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Recipe | Pesto Pizza with Roasted Red Peppers, Cremini Mushrooms & Asparagus

Nearly-Instant Thai Coconut Corn Soup

Dudhi na muthiya recipe | doodhi muthiya | how to make lauki muthiya

Black Rice with Black-Eyed Peas and Greens










avocado vegetarian recipes

Vegan Carnitas with Mushrooms

March 3 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Carnitas with MushroomsEasy Vegan Carnitas. Mushrooms marinated in Spicy Smoky Zesty Marinade and Baked. Serve these Mushroom Carnitas with toppings in tacos, wraps, burritos. Use Jackfruit for variation. Glutenfree Nutfree Oilfree Recipe. Soyfree option. Jump to Recipe Every since I baked jackfruit with sauce for Pulled Jackfruit Sandwiches, I’ve fallen in love with crisp caramelized result! Its much easier, no mess, short active time. Just mix everything and bake! I use the same process for these mushroom Carnitas. Sliced mushrooms, sliced onion, spices, herbs, and a flavorful marinade. Just put everything in a bowl, marinate for a bit if possible, spread in a baking dish and bake and done! No oil needed. The onions caramelize to a juicy sweet spicy state. Mushrooms cook wonderfully and crisp. Bake less or more time depending on your preference. Fill up tacos or wraps, add your favorite toppings like mashed avocado/­­guacamole, vegan sour cream or salsa and done. Add some smoky black beans or refried beans to the tacos for a hearty meal. You can use the same process with Jackfruit, shredded oyster mushrooms, hearts of palm and shredded seitan. Continue reading: Vegan Carnitas with MushroomsThe post Vegan Carnitas with Mushrooms appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Less Waste: Broccoli Stem ‘Tartare’

February 27 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Less Waste: Broccoli Stem ‘Tartare’ It seems like a lot of people still see broccoli stems a scraps to be thrown away, but the truth is that broccoli is delicious in its entirety. The stems make up the bulk of the weight for a reason – they are totally edible, incredibly tender inside, and very versatile. To prep them, all you have to do is peel away the tough outer skin, and you’ll be left with a velvety ‘heart,’ which kind of reminds us of an artichoke heart. It can be utilized in so many ways – in fried rice, soups, salads, gratin, latkes, and even apps. This ‘tartare’ is an unexpected little number to serve on a snack platter, but we think that it will pleasantly surprise any guests. It comes together with the help of staple pantry ingredients, and tastes indulgent…but in reality you’re eating a bunch of broccoli. Win-win all around. We came up with the idea for this recipe because broccoli stems get incredibly tender when steamed, and they take on flavor really well, like little sponges. We’ve seen various plant-based ‘tartare’ done before, like carrot tartare and avocado tartare, so we had the idea to try out something similar with broccoli stems. We marinated the stems with classic tartare ingredients like mustard, capers, and red onion (or shallot), and were so pleased with the result. Give broccoli stems a chance! And enjoy :) Broccoli Stem Tartare   Print Serves: 3 cups Ingredients 4 broccoli stems (or 5-6 if theyre particularly thin) ⅛ of 1 red onion - finely chopped 2 teaspoons capers - minced 4 teaspoons mustard (mix of Dijon and grainy or just 1 type) 4 teaspoons apple cider vinegar 2 teaspoons tamari sea salt black pepper red pepper flakes 5 tablespoons olive oil any herbs of choice - for garnish (optional) Instructions Prepare a steamer or steaming basket and boil water for steaming the broccoli stems. Peel the broccoli stems with a vegetable peeler, making sure to peel away all the tough outer skin, until youre left with the tender inner stem. Roughly chop the stems into about ½ thick rounds and place in the steamer basket. Steam for 10 minutes, or until very tender but not mushy. Once ready, chop the broccoli stems into finer pieces. You can chop them finely for a smoother tartare or leave them chunky for one with more bite. Meanwhile, in a large mixing bowl, combine the onion, capers, mustard, apple cider vinegar, tamari, salt, black pepper, and red pepper flakes to taste, and mix. Pour in the olive oil, whisking it in to emulsify. Add the broccoli stems and mix to coat in the dressing. Transfer the tartare to an airtight container and ideally refrigerate for 30 min to an hour before serving, to allow the broccoli stems to marinate, and also for the olive oil to thicken, which will make the tartare easier to spread. Serve with your favorite crackers or toasted bread, garnished with any herbs of choice. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Fruit Leather Puzzle Tofu Saag Paneer, Spring Style Raw Onion Bread Pink Soup with Roasted Onions and Broccoli .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Less Waste: Broccoli Stem ‘Tartare’ appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Glazed Tempeh Steaks with Rosemary Mushroom Gravy

February 6 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Glazed Tempeh Steaks with Rosemary Mushroom Gravy Hi friends! Checking in really quickly with a favorite dinner as of late. I think tempeh is one of those things that people either love or hate, but there’s a few ways of cooking it that I’m pretty sure would make anyone like it. ‘Glazing’ it is one of those. It’s a decadent method that leaves you with irresistibly golden tempeh ‘steaks’ with crispy edges. Today we’ve got a cozy rosemary, mushroom and white bean gravy to top it with. I thought I’d also share something that’s been helping me stay on track with eating the foods that make me feel good after an indulgent December and January. I noticed myself falling into some not-so-great eating patterns ever since the holidays. Things like treats after dinner almost every night, or buying salty processed snacks more often than I like (have you tried Hippeas?!). None of them are a big deal, but it’s things that don’t contribute to me feeling 100%. So I’ve been aiming to gently steer my focus towards the food that gives me the most energy: whole plant foods. I like the idea of Dr. Michael Greger’s daily dozen checklist, which is his proposed list of the most nourishing plant foods to try to fit into your daily routine. It goes as follows: beans, berries, other fruit, cruciferous vegetables, greens, other vegetables, flax seeds, nuts and seeds, herbs and spices, whole grains, beverages (water), along with the suggested number of servings. So, I’ve been aiming to check off most of the items with my meals every day. At first it becomes a fun game, and then turns more and more into a habit. Of course, it’s not realistic to expect yourself to eat that way every single day, and some days I don’t even eat half of the things listed, but it’s also easier than you might think to get these things in. These tempeh steaks, for example, check off 4 of the items! I make sure to use this tool as a gentle reminder, definitely not as a way to control my eating or stress myself out in any way. There’s a daily dozen app that lets you check off the items, which I used at first, but now I just think about the checklist when buying groceries for the day/­­week, and it helps so much with building out nourishing meals. Just wanted to share this, in case anyone else finds it helpful. Have a great rest of your week! Glazed Tempeh Steaks with Rosemary Mushroom Gravy   Print Serves: 4 medium portions or 2 large Ingredients for the tempeh steaks 8 oz tempeh (we used 3-grain tempeh) 1 teaspoon sesame oil 1½ tablespoons tamari or coconut aminos 1 tablespoon brown rice vinegar or mirin 1 teaspoon maple syrup 1 tablespoon avocado oil or olive oil for oiling the pan for the rosemary mushroom gravy avocado or olive oil 1 yellow onion - diced sea salt 1 lb crimini mushrooms - sliced 2 cloves of garlic - minced 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 2 cups or 1 can of cooked white beans (any variety) 1 tablespoon white miso 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard splash of Sriracha/­­chili sauce or a pinch of red pepper flakes 1 tablespoon chopped rosemary freshly ground black pepper ¼ cup white bean broth (if cooking white beans from scratch), veggie broth or water parsley, cilantro, or other herbs - for serving Instructions to make the tempeh steaks Slice the tempeh in half crosswise and then slice each half in half lengthwise, so that you end up with 4 thin, square or slightly rectangular pieces. In a shallow dish, whisk together the sesame oil, tamari/­­coconut aminos, vinegar, maple syrup, and oil. Place the tempeh pieces into the shallow dish with the marinade and let it marinate while you make the gravy. To cook the steaks, heat oil in a large pan over medium heat. Remove the tempeh from the shallow dish, leaving the marinade in the dish. Place the tempeh in the pan and cook for 2-3 minutes on each side, until golden. Pour the remaining marinade over the tempeh, letting it bubble up and create a glaze over the tempeh. Serve right away with the mushroom rosemary gravy. to make the rosemary mushroom gravy Heat some oil in a large pan over medium heat. Add the onion and a pinch of salt and cook for about 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the mushrooms, stir once, and then let them sit without stirring for a minute or two. Cook for another 7 minutes, or until all the liquid, released by the mushrooms evaporates. Add the garlic and stir for about 30 seconds, until fragrant. Add the balsamic and cook for another few minutes, until the vinegary flavor of the balsamic cooks off. Add about a ¼ of the amount of the mushrooms to an upright blender. Add half of the white beans, miso, mustard, chili sauce/­­red pepper flakes, rosemary, black pepper, more sea salt, and broth/­­water. Blend until smooth, adding more broth if needed. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Add the blended gravy back to the pan with the mushrooms, along with the remaining white beans. Heat everything through, adding more broth if necessary to achieve a gravy-like consistency. Serve the gravy over the tempeh steaks, garnished with herbs. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... Grain-Free Tomato Tart with Cauliflower Ricotta Barley Tomato Salad Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash Pasta e Ceci - The Coziest Pasta and Chickpea Soup from Abruzzo .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Glazed Tempeh Steaks with Rosemary Mushroom Gravy appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Jicama Bao

February 4 2019 Meatless Monday 

Inspired by the Oscar nominated Pixar’s short film ‘Bao,’ Instagrammer WoonHeng  created a Jicama Bao recipe  to celebrate Chinese New Year. Serve these hot steamy baos on a bamboo steamer with Chinese tea for a light but satisfying lunch.   Follow WoonHeng on Instagram  for more great plant-based recipes.   Makes about 12 baos - 2 medium jicama, shredded - 2 medium carrot, shredded - 3 tsp avocado oil - 3 tbsp chopped cilantro - salt and white pepper to taste - 1 16 oz. package of bao flour, prepared based on package instruction, used plant-based milk as replacement – yields about 12 baos. Bao flour available online or at any Asian grocery store.   In a heated pan with 3 tsp avocado oil, sauté carrot until oil turns orangey, add jicama, and stir fry until jicama is soft. Season with salt and pepper and add cilantro. Set aside to cool. You may refrigerate this overnight until ready to use. Prepare 12 3×3 square parchment paper. Make bao according to package instruction. Fill a heaping 2 tbsp of the jicama mixture in the middle, pleat to seal the bao. Place on parchment paper. Repeat until you have all the baos ready. Cover the bao with a partially wet paper towel to avoid dryness while you are working on the dough. Boil water in steamer, steam bao for 20 mins. To get the crusty look, pan fried them with some sesame seeds until golden brown. Serve warm with a cup of Chinese tea and you can now enjoy dim sum at home too. The post Jicama Bao appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Healthier You Series: All-Star Nutritionist Bonnie Taub-Dix Sheds Light on Good Heart Health Practices You Can Use

January 28 2019 Meatless Monday 

Healthier You Series: All-Star Nutritionist Bonnie Taub-Dix Sheds Light on Good Heart Health Practices You Can UseStart smart eating habits on Mondays for a happier and healthier you! February is just around the corner and its American Heart Month . Take a moment on Monday to focus on behaviors that may help you live a longer and healthier life. This is the third article in this months Healthier You Series. Weve discussed making good dietary choices for kidney health and type 2 diabetes . This week, we look at heart health. The American Heart Association recommends making simple changes to your diet to improve heart health, such as limiting red meat. Meatless Monday is an easy and enjoyable way to make smart food choices for your heart . Consuming less red and processed meat and more plant-based foods like whole grains, fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes can benefit cardio-health. Bonnie Taub-Dix is a nutrition consultant, author, and Meatless Monday advocate. We asked her to share some heart-friendly advice. 1. Meatless Monday encourages people to cut out meat one day a week for their health and to try a great variety of plant-based foods. Are there specific plant-based foods that are most beneficial for heart health? Plant-based protein is a hot, trendy topic but these are foods that have been around for centuries, providing fiber and an array of nutrients. Plant proteins like beans, nuts, and seeds are just a few examples of how we can cut back on meat while boosting the value of our diets. Oatmeal is a steamy bowl of goodness for breakfast swirled with almond butter and bananas or as a savory side mixed with a variety of seasonings and spices. Oats and almonds are rich in fiber to help lower cholesterol levels. Beans, the most underrated superfoods, are also rich in soluble fiber to help keep you feeling fuller longer while controlling cholesterol levels. Theyre also a great source of plant-based protein.   2. Are there particular foods to avoid? What about processed foods? Many people say they try to avoid processed food, as if its a kind of poison. Its a well-intentioned goal, but even pre-chopped fruit or vegetables are processed foods! Certain processed foods make our lives more convenient, safer-and in many ways, even more nutritious. The good news is certain processed foods are healthier than some foods found in their natural state, such as: o Plain yogurt, with added cultures, retains the protein and calcium naturally found in dairy products, and it also includes added good bacteria to help boost our gut function and immune systems. o Canned tomatoes contain more lycopene--a powerful antioxidant that reduces inflammation--than fresh tomatoes do, especially when they are eaten simultaneously with a small amount of oil to enhance absorption. Dont judge a food by the front of the package. Flip that bag or box over to read whats really inside!   3. Should people with a family history of heart disease be much more careful than those who dont have a history? What can someone with a family history do to help prevent heart disease? If you knew you could have stopped that balsamic vinegar from splattering on your favorite white sweater, would you have done something to prevent it from happening? Unless youre clairvoyant, its not very easy to prevent something you cant predict. When it comes to your body--whether its potential damage from high blood sugar, blood pressure, or cholesterol levels--this is the time to take charge of your health. You can fight against your family histories by taking a closer look at what youre putting on your plate, moving more , and finding effective ways to manage stress .   4. Whats your go-to food for heart health on Meatless Monday? Id have to say my Spicy Dark Chocolate Chili Bowl ! What I love about this recipe is that you dont really have to follow it exactly -- you can swap out for your favorite ingredients. This recipe contains beans and avocado, as well as a variety of anti-inflammatory spices. Bonnie recently published Read It Before You Eat It – Taking You from Label to Table . You can find more about Bonnie at Better Than Dieting and on Instagram. For an extra bonus, check out heart-friendly Meatless Monday recipes, from pancakes to burgers, in our free comfort food e-cookbook . Use Mondays to make positive change in your life that will do you a world of good. Meatless Monday is a global movement followed by millions who choose not to eat meat one day a week for their health and the health of the planet. Help spread the word about the many benefits of Meatless Monday, such as how reducing meat consumption may improve your heart health. Download our shareable free graphics here . Follow  us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post Healthier You Series: All-Star Nutritionist Bonnie Taub-Dix Sheds Light on Good Heart Health Practices You Can Use appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Self-Care Interview Series: Cortney Herrera

January 27 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Cortney Herrera Cortney Herrera is the artisan distiller and founder of the holistic skincare company Wildcare, located in the Pacific Northwest. We’ve been crushing hard on Cortney’s creations, like her expertly distilled hydrosols and face masks full of the most unique, glow-promoting ingredients, and we’re so excited to share this wisdom-packed interview. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Structure of certain things like eating & sleeping times has always made me feel the most supported. I am a triple virgo so by nature I crave a solid routine around the everyday basics. With that said, its freeing to just rehash it all and recreate a functional flow if I feel like Im too caught up in our pattern. Now that I have a baby (hes 1!) as much as I want things to be regimented for us all to thrive,  its necessary to play with flexibility for the unexpected too, so Ive shifted a bit more towards that direction. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. We sleep with our curtains open so that each morning we wake up to natural light. We just moved back to Oregon from sunny CA, so this is especially crucial for me here in the Pacific Northwest to feel more stable during the darker winter months. Our baby almost always wakes us up around 7am and usually starts babbling, so well take him out of his crib and have a little cuddle time. If hes not out on a job, my husband Alex will get him ready for the day and then Ill make us a morning beverage (usually tea with mushroom powder and coconut manna, and honey) and either one of us will cook a simple breakfast for the family (tortilla with an egg, handful of parsley or cilantro and a fermented veggie). We both work from home so we each hop on our computers shortly after while switching off with who is playing with baby Oso. One thing I am firm on is giving myself a facial massage for 5-10 minutes after I wash up. My skin loves it, but more importantly its a nice form of meditation to have that little moment of space to zen out a bit. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I opt for a magnesium bath, face mask (I like our creamy Soft Focus Mask at night), sometimes a chocolate and always a cup of tea – lately its a blend of lemon balm, chamomile, oatstraw and raspberry leaf. If time gets the best of me, Ill have a mug of hot water with magnesium powder to relax before bed. Im also really big on lists (virgo) so I usually write a new one before bed every night for all different things like shopping lists, distillation lists, who I need to email back more urgently, recipes I want to make.... everything thats been floating around in my mind that day so Im more freed up before bed. I watch a little Netflix and laugh, and then get in bed around 11. I like the Headspace app as a guided 5-10 minute meditation to center my breathing when I lay down. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  Outdoor explorations! We aim to weave one day trip into each week, usually within an hour of home, and drive to a mountain, forest, or river to breathe clean air & explore without much of a plan or direction in mind. Having this free-flowing space contrary to our routines during the week creates lots of room for spontaneity…and sometimes we hit a dead-end, but thats all part of the fun of experimenting and not having a plan! Balance is key. If we dont have time to physically drive to a big open landscape that weekend because of work, well take walks in the neighborhood or a smaller visit to a nearby park (there are parks everywhere in Portland!). I like to be present and check in with myself as I move…how does the sun or mist feel on my skin, what scents are in the air, what does this leaf feel like in my hand.... All of these little check-ins help me feel more grounded and connected. Sustenance -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I stopped drinking coffee and caffeinated tea about 8 or so years ago to curb my anxiety – its helped tremendously! My favorite go-to drinks for energy & focus are roasted dandelion tea, fresh juice we make at home (the greener, the better), or chocolate milk with walnut milk and raw cacao! For the most part good quality chocolate has always mellowed me out actually – I think its the magnesium. -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? I like to opt for something that will satisfy a sweet tooth without the crash or sugar spike like incorporating dates, honey or maple with healthy fats that sustain my energy. Lately Ive been making these very simple almond butter cookies. The recipe is: 1 cup almond butter (any nut butter will do!), 1 egg, 1/­­2 Tbs of virgin coconut oil, a couple spoons of coconut sugar, a pinch of himalayan salt and any spices that appeal (cinnamon, nutmeg, vanilla bean etc). Roll into balls, smoosh with a fork and bake for 10 minutes! -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? My sister Ash (Black Sage Botanicals) makes delicious oxymels – vinegar based tinctures with infused organic and foraged herbs and honey. Im in love with her Tulsi Oxymel made with rose and pomegranate vinegar. It feels heart-opening and nurturing! Im pretty regimented on taking Vitamin D, a DHA fish oil, and iron with nettles along with various flower essences dependent on what my emotional state is calling for. Water is the main tool for me I need to remember, all day every day!!!!! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I aim to get out at least a couple times a week on an adventure and walk, usually finding a new forest to explore here in the northwest. Its been the single best thing for me in releasing any anxiety or stress from the week. I also am just getting back into yoga, focusing on the balance between movement + stillness. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I see beauty in nourishing and embracing every facet of our unique selves so much that the joy and loving energy we hold for our own bodies and spirit inherently radiates to those around us. I think when we allow ourselves to really connect with others, be vulnerable, be authentic, be blissful, be curious, beauty is an energy thats more magnetic than visually stimulating. I find a lot of rocks beautiful because I take time to notice their expressive nature. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? My approach is all about balance supported by nature and ancient rituals. Cold-pressed oils, raw honey, herb infusions, powdered herbs....focusing on the balance between humans and the natural world – how we care for botanicals and how they may care for us. I like to look at skincare the same way I look at the food I eat; when I feel happy about the ingredients I apply on my skin, my skin feels happy too. Its all about respecting and caring for ingredients so we create more harmony as we utilize them. My favorite tools are oil + water, in the form of our face oil and hydrosols. It may sound counterintuitive for those two to go hand in hand yet its what our skin is essentially made of and vital for nourished skin + optimal function. After cleansing, Ill mist a hydrosol (during winter I choose Empress Cypress or Rosemary Bay) and follow with SunRoot Solar Serum. Ill take about 5-10 minutes for a facial massage and then follow with another generous mist of Hydrosol. My skin glows!! -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Water mainly. Eating lots of healthy fats like coconut oil/­­manna, ghee, avocado. The fish oil and vitamin d every day along with eating a lot of fermented foods and drinking the roasted dandelion tea I mentioned earlier (hormone balancing = skin balancing). The more we can do to support the gut and liver especially, the happier our skin is! I love incorporating raw honey and bee pollen in my rituals. Our Bee Rosy Mask actually has ground bee pollen in it and makes my skin feel like a spring flower. As for my hair, I like to use our skin soother Rosemary Bay Hydrosol to keep my scalp healthy. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? As a mama & business owner, there is always stress – good stress and real earth-shaking stress. The beauty/­­wellness business is pretty idealized – its HARD work and creating boundaries to minimize stress and prioritize your own personal wellness can be easily misplaced. Some things that usually help me release are talking it out with my sisters, breathing deep with a tall glass of water, embracing quietness, saying no when I need to, saying yes when I want to, putting my hands in dirt to work in the garden, and going on a walk. The past year I also started writing more regularly. Oddly enough a lot of it started flowing on my instagram which has led me to a beautiful community of friends that Ill message with on and off. On some more wild days, my husband and I will just run to the living room, turn up the music and just go crazy dancing for 10 minutes and then go back to work. This often helps the most with little stressors, especially seeing baby Oso laughing at us. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I make elderberry syrup every winter and take a spoon everyday when Im run down. Magnesium baths, herbal steams, foot soaks, rest, water, raw honey, and garlic. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Something that always helps me is doing something for myself first thing in the morning, so I dont end up too busy and putting it off later. That usually takes shape as a face massage. At the end of the day when Im laying in bed, I almost always do a self-check in and think of one nice thing I did for myself that day. If I forgot to physically do something, Ill say a few affirmations to myself. Im also quite excited to be starting therapy again and EMDR this month. I honestly am really eager to get back into it and work through some heavy triggers and blockages. I think thats one of the nicest things I could do for myself right now. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Allowing myself space to slow down & connect. Wildcare has been buzzing since conception. We were featured in Vogue the first month we opened, and from there it just became an everyday hustle to stay caught up – a challenge Im incredibly grateful for. Last year I had my first baby, and he arrived to our surprise 2 months early via an emergency cesarean. He remained in the NICU for a month while my husband and I went home as baby and I each had to separately heal. I felt broken, and at first, I jumped right back into work as soon as I had more movement to distract from much of the emotional pain I had experienced. A few months later when he was home, business was great but there was this moment I knew I needed to stop everything, reflect and be present with what I was feeling and with our baby. I closed the shop for a few weeks, and decided to stop taking on new retail partners for pretty much the remainder of 2018. Being transparent and open with those around me – even our customers about what I was going through, has been the biggest change Ive made. Slowing down, bridging that connection of my voice + products, being present and prioritizing the same amount of care for myself that I give others has allowed me to feel more honest with myself. Still a huge work in progress yet this practice continues to reveal a community of supporters that wouldnt have been there unless I was vulnerable. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I feel like inspiration finds me within the energy of the landscapes I’m immersed in. Right now its walking on the soft mossy forest floor in Oregon, hypnotized by rushing rivers and gazing up at towering Fir trees and dancing leaves. I really trust in the natural relationship of quiet down time vs the times Im energized with new ideas, and think its important to allow things to reveal themselves naturally as a connection is made. These visuals, scent memories, and feelings from nature always wind their way into my dreams even years later and lead me to formulas and product names so its best for me to just to go with the flow. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming a distiller and starting Wildcare? My sisters and I grew up strongly influenced with our moms skin care rituals who worked as a makeup artist for film & tv, amongst other things. As kids, we would concoct foot soaks using pine needles and flowers we would collect on afternoon walks, and hair masks with eggs and mayonnaise! These DIY projects have always stayed with me. My formal schooling was both in Culinary and Herbal disciplines – a foundation that propelled my special focus on care – internal & external. There was an afternoon in particular where I had focused all my energy on exploring a better remedy to comfort my eczema flare-ups. When I noticed all the Rosemary that was growing in our yard near a little Bay tree I intuitively crafted my first Wildcare product, The Skin Soother Rosemary + Bay Hydrosol using a makeshift distillation system out of kitchen pots & pans. I remember I actually cried at the moment I saw the first hydrosol emerge…I really felt lucky to be in the presence of such an ancient form of alchemy. After obsessively spraying this camphorous green-smelling mist for a few weeks & seeing my skins improved health, this artful practice of distilling was something I fully got behind. I spent a year doing playful and careful experimentations, making hydrosols for family and friends. There was one night I even dreamt about filling a table full of tiny amber bottles with aromatic liquid and then a month or so later, I sprung up from a dream and shouted Wildcare! to my husband. Wildcare was born shortly after that in the end of 2015. -- At Wildcare, you make your own hydrosols and advocate their healing properties. Can you tell us a little bit about what they are and why they are so effective? Hydrosols are the subtly aromatic waters from distilled plant material. A copper still is placed over fire, holding spring water (we hand-collect from a local Oregon spring!) & fresh plant material. Inside the still, steam rises & passes through the plant in the form of vapor, carrying vital nutrients, plant acids & suspended particles of the plants essential oils. As the vapor cools, it condenses back into a liquid state and emerges in the form of aromatic water (now a Hydrosol) along with its essential oil counterpart. Our distillations have about an 8 hour duration depending on the plant utilized, a very slow & thoughtful process that requires a focused presence from the distiller. The majority of the essential oil will rise to the top, leaving the Hydrosol with about 0.1% micro-particles of essential oil, making it a very gentle mist without the same safety concerns that essential oils carry. When you purchase a pure Hydrosol, note that it will read as 100% distillate or floral water – without the addition of other ingredients or essential oils. More on the distillation process here. -- What are some of your best-sellers? 100% SunRoot Solar Serum, but more on that below! Our best selling Hydrosols of the season have been the skin soother Rosemary Bay, awakening Palo Santo, and Empress Cypress (a personal favorite!). From our face and body line, Soft Focus Mask has been flying off the shelves. Its a gentle and creamy clay based mask with brightening pearl powder, soothing organic coconut milk, and pineapple extract to even out lackluster skin. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? SunRoot Solar Serum is a product Ive worked on for 2+ years and was just released! After working so long on this formula, its been the most rewarding experience to see so many glowing reviews pour in. Im overwhelmed in the best possible way. It features a 4-week infusion of organic artichoke leaf in this incredibly beautiful Jojoba oil that Im sourcing directly from a farmer here in the US. He is self-taught and does all his cold-pressing by hand! Artichoke leaf is a powerhouse in healing sun damage, scarring and repairing tissue. Its combined with warming turmeric root, and juicy fruit oils like Sea buckthorn, Rose hip and Raspberry Seed. To extend even more beauty and peace of mind, its a 90+% certified organic formula! I am also in the middle of a complete rebrand, designed by artist Morgan Ritter (my younger sister!), with SunRoot as the first look of Wildcares new visual identity. The bottles are entirely covered with my actual tiny handwriting thats been screen-printed, echoing my commitment to being a maker – literally being a conduit, like water. Its a bold gesture to avoid a standardized typeface and is unlike what is commonly seen in the market, as we intend for this design to be a personal, embodied approach to commerce. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Its been a challenge as a nurturer however Ive been practicing treating myself more, creating stronger boundaries around my own personal time so that I can give more too. My affirmations since going through what I did last year have been The nurturer deserves to be nourished. I am deserving of nourishment. I am deserving of my own care. Simple pleasures like tinkering around in the kitchen and baking something experimental, even a chiropractic care visit from my favorite Luna Wellness practitioner, Megan makes me feel extra supported. Every so often Ive been treating myself to a facial from any one of a few dear friends here in Portland too. Allowing myself this space has been crucial to be able to lovingly care for child and have peace of mind. -- Standout book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art: Book - Aromatic Medicine by Patrice de Bonneval & Cathy Skipper Song/­­Album -Papa Celestin ragtime music, bought it at Mississippi Records :-) Movie - Stargate (I just saw Hackers for the 1st time and that was cool, ha ha ha) Piece of Art - STOOL WITH WHEELS (ALL THE WORLD’S PAIN, YET THERE ARE MOVEMENTS) by Morgan Ritter from her show The Cat House Settlements -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Dena Nakhle Birch – She is my friend/­­angel/­­naturopathic doctor based out of Santa Barbara, CA. A brilliant healer with one of the biggest hearts I know. Erica Chidi Cohen – her friendship and book Nurture was incredibly supportive to me after my birthing experience. Neva Osterloh – the sweetest woman offering loving forms of care through her Portland skincare studio. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Gabrielle Russomagno Self-Care Interview Series: Rocio Graves Self-Care Interview Series: Satsuki Shibuya Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Cortney Herrera appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

New Year Glow Meal Plan: Spaghetti Squash (Pho, Lasagna, Tacos, Pesto Noodles)

January 16 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

New Year Glow Meal Plan: Spaghetti Squash (Pho, Lasagna, Tacos, Pesto Noodles) The New Year Glow Meal Plan is here! All kinds of carb-on-carb, dessert-every-day type of holiday indulgence happened for us over the past month, and at this point we are so ready to fill our plates with 99% plants. That’s what this meal plan is all about. We are employing the amazing, shape-shifting powers of spaghetti squash to create four distinctly different, plant-fueled dishes that will still keep us cozy in this frigid weather (no bone-chilling, cold salads or fully raw dishes here!). We’ve got special pesto ‘noodles’, pho, tacos, and lasagna. As usual, there is a step-by-step weekend prep guide, as well as a shopping list for your convenience :) Hope you enjoy this one! Menu - Spaghetti Squash Noodles with Brussels Sprout Pesto - Kale Pho with Spaghetti Squash Noodles - Spaghetti Squash Kimchi Tacos - Portobello Spaghetti Squash Lasagna *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free if needed, see the recipes for serving sizes Shopping List (Print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, its got all the ingredients youll need for the recipes in this meal plan mini. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Add whatever other ingredients youll need for the week here, if doing shopping for the whole week. Produce 2 large or 3 medium spaghetti squash 1 lb Brussel sprouts 1 medium yellow onion 2 large leeks 1 head of garlic 1-inch piece ginger 1 bunch kale 1/­­2 lb shiitake 8-10 portobello caps 2-3 avocados 1 bunch cilantro 1 lemon 3 limes Spices 2 cinnamon sticks 2 star anise black peppercorns 5 whole cloves 3 whole cardamom pods 1 teaspoon coriander seeds Staples/­­Other sea salt olive oil neutral avocado oil or other oil of choice apple cider vinegar brown rice vinegar tamari sriracha/­­chili sauce 24 oz marinara sauce 1 cup vegan kimchi tortillas – gluten-free if needed sea salt Bulk 1 cup dried chickpeas 1 cup raw pumpkin seeds 1 cup raw almonds nutritional yeast Basic Prep Complete these steps on the weekend (or whenever you have the time), and these meals will be a breeze to put together during the week, thanks to all the prepared components. 1) Roast The Spaghetti Squash Spaghetti Squash, the beautiful yellow vegetable with flesh that turns into ‘noodles’ when roasted, will be the base for all our dishes in this meal plan. Here, we are roasting 2 large squashes, which we’ll be using for pesto noodles, pho, tacos, and lasagna throughout the week. Roasted Spaghetti Squash   Print Ingredients 2 large spaghetti squash - halved, seeds scooped out avocado oil or other neutral oil of choice sea salt freshly ground black pepper Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare 2 baking sheets, lined with parchment paper. Place the halved spaghetti squash on the baking sheets, face up. Oil thoroughly and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Turn the squashes face down, place in the oven, and roast for 30-40 minutes,until the flesh is soft, cooked through, and noodle-like when scraped with a fork. Take care not to overcook, as the noodles can turn mushy. Let cool slightly. Scrape all of the noodles out of the squash skins using a fork, and store refrigerated in an airtight glass container, until ready to use. 3.5.3226   2) Cook Chickpeas and Make Broth Base for Pho In this step, we are cooking chickpeas for the pho and tacos, while also making the broth base for our pho. Making ingredients using the offshoots from other ingredients is one of the most gratifying and humbling things about cooking! Pot of Chickpeas   Print Ingredients 1 cup dried chickpeas - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the chickpeas. Place the chickpeas in a pot and cover with about 8 cups of purified water. Bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 30 minutes. Test the chickpeas for doneness. Cook longer if needed, until completely soft. Add salt to taste at the end. Drain, reserving the cooking liquid for the pho broth (below). 3.5.3226   3) Make the Pho Broth This pho broth gets its deep, comforting flavor from toasted spices, chickpeas (cooked in the same water, in the previous step), tamari, and any other vegetable scraps you have around. Pho Broth   Print Ingredients 2 star anise 2 cinnamon sticks 1 teaspoon whole coriander seeds 1 teaspoon black peppercorn 5 whole cloves 3 cardamom pods 1 medium yellow onion - sliced into 8 wedges 3 garlic cloves - crushed with a knife 1-inch piece ginger, sliced and crushed with a knife 6 cups chickpea broth - from above any vegetable scraps like leek tops, onion skins, etc. (optional) ½ lb shiitake - hard stems separated, caps reserved 3½ tablespoons tamari 1 tablespoon brown rice vinegar ¼ teaspoon sriracha/­­chili sauce Instructions Warm a soup pot over medium heat. Add the star anise, cinnamon, coriander, peppercorns, cloves, and cardamom. Toast, stirring, until fragrant, for about 2-3 minutes. Add the onion, garlic, and ginger and sauté for another couple of minutes, until fragrant, and until the onion begins to get some color. Carefully add the chickpea broth (it may splatter), vegetable scraps (if using), shiitake stems, tamari, brown rice vinegar, and sriracha. Bring to a boil, lower the heat to simmer and cook, covered, for 30 minutes. Reserve the shiitake caps for when you make the pho (recipe below). Remove the pot from heat and let infuse further for at least 30 minutes, or as long as you have (overnight is best, refrigerate if letting infuse overnight). Strain the broth, discarding the solids. Keep the broth in the same soup pot, refrigerated, until ready to make the pho. 3.5.3226   4) Make the Brussels Sprout Pesto This pesto is made with blanched Brussels sprouts, for a dose of cruciferous goodness, and pumpkin seeds, for a lighter alternative to nuts. The result is surprisingly delicious pesto, which will be used for the Spaghetti Squash Noodle dish, as well as the lasagna. Brussels Sprout Pesto   Print Ingredients 1 cup raw pumpkin seeds 1 lb Brussels sprouts - ends trimmed off, sliced in half sea salt 1 clove garlic - chopped 1 bunch cilantro, stems and leaves (reserve a handful of leaves for the pho and tacos) - torn juice of ½ lemon 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast freshly ground black pepper ½ cup olive oil Instructions Preheat the oven to 350° F (180° C). Spread the pumpkin seeds on a baking tray and toast in the oven for 5-7 minutes, until fragrant and slightly golden. Bring a large pot of well-salted water to a rapid boil. Add the Brussels sprouts and blanch for about 8 minutes, or longer, until soft throughout, but not mushy. Drain and set aside. Reserve a small handful of pumpkin seeds and set aside to use as a garnish for the pesto noodle dish. Place the rest of the pumpkin seeds into a food processor, followed by a large pinch of salt and garlic. Pulse to roughly break up the pumpkin seeds. Divide the blanched Brussels sprouts in half. Save one half of them whole, to use later in the pesto noodle dish, keeping them refrigerated in an airtight container. Add the other half of the blanched Brussels sprouts to the food processor, along with the cilantro, lemon juice, nutritional yeast, another pinch of salt and black pepper. Process until well combined. Slowly poor the olive oil through the feeding tube on the lid, with the motor still running. Taste for salt, adjust if needed. Use the pesto right away or store refrigerated for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   5) Make the Almond Ricotta This easy almond ricotta is mainly meant for the lasagna, but you can use any of the leftovers in the tacos or in the Brussels sprout pesto noodles. Almond Ricotta   Print Ingredients 1 cup almonds - soaked overnight in purified water 1 small garlic clove pinch of sea salt 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast generous squeeze of lemon juice - to taste Instructions Drain and rinse the almonds. Optionally, squeeze each almond to slip off the skin for a whiter, smoother ricotta. Place the almonds into the bowl of a food processor, along with the garlic, salt, nutritional yeast, and lemon juice. Add 2 tablespoons water and pulse, until you achieve a ricotta consistency. Add another 1-2 tablespoons of water, if needed. Use right away or refrigerate for up to 3 days. 3.5.3226   Recipes This is a meal that will take you minutes to prepare, thanks to all the weekend prep. Spaghetti squash ‘noodles’ go well with pesto of any kind, but they become something really special, when combined with the Brussels Sprout Pumpkinseed Pesto and silky, blanched Brussels sprouts. Spaghetti Squash Noodles with Brussels Sprout Pesto   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients ⅔ of the amount of the Brussels Sprout Pesto - from above about 3 cups roasted spaghetti squash - from above reserved ½ lb whole blanched Brussels sprouts - from the pesto recipe, above reserved handful whole toasted pumpkin seeds - from the pesto recipe, above Instructions Warm a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the pesto and let warm through, stirring, for about a minute. Add the spaghetti squash and toss to coat in the pesto. Add the whole Brussels sprouts and let everything heat through thoroughly, stirring. Serve right away, garnished with the whole pumpkin seeds and almond ricotta from above, if using. 3.5.3226   This Pho is incredibly cozy, but also very nourishing and light. The deep, dark broth holds the powers of various warming spices, shiitake, chickpeas, and veg. Spaghetti squash ‘noodles,’ chickpeas, and kale fill it out, and a scoop of avocado + a drizzle of chili sauce on top take it to that next level. Kale Pho with Spaghetti Squash Noodles   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients pho broth - from above 1½ cups cooked chickpeas - from above about 3 cups roasted spaghetti squash - from above shiitake caps from ½ lb shiitake - sliced, reserved while making pho broth 2-3 kale leaves - stems removed, roughly chopped juice from 1 lime, plus more for serving handful of cilantro leaves - for garnish ripe avocado - for garnish sriracha/­­chili sauce - for garnish (optional) Instructions Bring the pho broth back to a boil, add the cooked chickpeas, spaghetti squash, sliced shiitake caps, and kale. Adjust the heat to a simmer and cook for about 10 minutes, until the kale is cooked through. Remove from heat and mix in the lime juice. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve warm, with more lime slices, garnished with cilantro leaves, cubed ripe avocado, and more sriracha/­­chili sauce, if desired. 3.5.3226   This is the wintery version of our Kimchi Tacos from the Summer Meal Plan. It’s hard to do them justice with words or photos, but they are really good. Proof: my ten year old, who strongly dislikes squash and doesn’t eat kimchi because it’s too spicy, ate them for dinner two nights in a row without any comment (silence during a meal is always a good sign around here :). They are also so, so quick! Spaghetti Squash Kimchi Tacos   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients 1 tablespoon avocado oil or other neutral oil of choice 2-3 kale leaves - stems removed, leaves torn sea salt 1½ cup cooked chickpeas - all of the remaining from above 2 cups roasted spaghetti squash - from above about 1 cup vegan kimchi tortillas of choice - gluten-free if needed 1-2 ripe avocado - cubed cilantro - for serving lime slices - for serving sriracha or hot sauce of choice - for serving (optional) Instructions Warm the oil over medium heat in a large sauté pan. Add the kale and salt, and sauté for about 7-10 minutes, until soft. Add the chickpeas to the pan and stir around to lightly toast. Add the spaghetti squash and toss to combine. Add the kimchi and stir to combine and warm everything through. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve the warm veg in tortillas, topped with avocado, cilantro, squeezes of lime juice, and hot sauce (if using). 3.5.3226   Does this dish of layered vegetables, mushrooms, and sauces actually taste like lasagna? It really does! The spaghetti squash ‘noodles’ replace the carb component of regular lasagna noodles, while the portobello mushrooms add substance, depth, and meatiness. The almond cheese and pesto from prep day, as well as good, store-bought marinara add just the right punch of flavor. It’s a higher vibe lasagna that will still leave you satisfied, with a bonus of not weighing you down. Portobello Spaghetti Squash Lasagna   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 2 tablespoons avocado oil or other neutral oil of choice - divided, plus more for oiling the dish 8-10 portobello caps 2 large leeks, white and pale green parts only - sliced sea salt 24 oz marinara sauce about 7 cups roasted spaghetti squash - from above almond ricotta - from above reserved ⅓ the amount of Brussels sprouts pesto - from above freshly ground black pepper Instructions Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Warm 1 tablespoon of the oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add as many portobello caps as the pan can hold and fry them on one side for a couple of minutes, until golden. Flip and fry the other side. Remove and continue with the rest of the portobellos. Set them aside on a plate and drain off any water that they release. Add the remaining 1 tablespoon of the oil to the same pan. Add leeks and a pinch of salt and sauté for about 8-10 minutes, until soft. Oil a 10 x 1o-inch, deep baking dish or a baking dish of a similar size. Spread half of the marinara sauce over the bottom. Add half of the spaghetti squash, spreading it into an even layer. Spread half of the almond ricotta over top, in little clumps. Arrange all the portobello caps in the next layer, overlapping them as you go. Next, add a layer of the pesto and sautéed leeks. Continue with layers as follows: the rest of the almond ricotta, the rest of the marinara, and the rest of the spaghetti squash. Sprinkle the top layer with salt and pepper, and drizzle with avocado oil. Cover the dish, place in the oven, and bake for 30 minutes. Increase the temperature to 400° F (200° C), uncover and bake for another 15 minutes. Let the lasagna rest and cool slightly for 10-15 minutes before serving. Store refrigerated, reheat in the oven or in a pan, covered, until warmed through. The lasagna gets even more flavorful after a day or two in the fridge. 3.5.3226   You might also like... Lemongrass Mung Beans over Spaghetti Squash Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Rice (Congee, Fried Rice, Veggie Burgers) .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post New Year Glow Meal Plan: Spaghetti Squash (Pho, Lasagna, Tacos, Pesto Noodles) appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

avocado toast recipe | avocado sandwich | avocado bread toast

December 24 2018 hebbar's kitchen 

avocado toast recipe | avocado sandwich | avocado bread toastavocado toast recipe | avocado sandwich | avocado bread toast with step by step photo and video recipe. sandwich and toast recipes are quite common especially for morning breakfast and also as a evening snack. they can be made with several toppings and fillings with different vegetables and spread. one such popular and easy sandwich and toast recipe is avocado toast and avocado sandwich for morning breakfast. The post avocado toast recipe | avocado sandwich | avocado bread toast appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Green Monster Smoothie

December 10 2018 Meatless Monday 

Lentils in a smoothie? Dont scoff just yet! This recipe pairs nutritious lentils with avocado, spinach, apples and pea-based milk for a light and refreshing yet protein-packed drink. This recipe comes to us from USA Pulses. Serves 5   - 1/­­2 cup avocado - 1 tsp fresh ginger - 1/­­2 cup chopped granny smith apples, frozen - 1 frozen banana - 1/­­2 cup cooked green lentils - 1 cup frozen blueberries - 1/­­2 cup spinach - 1 cup pea milk (such as Ripple) - 1 tsp cinnamon   In a blender combine lentils, ginger, spinach and cinnamon, blend until smooth. Add frozen fruit and avocado, begin to blend, adding pea milk slowly until mixture is smooth and well blended. The post Green Monster Smoothie appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Avocado and Chocolate Smoothie

December 1 2018 VegKitchen 

Avocado and Chocolate Smoothie A fast breakfast for a busy morning--we have to admit, its the ideal smoothie! The texture of avocado is the secret to smooth, creamy smoothies, and avocado combines perfectly with chocolate. In addition to its digestive properties, the avocado has another quality: the fatty acids it contains quickly gives the satiety signal to the brain of the person who eats it!   Save Print Avocado and Chocolate Smoothie Serves: 2   Ingredients 1-2 mature avocados 1/­­2 cup spinach 2 cups vegetable milk of your choice 3 tablespoons of good quality cocoa 3 tablespoons maple syrup or honey Instructions Mix all these ingredients together in the blender. Thats it! 3.3.3077   The article Avocado and Chocolate Smoothie appeared first on VegKitchen.

Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Black Beans, Sweet Potatoes, Harissa

November 7 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Black Beans, Sweet Potatoes, Harissa We finally pulled together another meal plan! This ‘mini’ is very simple, seasonally-inspired, and will leave you with a bunch of nourishing food for the week. Everything starts out with a pot of black beans, a batch of roasted sweet potatoes, and a jar of homemade harissa (so easy to make, and such a flavor bomb ingredient!), which will then make their way into three interconnected savory meals and one snack. Ready? Menu - Roasted Sweet Potato and Black Bean Soup - No-Huevos Rancheros - Curried Cauliflower Rice and Beans - Harissa Black Bean Dip *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free, see the recipes for serving sizes Shopping List (Print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, its got all the ingredients youll need for the recipes in this meal plan mini. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Add whatever other ingredients you’ll need for the week here, if doing shopping for the whole week. Produce - 1 large head of garlic - 3 medium sweet potatoes - 3 large yellow onions - 1 large carrot - 2-4 celery ribs - 1 bunch kale (2 packed cups) - 3 limes - 2 lemons - 1 large bunch of cilantro - 2-3 avocados - 1/­­2 lb crimini mushrooms - 1 small head of red cabbage - 1 large head of cauliflower Bulk - 4 cups black beans - 2 cups Basmati rice - 3 large prunes Spices - black pepper - curry powder (1 tablespoon) - bay leaves - 8 dried chipotle chilis - whole caraway seeds - whole coriander seeds - whole cumin seeds - harissa paste – if not making your own Staples - neutral coconut oil or avocado oil - red wine vinegar - sea salt - tahini - kombu (optional) - balsamic vinegar (optional) Other - corn tortillas or other tortillas of choice - 8 sun-dried tomatoes Basic Prep 1) Cook the Black Beans Pot of Black Beans   Print Ingredients 4 cups black beans 2-3 garlic cloves - smashed 2-3 bay leaves 1 sheet of kombu (optional) sea salt Instructions Soak the beans overnight or up to 24 hours in plenty of purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar. Drain and rinse the beans. Place them in a large soup pot with plenty of purified water (about 10 cups). Add the garlic cloves, bay leaves and kombu, if using. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 30 minutes. Taste for doneness. If the beans are not completely soft and buttery inside, continue to cook until fully done. Salt at the last 10 minutes. Drain, saving the cooking liquid. Discard the bay leaves and kombu, if using. 3.5.3226   2) Cook the Rice Pot of Basmati Rice   Print Ingredients 2 cups basmati rice Instructions Cook 2 cups of basmati rice according to the instructions on the package (if your rice came in a package). Or cook the rice according the this method, or any other rice cooking method you prefer, like in a rice cooker, etc. You should end up with about 5-6 cups of cooked rice. 3.5.3226   3) Roast the Sweet Potatoes Roasted Sweet Potatoes   Print Ingredients 3 medium sweet potatoes avocado oil or other neutral oil of choice sea salt freshly ground black pepper Instructions Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare 2 parchment paper-covered baking trays. Peel and cube two of the sweet potatoes and place them on the trays. Sprinkle with avocado oil, salt and pepper, toss to cover and spread into a single layer. Leave the third sweet potato whole, just scrub it and prick with a fork, and place on one of the baking trays. Roast the sweet potatoes for 20-30 minutes, until the cubed ones are soft and browned in places. Toss at half time. The whole sweet potato will take a little longer to bake. Cook it until its easily pierced with a knife. Store the potatoes in an airtight container in the refrigerator. 3.5.3226   4) Make the Harissa (you can also buy harissa paste) Harissa   Print Adapted from Vibrant Food Serves: about 1 cup Ingredients 8 dried chipotle chilis 8 sun-dried tomatoes 1 tablespoon whole caraway seeds 1 tablespoon whole coriander seeds 1 tablespoon whole cumin seeds 1 large garlic clove - minced ¼ cup olive oil juice from ½ lemon 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 1 teaspoon sea salt Instructions Place the chipotle chilis and sun dried tomatoes in a medium bowl and cover with boiling water. Cover the bowl and let soften for about 30 minutes. Toast the caraway, coriander, and cumin seeds in a dry pan over medium heat until fragrant, about 2 minutes, stirring regularly. Grind the seeds using a spice grinder, dedicated coffee grinder, or mortar and pestle. Drain the chilis and sun-dried tomatoes. Remove the seeds and stems from the chilis (wear gloves to protect your hands if sensitive to spice). Place the chilis and sun-dried tomatoes in a food processor, add the toasted and ground spices, garlic, olive oil, lemon juice, vinegar, and salt. Process into a slightly chunky paste. Refrigerate in an air-tight container for up to 1 month. 3.5.3226   Recipes This soup is cozy and incredibly quick to put together once you’ve done all the prep. It gets its rich, earthy flavor from the black bean broth and harissa. Roasted sweet potatoes bring more depth and nourishment to the table, and kale provides a dose of dark leafy green magic. Roasted Sweet Potato and Black Bean Soup   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil or avocado oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped 1 large carrot - sliced 2-4 celery ribs - sliced thin 3 large prunes - chopped sea salt 3 garlic cloves - minced 3 cups cooked beans (from above) 3 teaspoons harissa or more to taste (from above) 5-6 cups black bean broth (from above) 2 cups packed chopped kale leaves 2 cups roasted sweet potatoes (from above) splash of balsamic vinegar (optional) juice of 1 lime cilantro - for garnish Instructions Warm the oil in a medium soup pot over medium heat. Add the onion, carrot, celery and prunes, and sauté for 8 minutes, until the vegetables are soft. Add salt and garlic, stir around for 1 minute. Add the beans, harissa and black bean broth, and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 30 minutes, until all the vegetables are completely cooked. Add the kale, sweet potatoes, splash of balsamic vinegar, if using, and more black bean broth, if needed. Bring back to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for another 10 minutes. Add the lime juice. Taste for salt and spice and adjust if needed. Serve over the prepped rice, garnished with cilantro. This soup freezes very well. 3.5.3226   This huevos rancheros-inspired dish utilizes crimini mushrooms, together with the already prepped black beans, sweet potatoes, and harissa, to make a delicious topping for warm tortillas. Everything comes together in a flash, and it’s a meal that can be easily eaten for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. No-Huevos Rancheros   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil or avocado oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped sea salt ½ lb crimini mushrooms - sliced 1½ cups cooked black beans (from above) harissa - to taste (from above) roasted sweet potatoes (from above) corn tortillas or other tortillas of choice - warmed or charred avocado - sliced or cubed shredded red cabbage - for garnish lime - for serving cilantro leaves - for garnish Instructions Warm the oil in a medium pan over medium heat. Add the onion and salt and sauté for 7 minutes, until translucent. Add mushrooms and sauté for 8-10 minutes, until all the liquid released by the mushrooms evaporates. Add the beans, harissa, and prepped sweet potatoes (amount to taste), and stir to incorporate and warm everything through. Serve the mushrooms and beans over tortillas, topped avocado, shredded red cabbage, a squeeze of lime, and cilantro. 3.5.3226   This re-imagined rice and beans recipe gets its bright flavor from the addition of curry, which is always great at providing a shortcut to flavor. It’s also full of cruciferous goodness from cauliflower, a little zing from lime, and some serious freshness from the essential topping of cilantro. Curried Cauliflower Rice And Beans   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil or avocado oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped 1 large cauliflower - chopped into small florets sea salt 5 garlic cloves 1 tablespoon curry powder, or more to taste 3 cups cooked black beans (from above) 3 cups cooked basmati rice (from above) juice of 1 lime cilantro - to garnish Instructions Warm the oil in a large saucepan. Add the onion, cauliflower and salt, and sauté for about 15-20 minutes, until the cauliflower is soft. Splash some water in the pan if things begin to stick. Add garlic and curry powder, and stir around for 1 minute. Add the beans and rice, and stir to mix everything together until warmed through. Pour the lime juice over top and stir to incorporate. Serve, garnished with cilantro. 3.5.3226   A flavorful dip is a great thing to have on hand at all times. It saves the day during snacking emergencies, but can also be spread on sandwiches and dolloped into bowls. Homemade dips are usually cheaper, healthier, and more flavorful than store-bought ones, and they’re easy to make. All of that is definitely the case with this black bean dip, which is made with the remaining, prep day black beans and whole baked sweet potato. If you happen to have any chipotle in adobo, those are a great addition to this dip as well. Harissa Black Bean Dip   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients the rest of the cooked black beans (from above, about 4 cups) 1 whole roasted sweet potato (from above) - peeled ¼ cup tahini juice from 1 lemon harissa (from above) - to taste sea salt black bean broth (from above) - for thinning, if needed Instructions Combine the beans, sweet potato, tahini, lemon juice, harissa, and sea salt to taste in a food processor and blend until smooth. Add some black bean broth if necessary to thin the dip out. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve, garnished with more harissa, toasted sesame seeds, and a drizzle of good olive oil. This dip freezes well if you end up with leftovers. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Sweet Potato and Kale Salad Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower Coconut-Ginger Eggplant Fried Rice Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Black Beans, Sweet Potatoes, Harissa appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Sweet Potato Wedges with Tahini-Honey Sauce and Everything Bagel Spice

October 24 2018 My New Roots 

Sweet Potato Wedges with Tahini-Honey Sauce and Everything Bagel Spice   Ive now been blogging for eleven years (11years!!!). And in those eleven years, you know what Ive learned about you? You love sweet potatoes. You love tahini. And you love sauce. And if I post anything with those things - or even better - a combination of those things, I know its going to go over well. I often get preoccupied with making my recipe posts totally out there with crazy ingredients, involved techniques, and lose sight of the fact that a lot of you like really simple things too. Just like me. And just like me you like sweet potatoes and tahini and sauce. The sweet potato wedges with tahini-honey sauce and everything bagel spice that I posted on Instagram drew many requests for the recipe. I thought it would be way too easy, but your encouragement reminded me that its okay if its easy! We all have a place for uncomplicated in our lives.     I was first introduced to everything bagel spice while teaching cooking classes down in the states this past summer. One of the women in the group proclaimed that it took avocado toast to the next level, and after trying it once, I was totally hooked. She gave me two jars of the flavour confetti before I flew home, and I have just recently shaken out the last grain of salt. Without a clue on where to buy such a random thing in Canada, I set out to make my own - only I decided to be highly practical and mix up a laughably large batch because it is literally good on everything. For those of you who arent familiar with everything bagel spice mix, its the simplest combination of flaky salt, onion flakes, garlic flakes, sesame seeds, and poppy seeds, which classically tops an everything bagel. It doesnt sound like that much, but trust me, if it can make a white, doughy   this blend far more than the sum of its parts. A generous sprinkle on any dish makes it all that much more dimensional, seasoned, and delicious. My favourite applications for it include sliced garden tomatoes, cucumber, steamed green beans, roasted beets, goat cheese, cauliflower, popcorn, green salads, steamed brown rice or quinoa, eggs, hummus, and sweet potatoes...you see where Im going with this. Maybe its faster to write a list of the foods that it wouldnt be good on? Chocolate cake. There, that was easy.     But Im actually here to talk about sweet potatoes. These gorgeous golden roots are now in season, and the last local tubers being pulled from the earth as I write this. Since I live so close to a number of organic farms here in Ontario, I thought it would be fun to go see them being harvested. I called around my area to see if anyone still had them in the ground, and I got lucky when one place, Fiddlehead Farm, called me back with good news and an invitation out to their field. Fiddlehead Farm is run by a tribe of boss women who support over 150 local families through their CSA program, and hold stands at four different markets. These ladies are busy, and growing a diverse range of vegetables, greens, and herbs that seemed to stretch on for miles. I could tell from walking around the property how passionate they were about their work, and how deeply they care for their little corner of the earth. What an inspiration! Heather, the farms co-owner, hopped off her tractor to introduce herself and show me the goods. She pulled back a tangle of stems and gave a good yank to unearth a juicy bunch of sweet potatoes, all clumped together like a vegetable cuddle puddle. Jackpot! She said it had been a really good year for this particular crop, and right under my feet were literally hundreds of roots waiting patiently to be harvested before the impending frost. Seeing how things grow and meeting the people that work so hard to bring these food gifts to us gives me a deeper appreciation for every bite I take.     Sweet potatoes are nutritional powerhouses, as one of natures best sources of beta-carotene. Beta-carotene is a carotenoid form of vitamin A - an essential anti-inflammatory and antioxidant nutrient. The intensity of a sweet potatos orange flesh is a direct reflection of its beta-carotene content, so find the most vibrant ones you can, and dig in. Remember that you need a little fat to help your body absorb beta-carotene, so a drizzle of olive oil, or dousing your taters in a sauce like the one in this recipe is an important step in receiving those life-giving nutrients. Not a bad deal if you ask me. Sweet potatoes can be enjoyed roasted, steamed, sautéed, or even eaten raw, but however you choose to eat them, keep those skins on! The skin of a sweet potato is loaded with extra fiber to regulate blood sugar and support digestion, potassium to maintain normal blood pressure, and iron to deliver much-needed oxygen to your cells. Scrub sweet potatoes firmly with a soft vegetable brush - you want to remove the dirt but not take the skin away. When purchasing sweet potatoes, look for smooth, even skin without bruises or soft spots. Avoid buying sweet potatoes that are in the fridge, since cold temperatures negatively affect their flavour. Once you get them home, store them in a dry, and well-ventilated place away from a hot spot (like near the stove or on top of the fridge). Instead of keeping them in plastic, which can cause them to mold, store them in an open paper bag to extend their life.   Some notes on the recipe. Other methods Ive seen online for everything bagel spice do not suggest toasting the seeds beforehand, and I think this is a major miss. It makes a huge difference giving the sesame and poppy seeds a quick tour in a hot pan to coax out more of their flavour. If youre in a rush or simply cant be bothered, thats fine, just know that youll be missing out on some bonus taste points. And if you dont want to make three cups of the mix to start, simply half, or even quarter the recipe. I am pretty confident that youll love it though, especially once you try it on avocado toast. The Tahini Honey Sauce makes about one cup (250ml), which is plenty to cover the sweet potato wedges, but make a double batch if you want a great staple dressing for the week ahead. Its delicious on simple green salad, folded into cooked grains, drizzled over roast vegetables, or on avocado toast. The honey taste is present, but not overpowering, so feel free to add more if you want to ramp up the sweetness. For a vegan version, use maple syrup or date syrup in its place.       Print recipe     Sweet Potato Wedges with Tahini- Honey Sauce and Everything Bagel Spice Serves 4 Ingredients: 3 medium organic sweet potatoes (about 1 1/­­2 lbs. /­­ 650g) coconut oil (expeller-pressed and flavour-neutral) sea salt flat-leaf parsley and /­­ or cilantro for garnish chili flakes toasted pumpkin seeds Tahini-Honey Sauce (recipe follows) Everything Bagel Spice Mix (recipe follows) Tahini-Honey Sauce Makes 1 cup /­­ 250ml Ingredients: 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml tahini 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml water 2 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 Tbsp. extra virgin cold-pressed olive oil 1 Tbsp. raw liquid honey (substitute with maple syrup for a vegan version) 1 small clove garlic, minced 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt Big Batch Everything Bagel Spice Mix Makes 3 cups /­­ 430g Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup /­­ 80g garlic flakes 3/­­4 cup /­­ 85g onion flakes 3/­­4 cup /­­100g sesame seeds (any colour you like) 1/­­2 cup/­­ 85g poppy seeds 1/­­2 cup /­­ 80g flaky sea salt (I used Maldon) Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. 2. Scrub the sweet potatoes well under running water. Slice them lengthwise into wedges of your desired thickness. Place them on a baking sheet with space between them (if theyre too close together theyll steam each other and get soggy), and roast for about 20-25 minutes, depending on their size. Remove from the oven when fork-tender. 3. While the sweet potatoes are roasting, make the Tahini-Honey Sauce by placing all the ingredients in a blender and blend until completely smooth. Taste and adjust seasoning if necessary. To thin, add a little water and blend or stir until the desired consistency is reached. Store leftovers in the fridge for five days. 4. Make the Everything Bagel Spice Mix In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast the sesame seeds until fragrant. Remove from heat and let cool. Place poppy seeds in the same skillet, and toast over medium heat until fragrant. Remove from heat and let cool. In a large jar combine the cooled sesame and poppy seeds, garlic flakes, onion flakes, and salt. Shake or stir to combine, and secure with an airtight lid. Store in a cool, dry place away from direct light. Keeps for 3-4 month. 5. To serve, drizzle the Tahini-Honey Sauce over the sweet potato wedges (you can keep them on the baking sheet or plate them as desired), then sprinkle generously with the Everything Bagel Spice Mix, and top with fresh herbs, toasted pumpkin seeds, and chili flakes (but get creative, these are just suggestions!). Enjoy. I want to sign off with a sincere thanks for the past eleven years of support from all of you. It’s hard for me to believe that I’ve been creating in this space for so many years now (I’ve never done anything for this long!), but I wouldn’t have the motivation to keep going if it weren’t for your curiosity, enthusiasm, and appetite for the heart work I put in here. I know that I’ll stay hungry if you do Let’s keep going, together. In sincere gratitude and love, Sarah B. *   *   *   *   *   * I have great news, dear friends! Due to the overwhelmingly positive response to the Life-Changing Loaf Subscription Box, we have reopened the sales so that you can still receive (or give!) the box before the holiday season. Click here for more information, and to subscribe. Thank you very much for your ongoing support of My New Roots! The post Sweet Potato Wedges with Tahini-Honey Sauce and Everything Bagel Spice appeared first on My New Roots.

Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri

October 20 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri Sana on the left Sana Javeri Kadri is the founder of Diaspora Co., a radically different spice collective dedicated to equity, sustainable agriculture, and decolonization. We’ve been fortunate to try Diaspora’s heirloom, organic, single-origin turmeric powder, and let’s just say it’s going to be very hard to go back to enjoying any other powdered turmeric ever again. Sana lives between Mumbai and Oakland, California. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I crave routine and am most productive when Im following a routine. However, Im unable to do deep thinking work or larger creative work in the middle of a hectic routine, so I like to keep at least one day of the week wide open for creative projects and giving myself the time and space I need to create something important. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I have been trying really hard to wake up, spend as little time on my phone as possible and then make myself a nourishing drink and most importantly, make myself some breakfast. One of my worst habits is to wake up, get on my phone, start responding to emails and then quickly get changed for work and dive straight into a full workday without taking any time to nourish myself or check in with my body. It means that by 1pm Im starving, cranky and already tired for the day. The life changing power of breakfast is something Im still learning… -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? My girlfriend and I try not to spend too much time on our phones before bed, or looking at a screen. She recently introduced a 20 mins of reading before bed practice that were trying to stick to, its my favorite way to wind down and Im committing to not responding to work emails at 10:45pm, even if its 11:15am in Mumbai and my team there is just getting fired up. Work in progress. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  My therapist guides me into mindfulness during our sessions every week because I often come in feeling stressed, frantic and a bit fragile. Shes always able to help me get back in touch with my body and begin to feel grounded again. At her urging, I handle all my stressful work calls or emails sitting outside in the sunshine, ideally with my bare feet in the ground. This practice of grounding has been particularly helpful to me in the past few months of managing a stressful season. I also recently downloaded the Headspace app, and just the five minutes everyday of meditation has made a huge difference to me. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – In Oakland – Bread srsly gluten free sourdough, crispy fried egg cooked in ghee topped with smoked paprika, turmeric and salt, sliced avocado or smoky pinto beans or sliced tomatoes or any veggie leftovers I can wrangle from the fridge, maybe a slice of bacon if Im wanting some extra fat. In Mumbai – a loaded crispy veggie dosa. Either way, I love hot and savory breakfast. The cold and sweet breakfast tradition isnt common in India so, cereal and granola with milk culture is something I find very odd about the United States. Lunch – Leftovers express. My girlfriend and I both work long hours, so our saving grace is prepping large meals a couple times a week and then subsisting on leftovers. Gluten-free pasta with canned early girls (I can 80 lb every summer so that we never have to buy store bought tomato sauce) with every vegetable in the fridge/­­our imperfect produce box and ground beef is a family classic. Rosie is always joking that my stomach doubles when it comes to pasta and shrinks for everything else. Shes not wrong. Snack – My favorite snack is stovetop popcorn. Growing up in Mumbai we never had a microwave, it was my parents most loathed kitchen appliance. So now Im following that tradition of never owning a microwave. My favorite stovetop popcorn is popped in ghee and then topped with nutritional yeast, turmeric, and salt. Its perfect. Dinner - My perfect dinner is khichdi (spiced rice and lentils cooked in ghee and heavy on the ginger, turmeric and cumin), thick full fat yogurt, masala okra, a little bit of pickle (Brooklyn Delhi achaars are divine) and a side of spicy amaranth battered fish. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I used to do caffeine, in a delicious ghee, turmeric, cardamom and coconut sugar concoction, but over time Ive stopped being able to handle it. It started to make my stomach hurt and made me anxious. So I now drink either matcha with rice milk and date syrup, or hot chocolate with hemp oil, coconut sugar and adaptogens if Im needing the extra nourishment. Some days, if Ive slept enough and rested enough, I do better on just water and breakfast, no extra boost needed. -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? I had a notorious sweet tooth all the way until my early twenties – I couldnt be trusted with bars of chocolate and was known to sneak spoonfuls of cake first thing in the morning. However the older Ive gotten (Im still technically in the early twenties), sweets just give me a sugar crash and make me feel sluggish. As an avid lover of food, Id rather eat plenty of things that make me feel fantastic, than the things that make me feel terrible. Both Rosie and I have been surprised and how quickly our respective sweet tooths have disappeared since we started living together, and how easily weve been able to cut out sugar from our life once we could verbalize how terrible it made us feel. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I swear by cannabis tinctures. Im not big on cannabis in other ways, but I find cannabis to be the only way to really deal with chronic pain. Ive also started using Super Good Hemps Turmeric Full Spectrum Hemp Oil in my morning drinks, and I find that it has similar effects. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I used to weight lift and do Crossfit pretty intensely, but had a really awful injury in 2016. Since then, Ive really had to reframe my definition of exercise. Now, I consider it an extension of my healing process. Intense exercise just isnt possible for me in the same way, so I stick to swimming as often as I can (usually a couple times a week), doing Nike Training body weight workouts at home, and talking our dog for a long walk every evening. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I love exercise and do best when Im outside and moving my body. Rosie and I try to take our pup Lilly out for a hike at least once a week, and we notice how much more present are with each other and our work when weve exercised.  That being said, Im also an incredibly competitive person, so reframing exercise to no longer be an intensely competitive thing has been very hard for me. I find it difficult to work up the enthusiasm to go on a leisurely swim, without a team to train with, or a competition to work towards. Switching off my producing strategy is my biggest challenge. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Both! It took me a long time to love my face, acknowledge that it was beautiful despite not looking like everything I saw on magazines and on billboards. But that acceptance and love for my external beauty definitely came from tending to, and growing confidence in my inner beauty. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I grew up using raw honey as a face cleanser, handmade ayurvedic soaps for my body, and a mom who never used makeup. So that has informed a lot of my skincare today. My skincare guru is 300% Abena, the founder of Hanahana Beauty, I use her shea butter exfoliating body bar and swear by it, and I use Abenas recipe for a rose water, tea tree oil and jojoba oil soaked cotton pad as a cleanser morning and night, and it has been a complete game changer for getting my glow back. Ive also been using Curology, which is a custom dermatologist service, that is super affordable and came highly recommended by friends. They prescribed me their night cream, which has really taken care of my breakouts and blackheads. Im not usually big on using chemicals on my skin but have found Curology to be a minimalist option that really works. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Cutting out sugar and gluten entirely is the most obvious one – I break out as soon as I am eating sugar, so its first to go. I also use a turmeric, honey, hemp oil and cornmeal face mask every couple weeks that always makes me feel radiant. My dentist has noticed and commented on the huge difference in my teeth that shes seen since I stopped drinking coffee – theyre whiter than ever before and need much less cleaning, which for me is reason enough to skip the coffee. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Abenas DIY rose water, jojoba oil and tea tree oil cotton pads! I used to be a ardent fan of Thayers Rose Witch Hazel Toner but in my experience with skincare – once you go DIY, its impossible to go back :) That being said – I will admit to being a Glossier believer, I didnt use makeup until I discovered Glossier concealer and highlighter. Its so easy and lazy but it works so wonderfully. Stress, Etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Taking our pup out for a long walk by the water is a really grounding activity for me. I have no idea how I managed my stress before she moved in with us. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Honestly Im a spokesperson for not really managing my stress well. My partner often comes home to a fuming, off the hook Sana and it takes significant chatting, massaging and cuddling to work me out of the state that I can get into if Im very stressed.  Im an extrovert and a peoples person so being around people that I love is my best coping mechanism. That being said – I have to be careful not to emotionally dump onto my loved ones, just because theyre willing to be there for me. Ive definitely been guilty of that in the past. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? The first one is to make sure I get a really good nights sleep, and make sure Im not drinking alcohol, eating dairy or any processed food. Usually, managing my sleep and diet is the easiest way to kick a cold before it hits. If the cold cant be stopped, I usually start by accepting that my bodys way of asking for rest is by getting sick, and its important to just honor that and completely rest. Then – turmeric, ginger, honey tea all day long.  -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? Ive been trying really hard to take weekends off, and any weekend that I succeed at that- the balance feels so much better. Honestly, as a young business owner, the hustle is so glamorized and romanticized. Youre told that now is your time to grind, and to get further in your career. Whilst this is true, Id also argue that now is the time to establish healthy boundaries and habits in your life so you learn how to maximize your productivity and your potential. Any day that I work a 16 hour day (which is too often), I know that I am not focusing on the bigger picture, and am actually sacrificing my long term goals as a business owner. Remembering that, and focusing on working more effectively, rather than working more, has been a huge step towards achieving healthier work life balance. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Therapy. Every week, no matter what. That perspective and process is something Im deeply committed to. Therapy rarely feels easy, but it is always in service of myself and my larger goals, so its the easiest way to feel on track. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Eating based on how it makes me feel, not how it sounds or tastes. As soon as I focused on how it made me feel, my taste buds changed, I lost weight, my skin issues cleared and I became a very healthy person, with remarkable ease. I know how obnoxious that sounds, Im sorry. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I fly home to India. I know this is incredibly privileged, and a bit excessive, but shuffling back and forth between two continents constantly gives me a broader perspective, and somehow – the psychology of taking an international flight is an incredibly cathartic and productive experience for me. I almost always come back from my trips to India with fresh eyes, new vision and a bigger picture. Thats true for all travel, in my opinion. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. The fundamental line of Crossfit – eat meat and vegetables, nuts and seeds, some fruit, little starch and no sugar. has influenced my self nourishment beyond any book or movie. I may not be a competitive Crossfit athlete any more but eating to nourish my body is so much more fulfilling than eating to nourish my cravings. Knowledge --  What was your path to starting Diaspora Co.? You can read a lot more about that here, but long story short – Ive been working in the food industry since I moved to the United States in 2012 and I quickly noticed that whilst the farm to table movement felt at its zenith in the Bay Area, it only applied to certain things. Spices and imported foods were somehow excluded from those quality standards. The idea for a new kind of import export company formed in November 2016, and in February 2017 I quit my job and embarked on seven months of research visiting farms, research institutions and markets across India. Diaspora Co. was formally launched as a direct trade sustainable food company with our first offering of turmeric in August 2017. Its been a total rollercoaster since then. --  Can you tell us about the kind of turmeric you sell and how it differs from most turmeric one can buy at a store today? Im biased, but Im also overly honest so I dont think it would be an exaggeration to say that we sell the worlds best turmeric. Historically, there hasnt ever been a quality standard for how to define the highest quality, beyond arguments and branding largely based in exoticism and the colonizer/­­savior mindset. It is the freshest, as in it was harvested in 2018 and is milled every 3 months, versus powders that can be up to five years old and still on a grocery store shelf, stale as ever. It is the most potent variety of turmeric out there, with a tested 4.7% curcumin content. It is a fragrant and exceptional heirloom rhizome variety that compares to other turmeric powders out there as an heirloom summer tomato would to a grocery store store tomato grown for storage not flavor. Finally, it is organically farmed in a spice agriculture landscape where pesticide overuse and residue is notorious. Phew! --  Can you tell us about your decision to pay your turmeric producer really well and about owning the fact that your product costs more because of this? I think part of our work is that what the industry considers paying our producer really well, we consider basic human dignity of paying a living wage and for the price of sustainability, flavor and honest work. If we didnt pay our partner farmers the prices that we do, they wouldnt have the power or the incentive to produce at the standard that they do. To me, this big word decolonizing really just means how are you going to empower the people around you who have historically been stripped of their power? Paying our farmers well is actually the easiest embodiment of our decolonizing mission. As for owning our higher prices – we simply couldnt exist without charging what we do. And ultimately, were dedicating to riding the fine line between being affordable to the home cook and being a leader of sustainability and supply chains and therefore being regarded as a luxury product. I have to believe that we can do both. Turmeric latte blends or turmeric centered businesses that dont want to pay our prices or wholesale from us because theyd like to continue to exploit their sources and maintain their ridiculously high margins, Im in this for the long game and their reckoning will come. It always does. Apologies if I sound cold and jaded, business is vicious and Ive had to steel parts of myself to tolerate it all. --  What are some of your favorite ways to use Diaspora Co. turmeric? Honestly, turmeric was so woven into the fabric of my childhood that it was invisible to me. We cooked with it, made beauty treatments with it, and we used it to mark life and death. So even now, my favorite way to use turmeric is still in simple Indian vegetable dishes – lightly cooked okra tossed in cumin, turmeric and salt is the definition of comfort for me, or a coconut milk turmeric chicken broth with squash and long beans. Comforting, vegetable heavy home cooking is how I innately know how to use turmeric. Lattes just arent for me. --  We love your photos! How did you become a photographer? When I was 14 and going through a really tough phase at school (bullying, puberty, the patriarchy et all), my parents taught me how to use their DSLR. Ive used photography as the lens through which I make sense of and connect with the world ever since. When my academic pursuits turned to food and agriculture in college, my lens turned to it too. In so many ways, I recognize that I was never particularly talented or the best or the brightest, I was always just a really solid worker, and entirely self motivated, and that meant that once I started photographing, I just never stopped, and now here we are. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Ive found that balancing my role as a business owner with my role as a photographer is what gives me the most joy professionally. So I have a couple exciting photo shoots planned for the coming months that will be a welcome respite to the chaos of holiday e-commerce. That, and I havent seen my girlfriend and pup in almost a month since Ive been in India and I miss them terribly, so very excited to come home to my two favorite living beings. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Were so lucky to live in Oakland, where eating out is an incredible experience, especially at a time where women chefs are absolutely excelling in their field. So eating delicious meals by our favorite local women chefs is my favorite treat – Cosecha Cafe (Mexican), Nyum Bai (Cambodian), Champa Garden (Laotian) and 20th Century Cafe (Eastern European) to name a few.  -- A book to feed the soul:  I just finished reading Yvon Chounards Let My People Go Surfing and its been so deeply inspiring to me. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Akwaeke Emezi, they are my favorite writer, a member of this third culture/­­diaspora/­­immigrant excellence interweb community and has navigated their self care so beautifully and visibly through the years. Id love to learn more from them. Photos by Sana Javeri Kadri, Sophie Peoples, Assad Keval /­­/­­ This post contains Amazon Affiliate Links You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Ashley Neese Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Amanda Forcella Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Aubergine Polpette - Three Ways

October 12 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Vegan Aubergine Polpette - Three Ways Our first thought was to do a classic Lady and the Tramp Spaghetti and Meatball dish with this polpette recipe, but then we decided that it was too expected. So here is instead another spin on our one makes three-series. Where we use one staple food in three different recipes. We really love this series because it reflects so much how we actually eat. It’s not always an entirely new meal every day but more of a flow where the same components are repeated with new pairings. These polpette or vegan meatballs are perfect for this. They are good on their own - tender and very flavorful. And they are also insanely versatile, rolled into a wrap, tangled into pasta, paired with a spicy tomato sauce and hummus or tossed in a crunchy vegan take on a caesar salad. Vegan Aubergine Polpette Makes around 40 balls 2 medium sized aubergines 2 red onions 4 tbsp olive oil 100 g /­­ 1 cup almond flour 120 g /­­ 1 cup cooked lentils 4 tbsp pickled capers, drained and finely chopped 2 tbsp raisins zest from 1 lemon 15 leaves basil leaves salt Preheat the oven to 200°C  /­­ 400°F. Peel and chop the onion finely and chop the aubergine into small dices. Stir fry both in a large skillet with the oil for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally, until very soft. When soft, add to a food processor with the rest of the ingredients. Pulse a few times to mix everything together. You want a very chunky sticky texture but dont pulse too much or youll end up with a mushy mixture. Remove the knife blades and shape 30-40 small balls with your hands. Place them on a baking tray covered with baking paper and bake for 25 minutes. Store in the fridge or freeze them. Scroll down for three ways to serve them. Hummus with spicy tomato sauce, polpette and cucumber salad 1 batch vegan aubergine polpette (see recipe above) 1 batch Hummus, see this recipe or store-bought hummus Spicy tomato sauce Serves 4 1 tbsp olive oil 1 red onion 1 garlic clove 1 tsp cumin 1 tsp harissa paste (or 1 red chili) 2 x 400 g tins tomatoes 1/­­2 tsp sea salt, to taste Heat the oil in a large sauce pan on medium heat. Peel and finely chop the onion and garlic and add them to the sauce pan  together with the spices. Let sauté for a few minutes until soft not browned and then add  the tomatoes and salt. Let cook for at least 20 minutes, until rich and fragrant. It will become sweeter and rounder in flavour the longer you leave it on. Store the sauce you are not using tonight in glass bottles in the fridge. Cucumber salad 1/­­2 cucumber 2 tsp olive oil 1/­­2 lemon, juice + zest 1 pinch sea salt 1 small handful fresh dill Finely dice the cucumber and place in a bowl. Add olive oil, lemon juice and zest, salt and dill and toss to combine. Arrange the hummus in shallow bowls and make a well in the middle. Place a couple of spoonfuls tomato sauce in the well, add a few aubergine polpette and a few spoonfuls cucumber sallad. Vegan Wrap with Polpette, Ajvar and Krauts Serves 4 4 wrap breads /­­ tortilla breads, gluten free or whole grain 4 lettuce leaves 4 cavalo nero or kale, stems removed 1 cup cooked white quinoa 4 tbsp ajvar dressing 1/­­2 cucumber, cut into sticks 4 tbsp sauerkraut (see recipe here) 1 batch aubergine polpette (see recipe above) Place one lettuce leave and one kale leave on each tortilla bread, then place 2-3 tbsp quinoa in the middle, a dollop ajvar, cucumber slices, sauerkraut and top with a couple of aubergine polpette. Fold the top and bottom edges over the filling. Roll the whole tortilla from left to right to wrap in the filling. Roll some parchment paper around them and tie with a string to hold them together. Vegan Ceasar Salad with Polpette Serves 4 1 head Cosmopolitan lettuce 1 batch aubergine polpette (see recipe above) 2 avocados, stone/­­peel removed and sliced 2 small apples, cored and sliced 2 tbsp sunflower seeds, toasted Dressing 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml cold pressed neutral oil (organic rapeseed) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml soy milk, unsweetened 2-3 tsp lemon juice 1 tsp dijon mustard 1 tbsp pickled capers, drained 1 large pinch salt Add all dressing ingredients to a tall glas or blender cup. Mix with a stick blender on high speed for about 15 seconds or until you have a creamy white dressing. Taste and adjust the flavours to your preference. Add more oil and blend again if you like it thicker. Tear the lettuce into bite size pieces and place in a mixing bowl. Add 2 tbsp vegan mayo dressing and toss to cover. Then transfer to a serving platter and arrange avocado slices, apple slices and aubergine polpette and last, scatter over toasted sunflower seeds.

Candied Chocolate Dipped Citron + Video

January 31 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Candied Chocolate Dipped Citron + Video I’m constantly amazed by the fact that nature gives us the exact things we need during each given season. Citrus season might be my favorite fruit season, just because it’s such a ray of sunshine in the midst of winter bleakness. The contrast between the quiet darkness of this time of year and the bright, juicy, sweet citruses that spring up at the stores is especially intense. Our grocery store is exploding with all kinds of citrus varieties, more than I can count on my two hands. I couldn’t resist getting a few citrons, since they smelled amazing, and I had never tried them before. I knew that they have a really thick rind (they are mostly rind really), which is great for candying. After doing some research, I also learned that citron is one of the original citrus fruit, from which a lot of the other household citruses were developed. So, to celebrate this year’s citrus season, I made some candied, chocolate-dipped citron. The process will make your kitchen smell amazing, and the result is such a unique and delicious treat, with a perfect balance of sweetness, bitterness, and citrusy zing. I also made a ‘day of eating’ video, which takes you through the whole candying process, as well as a day of plant-based meals. All the recipes and things mentioned in the video are linked below :) Video links: Magic Moisturizer Gua Sha Routine Shortcut Steel Cut Oats Pasta e Ceci (Chickpea Noodle Soup) Candied Chocolate Dipped Citron   Print adapted from David Lebovitz Serves: about 1½ cups Ingredients 2 citrons 1½ cup maple syrup or a mixture of maple syrup and honey (not vegan) 1 cup water, plus more for blanching the citron pieces ½ - ¾ cup chocolate chips Instructions Wash and dry the citrons. Cut out any flesh and seeds (you can juice the flesh and use the juice in your water, in salad dressing, or as an acidic finish to any savory dish), then cut the rind into strips. Put the rind strips in a medium pot, cover with water, and blanch the citron pieces in simmering water for 30 minutes, until translucent. Drain the citrons and return to the same pot. Add the maple syrup/­­honey (if using) and water. Bring the mixture up to a boil, stirring a few times. Turn the heat down to establish a strong simmer, and simmer until the syrup reduces, almost completely. You should be left with candied citron strips, covered in a thin layer of syrup. This will take about an hour or more. Let cool for about 15 minutes. Transfer the strips to a wire drying rack to let any excess syrup drain off. Meanwhile, melt the chocolate chips on a double boiler. Dip each citron strip into the chocolate, so that its about half way covered. Transfer back to the drying rack. Once youve dipped all the citron strips in the chocolate, transfer the whole rack to the refrigerator to let the chocolate harden. Keep the candied citron refrigerated in an airtight container. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... Rose and Lavender Parfait and a Breakfast with Friends Chocolate Avocado Truffles and Concord Grape Sorbet Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats Clementine Fudge Cake .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Candied Chocolate Dipped Citron + Video appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Spicy Dark Chocolate Chili Bowl

January 28 2019 Meatless Monday 

This recipe contains heart healthy beans and avocado as well as a variety of anti-inflammatory spices. This recipe comes to us from Bonnie Taub-Dix, RDN . Bonnie says: “What I love about this recipe is that you dont really have to follow it exactly -- you can use your favorite ingredients. Im a recipe rebel so Im always improvising and swapping ingredients.” Serves 6 - For the chili - 1 medium onion, chopped - 5 cloves garlic, minced - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 1 teaspoon cumin - 1 teaspoon turmeric - 1 teaspoon chili powder - 1/­­8 teaspoon cinnamon - 1/­­4 teaspoon red pepper flakes - 1/­­4 cup dark chocolate chips - 1 can (28 ounces) crushed tomatoes - 2 cans (16 ounces) kidney beans in chili sauce   - Toppings - 2 tablespoons cheddar cheese, shredded - 1/­­2 cup corn kernels, cooked - 1/­­2 each red, yellow and orange bell peppers, chopped - 1/­­2 avocado, chopped - 1/­­2 cup crushed multigrain tortilla chips - To taste salt and pepper   Directions: In a large frying pan, cook onion and garlic in oil for approximately 5 minutes. Add cumin, turmeric, chili powder, cinnamon and pepper flakes and cook until fragrant. Add tomatoes, beans, chocolate chips. Stir together well. Simmer for approximately 15 minutes. Place chili in bowl, and sprinkle one row each of cheese, corn kernels, peppers, avocado, and tortilla chips on top of chili.   Note: Serving suggestions -- place chili over brown or wild rice and then add toppings. Sauté bell peppers, if preferred. The post Spicy Dark Chocolate Chili Bowl appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Quinoa, Mango, Jicama Salad

January 20 2019 Meatless Monday 

This recipe comes to us from Chef Ronaldo Linares and is featured in his cookbook Chef Ronaldo’s Sabores de Cuba: Diabetes-Friendly Traditional and Nueva Cubano Cuisine . Chef Ronaldo says this about the recipe: “You get a great balance of protein, fat, and carbs in this tasty recipe. Being a mango lover this recipe allows me to enjoy it in a different way. The crunch of the jicama, the nutty flavor from the quinoa, and the fresh herbs add the perfect touch. This is also a great meal prep salad, bring to work in a mason jar, put the dressing in a separate container, and when ready mix everything up. For me it;s about keeping it simple and maximizing the flavors.” Serves 6 - For the quinoa - 1 cup quinoa - 1 1/­­2 cups water - 1/­­4 teaspoon avocado oil - 1/­­4 teaspoon kosher salt   - For the salad - 1 cup jicama, peeled and cut into 1/­­4- - inch cubes - 1/­­4 cup thinly sliced red onion - 3 ounces mango, peeled and cubed - 3 radishes, cut into thin rounds - 1 tablespoon finely chopped cilantro - 1/­­4 teaspoon cracked black pepper - 1 tablespoon lime juice - 1/­­4 teaspoon chili powder - 1/­­4 teaspoon avocado oil   Rinse quinoa with cold water in a colander. Add quinoa, water, oil, and salt to a rice cooker and cook. This should take about 20 minutes. Once the quinoa is done, fluff it with a fork and spread it onto a baking sheet to cool. Set aside. Once quinoa has cooled, transfer it to a large bowl. Add jicama, onion, mango,radishes, cilantro, and pepper. Toss gently to incorporate. Set aside. In a small bowl, add lime juice, chili powder, and avocado oil, and whisk together for about 30 seconds to create a light flavorful dressing. Add dressing to the bowl with all the ingredients and mix together gently so the dressing is fully incorporated with the salad ingredients. The post Quinoa, Mango, Jicama Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Self-Care Interview Series: Erin Lovell Verinder

December 30 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Erin Lovell Verinder Erin Lovell Verinder is a herbalist, nutritionist and energetic healer living in the wilds of the Byron Bay hinterland in Australia, working with clients locally in her Sydney clinic and worldwide via Skype. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I honestly love both. I keep certain parts of my day very structured especially around work days and where I can, I claim open space. I follow structure to bring in the foundations of support that are essential for me to thrive and maintain my balance. Like slow mornings, connecting to nature, enjoying a whole nourishing breakfast. But then I open up my days where possible to flow & allow spontaneity. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I keep my mornings slow and sacred, it’s been a very intentional movement towards this over the years. I wake with the sunlight pouring into our bedroom, we live in an old church and the light in here is just next level serene. I always keep the blinds open to allow my body rhythms to harmonize with the sun and moon cycle. This regulates your cortisol and melatonin in such a fundamental way. I allow myself to wake slowly, no rush, no jump out of bed, no alarms, no startle response! I will then take time to do some stretching sequences with conscious breath, and then sit for a 20 minute meditation. Followed by a morning dog walk around our very green country town. Other mornings it’s a swim in the ocean with my husband and a lazy lay on the sand. After this, it’s breakfast time. I brew a tea, or make a tonic and take that out into the garden. I really feel it’s so important to have a whole breakfast, and we really honour that in our household, we sit and chat and connect over a meal before the day unfolds. I do my absolute best to only engage in anything work related after 8am and completely screen free before then is the daily goal. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Yes! I am super ritualistic about the evening wind down. I ensure I am off all screens at least two hours before sleep. I feel this is so greatly important to allow our bodies to align and flow into the yin cycle of the night. I switch off all overhead lights and only use very warm low light lamps as the sun sets. This is another trick to converse with your body to wind down, let go of any tasks and prep for rest. I read, write, listen to music and savour evenings for creative flow and conversation with my husband. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  Many. I practice conscious breath and meditation as my main allies. But I also spend A LOT of time with plants, growing, making, conversing and in nature scapes. This is for me the ultimate mindfulness practice of oneness, presence and connection. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Scrambled eggs with turmeric, garlic and greens, avocado and some home fermented veggies on the side.  Lunch – Wild caught Mahi Mahi with tarragon, parsley, lemon and garlic cooked in ghee, on top of a bed of greens with some roasted sweet potato on the side. (Literally one of my favourite dishes ever) Snack – I love smoothies. Often a smoothie, my current fav is Strawberries, cashew nut butter, cashew nut mylk, collagen, hemp seeds, tocos, cinnamon, vanilla powder & ashwaganda powder. Dinner - San choy bow, with a rainbow of veggies & lots of bold ginger flavour in vibrant cos lettuce cups. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I actually do not, I am completely stimulant free. I have not always been, but just find myself so very sensitive to any stimulants these days. I used to love love love a great spicy black chai tea but since going caffeine free I have replaced it with a dandelion chai blend I make myself that is just so warming and grounding I adore it. Plus no crazy energy spikes and lows, so thats a plus! -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? At the same time when I let go of stimulants, I completely let go of sweets- even natural sweeteners. In the past I have been an avid lover of raw chocolate and quite the connoisseur (ha) but these days I make my own carob chocolate that has no sweetener in it at all. I love carob as it’s very sweet naturally so you can get away with no added sweeteners. I pair it with vanilla powder and they work synergistically to give a natural sweetness that I find so comforting. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I do utilize supplement support as needed, this shifts as my body shifts. I love Vitamin C on so many levels but particularly for its adrenally restorative healing elements, so it is absolutely in my daily supplement routine, alongside Magnesium citrate on the daily. With herbs, I will vary what I am taking depending on my needs. I add herbal powders and medicinal mushrooms to my tonics and smoothies. Currently my favourites are Withania (Ashwaganda) and Reishi. I also am a huge lover of infusions (long loose leaf herbal brews) and always have a big jar of an overnight infusion with me to sip throughout my day. My most utilized blend would be Nettle leaf, Oat straw and Hibiscus. Earthy, calming, tangy and nourishing. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Years go I had a heinous back injury, I herniated multiple discs from overexercising. My approach and relationship to body movement completely shifted after this, from rigorous to gentleness. It is still an area of my life I have to encourage myself back to and approach more as an act of self love. Taking care of my temple. I walk my pups daily, I love pilates and swimming, I have begun the be.come project and absolutely LOVE the approach to body movement with body positivity, inclusivity, no need for any equipment and in the comfort of my own home. This all feels really supportive and a mix of gentle yet effective support for me and my body. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I am not a natural athlete by any measure! I have recently connected to how emotional it can be to return to body movement when you have been through a big physical injury/­­body change/­­life change. So for me the way I psyche myself up to do a session is to come from self love, to know this is a loving act of care for my body. That really helps me so much. Also knowing there are no rules to how you must move your body, allow exercise to meet your vibration- yin, yang and all between. Shifting the type of body movement I do with my menstrual cycle/­­hormones is so key. Be your own compass. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Authenticity, when someone is just purely themselves and at ease with it. I find it absolutely stunning. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Oils, oils and more oil. I swear by the dewy hydration of oils. I am pretty low maintenance with skin care, and have noticed I need a lot less intervention since moving to the sea and swimming in the ocean most days. The salt magic is so nourishing for the skin. I also find the sun very healing, contrary to the fear of UV rays we have been indoctrinated with! I use a homemade herbal balm for a lot of applications, hair mask, makeup remover, and moisturizer. It is a power packed plant based mix, and such a heavenly blend. I also use Ritual oil, a moringa and blue lotus oil as a body moisturizer.  I am in my mid 30s and really notice my skin responds so well to the dewy goodness of oils. I practice dry body brushing also, which I feel is so wonderful to aid stagnation and lymphatic flow. I use a jade roller which I keep in the fridge for extra lymphatic cooling, and use on my face every few days with oil. I always end my showers with cold water, to add in a hydrotherapy element. I wear very little makeup, but when I do it is always natural, as clean as can be. I love RMS and Ere Perez. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? The importance of a vibrant whole foods diet and hydration is EVERYTHING! So many compounds in our foods, fruit + veggies are anti aging and collagen boosting anti oxidant heros. I drink 3+ litres of filtered water daily and do my very best to eat a rainbow of seasonal organic fruit/­­veggies daily and honestly I rely on this to support my health, skin and hair primarily. I do add in a marine based collagen daily to either smoothies or tonics. Also I am in a stage of encouraging my hair to grow, and am using nettle, rosemary and horsetail infusions as a hair rinse. I also massage in olive oil and rosemary oil into my scalp, truly it is so simple and aids hair growth. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? A low tox life is key. Keep your stress in check, move your body, eat as clean as possible – mostly plants, organics or pesticide free produce, clean water and clean air. The most incredibly glowy humans I know follow this ethos. This has been my guideline and I am often told I really do not look my age. I am so at ease with ageing but it is always nice to hear you are maintaining a youthful glow! Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  I really do. I work for myself and direct all of my offerings at this point. This can be demanding and means work can have a never-ending feel. There are always so many thoughts, needs and energy streams flowing into my work life. I also feel when you work as a space holder and in the healing realms, your energy output can be hefty. Burn out is high in this line of work, as you truly want to assist so deeply to aid others, we can often throw our needs to the side. I have learnt this many times in my years as a clinician/­­healer. I implement a lot of consistency with a structured clinic week~ limiting the amount of clients I see weekly to where I feel my energy is at and how many clients I can truly be present for. I balance myself with time off, away from screens, in nature and welcome in receiving energy to counteract my giving energy. My self care practice is the core of how I seek balance. I am actually freakily good at giving back to myself, which I believe enables me to do what I do! -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? For me, it is much healthier to come at it head on.. (typical Aries answer!) I do my finest to address the stressors, and clear the way. Whether this means a mountain of admin,  which is often a stressor for me as I not a natural lover of admin. I bunker down, switch off all other distractions, play some flute music or chants, burn some incense and get in the zone. When I exit that zone I feel so accomplished and reward myself with an ocean swim, or a nature walk to balance out the mental space I have been in. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? First and foremost I rest. Immunity can be a very strong conversation our bodies communicate to us with the message of needed REST. My go to supplement and herbal approach is to take a high dose of Vitamin C consistently in divided doses throughout my day, I also add in zinc supplements. I always have an immune focused liquid herbal tonic in my first aid support cabinet, so I begin this at a high frequent dose to meet the acute presentation of a cold/­­virus~ generally dosing up to 4 x daily. Usually it will have Echinacea, andrographis, elderberry, manuka, thyme in it. I love medicinal mushrooms to support immunity so I will take a blend of Reishi and Chaga in higher doses. I avoid raw foods and focus on lots of cooked warming nourishing food to feed the cold, congees, broths, soups, stew. I also make fresh oregano, thyme with sliced lemon &  ginger tea. If I really honour the rest that is needed, the cold/­­rundown feelings will shift very swiftly. -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? The best thing I ever did was to get a separate work phone. I have a dedicated phone that my clients can contact me on, so in my free time it is left at home or on silent. This has helped me enormously create healthy boundaries. I also do not have my work emails on my phone, so I do not check them at all unless I am sitting down at my computer to work. It is so important to be available to your own process and own life, especially when you are in the field of assisting others. These simple interventions help fortify those boundaries greatly for me. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I return to softness with myself if I lose my way a little. I do my best to not judge or engage in negative self talk. I soften and return to my centre. We all have patterns we are cycling. Although I feel I am quite a master of my own self care practice I definitely can get caught up in my workload a fair bit. One thing I do consciously do is to book a treatment in weekly in some form, usually a bodywork-massage session. I find this tactile healing so restorative. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? I recently moved from the mountains to the sea, although they are both completely beautiful nature rich locations I was very much in need a big environment change for my own health and wellbeing.  Having lived in a very cold environment mountain side for 10 + years I was craving the warmth, the salt and the sun. Being by the ocean and soaking up the sun rays has been so fundamentally healing for me at this point. Total game changer! The power of changing your environment is so potent when you feel the call to do so. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I acknowledge that this too shall pass, it is transient. I do my best to trust my own creative genius. I am quite a forward motion person, so when I am feeling uninspired it absolutely can get me down. I am naturally a procrastinator in many ways, which can be so frustrating but saying that I also have the ability to then smash out the tasks in an uncanny way! I often find when I am not in such a wonderful place with myself I feel that sense of stagnation, so I do my very best to get to the roots of that stagnation. Often it takes me getting into nature to be re inspired, crafting out some quiet space to re energize and tackle the task head on. I try to ask myself what is the block, and unpack the block to free up the energy flow. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. As cheesy at it sounds I LOVED Practical Magic, the witchy plant potions and the apothecary Sandra Bullocks character opened was a total inspiration for me as teenager.. & still is now (lol). Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming a herbalist, nutritionist, and energetic healer? How do all of those practices interweave for you? I was always drawn to the esoteric realms and the mystery of nature. As a little girl I loved being outside, I loved the flowers, the trees, the plants, the grasses, the oceans, the mountains. I loved being an observer and always felt so held when I was in nature. As soon as I began to understand that plants could have a positive effect on our health, it just fascinated me. Learning about folklore of plant medicine, applications and remedies drew me into a language I wanted to be fluent in. I believe that much of our call to the plant path is remembering, these plants  have been with us through our ancestral lines for eons. My career began really at the age of 16 with energetic healing, I met a group of wild women up north in Australia and was welcomed into circles, introduced to the concepts of healing, and recognized as a student of these realms. I learnt reiki which led to crystal healing, then to sound healing, colour therapy, kinesiology.. I went to a college for 2 years to learn energetic healing in depth and graduated by the age of 19 holding full in depth sessions on auric healing and clearing energetic blockages. For me it felt too much too soon. So I went and travelled, met my husband in the USA and studied a whole lot more. When I returned to Australia I wanted to anchor my knowledge of healing with more grounded modalities so I began studying Naturopathic medicine. I forked off into a Bachelor of Western Herbal Medicine and Nutritional Medicine. I loved learning about plants and food as medicine, I loved the union of science and grass roots knowledge. Over years of being in practice, I have found that there is no way or no need to seperate these modalities. I weave them all in together to ultimately support the client in a very holistic way. I approach my practice with this lens of perception. I lead with intuition, and merge functional testing, pathology testing, traditional folk medicine, evidence based plant medicine, nutritional medicine, and energetics all to support. I believe there are always energetics involved in a health presentation, along with the demand for nutritional healing as powerful ally, and herbal medicine to assist, shift and support. Aligning these healing modalities is a potent combination. Essentially the basis of Naturopathic Medicine is individualised care, no one case is the same. This ethos rings true to me, there is not one client I have worked with that is the same as any other. How can we approach health in one way, or believe there is one remedy for one presentation? It goes against the nature of our uniqueness! My practice is about honouring the individuals path, story and health goals. -- You put a lot of emphasis on gut health in your practice and believe it to be the root to all balanced health. Can you talk a little bit about why you see this as such an important aspect of wellbeing?  All diseases begin in the gut – Hippocrates had it right! So many issues stem from the gut, it is the root of our health. With the emergence of continued evolving science we are seeing so much more information come to light around the microbiome/­­microbiota, which is truly wonderful. Much of our immunity is linked with gut health, it impacts mental health greatly with our second brain residing in the gut producing neurotransmitters, it is involved in the auto immune expression, it defines our ability to absorb and produce nutrients/­­vitamins/­­minerals, it impacts our metabolism, it is directly connected to our stress response and digestion responds accordingly.. And so much more... I work very closely with digestive healing with each and every one of my clients as I believe this is a key element to balanced health and shifting imbalanced symptoms. Many of my clients present with poor digestion and we dig like detectives to get to the roots, often it is a leaky gut like picture – with parasites, yeast overgrowths or SIBO which we generally detect via functional testing. Once we have a good sense of what is actually happening in the gut, we go in with a supportive treatment plan – lifestyle, supplemental, nutritional and herbal interventions. It always astounds me how health can transform so greatly, from imbalanced to balanced with the right support, intention and dedication. Our bodies are so wise, and so willing to transform. -- What is your favorite way of incorporating herbal medicine into your (or your clients) everyday life? I personally incorporate it in so many ways. I make my own products and use them on my skin and in my home on the daily, I drink herbal teas and infusions daily and use tonic herbs to support my body/­­being. I have a herbal garden that is buzzing right now, so connecting with the plants via gardening is medicine to me. There is something so potent about growing and caring for a plant and utilising her healing, knowing the story of the plants beginnings enhances the healing power I believe. For clients~ it really depends but I do always advise infusions to become a part of their everyday lives. They are so very simple and accessible, basically a long brewed overnight tea! If you are working with me in a session we will touch on many ways to incorporate plant medicine into your life, from the herbs that are suitable for your current process, to cleaning up your skin care with more plant love, to working with herbal tablets/­­liquid tonics for marked support. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? This next year feels so full of creativity, as I expand and launch multiple new offerings. Right now I am in a potent brewing stage, so I look forward to it all coming to fruition! -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Days off at the beach, going into the bush, gardening in my medicinal plant patch, reading a great book, screen free days, massages, hugs with my husband & dogs. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Braiding Sweetgrass – Robin Wall Kimmerer Song –  Stay – Cat Power/­­ Ba Movie –  Call me by your name Piece of Art –  A oil pastel pencil drawing gifted to me by my husband and family by my dear friend and incredible creator Chanel Tobler called Curves like jam -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Emily Lami from Bodha, she is a scent magician. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri Self-Care Interview Series: Sasha Swerdloff Self-Care Interview Series: Lucy Vincent Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Erin Lovell Verinder appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Magic Moisturizer

December 16 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Magic Moisturizer This has been the moisturizer to end all moisturizers for us. Its lush, deeply hydrating, made with all natural ingredients, and so easy to whip up at home. It has also gained a mini-cult following among our friends. It’s been reported to help with cold sores, eczema, and chronically dry skin. It’s impossible for anyone to stay indifferent to the luxurious texture (very much like whipped butter) and dreamy scent (not unlike the most heavenly dessert) of this moisturizer. It evokes all kinds of emotion :) I’m pretty sure that every person who tried it urged us to package and sell it. Instead of doing that, we thought we would share the recipe here, which just seems more fun in every way. Also, we find gift guides to be overwhelming and don’t have one for you this year, but this magic moisturizer would make for an amazing, thoughtful, homemade gift. Our Experience Anya: A few years ago, I got really into making my own natural skincare and tried lots of different moisturizer recipes. A lot of them were nice and smelled really good, but none turned out completely perfect. That was until I decided to experiment with mixing raw cacao butter into a moisturizer formula I kind of liked, and the result completely blew me away. Cacao butter gives the cream a special, light, whipped texture, and the scent is out of this world. I especially like combining it with citrusy essential oils like blood orange, sweet orange, lemon, and lime, since orange and chocolate is one of my favorite scent pairings ever. I’ve been using this moisturizer exclusively for the past two years, and I honestly can’t imagine life without it. I usually apply it while doing this facial massage, which makes it absorb really well. Masha: I have very dry skin that likes to be moisturized both morning and night. Ive tried a bunch of natural moisturizers, and this homemade one came out on top every single time. I love the way it smells and how deeply hydrating it is for my skin. I also like the fact that I can curate the ingredients, depending on what I feel my skin needs, especially when it comes to the essential oils. As a bonus, this cream really helps soothe my eczema, which pops up above my eyelids occasionally, when Im stressed. I make sure to include some lavender oil in the recipe in those cases, since its really healing for inflamed skin. It’s also wonderful to use for our favorite gua sha routine. Since this moisturizer is homemade and full of natural oils, its not exactly non-greasy. What I personally like to do is put it on right as I wake up. That way, it has a chance to absorb while I eat breakfast and get ready, and I dab away any extra shininess with a washcloth once Im ready to head out the door. And at night, the little bit of shine on my face is not a problem, since I put it on right before bed. A Little Bit on Essential Oils The beauty of making your own skincare at home is that you can completely curate your own ingredients, especially when it comes to essential oils. There are essential oils that are good for all kinds of skin conditions, like acne, scarring, eczema, rosacea, dryness, etc. It’s best to do your own research, experiment, and see what essential oils work for you. Our favorite two books on the subject are Renegade Beauty and Just the Essentials. It’s also important to note that essential oils are powerful stuff, and might evoke skin sensitivities, so it’s a good idea to test them out and see if your skin likes them, before committing to making a whole batch of the moisturizer (or anything else). 2 of our favorite essential oil combinations for this moisturizer: – Italian lemon, lavender, spearmint – blood orange, sweet orange, lemon, lime skincare superstars that we include in every batch: – turmeric – carrot seed other great ones we often add: – geranium – palma rosa – bay leaf – peppermint – clary sage – frankincense Magic Moisturizer   Print Ingredients 2 oz raw cacao butter - shredded 2 oz virgin, cold-pressed coconut oil 1 oz good quality beeswax - shredded 4 oz any good quality, virgin, cold pressed oil like olive, avocado, almond (or a mix of a few) 1 oz cold-pressed jojoba oil 1 tablespoon cold-pressed calendula oil (optional) 1 teaspoon pure vitamin E oil 9 oz distilled water about 80-100 drops of any mix of essential oils of choice (see above for more on essential oils) Instructions Melt the cacao butter, coconut oil, and beeswax on a double boiler. Remove from heat. Mix in the rest of the oils and vitamin E. Once you remove this mixture from the heat, it might start solidifying quickly, especially if youre in a cool temperature room, so act fast and prepare for the next step in advance. In an upright blender, start blending the distilled water on low. Slowly pour in the oil mixture, turn up the speed to medium-low, and blend until it emulsifies, about 1 minute. Add the essential oils and pulse to combine. Take care not to over-blend. Transfer to (preferably glass) containers with air-tight lids. I like to keep a small batch of the moisturizer out in my bathroom for quick access, and the rest in the refrigerator, which will keep the moisturizer fresher for longer. The moisturizer softens at room temperature and hardens when refrigerated. Notes The quality of ingredients really matters for this moisturizer, so strive to use organic, cold-pressed, virgin, and unrefined ingredients. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Our Favorite Gua Sha Routine - Video .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Magic Moisturizer appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Black Bean Nachos

December 10 2018 Meatless Monday 

Nachos get a healthy plant-based boost with nutritious black beans, which are sauteed with Tabasco sauce for a little heat and honey for a little sweet. This crowd-pleasing recipe comes together in no time and can be customized with your favorite toppings. This recipe comes to us from Golden Blossom Honey. Serves 6 - 1/­­2 medium onion, chopped - 1 clove garlic, minced - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 (15 ounce can) black beans, drained and rinsed - 2 dashes Tabasco sauce - 1 tablespoon honey - 3 medium tomatoes, chopped - 1 jalapeno pepper, seeded and minced - 2 scallions, chopped - 1 (8 1/­­2 ounce) bag tortilla chips - 4 ounces sharp cheddar cheese, grated - 4 ounces Monterey Jack cheese, grated - 1 avocado, peeled and sliced - 3 tablespoons fresh cilantro, chopped - sour cream - salt and pepper to taste   Preheat oven to 475°.   Saute onion and garlic for 5 minutes in olive oil over medium heat. Reduce heat. Add black beans and Tabasco sauce. Stir in honey. Cook for 10 minutes, stirring often. In a medium bowl, mix together tomatoes, jalapeno pepper, and scallions. Place tortilla chips evenly on baking sheet. Place black bean mixture over chips, followed by tomato mixture and grated cheeses. Bake for about 5 minutes, until cheese melts. Top with avocado slices, cilantro and sour cream. The post Black Bean Nachos appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Sweet Potato and Lentil Mason Jar Salad

November 12 2018 Meatless Monday 

The recipe below makes one serving of a fantastic make-ahead salad, packed with plant-powered ingredients like lentils and sweet potatoes. So stock your fridge with a few servings and youll be set with nourishing lunches all week long! This recipe comes to us from our friends at USA Pulses. Serves 1 - For the Salad: - 1 cup sweet potato (diced) - 1/­­2 cup cup green lentils (cooked) - 1/­­2 cup couscous (cooked) - 1/­­2 cup arugula - 1/­­4 cup dried cranberries - 1 tbsp avocado oil   - For the Dressing: - 1/­­2 lemon, juiced - 1 tbsp olive oil - Salt and pepper to taste   Prepare French green lentils and couscous according to package directions Preheat oven to 400F, toss sweet potatoes with avocado oil and spread in a single layer on a baking tray. Roast sweet potatoes for 20 minutes, or until tender when pierced with a fork. Remove sweet potatoes from oven and set aside. Add dressing ingredients into a small mixing bowl and stir with a fork until combined In a mason jar add dressing, lentils, sweet potatoes, couscous, cranberries, arugula in that particular order, to make sure the greens stay crisp! Store mason jar in refrigerator until ready to eat. Mason jar will keep for 3 days refrigerated. Note: The above recipe makes one very large serving. Consider portioning the ingredients according to your own appetite if the portion seems large to you. The post Sweet Potato and Lentil Mason Jar Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Golden Broth Rice Noodles + Favorite Natural Cold Remedies

November 3 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Golden Broth Rice Noodles + Favorite Natural Cold Remedies It seems like everyone around has been sick with a cold recently, so we thought it our duty share another recipe involving our favorite golden broth formula that’s helped numerous friends and family fight so many colds. The broth is infused with all kinds of anti-inflammatory and mineral-rich ingredients that are said to be immunity powerhouses – think ginger, turmeric, black pepper, garlic, kombu, shiitake, bay leaf, and more. It also tastes deeply nourishing and delicious, and has the most beautiful color. There are so many ways it can be served, too. Drink it on its own, use it as a base for dahl or curry, or very simply pour it over noodles and top with some seasonal vegetables, like in this recipe. Today we are also sharing some natural cold remedies that we find to be powerful, especially when employed during the very first signs of a scratchy throat. Oregano Oil This stuff is serious! It’s both anti-viral and anti-inflammatory, and works wonders when taken consistently during the first signs of sickness. It’s incredibly potent and should be diluted with a carrier oil (I use this one), and it burns quite a bit when going down. You do get used to it though. I usually hold it under my tongue for about 15 seconds before swallowing. Salt Water Gargle This is an ancient folk remedy that’s still prescribed by modern doctors…enough said. If I wake up with a scratchy throat, I make a point of gargling with salt water every few hours, which feels incredibly soothing, helps take down any swelling, thins down mucus build up, and more. I use the ratio of about 1/­­2 teaspoon of salt to 1 glass of water. Sang Ju Yin Sang Ju Yin is a Chinese herbal formula recommended to us by our acupuncturist. I’ve had a few instances, where it completely healed me of an early cold. I’m a total convert now, and make sure to keep it on had at all times. Vitamin C All Day It’s great to eat Vitamin C-rich foods during cold season, but I find that supplementing with lots of Vitamin C is especially helpful when showing the first signs of a cold. Since you can’t really overdose on Vitamin C, I take it very often, about every 1-2 hours when fighting a cold. Just a warning that taking a bunch of Vitamin C can cause an upset stomach, which doesn’t happen to me personally, but I know that it’s a common side effect. I also make sure that I’m getting sufficient Vitamin D, either from the sun or supplements. Garlic The natural antibiotic that’s in everyone’s kitchen! I know a lot of people who will chew on a whole clove of garlic when they start feeling sick. I’m not brave enough for that, but I did realize from Trinity’s self-care interview that you can just swallow a whole clove or garlic like a really large pill (how did I not think of that?). My tip is to choose a very small clove of garlic, since they can be pretty uncomfortable to swallow, and to score it a tiny bit before swallowing. I also recently tried Amanda’s trick of putting a clove of garlic in my ear (kind of feels like iphone headphones), which really wasn’t as big of a deal as I thought it would be, and it helped. Probiotic Foods The link between our gut health and overall health is undeniably strong. I try to uptake my intake of things like sauerkraut, kimchi, and other living foods when feeling under the weather. Neti Pot For me, the worst part of having a cold is the stuffed and runny nose. Once my nose starts down this path, it doesn’t stop for at least a week, and it’s total agony. Rinsing my nasal passages with the help of a neti pot right before bed makes a world of difference when I’m sick. I’m also currently on the market for a nice, handmade ceramic neti-pot. There’s so many good ones on Etsy! Diffuse Essential Oils Purify the air in your living space and show some love to your nasal pathways and throat by diffusing pure essential oils. It’s helpful to have an ultrasonic diffuser (I have one from Saje), but you don’t have to have one. You can heat up a pot of water, drop some essential oils in the heated water, and stand over the pot, inhaling the steam. Or you can put some essential oils on the floor and walls of your shower while taking a hot shower, which will give a similar effect to the diffuser. My favorite essential oils to breathe in during a cold are: eucalyptus, lavender, and lemon. Liquid Gold Up your intake of turmeric any way you can! Make the recipe in this post, or try our Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy, or Fresh Turmeric Moon Milk. Check out Diaspora Co. for some super-potent, organic, heirloom turmeric powder. Hydrate and Rest These two are such no-brainers, but sometimes none of the other stuff works, and you just need to go to bed early, sleep in, and drink liters and liters of lemon water in between. I love rubbing some vetiver essential oil on the soles of my feet before bed for deep, quick relaxation. What do you do to help your bod fight and heal when you feel a cold coming on? We’d love to hear! Golden Broth Rice Noodles   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil or avocado oil 1 small yellow onion - chopped sea salt pinch of red pepper flakes 3 garlic cloves - minced 1½-inch piece of fresh ginger - minced 1 tablespoon turmeric powder 2 dried shiitake caps 2-inch piece kombu 2 bay leaves 8 cups purified water 1 small or ½ large butternut squash - peeled, seeded, and cubed 1 broccoli head juice from 2 limes - divided 10 oz rice noodles cilantro - for garnish toasted sesame oil and sesame seeds - for garnish (optional) Instructions Warm the oil over medium heat in a soup pot. Add onion, salt and red pepper flakes, and sauté for 5 minutes. Add garlic, ginger and turmeric, and stir around for 2 more minutes. Add shiitake, kombu, bay leaves, water and more salt to taste, and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 10 minutes. If you have time, turn off the heat and let the broth infuse for another 30 minutes. Remove the rehydrated shiitake caps, slice, and return to the pot. Remove the kombu and discard. Add butternut squash to the pot, adjust the heat back to a simmer and cook for 7 minutes. Add broccoli and cook for another 5-7 minutes, until crisp-tender. Add half of the lime juice. Check for salt, adjust if needed. Soak the rice noodles in well-salted hot water according to the instructions on the package. Drain the noodles, divide between plates, and ladle the soup over the noodles. Squeeze more lime juice over each bowl, and garnish with cilantro. Optionally, drizzle with some sesame oil and sprinkle with toasted sesame seeds and serve. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Yellow Split Pea Chowder from Power Plates Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 1 Smooth Vegetable Gazpacho with Watermelon Pieces .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Golden Broth Rice Noodles + Favorite Natural Cold Remedies appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Chili Verde

October 23 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Vegan Chili VerdeChili is always a cold weather favorite, and this vegan Chili Verde from One-Dish Vegan is a fun twist on the classic dish. Fresh tomatillos look like small green tomatoes in papery husks, and they have a slightly tart flavor. If fresh ones are unavailable, use the canned variety. Salsa verde, a green salsa, is available in most supermarkets. I use less chili powder than usual in this recipe to try to retain as much of the green color of the chili as possible. If you prefer additional chili powder, add it according to taste. When Lori Maffei tested the recipe, we discussed how nice it would be to have white chili powder and--guess what? -- she found some online! I havent tried it yet, but it sounds intriguing.   Chili Verde Fresh tomatillos look like small green tomatoes in papery husks, and they have a slightly tart flavor. If fresh ones are unavailable, use the canned variety. Salsa verde, a green salsa, is available in most supermarkets. I use less chili powder than usual in this recipe to try to retain as much of the green color of the chili as possible. If you prefer additional chili powder, add it according to taste. When Lori Maffei tested the recipe, we discussed how nice it would be to have white chili powder and--guess what? -- she found some online! I havent tried it yet, but it sounds intriguing. - 1 tablespoon (15 ml) olive oil or 1/­­4 cup (60 ml) water - 1 medium-size yellow onion, chopped - 3 garlic cloves, minced - 1 large green bell pepper, seeded and chopped - 1 medium-size zucchini, chopped - 1 or 2 jalape?o chiles, seeded and minced - 1 1/­­2 cups (198 g) husked and chopped tomatillos, or 1 can (14 ounces, or 395 g) of tomatillos, drained and chopped - 1 cup (256 g) salsa verde - 1 to 2 tablespoons (8 to 15 g) chili powder - 1 teaspoon dried oregano - 1 teaspoon ground cumin - Salt and freshly ground black pepper - 1 1/­­2 cups (355 ml) vegetable broth or water, plus more if needed - 3 cups (531 g) cooked Great Northern or other white beans or 2 cans (15.5 ounces, or 440 g each) of Great Northern or other white beans, rinsed and drained - 1 ripe Hass avocado, for serving -  1/­­4 cup chopped fresh (4 g) cilantro or (15 g) Italian parsley, for serving - Heat the olive oil or water in a large pot over medium heat. Add the onion, garlic, bell pepper, zucchini, and jalape?os. Cook, stirring, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 5 minutes. Add the tomatillos, salsa verde, chili powder, oregano, cumin, and salt and pepper to taste. - Add the broth and beans and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables are tender, about 40 minutes. Add more broth if the chili becomes too thick. - Taste and adjust the seasonings if needed. When ready to serve, pit, peel, and dice the avocado. Top each serving with avocado and cilantro and serve hot. From One-Dish Vegan by Robin Robertson (C) 2018 Quarto Publishing Group USA Inc. Used with permission. The post Vegan Chili Verde appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Vegan Sheet Pan fajitas Dinner with Chipotle Garlic Sauce – Tacos or Bowl

October 16 2018 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Sheet Pan fajitas Dinner with Chipotle Garlic Sauce – Tacos or BowlSheet Pan Fajitas. Tacos with Fajita Veggies with Chipotle Fajita Sauce. 1 Pan Vegan Glutenfree Soyfree Nutfree Recipe  Jump to Recipe  I have been loving Sheet Pan Meals that get baked up in 1 Pan and that can be served in a bowl, as wraps or tacos. These Fajita Veggies are perfect to bake in one pan and serve in a bowl, tacos or wraps.  The spicy and delicious Chipotle pepper marinade is quick to put together, then toss in with the veggies, spread and bake. Add some of the marinade to beans and bake those with the veggies too.  Layer however you like in tacos or a bowl. Add some crunchy lettuce or greens, avocado and lime juice or salsa. Perfect! Lets make this Sheet Pan Fajita Dinner.Continue reading: Vegan Sheet Pan fajitas Dinner with Chipotle Garlic Sauce – Tacos or BowlThe post Vegan Sheet Pan fajitas Dinner with Chipotle Garlic Sauce – Tacos or Bowl appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Smoky Chickpea Salad with Mango and Avocado

October 9 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Smoky Chickpea Salad with Mango and AvocadoToday is publication day for One-Dish Vegan Revised and Expanded Edition! To celebrate, I’m sharing my recipe for Smoky Chickpea Salad with Mango and Avocado from the book. Roasted chickpeas were a favorite snack of my grandmother, who first introduced me to the savory, protein-rich treat many years ago. These days you can find spin-offs of classic roasted chickpeas that feature various spice blends and sauces from curry to tamari. This one takes a smoky route. Once roasted, the chickpeas take on a lovely mahogany color and a deep smoky flavor that complements the other salad components. The luscious mango dressing can be made with your choice of Dijon mustard or sriracha sauce. Smoky Chickpea Salad with Mango and Avocado Roasted chickpeas were a favorite snack of my grandmother, who first introduced me to the savory, protein-rich treat many years ago. These days you can find spin-offs of classic roasted chickpeas that feature various spice blends and sauces from curry to tamari. This one takes a smoky route. Once roasted, the chickpeas take on a lovely mahogany color and a deep smoky flavor that complements the other salad components. The luscious mango dressing can be made with your choice of Dijon mustard or sriracha sauce. Smoky Chickpeas: - 1 tablespoon (15 ml) pure maple syrup - 1 tablespoon (15 ml) wheat-free tamari - 2 teaspoons liquid smoke - 2 teaspoons olive oil - 1 teaspoon nutritional yeast - 1 teaspoon smoked paprika -  1/­­2 teaspoon onion powder -  1/­­4 teaspoon freshly ground - black pepper -  1/­­4 teaspoon salt - 1 1/­­2 cups (246 g) cooked chickpeas or 1 can (15.5 ounces, or 440 g) of chick-peas, rinsed and drained Dressing: - 1 small mango pitted, peeled, and chopped - 3 tablespoons (45 ml) freshly squeezed lime juice - 1 to 2 tablespoons pure maple syrup - 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard or 1/­­2 teaspoon sriracha sauce -  1/­­2 teaspoon liquid smoke - Salt and freshly ground black pepper Salad: - 8 ounces (225 g) spinach or watercress (or a combination), thick stems removed - 1 ripe mango - 1 ripe Hass avocado - For the smoky chickpeas: Preheat the oven to 375°F (190°C, or gas mark 5). Line a shallow baking dish with parchment paper or spray it with nonstick cooking spray. - Place all of the chickpea ingredients in a bowl and toss to combine and coat the chickpeas. Transfer the chickpeas to the prepared baking dish and spread them out in a single layer. Bake for 30 minutes, stirring once about halfway through. The chickpeas should be lightly browned and nicely glazed. The chickpeas can be made in advance of the salad, if desired. Store in a tightly sealed container in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. - For the dressing: Combine the chopped mango, lime juice, agave, mustard, and liquid smoke in a high-speed blender or food processor. Blend until smooth, adding 1 to 3 tablespoons (15 to 45 ml) of water as needed to achieve the desired consistency. Season lightly with salt and pepper, blend again, and then taste and adjust the seasonings if needed. - For the salad: Place the greens in a large salad bowl or mound onto individual plates. Top with the chickpeas. Pit, peel, and dice the mango and avocado or use a small melon baller to scoop them into balls and then add them to the watercress and chickpeas. Drizzle the dressing onto the salad or serve the dressing on the side. From One-Dish Vegan by Robin Robertson (C) 2018 Quarto Publishing Group USA Inc. Used with permission   The post Smoky Chickpea Salad with Mango and Avocado appeared first on Robin Robertson.


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