender. Blend until smooth. Slowly pour olive oil into the mixture, with the motor running on slow, to emulsify. 3.5.3208 This post was created in partnership with Infinity Jars, with all opinions being genuine and our own. Thank you for considering the sponsors that help keep Golubka Kitchen going. You might also like... Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans Beet Mille-Feuille from the La Tartine Gourmande Cookbook Garden Juice Metabolism Boosting Everything Salad .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Artichoke Panzanella Salad

July 18 2016 Meatless Monday 

Ah, panzanella salad. How better to enjoy ripe tomatoes and cukes than alongside crusty bread and a healthy dose of garlic, olive oil and balsamic vinegar? Pack it all into a jar to enjoy at the beach, park, or wherever you celebrate summer! This recipe is part of Meatless Mondays No-Cook Summer Recipe video series. Watch the video! Serves 1 (multiply as needed for additional jars) - 4 1-inch slices baguette - 1 small bunch basil - 1 1/­­2 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil - 1 tbsp. balsamic vinegar - 1/­­2 clove garlic, minced - Pinch salt - Pepper to taste - 1 small tomato, cubed - 1/­­2 cucumber, cubed - 1/­­4 small red onion, thinly sliced - 3/­­4 cup (about 1/­­2 can) quartered artichoke hearts Cube baguette slices. Allow cubed bread to sit unwrapped overnight . Alternatively, toast cubed bread at 350 degrees for 15-20 minutes. Cut basil into a chiffonade, set aside. Into a quart-sized mason jar, mix extra-virgin olive oil, balsamic vinegar, garlic, salt and pepper. Gently swirl the jar to mix. Layer into the jar cubed tomatoes, cubed cucumber, sliced red onion and artichoke hearts. Add chiffonaded basil to create a barrier between the moist ingredients and dry bread. Top jar off with bread cubes and screw on lid. Keep jar upright until ready to serve. To serve, empty contents of jar into a large bowl and stir to combine. Alternatively, mix ingredients into a serving bowl and enjoy right away. The post Artichoke Panzanella Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Creamy Millet Polenta with Rainbow Chard and Chickpeas

February 20 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Creamy Millet Polenta with Rainbow Chard and Chickpeas A seven year old’s palate, at least my seven-years old’s palate, is completely unpredictable. There have been many times when I’d cooked up something along the kid friendly lines of muffins, pancakes, pizza, or chocolatey anything, convinced that Paloma will eat some, only to see a frown and hear around ten melodramatic versions of ‘I don’t like it.’ Just as often, she’ll surprise me with falling for flavors that I never thought she’d like. Last summer, during our long stay in Russia, Paloma discovered parsley and became obsessed with snacking on whole parsley leaves, frankly leaving me speechless. Lately, Florida farmer’s market Romaine lettuce sprinkled with balsamic vinegar and olive oil, or pizza topped with a mound of rainbow chard have been among those unexpected favorites. I have a variation of this polenta recipe I developed for the new cookbook, with a different grain. The dish is full of amazing flavors, but ones I thought to be too sophisticated for a child’s palate. I was wrong once again, when Paloma not only ate the polenta for dinner the night I made it, but became completely fixated on eating it every day, asking for it each time she came home from school. Since then, ‘polenta’ has become quite a hot item in our house. I’ve been experimenting with different grains and toppings, and this version came out on top. Creamed, lemony millet is topped with nourishing green vegetables and beans. The vibrant colors of the dish speak for its flavor – also zingy, sunny and comforting. I use chard stems along with the leaves in this recipe, which I cannot stand to see thrown away. They just need a little extra cooking time to be delicious. Enjoy the weekend! Creamy Millet Polenta with Rainbow Chard and Chickpeas 1/­­2 cup dried chickpeas – soaked overnight 1 medium onion – halved 3-4 garlic cloves – crushed with a knife 6 cups water sea salt – to taste 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil or ghee – divided 1 cup millet – soaked overnight juice of 2 lemons – divided 2 tablespoons olive oil – divided 1 tablespoon tamari 2 tablespoons sweet miso paste 1 tablespoon mustard 1 garlic clove – minced pinch of cayenne pepper 1 teaspoon cumin 1 large leek, white and pale green parts only – sliced 1 bunch rainbow chard – leaves separated from stems, stems chopped, leaves torn into bite-size pieces 1. Drain and rinse chickpeas and place them into a medium soup pot together with onion, garlic and water. Bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to a simmer and let cook, partially covered, for about 30 minutes or until completely soft. Add salt at the last 10 minutes. Drain chickpeas, reserving the broth. Discard onion and set chickpeas aside. Pour the broth back into the pot and keep it hot. 2. Drain and rinse millet. Add to a food processor and grind until partially broken down, but not completely smooth. 3. Warm 1 tablespoon coconut oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat, add millet, stir to coat. Add 1/­­2 lemon juice, stir in for about 30 seconds until absorbed. Add 3 cups of hot chickpea broth and salt. Bring to a boil while stirring. Lower the heat and simmer for 20 minutes, until polenta is creamy. Stir frequently to prevent clumping. Add 1 tablespoon olive oil or ghee and tamari. Cover and keep warm. 4. Meanwhile, mix together miso paste, mustard, the remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil and cayenne pepper. Set aside. 5. In a large pan, warm the remaining 1 tablespoon coconut oil. Add cumin and stir around until fragrant. Add leek, saute for 5 minutes, then add chard stems, salt and pepper and saute for another 3-4 minutes, until soft.  Add chickpeas, stir to coat and warm through. Add chard leaves, 1/­­4 cup hot chickpea broth and the miso dressing. Stir until chard leaves are wilted and everything is coated evenly. 6. Distribute the polenta between bowls, top with the chickpea-veggie mixture and serve hot.

Mesclun Mix with Apples, Pomegranates, and Goat Cheese

November 24 2015 Vegetarian Times 

1 | Heat oil in small skillet over low heat. Add shallot, and sauté 4 minutes, or until soft. Remove from heat, and stir in balsamic vinegar and honey. Season with salt and pepper, if desired. 2 | Toss apple with lemon juice in small bowl. Place mesclun mix in large salad bowl, and add goat cheese, pomegranate seeds, and apple slices. Toss with dressing just before serving.

White Lentil Risotto with Mushrooms

October 18 2015 My New Roots 

White Lentil Risotto with Mushrooms Eating out is a grand seduction. From the moment I step into a restaurant, I am totally open and utterly surrendered to the experience. The first thing I notice when I enter is the smell - I actually like it to hit me with an assertive thwack - like someone proudly shouting a rainbow of aromas to my face that something amazing is happening in the kitchen. I love sitting down at the table, gently touching the cutlery, unfolding the napkin and placing it in my lap, the first exchange with the server, opening the menu. Its all very weighty, very important, very ritualistic for me. While I was on my cookbook tour, you can imagine that I ate out a lot. Mostly out of the necessity of not having a kitchen, but also because going to restaurants is a rare privilege for me and Ill take any excuse. During my few harried days in New York City I went to dine at a new, hip joint in the west village that came highly recommended (although I’ll refrain from naming names). The place was packed with an intimidating blend of gorgeous locals and well-dressed, in-the-know tourists. The menu looked incredibly promising with Sarah B. favourites and buzz ingredients like chia seeds, cashew cheese, baby kale, and turmeric oil. I was explosive with anticipation. I immediately committed myself to the ivory lentil risotto with peas. Id seen ivory lentils at the market before but never bought them, and had never had the revelation to try making risotto with them. I could feel my expectations soar and the desire pulsing between us. Hold me back! The dish arrived, its scent wafting up from the pristine white bowl and pools of amber oil intermingling with green globes of seasonal spring perfection. I looked at my friends with great eagerness, dipped my spoon in and took the first bite. The lentils were raw. No, not al dente. Raw. Crunchy. Hard. Uncooked. I rarely, rarely send something back to the kitchen, but because I was so seduced by the idea of this dish and it completely fell flat, I just had to. The lentils had obviously been cooked, but so far from properly cooked that it baffled me - what kind of chef would send a dish out like this unless by mistake? It must have been a mistake. I could feel myself loosing trust in this impeccably designed, obviously happening restaurant, but how could all of these hipsters be wrong? The waiter returned and said that there was nothing wrong with the dish. The chef meant it to be that way. He placed the plate of cold food back on the table in front of me, smiled, turned, and left. I was crushed. After all wed been through. Although it has been months since this experience, I cant shake it - the lunch bag letdown of a genius concept failing to meet its true potential, the fact that I was served undercooked legumes, and that I paid $30 for them. In order to right all of these wrongs, I headed to my local Indian grocer, bought some white lentils and made a date with my stove. What manifested was not just a better meal, but a new favourite one. Its pretty clear that Im into making risotto out of anything besides rice, such as the Miraculous Riceless Risotto and the Inspirational Sunflower Seed Risotto, but Im digging this new recipe for a lot of reasons. First, its grain-free and in my rice-loving life its nice to have an alternative. Its very high in protein, something that Im always mindful of as it is so important to balanced health. It cooks quickly so its perfect for a weeknight, and its endlessly customizable to the season simply by changing up the veggies on top. Its divinely creamy, rich and velvety and so much like risotto (by far the closest Ive come so far!). If you are looking for me this fall, you can find me tucked into a big bowl of this stuff. Its like eating hugs. Yum, Yum, Molybdenum Chances are you havent heard of molybdenum, but I will wager that you had to sound it out a couple times (let me help you: muh-LIB-duh-num). Moylbdenum is an essential trace mineral and happens to be wildly abundant in our pal, the lentil. It is found first in the soil where we grow our food and water, so healthy soil and groundwater is essential for healthy plants that contain good amounts of this stuff. In our bodies it is stored in the liver, kidneys, adrenal glands bones, and skin, but it is present in some amount in all of our tissues. Molybdenum is important because it is part of several enzyme systems, the most notable being that of xanthine oxidase. Xanthine oxidase (XO) helps the liver mobilize iron for use in the body and aid uric acid metabolism. Molybdenum also helps us digest and assimilate carbohydrates and detoxify the body from exposure to sulfites. Besides lentils, other sources of molybdenum include dried peas and beans, oats, tomatoes, romaine lettuce, cucumber, celery and eggs. A few notes on the recipe. First, white lentils are available at Indian grocery stores, but Ive also seen them at Middle Eastern markets and online. If you cant find white lentils, its good to know that they are also called urad daal or urid daal. To confuse you a little, the unhulled lentils themselves are called black lentils or black gram since their skins are completely black. It should be obvious, but Ill advise against buying the unhulled kind or you will have a very different result - a black one to be precise. Because someone will inevitably ask if they can make this with any other colour of lentil, I will say a half-hearted yes, but I wouldnt recommend anything other than red lentils due to their properties. Second, you can definitely make this a vegan recipe by leaving out the cheese rind, but good golly, it really makes for some delicious eating. I also like a grate a bunch of pecorino over the top right before serving, but Im pretty wild like that. Oh baby. Third, I got pretty fancy and bought (not foraged - the shame!) wild mushrooms for this because I just love them so, but when I originally tested the recipe I used good ol brown button mushrooms and portobellos. Whatever mushrooms you choose the biggest secret to cooking them is not moving them too much. Like pancakes, grilled cheese, and I would imagine, a steak, dont stir them for crying out loud. Get the pan pretty screeching hot, melt some ghee (or coconut oil), throw in the mushrooms, toss to coat, then just back away. Sure, you can watch them sizzle, talk to them, Instagram them, but do not touch them. The secret to really great mushrooms is a caramelized crust and that only happens with high heat and no mucking about. You are allowed to check the bottom of one (one!) after 3-4 minutes, but if there is no colour yet, flip it back until you have some serious golden going on. Also, dont crowd the pan too much - this causes the mushrooms to steam instead of fry - an important distinction.     Print recipe     White Lentil Risotto Serves 4 Ingredients: 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 325g white lentils, soaked for 8-12 hours if possible 2 Tbsp. ghee or coconut oil 2 medium /­­ 200g onions, finely diced 1/­­2 tsp. fine grain sea salt 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 rind Pecorino Romano, optional but delicious (a parmesan rind also works) a generous grating of Pecorino Romano to garnish (optional but delicious) 4-5 cups /­­ 1-1 1/­­4 liters vegetable broth 1 lb. /­­ 500g mixed mushrooms, cleaned of all dirt and debris, and roughly chopped (I chose golden and trumpet chanterelles, and oyster mushrooms, but any type work) a few sprigs fresh thyme, leaves removed, plus a few for garnish 2-3 Tbsp. ghee, butter, or coconut oil a couple pinches sea salt freshly ground black pepper 2 cloves garlic 2 tsp. balsamic vinegar, optional Directions: 1. Wash lentils well, drain and rinse until water runs clear. Set aside. 2. Melt ghee in a large stock pot. Add onions, salt and stir to coat. Cook over medium heat for about 10 minutes until the onions are softened and just starting to caramelize - dont brown them too much or they will colour the dish! Add garlic, the lentils, 3 cups /­­ 700ml vegetable broth and the cheese rind, if using. Stir well and make sure that the broth is covering the lentils by at least a few centimeters /­­ half an inch. If not, add more. Bring to a simmer, stir and cover. 3. Over the next 30 minutes or so (cook time depends on whether or not you soaked the lentils), stir the pot every few minutes (this helps release the starch and add creaminess) and check the broth level, adding more as needed to just cover the lentils. 4. After about 20 minutes, start to prepare the mushrooms. Melt the ghee in a large skillet and add the mushrooms. Stir to coat and let them cook over high heat without touching them (!!!) for at least three or four minutes. Flip and repeat until golden on all sides. Add a touch more ghee, garlic, thyme leaves and to the pan. Cook for 1-2 minutes until fragrant, season with salt and pepper and a splash of balsamic vinegar, if desired. 5. The lentils are done when they are tender but not mushy. The consistency of the dish should be very much like a classic risotto: more solid than a soup, but thinner than a stew, so make sure that there is enough stock in the pot. Remove cheese rind. Divide between plates, garnish with cheese and black pepper, place mushrooms on top and garnish with a sprig of thyme and more black pepper.   Show me your risotto on Instagram! #MNRwhitelentilrisotto *   *   *   *   * Hey Danes! I’m doing three events this month and I would love to see you there. First, I will be the guest chef at the organic and hyper-local food restaurant Mad Mad Mad Bodega cooking and serving a total pumpkin orgy, giving a talk and signing books as well. Click the flyer for a link to learn more. Secondly, I am giving two lectures on Nutrition Fundamentals (way more rad than it sounds!) with a Q&A at Books & Company. You can come to one of the talks or both. Click the flyer for a link to learn more.

Summervibes Salad

June 8 2017 Veganpassion 

Summervibes Salad On hot days like today my body is craving for salad. It has to be colorful and fresh and varied with lots of good stuff in it :-). Because I'm in such a good summer mood I named the salad "summervibes". I'm very interested in how you like the combo with asparagus, rocket, strawberries, avocado and watermelon. Just can't get enough of the good stuff! I'd love to hear your creative salad ideas. Have lots of fun with this one and enjoy! Makes 2 portions Preparation time: 10 Minutes Ingredients: 10,5 oz asparagus 4,4 oz rocket 8,8 oz Strawberries 1/­­2 small cucumber 6 radishes 1/­­2 small watermelon (2x 0,4 inch slices) lemon juice balsamic vinegar oilve oil salt hemp seeds/­­pumpkin seeds Peel the lower third of the asparagus and cut them lengthways. Cook in slated water for 7-8 minutes. When the water evaporates toss the asparagus in it, salt it and put it aside. Wash the rocket and cut the cucumber and the radishes in small slices. Cut the watermelon and the strawberries in half. Then sprinkle with lemon juice. Cut avocado in cubes. Serve rocket, fruits and veggies on a plate. Use some balsamic vinegar and sprinkle the salad. Spread with some oil and hemp seeds. Enjoy the summer!

Sweet Potato Toast, Two Ways

March 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Sweet Potato Toast, Two Ways I finally got around to trying sweet potato toast this week, a concept that I’ve been seeing circulating around the internet. Our instagram post about it generated a lot of interest, so I thought I would go into more detail here today. Basically, the whole idea is replacing bread with thinly sliced, toasted sweet potato and topping it as you would any toast. I know, why mess with an already perfect concept like toast? For one, it’s great for those trying to take it easy on grains or gluten. It’s also perfect for sweet potato lovers just looking to change things up for breakfast, snack, etc. (me). It’s a fun way to eat a nutritious root vegetable, and I have a feeling that it could easily be made very kid-friendly. It is decidedly its own thing, not toast, but totally stands on its own as tasty and filling fare. As with any toast, there are infinite possibilities when it comes to the toppings, since sweet potato gives a pretty neutral base. I offer my favorite sweet and savory options below. In the sweet one, earthy and creamy tahini is studded with jammy, smashed raspberries (I use frozen and defrosted ones this time of year), drizzled with honey/­­maple syrup and sprinkled with cacao nibs and seeds, and that combination is incredibly lovely. The savory one is (surprise!) avocado toast, but made a bit more substantial with the addition of balsamic lentils, a dusting of nutritional yeast and seeds. On a technical note, the whole reason behind the sweet potato toast craze is that you can cook the sweet potato slices right in the toaster. The catch is that I don’t own a toaster, so what I like to do is cook the slices in the oven the night before and then re-heat them, either in the oven or in a pan on the stovetop whenever I’m ready to eat my ‘toast.’ You could even cook a bigger batch for the week ahead, since the roasted sweet potatoes hold up well in the refrigerator. But if you do have a toaster, by all means cook the potato slices in there. I offer directions for both methods in the recipes. There are some weekend links below, Sunday hugs to you :) What The Health – a new film from the creators of Cowspiracy, this time targeting health organizations. Really excited to watch it, it’s available to stream on their website now. Hugh Forte’s Food Photography – just learned that the photographer behind Sprouted Kitchen has a separate Instagram account for his dreamy food photos, I can stare at them for ages. How Millions of Kids Are Being Shaped by Know-It-All Voice Assistants Sweet Potato Sheet Pan Dinner Salad – looks perfect, and those photos are amazing. The Avocado Show – an Amsterdam cafe centered around everything avocado, look at that. What We Eat When We Eat Alone – recently discovered this gem by Deborah Madison. Raspberry-Tahini Sweet Potato Toast   Print Serves: 4-6 toasts Ingredients 1 medium sweet potato ½ tablespoon coconut oil - soft (if using the oven) 2-4 tablespoons sesame tahini ¼ cup raspberries (fresh or frozen and thawed) honey or maple syrup for drizzling mixed seeds for garnish (I used cacao nibs, hemp, pumpkin seeds) Instructions Peel and slice the sweet potato into even, ¼-thick slices. If you have an organic sweet potato, you can leave the skin on, but I prefer it peeled. If using an oven, preheat it to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet and place the sweet potato slices on the sheet. Add the coconut oil and mix with your hands to coat. Put the baking sheet into the oven and cook for 15 minutes. Flip the slices and cook another 10-15 minutes until cooked through. Add toppings and enjoy right away or refrigerate in an air-tight container until ready to eat. Reheat in a 350° F (175° C) oven for about 5 minutes, then top. If using a toaster, place the sweet potato slices in the toaster and toast on high for about 5 minutes, until cooked through and toasty at the edges. Cooking time will vary slightly for different toasters. Spread tahini on each slice. Add raspberries, mashing them a bit with a fork. Drizzle each slice with the desired amount of honey/­­maple syrup and sprinkle with mixed seeds. Enjoy! 3.5.3226   Avocado-Lentil Sweet Potato Toast   Print Serves: 4-6 toasts Ingredients 1 medium sweet potato ½ tablespoon coconut oil - soft (if using the oven) ⅓ cup cooked black or French lentils 1 teaspoon olive oil ½ teaspoon balsamic vinegar, plus more for drizzling 1 small, ripe avocado juice of ½ small lemon sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste nutritional yeast for garnish mixed seeds for garnish (I used hemp, flax, pumpkin, and sunflower seeds) Instructions Peel and slice the sweet potato into even, ¼-thick slices. If you have an organic sweet potato, you can leave the skin on, but I prefer it peeled. If using an oven, preheat it to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet and place the sweet potato slices on the sheet. Add the coconut oil and mix with your hands to coat. Put the baking sheet into the oven and cook for 15 minutes. Flip the slices and cook another 10-15 minutes until cooked through. Add toppings and enjoy right away or refrigerate in an air-tight container until ready to eat. Reheat in a 350° F (175° C) oven for about 5 minutes, then top. If using a toaster, place the sweet potato slices in the toaster and toast on high for about 5 minutes, until cooked through and toasty at the edges. Cooking time will vary slightly for different toasters. In a small bowl, combine lentils, olive oil, balsamic vinegar, half of the lemon juice, salt and pepper. In another small bowl, mash the avocado with the remaining lemon juice, salt and pepper. Spread mashed avocado onto each sweet potato slice, followed by the lentils and a sprinkle of nutritional yeast and mixed seeds. Drizzle with more balsamic vinegar and enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... A Salad for the Weekdays Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream -- Ice Cream Sunday Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices Superfood Cherry Garcia Pops with a Chocolate Core - Ice... .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Sweet Potato Toast, Two Ways appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Persimmon & baked Cabbage Salad

December 20 2016 Veganpassion 

Persimmon & baked Cabbage Salad And here we are again, the christmas eating continues. For all the phonys inside us I have baked this super easy and very delicious salad. Yes, you heard it right! The red cabbage gets really aromatic in the oven. The salad gets its tastyness with maple sirup. Makes 4 portions. Ingredients: 1 red cabbage (about 600 g) 3 tbsp. olive oil 2 tbsp. maple sirup salt, pepper 1 sharon fruit 1 pomegranate 1 handful walnuts 1 tbsp. balsamic vinegar Slice red cabbage very finely and spread it on a baking sheet with baking paper. Sprinkle with olive oil and maple sirup and spice it. Roast at 180°C (356°F) for about 15 minutes until the cabbage is done. Be careful it may not decompose. So keep an eye on your cabbage, because every cabbage is a litte different ;-) Cut sharon fruit into slices and get the pits out of the pomegranate. Take the cabbage out of the oven and put it in a mixing bowl with the sharon fruit, the pomegranate and the walnuts. For the sourness sprikle with some balsamic vinegar or some lemon juice. Serve with love

Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache

December 8 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache Since we’ve been making a point of keeping things festive around here for the past month or so, we thought it was time that we do a proper cake recipe. By proper I mean layered, frosted, stunning and decadent. Then again, this cake is also vegan, gluten-free and the chocolate layers contain no added sugar, which are all elements not very commonly seen in those ‘proper’ cakes, but that’s just the way we do things around here ;) By now it’s no secret that sweet root vegetables are not to be underestimated when it comes to vegan baking. They are so good at contributing that right texture, moisture and body to baked goods, together with a neutral base for any flavor. Beets, the root vegetable I use in this cake, are all that and happen to be nature’s very best food coloring. The rich and moist chocolate layers of this cake are made of a mixture of gluten-free flours, dates and beet, and get their depth of flavor from cocoa, chicory coffee and a splash of balsamic vinegar. If you are wondering what the coffee and balsamic are doing in this recipe – they both work well at emphasizing the chocolate flavor and taking it up on the decadence scale. The beet-colored frosting is based on home-‘condensed’ coconut milk and is creamy but very light, and the same can be said for the chocolate ganache that glazes over the cake. Although this is a layered cake that requires time, attention and ritual, I would say that technique-wise, this cake is on the simpler side when it comes to traditional layer cakes. All the elements come together fairly quickly, and I find the assembly and frosting to be the most challenging part, as always. We hope this beauty makes it on your holiday table or birthday table, or rainy day baking table. In any case, let us know how it goes :) Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache   Print Serves: one 6-inch, double layer cake Ingredients for the pink frosting 2 cans full fat unsweetened coconut milk ⅔ cup raw sugar 2 tablespoons coconut oil, plus more for oiling parchment paper 1½ cups cashews - soaked for 2-4 hours, divided ¼ small beet root 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice ⅔ cup almond milk or purified water for the cake 1 cup brown rice flour ½ cup almond flour ½ cup cocoa powder 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda pinch sea salt 1 cup Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in hot water for 10 minutes 1 cup chicory coffee (1 teaspoon ground roasted chicory root or coffee substitute such as Dandy Blend per 1¼ cups boiling water, brewed for 5 minutes and strained) or strong regular coffee ⅓ cup apple sauce 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil - melted 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar 1 medium beet root - peeled and shredded for the chocolate ganache ½ cup condensed coconut milk (reserved when making frosting) ¼ cup cashews (reserved when making frosting) 5-7 tablespoons cocoa powder 2 tablespoons almond milk or water Instructions to make the frosting Combine coconut milk and sugar in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil over medium heat. Reduce heat to establish a strong simmer and cook, stirring often, for 20 minutes, until the mixture thickens and resembles condensed milk. Stir in coconut oil until well incorporated. Reserve ½ cup of the condensed coconut milk and ¼ cup soaked cashews for the ganache, below. Combine the rest of the condensed coconut milk, remaining soaked and rinsed cashews, beet, lemon juice and almond milk/­­water in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Scoop into an airtight container and chill in the refrigerator until firm, preferably overnight. to bake the cake Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Prepare two 6-inch spring forms or cake pans by lining them with lightly oiled parchment paper (if you only have one spring form/­­pan, you can bake one chocolate cake layer at a time). Combine all flours, cocoa powder, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a large bowl. Reserve ½ cup of the date soaking liquid and combine it with the dates, chicory coffee/­­regular coffee and apple sauce in an upright blender, blend until smooth. Add coconut oil and balsamic vinegar and pulse to incorporate. Pour the blended liquid into the bowl with the dried ingredients and mix to combine. Fold in the shredded beet. Divide batter in half between prepared pans and bake for 40-45 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean (or bake one at a time if you only have one pan). Remove from the oven and let cool completely. to make chocolate ganache Combine reserved ½ cup condensed coconut milk and ¼ cup reserved soaked and rinsed cashews with cocoa powder and 2 tablespoons almond milk/­­water in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Set aside. to assemble the cake Invert one of the chocolate cake layers onto a large plate or cake stand. Frost with about ⅓ of well-chilled, firm frosting. Place the other cake layer on top and frost the entire cake with the rest of the frosting. Chill the cake in the refrigerator for 10-15 minutes to firm up the frosting once again. Take the cake out of the refrigerator and pour the chocolate ganache over the cake, taking care to create photogenic drips, if you wish. Place the cake in the refrigerator for 30 minutes to an hour before slicing. Keep the leftovers refrigerated. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Asian Flavoured Veggie Burgers with Asparagus Fries Kohlrabi Avocado Salad Kaffir Lime Mango Ice-Cream Raw Berry Tarts with a Peach and Herb Sorbet .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Chickpea Marsala

November 28 2016 Meatless Monday 

Enjoy the syrupy goodness of a Marsala dish without the meat! Here, chickpeas replace Marsala’s traditional chicken while the dish’s traditional mushrooms remain. This recipe comes to us from the cookbook Fresh Italian Cooking for the New Generation by Alexandra Caspero Lenz. Serves 4 - 8 oz (230g) wide egg noodles - 2 tbsp (30 g) butter, divided - 10 oz (280 g) white, cremini or baby portobello mushrooms, sliced - Salt and freshly ground black pepper - 2 cloves garlic, minced - 1 cup (165 g) chickpeas, cooked, rinsed and drained if canned - 1/­­8 cup (15 g) flour - 2/­­3 cup (157 ml) Marsala wine, preferably dry - 2/­­3 cup (78 ml) water - 1 tsp balsamic vinegar - 1/­­2 cup (15 g) fresh parsley leaves, chopped Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the egg noodles and cook until al dente. Drain and set aside. Heat 1 tablespoon (15 g) butter in a large skillet over medium heat until melted and starting to sizzle. Add the sliced mushrooms, season with a generous pinch each of salt and pepper and cook, stirring occasionally, until mushrooms are seared and cooked through, about 6-8 minutes. Add the garlic and drained chickpeas and stir to combine. Sprinkle the flour over the mushroom and chickpea mixture, and stir a few times until flour is toasted and no longer white. Take care not to mush the beans and mushrooms together. Add the Marsala wine and water to the pan, using a wooden spoon or silicone spatula to scrape up any browned butter bits. Reduce the heat to medium low and cook, stirring occasionally, until the sauce thickens, about 5-6 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in the remaining 1 tablespoon (15 g) of butter, balsamic vinegar and parsley. Season with salt and pepper to taste, if necessary, and serve over cooked egg noodles. VEGAN VERSION: Replace butter with non-dairy butter, same amount. Replace egg noodles with egg-less noodles. The post Chickpea Marsala appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Pumpkin and Kale with Creamy Polenta

October 17 2016 Meatless Monday 

Forget canned pumpkin! Truly eat with the seasons with this cool-weather recipe, which features whole pumpkin, leeks and hearty kale over a bed of comforting polenta. Top it off with a homemade basil dressing for a spectacular plant-based meal. This recipe comes to us from Elena of Happy Kitchen. Rocks. Serves 4 - For pumpkin and kale with creamy polenta: - 1 1/­­2 cup polenta - 4 1/­­2 cups water - 1/­­2 cup grated Parmesan (optional) - 1/­­2 small pumpkin - 1 small red chili pepper - 4 sprigs fresh thyme - vegetable oil - 1 clove garlic chopped - 7 oz curly kale chopped, veins removed - 1/­­3 leek sliced - black pepper - salt - 4 oz mozzarella (optional) - For the dressing: - 5 tablespoons olive oil - 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar - 1 teaspoon lemon juice - 1 teaspoon Demerara sugar (optional) - 2 tablespoons freshly chopped basil - black pepper - salt - 4 tablespoons pomegranate seeds (to serve) In a pot, bring water with a tablespoon of salt to a boil. Gradually add polenta, cover with a lid and reduce the heat to low. Cook for 10 minutes, stirring frequently. Remove from the heat, add parmesan (optional),cover and let rest for 15 minutes. Meanwhile, slice the pumpkin. Heat a lug of vegetable oil in a large pan or wok over medium high heat. Add pumpkin and cook until the pumpkin it is soft, about 8 minutes. Chop red chili pepper and thyme leaves and add them before the pumpkin is ready. Transfer to a plate and put the pan or wok back on the stove. Add a bit of oil to the pan and once it’s hot, add garlic and kale. Add a pinch of salt and black pepper and cook until soft, about 4 minutes. Transfer to a plate. Add leek slices and cook until soft and slightly golden, about 4 minutes. Make the dressing: combine olive oil, balsamic vinegar, lemon juice, Demerara sugar (optional), chopped basil, a pinch of salt and black pepper. Arrange polenta, pumpkin, kale and leek on two plates. Add sliced mozzarella (optional). Serve with balsamic dressing and pomegranate seeds. Enjoy! The post Pumpkin and Kale with Creamy Polenta appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Grilled Vegetable Ratatouille - And my second Cookbook!

September 7 2016 My New Roots 

Grilled Vegetable Ratatouille - And my second Cookbook! Ratatouille is one of those dishes that always sounds really good in theory: peak-season vegetables stewed together in a rich, tomato sauce with herbs and olive oil. How could this be anything but delicious? But whenever Ive ordered it at a restaurant, my high hopes have been dashed with a pile of mushy vegetables that isnt really a soup, or a stew or even a main dish. After a farmers market blow out last week, I was preparing a bunch of veggies for the grill: eggplant, zucchini, peppers, and considering a tomato-basil salad for the side. As the veggies were grilling it dawned on me that I had everything I needed to make ratatouille. My first instinct was to run and grab the veg off the barbeque, but I stopped myself realizing the great potential of adding the grilled goodies to the tomato base instead of the traditional method of cooking everything together. Would this simple change-up make the difference and prevent mushy-ness? It was just crazy enough to work. I got to caramelizing onions on the stove to create the base, then added garlic, tomatoes, lemon slices and balsamic. So far, so good. The veggies were beautifully charred and grill-marked when I went to check on them, so I pulled them off, gave them a rough chop and added them to the simmering tomato mixture. So far, so really good. As I was contemplating how to make this a more substantial meal, I remembered that I had cooked lentils in the fridge. If you recall my slightly gripe-y post about restaurants halfway catering to vegetarians with dishes that were delicious but not all that complete, youll see how traditional ratatouille definitely falls into this category. The quickest fix and simplest solution is adding lentils, in those cases and this one. So without hesitation the pulses took the plunge and not only added protein and fiber, but gorgeous texture and colour as well. For the win! The final result is something I am pretty stoked about and definitely making again. Its a rich-tasting, chunky, hearty summer-in-a-bowl. My ratatouille may not have much in common with the classic version beyond its base ingredients, but I think that its far more filling and delicious. The grilled veggies prevent the mushiness from taking hold, as they miraculously hold their shape and tenderness while adding a bonus flavour layer of smokiness. If you dont have lentils, chickpeas or white beans would make fabulous stand-ins. You can also leave the legumes out altogether, but they definitely turn this light side dish into a more complete meal. To take my Grilled Vegetable Ratatouille over the top, serve it with plenty of olive oil drizzled over the top and a solid hunk of bread or toast on the side. This dish keeps well for up to four days in the fridge, or I imagine in the freezer for a few months. Ive already made another batch for a future dinner - I can hardly wait for the next time Im too tired to cook.     Print recipe     Grilled Vegetable Ratatouille Serves 4-5  Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup /­­ 150g black or du Puy lentils (about 1 1/­­2 cup cooked or 1 can), optional 1 large red onion 2 Tbsp. coconut oil 1 tsp. fine grain sea salt 4 cloves garlic 1 pint cherry tomatoes 1 pint mixed large tomatoes (whatever your market /­­ store has in season) 2 14oz /­­ 400ml cans whole tomatoes 4 slices of lemon 2 tsp. balsamic vinegar 1 large eggplant 2 red, yellow, or orange bell peppers 2 small green zucchini 1 small yellow zucchini generous handful fresh basil leaves, plus more for garnish small handful fresh oregano leaves 5 sprigs of fresh thyme cold-pressed olive oil for garnish crusty wholegrain sourdough bread or toast, for serving, optional Directions: 1. If possible, soak the lentils overnight or for up to 12 hours. Drain, rinse and place in a pot and cover with about 2 inches /­­ 5cm fresh, cold water. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer and cook until tender - about 10-15 minutes if youve soaked them, or about 20 minutes if un-soaked. Drain any excess water and set aside. 2. While the lentils are cooking, prepare the ratatouille base: slice the onion into thick rings and add them to a large saucepan with the coconut oil and salt. Once the oil has melted, stir to coat the onions and them let cook, stirring occasionally until the onions have lightly caramelized, about 15 minutes. Mince the garlic and add it to the onions, cook for a couple minutes until fragrant. Add the canned tomatoes and use the back of a large spoon to crush them up a little. 3. Roughly chop the large tomatoes and cherry tomatoes, leaving a few of the cherry tomatoes whole. Add all of the tomatoes to the pot and stir to combine. Add the lemon slices and balsamic vinegar, bring to a low simmer and cook covered while you grill the vegetables. 4. Preheat your grill to medium-high. Slice the eggplant and zucchini into rounds and slice the peppers in half then remove the seeds. Place the vegetables on the grill and close the lid. Cook for 5-7 minutes until the underside has slight grill marks. Flip and continue to grill on the other side until the vegetables are tender but not mushy. Let cool slightly, then roughly chop into bite-sized pieces. 5. Add the grilled vegetables to the pot along with the lentils, basil, oregano and thyme. Taste and add salt and freshly cracked black pepper to suit your taste. Stir well, bring to a simmer and let cook for about five minutes. Divide ratatouille among bowls. Drizzle generously with olive oil, garnish with basil, and serve hot with crusty bread. The next thing Im going to tell you has been the second most difficult secret Ive ever kept...Ive written another cookbook!!! Its called Naturally Nourished: Healthy, Delicious Meals made with Everyday Ingredients, and it will be available for purchase February 14, 2017. This book was a major departure from the first cookbook, and a true response to the feedback Ive received from you. Some readers found the ingredient lists from the first book too daunting, expensive, or unfamiliar, so the recipes from this next one can all be found at a discount grocery store! I wanted to remind everyone (including myself) that we all have access to fresh, healthy food in our supermarket, and that by preparing it consciously with simple techniques, we can make incredibly tasty meals every day on any budget. I absolutely loved creating this book as it pushed myself to the creative limits. I am so proud of the recipes and I know youre going to love them as much as I do! Ill keep you all updated as far as pre-orders go and my book tour. Thank you all again for inspiring me to write this book! All love, Sarah B Show me your Grilled Vegetable Ratatouille on Instagram: #MNRratatouille The post Grilled Vegetable Ratatouille – And my second Cookbook! appeared first on My New Roots.

Strawberry Salad

May 16 2016 Meatless Monday 

Tender mache lettuce is the backdrop for this fruity salad that offers yet another way to highlight luscious strawberries--rich in sweet flavor and antioxidants--during their spring through summer harvest.  This colorful salad is pretty enough for a buffet or holiday meal, yet it can also grace your lunch box or dinner table just as easily. This recipe comes to us from Sharon Palmer, The Plant-Powered Dietitian. Serves 4 - 4 cups packed mache* greens - 1 1/­­2 cups sliced fresh strawberries - 2 tablespoons sliced red onion - 2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil - 1 1/­­2 tablespoons orange juice - 1 1/­­2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar - 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil -  1/­­4 teaspoon black pepper - 2 tablespoons chopped Brazil nuts *Mache, also called lambs lettuce, is grown in California and may be available at many supermarkets.  If you cant find it in your supermarket, substitute any other tender lettuce green, such as butter lettuce of mesclun mixed greens. In a large salad bowl, combine mache, fresh strawberries, red onion, and fresh basil. In a small dish, whisk together blueberry juice, balsamic vinegar, extra virgin olive oil, and black pepper. Toss the salad with the dressing.  Garnish the salad with Brazil nuts and serve it immediately.   The post Strawberry Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Arugula Fig Almond Salad

January 4 2016 Meatless Monday 

Sweet figs, tangy feta and spicy arugula dont need much help to shine in this salad celebrating falls bounty. A simple balsamic vinaigrette seasons the greens, while almonds add an earthy crunch. This recipe comes to us from Jen of Domestic Divas. Serves 4 - 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar - 1/­­4 cup extra virgin olive oil - salt and pepper, to taste - 1 pint figs, quartered - 4 cups arugula - 1/­­2 cup Marcona almonds - 1/­­4 cup feta cheese, crumbled Place the balsamic vinegar in a small bowl, Whisk in the olive oil. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Layer 1/­­4 of the arugula and figs onto a small plate. Top with 1/­­4 of the almonds and feta. Drizzle with the balsamic vinaigrette. Repeat with the remaining ingriedients on 3 other plates and enjoy! The post Arugula Fig Almond Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Cranberry Balsamic Brussels Sprouts

November 23 2015 Meatless Monday 

Brussels sprouts are sautéed with balsamic vinegar, then tossed with pecans in this holiday side dish. Cranberries, brown sugar and orange zest are brewed in Concord grape juice for a gourmet glaze to top these delectable Brussels sprouts. This recipe comes to us from Kathy of Healthy. Happy. Life. Serves 6. For the cranberry topping: - 6 ounces whole cranberries, rinsed - 1/­­2 cup Concord grape juice - 1/­­2 cup brown sugar - 1/­­4 teaspoon orange zest - pinch of salt - 3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar For the Brussels Sprouts: - 1/­­4 cup safflower oil - 16 ounces Brussels sprouts - 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar, to taste - 1/­­4 teaspoon black pepper - 1/­­2 cup pecans, chopped - 1/­­2 cup dried cranberries - salt, to taste To make the cranberry topping: Place the cranberries into a soup pot over high heat. Add the sugar, salt and grape juice to the pot. Stir and bring to a boil. When cranberry grape juice boils, turn heat down to medium low. Simmer for 15 minutes, or until the berries pop. Stir in the orange zest and balsamic vinegar. Transfer to a small bowl and set aside. To make the Brussels sprouts: Place the oil into a large skillet over medium high heat. Add the Brussels sprouts and balsamic vinegar. Add 2 tablespoons of water and cover with a lid. Cook for 2-4 minutes, or until the Brussels sprouts become tender. Remove the lid and season with another splash of balsamic vinegar. Cook for 1-3 minutes more, adding more water if needed. Add the chopped pecans and dried cranberries, tossing to ensure the ingredients are evenly distributed. Season with the pepper and salt to taste. To complete the Cranberry Balsamic Brussels Sprouts: Place the Brussels sprouts in a serving bowl in the center of the table. Top with the balsamic cranberry sauce and enjoy! The post Cranberry Balsamic Brussels Sprouts appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Snap Pea Salad

September 28 2015 Meatless Monday 

Crisp jicama, savory squash and bitter radishes are cut into tiny matchsticks and tossed with sweat peaches, snap peas, cilantro and dill. A spicy lime ginger vinaigrette is the perfect pairing to dress this sophisticated salad. This recipe comes to us from Amy of The Crunchy Carrot. Serves 4 For the salad: - 5 ounces jicama - 5 ounces summer squash, preferably zephyr squash - 3 radishes - 1/­­2 lime - salt, to taste - 6 baby carrots, peeled and cut into slices - 2 peaches, cut into small cubes - 1 pound snap peas - 1-2 teaspoons dill - 1 tablespoon cilantro - sesame seeds, to taste For the ginger lime dressing: - 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil - 2 tablespoons white balsamic vinegar - 1 lime, juiced and half zested - 3 teaspoons fresh ginger, minced - 1 squirt hot sauce - salt and pepper, to taste To make the salad: Using a mandolin or vegetable peeler, slice the jicama and squash into very thin ribbons. Stack the ribbons of each vegetable on top of one another and cut with a knife to create matchsticks. Cut the radish into matchsticks using a knife. Place the jicama, squash and radish matchsticks together in a large sized bowl. Squirt with the half lime and season with salt to taste. Add the sliced baby carrots, peaches, snap peas, dill and cilantro. Toss to ensure all ingredients are evenly distributed. To make the lime ginger dressing: Whisk the olive oil, vinegar, lime juice, ginger and hot sauce together in a small bowl. Season with salt and pepper to taste. To complete the Snap Pea Salad: Toss the salad with half the lime ginger dressing and toss to ensure the salad is evenly coated. Refrigerate for 30 minutes. Divide into 4 portions, add more dressing if desired, sprinkle with sesame seeds and enjoy! The post Snap Pea Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.


You will enjoy these as well ...

Found an error?
Help to fix it! Tell it us!



Our sites missing something? Suggest new content or features!



Have you any comments?
Send it us!