autumn - vegetarian recipes

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Roasted Eggplant Wedges with Herbed Pistachio Millet










autumn vegetarian recipes

Vegan Dinner Ideas: Mid-September

September 11 2017 VegKitchen 

Vegan Dinner Ideas: Mid-September Fall is trying to sneak its way into the air; is your palate is ready? At the first hint of autumn Im ready to turn on the oven to bake sweet and savory fare, and make soups. Potatoes, Corn, and Green Chile Soup is a perfect transitional soup, making use of fresh corn and tomatoes […] The post Vegan Dinner Ideas: Mid-September appeared first on VegKitchen.

INDIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

July 7 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

INDIA vegan cookbook on KickstarterMy newest cookbook, The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA just launched on Kickstarter! watch the video: PRE-ORDER the the INDIA cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2uGbsog My new INDIA cookbook has been years in the making - with recipes, stories, artwork & photographs inspired by 8 trips to my most favourite country. It’s a culinary love story of my favorite cuisine - based on a total of nearly two years in India and 25 years of devotion to Indian cooking. My first trip to India was in 2001: mostly North India and Nepal. I spent 4 months on that journey, then another 6 weeks in South India in 2006. I visited twice more, in 2009 & 2010, followed by living and working for a year (as an art teacher) in Central India, returning to Berlin in 2011. In Autumn 2016 & Spring 2017, I went back to India to taste and explore the last regions (and cuisines) of India still waiting for me. I traveled across Kashmir & Ladakh, trekking through mountain villages and exploring towns and cities, staying mostly with families and cooking together in their kitchens. Then I went deep into the Northeast: West Bengal, Assam, Sikkim, and Nagaland. I even met with world famous chefs at their restaurants - and homes - for incredible eats and great times in the kitchen. Now I’m back in Berlin, recreating the culinary wonders of the Indian subcontinent in my own kitchen. As with my previous 4 cookbooks, I have written, illustrated, cooked, photographed, and designed this book myself. It’s a labor of love and the ultimate combination of my passions: art, travel, vegan cooking, and photography. I’m back on Kickstarter for my 5th international cookbook project. You can join the crowdfunding which makes everything possible. It’s an adventure in itself, complete with backer-only updates, behind the scenes sneak peaks, exclusive travel videos & stories, recipe testing groups, and more. Pre-order a signed copy of The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA (including worldwide shipping, stickers & e-book for EUR25!) My INDIA Cookbook at a glance: - My 5th cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide - 192 pages with 90+ recipes and over 70 full-page color photos - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by 8 trips /­­ 21+ months of travel around India and over 25 years vegan cooking experience - Total variety of regional cuisines: Rajasthani, Gujarati, Punjabi, Kashmiri, Sindhi, Maharashtrian, Tamil, Kerelan, Karnatakan, Goan, Hyderbadi, Bengali, Assamese, Sikkimese, Ladakhi, Tibetan, Nepali - Indian classics & family favorites, timeless treats, new culinary wonders, mind-blowing mega-metropolitan snacks, fabulous village feasts, scrumptious street food, and insanely delicious desserts - Discover new flavors, tasty spices, and awesome cooking skills - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients (Cook everything, anywhere!) - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Shahi Bengan – Roasted Stuffed Eggplant Gobi Pakoras – Batter-fried Cauliflower Saag Paneer – Spinach & Fried Tofu Cubes Pani Puri – Street Food Favorite Aloo Paratha – Grilled Potato-Stuffed Flatbreads Shahi Paneer – fried tofu cubes in creamy tomato sauce Seitan Vindaloo – Goan Tangy Curry Samosas! Fried Potato-Stuffed Pastries Gajur Halava – Bengali Carrot Pudding Gulab Jamuns – Doughballs in Rose Syrup Berry Halava – Fruity Semolina Dessert Recipes in The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA: - Garam Masala, Sambar Masala, Chaat Masala & Panch Puran - Tamarind Ginger, Pineapple, Tomato, Coconut, Chili & Bhang Chutneys - Aam Achar – Mango Pickle - Amitar Khar – Assamese papaya starter - Handvo – Gujurati zucchini cake - Uttapam – South Indian rice & lentil pancakes with tomatoes - Idly Paper Dosa – Karnatakan crispy rice & lentil crepes - Rava Dosa – Tamil semolina crepes - Dahi Vada Chaat – lentil cakes with yogurt & chutney - Hariali Paneer Tikka – Punjabi tofu skewers with spices & herbs - Gobi Pakora – batter-fried cauliflower - Mirchi Vada – Rajasthani batter-fried chillies - Aloo Tikka – spicy, fried potato cakes - Samosa – vegetable-stuffed fried pastry - Pani Puri – potato-stuffed fried pastry with tamarind spice water - Pav Bhaji - spicy vegetable mash with fresh baked buns - Momos – Tibetan vegetable dumplings - Shapaley – Tibetan vegetable pies - Kolkota Kathi Roll – spicy soymeat & shredded cabbage wrap - Sambar Bandhgobi Rolls – stuffed cabbage leaves - Aloo Dum – Kashmiri tomato potato curry - Shahi Tamatar – roasted stuffed tomatoes - Shahi Bengan – roasted stuffed eggplant - Shahi Mirch – roasted stuffed peppers - Shahi Paneer – tofu cubes in creamy, tomato curry - Paneer Jalfrezi – spicy tofu cubes - Saag Paneer – spinach & tofu cubes - Mutter Paneer - peas & tofu cubes - Xaak – Assamese greens, potatoes & cherry tomatoes - Bengan Bhartha – Kashmiri roasted aubergine - Malai Kofta – potato dumplings in creamy tomato curry - Bindi Aloo Tawa Masala – spicy stir-fried okra & potatoes - Khumb Kaju Makhani – Rajasthani cashew mushroom curry - Shukto – Bengali eggplant, potato & plantains - Pumpkin Posto – Bengali squash in creamy poppy seed curry - Seitan Vindaloo – Goan tangy curry - Black Sesame Seitan – Assamese spicy curry - Tamatar Pitika – Assamese tomatoes with herbs & spices - Aloo Pitika – Assamese potatoes with herbs & spices - Bol Tenga – Assames lentil dumplings in tangy curry - Mas Tenga – Assamese tangy jackfruit curry - Chupke – Tibetan dumpling soup - Tarka Dal – Punjabi lentil curry - Chana Masala – spicy chickpeas - Rajma - Kashmiri red kidney bean curry - Lobia Palak – black-eyed peas with lemon & spinach - Golden Rice - with turmeric & spices - Chana Pulao – rice with chickpeas - Pulihora – Tamil tamarind rice with peanuts & spices - Classic Biryani – Kashmiri rice dish with vegetables, nuts & spices - Jackfruit Biryani – Tamil coconut rice dish with spicy jackfruit - Tupula Bhaat – Assamese sticky rice steamed in banana leaves - Aloo Paratha – grilled flatbread stuffed with potatoes - Tibetan Bread – fried breakfast snack - Makki Roti – grilled cornbread - Roti – wholewheat grilled flatbread - Garlic Naan – traditional baked flatbread - Poori – deep-fried flatbreads - Date Ladoo – date & nut sweets - Besan Ladoo – chickpea sweet - Gajur Halava – spiced carrot pudding - Berry Halava – strawberry & blueberry semolina sweet - Mysore Pak – traditional sweet squares - Gulab Jamun – deep-fried dough balls in rose syrup - Rasmalai – cheese balls in saffron mango milk - Jalebi – fried, syrupy sweet - Peda – lemon cashew creamy sweet - Kheer – Kashmiri rice pudding with cardamom, nuts & raisins - Mishti Doi - Bengali sweet curd - Shrikand - Maharashtran yogurt dessert - Pista Kulfi – pistachio ice cream - Pitha – Bengali sesame & date pastry - Narikol Ladoo – Assamese shredded coconut balls - Kadala Parippu – Keralan sweet chana dal dessert - Ginger Chai – spiced black tea - Kahwa – Kashmiri green tea with almond & saffron - Badam Dudh – almond milk with cardamom & cinnamon - Anjoor Kaju Dudh – cashew shake with fig & date - Strawberry Mint Lassi – yogurt smoothie The post INDIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Pumpkin Pasta Squares with Red Cabbage

December 16 2016 Veganpassion 

Pumpkin Pasta Squares with Red Cabbage Hey lovelies! Christmas isn't too far away and I'm dreaming about a christmas menu. I cant decide which courses I'm going to put into my four exciting menus. On saturday I'm going to show you my four favourite christmas menus including the recipes! The pumpkin paste squares are a treat for one's buds at autumn-winter time and they're a lot of fun cooking with the whole family. Through the easy technique they're made very quick and they taste gread either you boil them or roast them. Makes 4 portions. For the pasta dough: 200 g coarse-grained spelt flour 90 ml water, lukewarm 3 tbsp. olive oil 1 pinch of salt Give coarse-grained spelt flour and salt into a mixing bowl and mix together. Add water and oil and mix again. Put the dough crumbs on a worktop and knead about 10-15 minutes until the dough is smooth. Put the dough into clear film and in a box and let it rest for about 20-30 mintues while preparing the filling. For the pumpkin filling: 500 g hokkaido pumpkin (420 g without seeds) 1 tsp. lemon juice 3 tbsp. water oilve oil salt, pepper 1 onion 150 g smoked tofu 1 tbsp. (30 g) almond butter 60 g breadcrumbs, whole spelt 1 tbsp. yeast flakes nutmeg, paprika spice sage Cut pumpkin into stripes and sprinkle with lemon juice and water. Heat up the pumpkin until the water has vaporized. Then add olive oil and roast it. Add onion rings and smoked tofu crumbs and roast everything. Flavour it. Put the mixture in a mixing bowl and add almond butter, breadcrumbs and yeast flakes. Mix everything together and taste it. Cut sage or put dry sage into mortar and bump it. Put some flour on your worktop and roll out the pasta dough very thin. If you have a pasta machine you can use this one but it will work with a rolling pin as well. Roll dough out longish and put each 1 tbsp. filling with some space on it. Fold the dough and press the interfaces together. Then simply cut out the pasta squares. Put the squares on a plate with flour and sprinkle with flour and let them rest. For red cabbage with apple: 600 g red cabbage 1 onion 1 apple 100 ml orange juice laurel, cloves, cinnamon Slice cabbage fine. Cut onion and apple into cubes. Roast the onions in some olive oil and add apple and red cabbage and base orange juice on it. Flavour it and let it cook on average heat about 10 minutes. Bake pasta thoroughly with sage in some olive oil or some margarine and serve with red cabbage. Enjoy your meal!

Plant-Powered Sloppy Joes

November 28 2016 My New Roots 

Plant-Powered Sloppy Joes When I was in elementary school I ate in the cafeteria. It was the cool thing to do after all, since homemade brown bag lunches were sooo kindergarten. At the time, I thought that the highly processed offerings behind the sneeze guard were a dream come true: pizza, burgers, chicken fingers, fish sticks, mac n cheese. But the very best thing of all in my first-grader opinion? Sloppy Joes. For those of you who dont know what Im talking about (ahem, mostly everyone outside North America), a Sloppy Joe is like a stew-y, wet hamburger. Ive also heard it been called a loose meat sandwich. Stay with me, people – I realize how riduclously unappetizing this sounds. As a kid, eating a Sloppy Joe was like getting permission to make a mess - a rare, sanctioned moment to smear sauce all over your face, drip on your plate, and have your whole meal basically deteriorate into a pile of savoury, saucy, deliciousness that you were allowed to eat with your hands?! Isn’t this every kid’s dream? Because eating a Sloppy Joe is just that: its sloppy. And that is why its awesome. Sloppy Joes are definitely not on top of the sophisticated food list, but that does not mean that they should be discriminated against. When made with plant-based, whole food ingredients, they are in fact quite the respectable meal. Perfect for chilly autumn and winter nights when all you want to do is tuck into something super cozy and comforting, Sloppy Joes are a one-way ticket to the land of savoury satisfaction. Since the temperatures have dropped here in Copenhagen, Ive been craving this kind of meal like crazy, so Im more than happy to have a healthy solution at hand, and of course to share it with you. The classic Sloppy Joe recipe includes ground beef cooked with onions and garlic, crushed tomatoes, ketchup, sugar and some spices. Sometimes there are some token carrots and celery tossed in, sometimes vinegar, mustard, or chilies, but the basic idea is a moist mixture that you pile on top of a bun. But! In my vegan Plant-Powered version, Ive replace the ground beef with black lentils and mushrooms. I suggest using this type of lentil for this recipe since they are very small, and they maintain their shape and texture while cooking. And if you care about appearances, or perhaps fooling someone, they look the most like ground beef. Just sayin. The flavouring elements of the Plant-Powered Sloppy Joe mix are diverse and potentially strange-sounding, but trust me, altogether just right. Balsamic for a sweet hit of acidity, Sriracha for a little heat, and cumin and paprika add smoky complexity. I also tossed in some walnuts because I am a firm believer in texture, and all that mushiness needed buffering! I toasted them lightly before giving them a rough chop and a stir through the thick lentil mixture. I love how their nuttiness comes through the rich sauce and adds even more deliciousness. I also made a simple slaw from red cabbage to add more crunch and freshness, plus some token sprouts. These items are optional, but I really love the bright contrast they provide against the rich lentil filling. Fill up on Folate Lentils are one of the yummiest sources of folate. Just one cup of cooked lentils provides you with almost 90% of your daily recommended intake! And why is folate so important? Youve probably heard about this vital B-vitamin in regards to pregnancy, as it is critical in the prevention of birth defects, but folate also functions to support red blood cell production and help prevent anemia, allows nerves to function properly, helps prevent osteoporosis-related bone fractures, and helps prevent dementias including Alzheimers disease. Folate received its name from the Latin word folium, meaning foliage, so its not wonder that other excellent sources of folate are dark leafy greens (yum, your favorite!) - kale, romaine lettuce, spinach, asparagus, turnip greens, beet greens, mustard greens, parsley, and collards to name a few. This may explain why North American diets seem to be on the deficient end of things when it comes to this B-vitamin, as folate is available from fresh, unprocessed food. The good news is it is easily absorbed, used, and stored by the body. Folate is also manufactured by intestinal bacteria (remember those probiotics?), so if colon flora is healthy, we have another good source of this important vitamin. Find the most high-vibe buns or bread you can get your hands on for this recipe. I used wholegrain sourdough buns from my local organic bakery, then toasted them lightly before drowning them in vegan sloppy goodness. You can also eat these open-faced if youd like to cut back on the bread. Or pull an alt-bread move and wrap it in socca, a cabbage leaf, or use it to top a crispbread (although, lets be honest: the bun rules). I should also mention that the sloppy joe filling was totally delicious on its own as a stew, and thinned with a little water to make soup! Bonus.     Print recipe     Plant-Powered Sloppy Joes Makes 6-8 sandwiches Ingredients: 6-8 wholegrain sourdough buns 1 batch Simple Cabbage Slaw (recipe follows) 1/­­2 small red onion, thinly sliced sprouts for topping, if desired 1 cup /­­ 230g black lentils 1 Tbsp. coconut oil 1 medium onion, diced 1 tsp. fine grain sea salt 3 cloves garlic, minced 135g brown button mushrooms, chopped 1 red bell pepper, diced 2 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­4 tsp. smoked paprika (hot or sweet, your choice) 1/­­2 tsp. freshly ground black pepper 2 Tbsp. Sriracha 1 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar 1 14oz. /­­ 400ml can crushed organic tomatoes 1/­­2 cup /­­ 60g walnuts, roughly chopped Simple Cabbage Slaw 2 cups shredded red cabbage 2 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1/­­2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup a couple pinches sea salt Directions: 1. Soak lentils overnight if possible. Drain, rinse, and place in a medium saucepan. Cover with about 3 cups /­­ 750ml water, bring to a boil and reduce to simmer until tender, about 15-20 minutes (cook time will depend on whether or not youve soaked them). 2. While the lentils are cooking, melt the coconut oil in a large skillet. Add the onions and salt, stir to coat, and cook for about 15 minutes until starting to caramelize. Add the garlic, mushrooms and red pepper and cook for about 5 minutes or so until fragrant. Next add the cumin, paprika, black pepper and stir to coat. Stir in the Sriracha, balsamic, and can of tomatoes. 3. Drain and rinse the lentils, add them to the pan with the veggies and spices. Give it all a stir and let simmer for a few minutes for the flavours to meld. 4. In a separate skillet over medium heat, lightly toast the walnuts until golden in places and fragrant. Give them a rough chop and add them to the lentil mixture. 5. Have a taste and adjust the seasoning to suit you. Add more salt if necessary, more balsamic for sweet-tartness, or Sriracha for heat. 6. Toast your buns and ladle and a generous amount of the sloppy joe filling over the top of one half. Top with the red cabbage slaw, red onion and some sprouts, if desired. Top with the other half of the bun, and tuck in! Show me your Sloppy Joes on Instagram: #MNRsloppyjoes The post Plant-Powered Sloppy Joes appeared first on My New Roots.

Saturday Six | Sweet Potato Gnocchi, Holiday Slaw & Autumn Rolls

November 19 2016 Oh My Veggies 

Were rounding up some of our favorite recipes from this weeks Potluck submissions, including two-ingredient sweet potato gnocchi, healthy holiday slaw and savory autumn rolls with creamy maple peanut dipping sauce.

Pumpkin Miso Broth with Soba

November 2 2016 My New Roots 

Pumpkin Miso Broth with Soba Danes are not big pumpkin eaters. Carrots, sure. Cabbage, indeed. Potatoes, definitely. But even though they seem to have caught on to the Halloween jack-o-lantern carving thing, actually consuming pumpkins is not high on their list. Just last week I was at the grocery store and saw a display of huge spaghetti squash on clearance, being promoted as autumn decorations.  Pfff, what?! I scooped up as many as I could (I mean, they were less than two bucks a pop) and I excitedly starting telling the cashier about the wild and crazy deal in the produce aisle, all the amazing things you could do with this gourd, and how it turns into freakin noodles. She raised an eyebrow, but was largely unimpressed. Maintaining conviction, I awkwardly carried my bushel of spaghetti squash to my bike, but not before telling two random customers on the way out as well. Just trying to spread the word, people! So aside from decorative (and reminder: totally edible) spaghetti squash, there is really only one proper pumpkin here in Denmark, and that is the Hokkaido. These spherical, bright orange beauties are available at most grocery stores, and for good reason: they are a very delicious and super versatile variety. They are yummy roasted, stuffed, baked, blended into dips, or in soups and stews. I dig them because you can eat the skin, which gives a serious boost of carotenes and fibre. Hokkaido pumpkins can also be called Kuri squash, and similar varieties include red Kabocha, Hubbard and Ambercup. As a PSA to Denmark, I would love to suggest growing these or other varieties of pumpkin since every single type has something special to offer, besides a being a decoration that is. Anyway, on to the recipe! As soon as the one-and-only pumpkin hit the stores a couple weeks back, I made this soup. Craving something creamy and soothing to combat autumn drizzle, I blended the steamed pumpkin with ginger and miso for the most luscious of broths, made even more satisfying with the addition of soba noodles. A few nights later I made it again and added even more goodies: spring onion, seaweed, toasted sesame and sautéed shiitake mushrooms. So. Good. I am obsessed with the combination of the sweet pumpkin and savoury miso, especially with the spicy warmth of the ginger to bring it all together. I also love the consistency of the soup, which is thinner than most of the purées I make. Its really more broth-like, and coats the soba in the perfect way. Unbelievably comforting on a chilly fall night, this dish will be on heavy rotation here this season, and I hope in your home as well. Pumpkin Miso Broth with Soba comes together in under 30 minutes, so its the perfect weeknight dinner. Plus, it is made mostly with pantry staples, so all you need to pick up at the store is a pumpkin! If you want to make this meal even faster, you can skip the toppings altogether, as the soup on its own is totally delicious, and can be made in under 20 minutes. It also freezes well, so make a double batch and store half in the freezer for your next there-is-nothing-to-eat emergency. You can thank me later. Miso delicious! Most people are familiar with miso from Japanese restaurants where miso soup is served, but beyond that I think Westerners greatly under utilize this miraculous umami gift from the gods! It is a consistent condiment in my kitchen repertoire and most times when I use it in something Ive served to guests, they often ask why the dish tastes so special. The answer is miso. Miso is a Japanese word meaning fermented beans. Traditionally, miso is made from soybeans and is found in the form of a thick paste. The process of making miso involves soaking cooking, and mashing soybeans, then finally inoculating the mix with koji (a specific mold spore) and salt. This mixture is transferred to a crock or barrel where it is left to ferment for months or years. Miso comes in various colours, depending on whether or not other legumes or grains were used in the fermentation process, and the length of fermentation. White, yellow, red, brown and dark brown miso are some of the shades youll see in the store. In general, lighter miso tends to be sweeter and milder, while darker miso leans towards the saltier and pungent. I generally keep two kinds in my fridge, since they taste so incredibly different. This recipe calls for light miso, and I really stress using this variety since a dark miso would be far too rich and overwhelming. I prefer to use dark miso in things like gravies and sauces. Either way though, miso is an explosive umami bomb that will add tons of complex, satisfying flavour to many of your favourite foods. Because of this six taste, miso gives plant-based foods that umph that it can be lacking. When buying miso, look for an organic or non-GMO product that is raw /­­ unpasteurized. Unpasteurized miso will always come in the form of a paste, whereas the instant miso soup that you can find on the dry goods shelf is likely pasteurized and therefore not as health-promoting. If your miso comes packaged in plastic, transfer it to an airtight clean glass jar or ceramic crock when you get home, and store it in the fridge for up to a year. Unpasteurized miso is full of live cultures and for that reason it should never be boiled. If you read this recipe through, youll see that I only add the miso at the end when the soup is in the blender. This is to ensure that we preserve all of those delicate nutrients and precious enzymes that would be destroyed with high heat. If you are going to reheat this soup, make sure to do so gently and stir constantly to avoid scorching. Some notes on the recipe ingredients: if you absolutely cannot find light miso, a simple vegetable stock or bullion can be used in its place. But it’s worth tracking down. Soba noodles can be found at Asian supermarkets, health food stores, and gourmet foods shops. Make sure to look for noodles that are 100% buckwheat flour, as many brands of soba will add wheat flour to act as a binder, and keep in mind that these will not be gluten-free. Some people also find the taste of pure soba noodles off-putting since buckwheat can taste very strong, but I love it! Finicky kids (and adults) may prefer the milder-flavour of brown rice noodles, or even whole grain pasta.     Print recipe     Pumpkin Miso Broth with Soba Serves 4 as a main, 6 as a side Ingredients: 1 Tbsp. coconut oil 2 medium yellow onion 3/­­4 tsp. fine grain sea salt 3 cloves garlic 1 medium, 2 lb /­­ 1kg Hokkaido pumpkin (or other favourite hard winter squash) 3 – 4 cups /­­ 750ml - 1 liter water 3 – 4 Tbsp. white or light miso 1 Tbsp. minced fresh ginger 175g /­­ 6oz. soba noodles (100% buckwheat) toppings: spring onion sesame seeds sautéed shiitake mushrooms seaweed, optional (I used oarweed, but any sea vegetable is good!) Directions: 1. Roughly chop onions, mince garlic. Wash the pumpkin well (as youll be eating the skin), and chop into chunks. 2. In a large stockpot, melt the coconut oil. Add the onions and salt, stir to coat and cook for about 10 minutes until the onions are just starting to caramelize. Add garlic and cook for about a minute until fragrant. 3. Add the pumpkin and stir to coat. Add 3 cups /­­ 750ml of water, cover, bring to a boil, and reduce to simmer for about 15 minutes, until the pumpkin is tender. 4. While the soup is cooking, prepare the toppings: Bring a pot of salted water to the boil. Cook soba noodles according to package directions, drain and lightly rinse. Slice spring onion, lightly toast sesame seeds in a dry skillet over medium heat, about 2-3 minutes. Sauté mushrooms in a lightly oiled skillet over high heat for 5-7 minutes. 5. Transfer the soup to a blender and blend on high until completely smooth. Add more water if necessary - youre looking for a creamy consistency, but it should not be thick like a paste. I like the soup to be on the thinner side for this dish. Add the miso, ginger and blend again until smooth. Taste and adjust seasoning as desired. Transfer soup back to the pot and keep warm (reheat if necessary, but try not to boil). 6. Ladle soup into bowls, top with soba, spring onion, sesame seeds, mushrooms and crumble the seaweed over top. Serve immediately and enjoy. This soup is wildly tasty and saisfying, and will probably make you look forward to cooler temperatures and nights spent in. I hope you all are having a lovely fall so far. Sending big love and cozy moments to you all, Sarah B. Show me your soups on Instagram: #MNRpupmkinmisobroth The post Pumpkin Miso Broth with Soba appeared first on My New Roots.

Pumpkin Cornbread

October 31 2016 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Pumpkin Cornbread Plain old cornbread…sure, people love it. But pumpkin cornbread is next-level awesome, with its beautiful orange hue, moist crumb, and hint of spice. Put it out in batches so that greedy people dont snag three pieces at once. Spread on some apple butter and your heart will feel like fluttering autumn leaves. This recipe is from my latest cookbook, The Superfun Times Vegan Holiday Cookbook.

Pear Cranberry Chai

October 30 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Pear Cranberry Chai Are you guys dressing up for Halloween? I’m not, but Paloma is going to be John Lennon circa 1974 (the rest of her friends are princesses). Yep, the Beatles obsession is as strong as ever. Right now, John is the absolute favorite. 1980 (year of his death) is the WORST number, not to be spoken in the house, and she’s been know to put on Imagine and cry to it more than a few times. And this is an otherwise cheerful, happy kid too. Crazy! Anyways, whether you are participating in this weekend’s spooky activities or not, maybe you can consider treating yourself with this seriously autumnal chai, or better yet, plan to serve it at some sort of holiday occasion. I’m confident your guests will be blown away. As far as I can recall, this is the best chai I’ve ever tried. Besides all the required, invigorating spices, this one is infused with fresh pears and cranberries, which add lovely flavor and a tiny hint of sourness. It’s a bit sweet, spicy, gingery and creamy. And if you are wondering what I do with all the leftover stewed pears, I blend them into a pear sauce and spoon it onto all kinds of dishes. There are some weekend links after the jump. Have a nice one :) Protein, Iron, Calcium – I’ve been finding Gena’s articles about protein/­­iron/­­calcium-rich plant food combinations so helpful Urban Moonshine – I’ve been taking these digestive bitters before almost every meal and have really noticed a difference. Highly recommended if you have any mild issues with digestion or even as a blood sugar stabilizing aid. Also, want to make this Happy Belly Seed Mix soon. Sophie Buhai’s New Jewelry Collection – the photos! Exceptional Advice from Anthony Bourdain’s New Book – please never change Tony .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Pear Cranberry Chai appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Saturday Six | Persimmon Salad, Vegan Potato Skins & Autumn Paella

October 29 2016 Oh My Veggies 

Every Saturday, we highlight some of our favorite submissions from Potluck. Here are this week’s picks: Persimmon and Spinach Salad /­­/­­ Persimmons are the juicy fall fruit you probably haven’t tried, but totally should! Here they add a sweet note to this spinach salad. Get the recipe from Flavor the Moments -> Caramel Apple Pie... Read More »

15 vegan pumpkin recipes to get a jump on autumn

October 3 2016 Oh My Veggies 

From breakfast to dessert, these vegan pumpkin recipes will have you covered!

Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake

September 21 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Concord Grape Fruit and Nut CakeThis post was created in partnership with Nuts.com I have a whole lot of cozy fall and holiday recipe ideas bouncing around in my mind, even though it’s still warm out and even though we are still enjoying the sweetest of summer tomatoes daily (I swear the yellow cherry tomatoes truly taste like candy this year). This transitional time is always exciting to me – all the fall produce brings back so many new or forgotten possibilities. I think autumn is much more of vegetable territory than summer – all the stone fruit and berries come in a quick, bright and happy flash, and before we know it, we are left with squash, roots, and sturdy winter greens. But there are still a few sweet gems like apples, pears, figs (fig recipe hopefully coming next week), and grapes to grace our fall cobblers, salads and such, and I plan to take full advantage of them this fall. If you’ve been sticking around this space for a while or have my cookbook, you might know about my love for Concord grapes. I can never resist them at the store or market, being completely mesmerized by the stunning, cloudy berries. Their flavor is lovely too – deep and concentrated, much like the color. The main issue with Concord grapes lies in their prominent seeds. There is no way around them, so I usually end up making juice or compote with Concords – anything where the seeds can be strained out. I did so for this fruit and nut cake, where a myriad of dried fruit is gently cooked in Concord grape juice to soften the fruit’s skin and infuse them with the grape flavor. It’s worth mentioning here that, in the absence of Concord grapes, you can use all kinds of fruit juice for this cake – regular grapes, oranges or even apples would make for a fine juice substitute. This cake is dense and punctuated by comforting flavors of toasted nuts, along with aromatic sweetness from dried fruit and Concord grape juice. A small slice goes a long way. There is no added sugar, as the dried fruit and grape juice bring plenty of sweet to the plate. This is the kind of cake that can serve many purposes. It would make for a perfect edible holiday present, whether brought whole to a festive potluck, or divided into smaller, rectangular cakes, wrapped, tied with a ribbon and gifted. Little squares of this cake would also make a nice addition to a fancy cheese plate, if you’re into that kind of thing. Or it can simply be enjoyed as a dessert at home – it keeps well refrigerated for a good amount of time, and a slice makes for a good component to a kid’s school lunch (or adult’s work snack!). You can get crazy with the decorating like I did here, or not decorate it at all, depending on the occasion. I’ve been shopping on nuts.com for years (since the days when they were still called nuts online) and was thrilled to collaborate on a post with them. All the dried fruit and nuts in this cake came from their online store, which made for extra-delicious results, because their products are consistently fresh and delicious. If you aren’t familiar with nuts.com, they are a family-owned, premium bulk nut and dried fruit supplier, and so much more than that, really. The business has been in the family for three generations now, starting with a stand at a farmer’s market back in 1929,  and they’ve built up an amazingly extensive catalogue of natural bulk foods. In addition to nuts/­­dried fruit, they carry grains, beans, flours, teas, snacks, superfood powders, spices, and more. I feel like a kid in a candy store when I’m on their website. Their dried fruit are the juiciest I’ve ever gotten anywhere, and both Paloma and I are hooked on their dried mango. They also freshly roast their nuts the same day they are shipped out to customers, which is just so cool. The best news is that Nuts.com has a great offer for GK readers – follow this link and choose four free gifts (like chia seeds, goji berries, hemp protein powder, habanero pistachios and more) to receive together with an order of $25 or more. Enjoy :) Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake   Print Serves: one 10 cake Ingredients for the cake (inspiration from At Home in the Whole Foods Kitchen) 4 cups mixed dried fruit - figs, prunes, apricots, raisins - chopped (no need to chop raisins) 4 Medjool dates or 6-8 regular dates - pitted and chopped 1½ cups freshly squeezed Concord grape juice or other fruit juice - hot 1 teaspoon cinnamon ¼ teaspoon nutmeg other spices such as ground cardamom, cloves and allspice - to taste (optional) 1 tablespoon vanilla extract (optional) 1¼ cup toasted almonds - ground ½ cup toasted hazelnuts - chopped ½ cup toasted pecans or walnuts - chopped neutral coconut oil or other vegetable oil for oiling parchment paper for the decoration (all optional) cashews pumpkin seeds pistachios pecans dried apricots dried lemon slices dried cantaloupe dried mango Instructions to make the cake Preheat oven to 300° F (150° C). Place 1½ cup of mixed dried fruit and all the dates into a medium bowl. Pour hot Concord grape/­­fruit juice over them, cover and let soak for 15 minutes. Place the remaining 2½ cups of dried fruit into a medium saucepan and set aside. Drain the soaked fruit into a strainer, over the saucepan with the dried fruit, pouring the soaking juice into the saucepan. Bring contents of the saucepan to a boil over high heat, adjust the heat to a simmer and cook until most of the juice is absorbed, about 8-12 minutes. Transfer the cooked fruit into a food processor, add spices and vanilla extract, if using, and blend until smooth. Transfer into a large bowl, add ground almonds and mix to combine. Stir in soaked fruit, chopped hazelnuts and pecans/­­walnuts, mixing well. Line a 10 cake pan with well-oiled parchment paper and press the fruit-nut mixture into the pan, evening it out with a spoon. Optionally, decorate with nuts and dried fruit to your liking. Bake for 1 hour, until firm. Let cool completely before slicing. The cake stores very well refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 2 weeks. Notes 1. In the absence of Concord grapes, any other grapes, oranges or apples can be used to make juice for this cake. 2. If you dont have a juicer for juicing grapes, blend them in a blender and strain through a fine mesh strainer to get rid of any seeds and skins. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Raw Fruity Panna Cotta, Easter Style Raw Greenylicious Herb Soup and BBQ Grissini by Earthsprout Raw Lady Apple and Cranberry Cookies Simple Spicy Strawberry Gazpacho .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vanilla Almond Milk Oatmeal

April 4 2016 Meatless Monday 

Almond milk, dark brown sugar and a sprinkle of cinnamon give these oats a warm Autumn spiced flavor. This recipe makes loose, milky oats, but for a thicker breakfast simply add more oats or less almond milk in this easily adaptable treat. This recipe comes to us from Madelyn from Karma Free Cooking. Serves 2 - 3 cups almond milk - 1/­­4 cup dark brown sugar - 1 teaspoon vanilla powder* - a pinch salt - 1/­­2 cup steel cut oats - 2 sprinkles cinnamon, for garnish *Found in the spice section of most grocery stores. Place the almond milk in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Season the almond milk with the brown sugar, vanilla powder and salt. Stir. Add the oatmeal, stir, partially cover and bring to a low boil. Stir, lower temperature to low and continue to cook, partially covered for about 5-6 minutes more, or until the oatmeal begins to thicken, but is not fully cooked. Cover the saucepan completely, wait 10 seconds and turn heat off. Allow the oatmeal to stand on the stove for about 15 minutes. Divide into 2 portions, sprinkle with cinnamon and enjoy! The post Vanilla Almond Milk Oatmeal appeared first on Meatless Monday.

9 Meatless Soups & Stews to Warm Up Winter

November 30 2015 Meatless Monday 

Winter is here, and with it all the hearty and savory foods of the season! One-pot meals like soups or stews can be simple to assemble, easy to cook, and even easier to clean up (just one pot and your prep utensils). A simmering stockpot on the stove is a welcome sight for friends and family, whether youre having a quiet dinner at home or a celebrating a festive occasion. These cozy soups and stews are bound to keep you warm on Meatless Monday; theyre delicious and hearty enough to make a perfect winter meal for any day of the week! For a time-saving trick, try making a big pot of one of your favorite recipes on Sunday night, and pack it away as an easy lunch you can bring with you to work, school, or wherever youre off to during the day. A thermos full of something warm is a great way to take the chill out of a frosty day. These recipes come from Meatless Monday bloggers, and feature some meatless favorite foods of the season. Hearty squashes, earthy root vegetables, and flavorful cooking greens add color, texture and taste to winter meals. You can make soups with almost any vegetables you have on hand, and these recipes call for a variety of ingredients that is sure to inspire! Greek Lentil Soup Fakes, Veggies Dont Bite Pumpkin Goulash with Bread Dumplings, Elephantastic Vegan Asparagus Potato Leek Soup, Feed Me Phoebe Seitan, Kale & Butternut Squash Stew, Oh My Veggies Spicy Roasted Butternut Squash Soup, Eat Healthy Eat Happy Vegan Creamy Spinach Soup, Crackle and Temper Vegetarian Onion Soup, Lydias Flexitarian Kitchen Autumn Harvest Soup with Butternut Squash and Kale, Kalyns Kitchen Persian Eggplant Stew, In My Bowl   Hungry for more? Find more ideas on our Meatless Menu: Soup’s On! Pinterest board or visit the Meatless Monday recipe archive for hearty entrees and savory side dishes that will keep you warm all winter long. The post 9 Meatless Soups & Stews to Warm Up Winter appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Squash Noodle Soup with Healing Turmeric-Ginger Broth, Roasted Carrots and Beluga Lentils

November 4 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Squash Noodle Soup with Healing Turmeric-Ginger Broth, Roasted Carrots and Beluga Lentils I recently came back from a short stay in NYC with Masha (older daughter and Golubka photographer), where I was happy to get a glimpse of autumn with its turning trees and crisp air. Fall is something I miss a lot after being a resident of almost seasonless Florida for so many years. All the falling leaves and a minor sniffle got me thinking about comforting soups, which are the best answer to being under the weather or any general cravings for warming, healing food. This soup is simple in preparation, but full of powerful flavors and anti-inflammatory properties. I started with a play on chicken noodle soup, the classic ‘get well’ food, by using roasted spaghetti squash in place of noodles and making a nutritious broth. The broth is infused with the best of the best – turmeric, ginger, garlic, lemongrass and plenty of lemon. The sweetness of roasted carrots balances out the tartness and spiciness of the broth. Puy lentils complete the soup with body and substance. If you can get your hands on kaffir lime leaves, which can be found frozen at Asian markets, do not hesitate to include them, you’ll be in for a real treat. I created this recipe as part of a healthy recipe package for Food & Wine online, see the detailed recipe here.

Tri-Color Quinoa Salad

November 21 2016 Meatless Monday 

Vibrant quinoa meets tart apples and warm roasted eggplant in this hearty fall salad, which comes together with a honey vinaigrette. Join us on Monday, November 28th at 7 pm EST as we cook this dish along with HelloFresh on their Facebook page. Use the code MEATLESS MONDAY to get $35 off a box containing this meal at HelloFresh.com. - 1 eggplant - 1 tsp. autumn spice blend (1 part cinnamon, 1 part cloves, and 8 parts cumin) - 1/­­2 cup tri-color quinoa - 1 shallot - 1 oz. dried cranberries - 2 tbsp. sherry vinegar - 1 tsp. honey - 1 honeycrisp apple - 2 oz. spring mix - 2 oz. walnuts Wash and dry all produce. Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Trim top of eggplant, then dice rest into 1/­­2-inch cubes. Toss on a baking sheet with 1 tbsp. olive oil and the autumn spice blend. Season with salt and pepper. Roast until golden brown and softened, 20-25 minutes. Bring 1 1/­­4 cups salted water to a boil in a medium pot. Once boiling, add quinoa. Reduce to a simmer, cover, and cook until tender, 12-15 minutes. Halve, peel, and mince shallot. Place cranberries in a small bowl with enough hot water to cover them. Combine minced shallots and sherry vinegar in another small bowl to marinate. Whisk together 2 tbsp. olive oil and honey. Season with salt and pepper. Pour in 1 tbsp. sherry vinegar from marinating shallots and as much of the shallots as you like (we recommend 2 tsp). Core and dice apple into 1/­­2 -inch cubes. Fluff cooked quinoa with a fork. Drain any excess liquid. Toss quinoa in a large bowl with roasted eggplant, apple cubes, and spring mix. Add in additional marinated shallots (to taste). Drain cranberries and toss into salad. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Divide between plates, and top with walnuts. The post Tri-Color Quinoa Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage

November 6 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage This past week, we posted a recipe for a Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower, which was pictured served with this very nourishing and super tasty Celeriac and Parsnip mash. We promised to come back with the mash recipe this weekend, so here it is. I grew up on mashed potatoes – my mom probably made them twice a week or more, which is quite standard for a Russian household, where potatoes somehow make it into every meal every day. I love mashed potatoes to this day and can easily put away a good portion, which I think is true for a lot of people due to the dish’s comfort food status. I remember discovering that other roots could be eaten as a mash upon moving to the U.S. – I was at one of my first Thanksgiving dinners and was quite impressed with the mashed sweet potato option that was offered. Slowly, I came around to the idea at home, and now, whenever I have a craving but don’t feel like being weighed down by the inevitably large portion of mashed potatoes I will consume, I make something similar with other, more nutritious and lighter roots. This celeriac and parsnip mash is my absolute favorite version for that scenario. Each of the pale roots are known for their unique, characteristic flavors, which combine well in this mash and become quite complementary with that earthy sweetness they both have going on. This is mash elevated – lighter and more nourishing than mashed potatoes and more interesting in flavor than mashed sweet potato, but still starchy, creamy and very comforting. This stuff is great to have on your holiday table to surprise your guests with something new, yet familiar, or just make a batch of it to have alongside your meals for the week, to get more nutritious wintery roots in your diet. Frying up sage leaves until they are crispy is an easy trick for fancying up a modest looking autumn dish like this one, and the chip-like sage itself is surprisingly delicious. There are some weekend links after the jump, have a cozy Sunday ;) How to Master the Art of Getting Noticed – Austin Kleon’s advice to aspiring artists Salad for President – always so much good stuff on this website, like Leif Hedendal cooking salad at the David Ireland House, Yuri Shimojo’s home and Japanese Crudité Recipe, Laila Gohar’s food as installation art and more The Woman Code Cleanse Review – just read Alisa Vitti’s The Woman Code (and loved it), and was very excited to read about Dana’s experience of the gentle four-day cleanse proposed in the book Noël Graupner – new instagram crush, plant-based private chef with an Ayurvedic tradition background and great photography skills Street Vendors of Hanoi, Photographed from Above – amazing Jade Rolling – have you tried it? I saw a lady doing this on the subway recently (weird setting for that), and it looked really relaxing. Three New Cookbooks, for Health’s Sake – so many health-centered cookbooks coming out nowadays, and these three look great (two of them are from our publisher!) I have a copy Dandelion and Quince and it’s a beauty. Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients 1 large or 2 medium celeriacs - peeled and roughly chopped 2-3 parsnips - peeled and roughly chopped sea salt 1 large red onion - peeled and sliced into 8 wedges 1-2 garlic heads - separated into cloves (no need to peel the cloves) coconut oil - to taste freshly ground black pepper any plant milk or cooking water from boiling the roots - to taste ghee or olive oil - to taste 1 small bunch sage - leaves smoked paprika - for garnish (optional) olive oil - for garnish (optional) Instructions Preheat oven 400° F (200° C). Bring celeriac and parsnips to a boil in a large pot of water. Reduce heat to a strong simmer and cook vegetables for 10-15 minutes, until soft throughout, adding salt towards the end. Place onion and garlic onto a parchment paper-covered baking tray. Add coconut oil, salt, pepper and mix well. Bake for 20 minutes. After 20 minutes, garlic should be done but the onions might need more time - in this case, remove garlic from oven and finish baking the onion until completely soft and caramelized. Slip garlic cloves out of their shells. Drain the boiled vegetables, reserving some of the cooking liquid if youll be using it in place of plant milk. Place vegetables into a large bowl together with the roasted garlic and mash with a potato masher to your desired consistency. Place roasted onion and ½ cup plant milk/­­cooking water into a blender and blend until smooth. Add blended onion to the mashed vegetables, adding more liquid if needed to achieve your desired consistency. Add ghee or olive oil to taste. Alternatively, mix all the vegetables in a food processor together with the plant milk/­­cooking liquid, which will make for a smoother, less textured puree. Heat 2-3 tablespoons coconut oil in a medium pan on medium heat. Add well-dried sage leaves to the pan along with salt and pepper and fry, stirring, for a couple of minutes until crispy. Mix the oil left over from frying the sage into the mash. Optionally, mix in some of the crispy sage into the mash as well. Garnish mash with crispy sage, smoked paprika and olive oil, and serve. Notes You can use just celeriac or just parsnips for this mash as well. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Givea... Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin Chocolate Fudge with Fresh Sage and Goji Berries Raw Rainbow Lasagne with Heirloom Tomatoes, Mushrooms, and Castelvetra... .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower

November 2 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower This post was created in partnership with San-J. Happy November! It’s so hard to believe that the year is almost over. November in the U.S. means Thanksgiving, and for the rest of the world, those December and January holidays are not so far off as well. We are here to give you some ideas to consider for those festive family dinners, friendsgivings and potlucks, with an emphasis on vegetables, fruit and whole food ingredients. The holidays can be a little tough if you are trying to stay on track with eating well or even simply keeping away from meat/­­dairy/­­gluten. If you aren’t participating in one or more of those categories, chances are, you might feel excluded at a holiday table. And even if you are totally fine with eating those veg-centered sides only, others might find it offensive or feel as though they are not being good hosts, etc. The point is, there is usually a main event to a holiday table, and although to me it’s always been the pie, to most it’s the bird, or another grand platter of some sort of meat. There is a ceremony to getting that platter on the table – it takes time and care to pick out and prepare, which creates anticipation and excitement. Here, I applied that kind of thinking to cauliflower, a whole cauliflower, prepared in a way that feels ritualistic, celebratory and fun, and delicious enough to be a holiday table centerpiece. This cauliflower is slowly stewed whole in a rich, tomato-based sauce with greens, carrots, onions, mushrooms, spices and autumn herbs. Tamari, balsamic and prunes help create body, depth and complexity in flavor. In the end, the cauliflower comes out incredibly tender and cuts like butter – ‘carving’ it is quite a pleasure. It’s incredibly good served over anything starchy, which should be easy since many holiday tables will likely include some sort of potato/­­root mash in their setting. The cauliflower is pictured here served with a delicious celeriac and parsnip mash with crispy sage, which makes for a perfect accompaniment. We will be posting the recipe for the mash this coming weekend, so make sure to stop by for that, it’s a real winner. Tamari, the gluten free soy sauce, is such a staple ingredient in my kitchen, that I feel at a loss whenever I run out. It’s a basic requirement in many Japanese and Asian-inspired dishes, but I use it in all kinds of meals, way beyond Japanese. It’s an essential flavor builder in this cauliflower, for example. I find tamari to be especially great for vegan and vegetarian cooking – it helps immensely with developing flavor depth and complexity when added to vegetables, and of course, it’s an amazing addition to sauces. When it comes to tamari brands, San-J is a classic that’s been around for eight generations, and the brand you will likely see when you search for gluten-free soy sauce in your store. The difference between San-J tamari and regular soy sauce is that tamari contains no wheat, just organic fermented soybeans, while soy sauce usually has 40%-60% wheat. The higher concentration of soybeans in tamari also contributes to its richer flavor and smoother texture. San-J tamari contains no artificial preservatives or additives, the soybeans are non-GMO, and are brewed for up to six months according to traditional Japanese techniques. It really is the best, and I’m so happy to have partnered with San-J on this festive recipe. Enjoy :) Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower   Print Serves: 1 cauliflower head Ingredients 5 prunes - roughly chopped 3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil 1 large yellow onion - sliced 2 medium carrots - diced about 6 cups roughly chopped collard greens about 3 tablespoons tamari - divided 1 lb crimini mushrooms - quartered 5 garlic cloves - sliced 1 chili pepper - seeded and chopped 3-4 sprigs thyme - chopped about 2 tablespoons chopped rosemary handful sage leaves - chopped freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon tomato paste two 28 oz boxes/­­cans of crushed tomatoes 1 large cauliflower head - outer leaves trimmed Instructions Drizzle prunes with balsamic vinegar in a small bowl and set aside. Warm coconut oil in a large pot over medium high heat. Add onion, carrots, collard greens and a splash of tamari and sauté for 10 minutes, until onion is translucent and collard greens are wilted. Add mushrooms and sauté for about 8 minutes, until all their liquid is evaporated. Add garlic, chili, thyme, rosemary, sage and black pepper and saute for 2-3 minutes. Add prunes together with balsamic vinegar, followed by 2 tablespoons tamari and tomato paste and stir around until the liquid evaporates, about 1 minute. Add crushed tomatoes, stir to combine and bring to a near boil. Carefully drop cauliflower into the sauce and spoon plenty of sauce on top of the cauliflower to coat it completely. Stir some of the vegetables out from under the cauliflower to ensure that its covered with the sauce as much as possible. The top of the cauliflower may peek out a little and thats ok. Bring the sauce back to a boil, adjust the heat to a slow simmer, cover and cook for 40-50 minutes, until the cauliflower is completely cooked and soft throughout. Scoop the simmering sauce over the cauliflower every now and then while its cooking. Remove the cauliflower from the pot, slice and serve it warm with plenty of sauce, over vegetable mash or any grains of choice. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Black Bean Chocolate and Fig Cookies Banana Toffee Tart Butternut Squash Spaghetti with Creamy Almond Butter Sauce Lemongrass Mango Curry with Toasted Pumpkin Seeds .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Curry-Stuffed Mini Pumpkins

October 31 2016 Meatless Monday 

Who says Halloween has to be all about candy? These savory stuffed pumpkins are the perfect autumn treat. Filled with millet, jalapeno, nuts, coconut and curry, they’re perfect for guests or a quiet evening in. This recipe comes to us from Robin Asbell. Serves 6 - 3 small sweet dumpling squash or mini pumpkins (about 13 oz/­­370 g each) - 1 tsp canola oil - 1/­­2 cup/­­60 g chopped onion - 1 tbsp minced peeled fresh ginger - 1 tsp black mustard seeds - 1 medium jalape?o, chopped - 1 tsp whole cumin seeds - 1 tsp ground coriander - 1/­­4 tsp ground turmeric - 1/­­4 tsp ground cinnamon - 1/­­4 cup/­­50 g millet - 1/­­2 cup/­­120 ml coconut milk - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1/­­2 cup/­­55 g raw cashews - 1/­­2 cup/­­55 g whole almonds, toasted - 2 tbsp shredded unsweetened coconut Preheat the oven to 400° F/­­200° C/­­gas 6. Cut the squashes in half from the stem to the tip, or if you are using pumpkins that sit flat, cut off the tops as shown in the photo above. Scoop out the seeds and place them cut-side down on oiled baking sheets/­­trays. Bake for 10 minutes (they will not be completely cooked). Take the pans out and flip the squash halves over. When they have cooled, use a spoon to cut into the flesh, loosening it in spots but leaving it in the shell. Reduce the oven temperature to 375° F/­­190° C/­­gas 5. In a 2-qt/­­2-L saucepan, heat the oil and add the onion, ginger, and mustard seeds. Sauté over medium-high heat until the onions are golden, about 5 minutes. Add the jalape?o, cumin, coriander, turmeric, and cinnamon and stir until they are fragrant. Add the millet and stir to coat, then add the 1/­­4 cup/­­60 ml water, the coconut milk, and salt and bring them to a boil. When it boils, cover the pan and turn the heat to low. Cook until the liquid is absorbed, about 20 minutes. Take the pan off the heat and stir in the nuts, then stuff the mixture into the squashes. Sprinkle each with 1 tsp of coconut. Bake the squashes until the filling is set and bubbling and the squashes are easily pierced with a knife, about 20 minutes. Let them cool slightly before serving. The post Curry-Stuffed Mini Pumpkins appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Pear Cranberry Chai – Holiday Recipe Month

October 30 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Pear Cranberry Chai – Holiday Recipe Month Are you guys dressing up for Halloween? I’m not, but Paloma is going to be John Lennon circa 1974 (the rest of her friends are princesses). Yep, the Beatles obsession is as strong as ever. Right now, John is the absolute favorite. 1980 (year of his death) is the WORST number, not to be spoken in the house, and she’s been know to put on Imagine and cry to it more than a few times. And this is an otherwise cheerful, happy kid too. Crazy! Anyways, whether you are participating in this weekend’s spooky activities or not, maybe you can consider treating yourself with this seriously autumnal chai, or better yet, plan to serve it at some sort of holiday occasion. I’m confident your guests will be blown away. As far as I can recall, this is the best chai I’ve ever tried. Besides all the required, invigorating spices, this one is infused with fresh pears and cranberries, which add lovely flavor and a tiny hint of sourness. It’s a bit sweet, spicy, gingery and creamy. And if you are wondering what I do with all the leftover stewed pears, I blend them into a pear sauce and spoon it onto all kinds of dishes. There are some weekend links after the jump. Have a nice one :) Protein, Iron, Calcium – I’ve been finding Gena’s articles about protein/­­iron/­­calcium-rich plant food combinations so helpful Urban Moonshine – I’ve been taking these digestive bitters before almost every meal and have really noticed a difference. Highly recommended if you have any mild issues with digestion or even as a blood sugar stabilizing aid. Also, want to make this Happy Belly Seed Mix soon. Sophie Buhai’s New Jewelry Collection – the photos! Exceptional Advice from Anthony Bourdain’s New Book – please never change Tony .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Pear Cranberry Chai – Holiday Recipe Month appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Apple & Cinnamon Tray Cake

October 8 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Apple & Cinnamon Tray Cake It’s not like I don’t appreciate a good apple cake. And I still think David is an okay guy. But paired together, they have simply been too much this past week. Sometimes I really wish David would just settle for good. He has literally baked and photographed this cake e-v-e-r-y damn day of the week. I know, apple cake every day sounds like an October dream. But when it is served along with constant whining that: “It’s under baked”, “The apples don’t look nice on this” or “It’s way too much cinnamon on top”, it kind of takes the pleasure out of eating it. And with 57+ other things on our to-do-before-the-baby-arrives list, I just couldn’t believe my eyes when he started baking one more cake last night. But now he is finally pleased with it, and the photos. So here it is: A Simple Apple Cake (overly tested like it was an advanced science project). Seriously though, it is a really good cake. I can’t really tell the difference from the one he did in the beginning of the week but I’m just happy that we can finally move on to more pressing issues. I’ll leave it to David to talk about the flavours. /­­Luise Okay ... obviously Luise has no idea what she is talking about. The first cake had way too much cinnamon on it and I hadn’t separated the eggs in the batter so it didn’t rise properly. The photos looked terrible too. So that’s that. What she also forgot to mention is that - thanks to me - we have plenty of cakes in the freezer now, which actually is one of the things on that to-do list of hers. Ha! Back to the cake. I have a long history of not liking apple cake. I have learned to love it now but I do still think that many cakes are too sweet, some are too dry and other have too much apple pieces mixed with the batter. This one is inspired by a slice of apple cake that we tried at the farmer’s market earlier this autumn. It was perfect. Moist, flavourful and with lots of cinnamon and large apple slices on top and a hint of grated apples in the batter. Ever since we tried it, I have been experimenting with my own versions of it. And as Luise so lovingly pointed out, it has taken a few attempts to get it right. We are using one of our favourite flour mixtures to get a good texture. Oat and almond flour adds nuttiness and richness and rice flour keeps it light. I like to bake it in a small tray to get the right height (roughly 2,5 cm /­­ 1 inch), but it works well as a thick cake in a traditional round cake tin as well  (just increase the baking time 5-10 min). Instead of serving it with the traditional vanilla custard, we prefer a ginger-spiced greek yogurt which adds a nice tartness to balance the sweetness in the cake. /­­David Apple, Cinnamon & Buttermilk Tray Cake Serves 12 Dry Ingredients 100 g /­­ 1 cup rolled oats 100 g /­­ 1 cup almond flour 100 g /­­ 3/­­4 cup rice flour (or buckwheat flour or spelt flour) 1 1/­­2 tsp baking powder 1 tsp ground cinnamon 1/­­2 tsp ground ginger 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 1/­­4 tsp ground vanilla or 1/­­2 tsp vanilla extract Wet Ingredients 100 g /­­ 3.5 oz butter or coconut oil, at room temperature 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup maple syrup ?or runny honey 1 apple, rinsed 180 ml /­­ 3/­­4 cup cultured buttermilk (or yogurt) 3 free-range eggs, separated Topping 2 apples, rinsed 2 tbsp melted butter 1-2 tsp cinnamon Ginger-Spiced Yogurt 250 g /­­ 1 cup unsweetened yogurt 1 knob (roughly 2,5 cm /­­ 1 inch) fresh ginger 1 tbsp maple syrup 1 tbsp lemon Preheat the oven to 180°C /­­ 350°F bake mode, grease a 30 x 22 cm /­­ 12 x 9 inch tray or springform cake tin and line it with parchment paper. Place the oats in a food processor and blend until the texture resembles coarse flour. Transfer to a large mixing bowl, add the rest of the dry ingredients and stir until combined. Make a well in the centre and set aside while preparing the wet ingredients. Cut the butter into cubes and add it to the bowl of a stand mixer along with the maple syrup and mix until well combined and creamy. Add the buttermilk and egg yolks and mix until smooth. Grate the apple coarsely (with peel), add to the stand mixer and mix until just combined, set aside. Place the egg whites in a separate bowl and beat until soft peaks form. Using a spatula, gently fold the wet ingredients, followed by the egg whites, into the dry ingredients until just combined, making sure not to over mix as the cake will be compact otherwise. Pour the cake batter into the tray. Cut the two apples in thin slices and place them on top of the batter, pushing them down just slightly. Brush the slices with melted butter and the dust the cake with cinnamon. Bake for approx. 45-55 minutes or until golden and a skewer inserted in the centre of the cake comes out clean. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool slightly in the tin before transferring to a wire wrack to cool completely. Store the cake at room temperature in an airtight container and it will keep for a few days. To make the yogurt, simply scoop it into a bowl, grate the fresh ginger into it, add maple syrup and lemon and stir until combined. Taste and adjust the flavours after preference. Enjoy! PS! I sprinkled the cake with some powdered sugar because it looks pretty on the photos but it’s really not necessary for the flavor.

Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette

September 29 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette This post was created in partnership with Infinity Jars. Having recently finished a cookbook manuscript with the backbone of seasonality, I turn to seasons more than ever when coming up with recipes. It’s hard not to sound like a broken record when talking about the topic, but I find just as much romance as I do practicality in eating what grows at any given time of the year. I grew up in a place, where the season completely dictated what we ate, which at times led to scarcity and deprivation, but made the periods of abundance that much sweeter. Nowadays, I fall back on that feeling, having made peace with waiting a year for the sweetest summer tomato or the plumpest fig. Of course, I will also buy boxed tomatoes for stews and roast up well-traveled California cherry tomatoes when a craving hits out of season – frankly I’m grateful for such options, having experienced what it’s like to have no options during my Soviet childhood. But I also know that the wait for the real deal will be well worth it in the end, so why not embrace it? Another thing I’m constantly encouraged by, when it comes to cooking with nature’s rhythms, is how well a lot of a given season’s ingredients fit together. Let’s take this bowl as an example. I started with the fig – the ultimate fruit of indulgence in the late summer and early fall. Figs are jammy and sweet, especially when broiled, and make easy friends with dense sweet potato and buttery eggplant. Sturdy-leafed kale, known to do well in the cold, together with a hearty grain and lentils make a nice bed for the vegetables. Sage is an evergreen and can be harvested well into the fall months, and coincidentally has that intoxicating, deep, piney flavor that pairs so well with autumn produce. It’s all quite seamless and effortless – the ingredients fit together as if they have been sharing a place under the sun, which, theoretically speaking, is true. This bowl is the opposite of boring, full of those complementary flavors and a variety of textures, from chewy kale and grains, velvety eggplant and sweet potato, to juicy figs and crunchy hazelnuts. It’s a complete meal, and, like any bowl is highly customizable. The hazelnut vinaigrette here is quite special – an interesting twist on a classic dressing, with the addition of well-toasted hazelnuts and sage. It keeps well in the refrigerator, and will improve any one of your bowls or salads. I would very much like to hear your thoughts on cooking with the seasons – do you follow them? do you find it helpful to have them as a guide? or do you find it overwhelming? Whatever it is, I would love to open a conversation. Infinity Jars sent me a variety of their airtight and lightproof ultraviolet glass jars, and I have nothing but great things to say about them. I’m kind of a stickler for storing ingredients in glass whenever possible, and keep a lot of uncommonly refrigerated things in the fridge, from matcha to tamari, to certain nuts and spices. It makes a lot of sense to me to take care of my ingredients and try to preserve their freshness as log as possible, especially for those pricier items. Infinity Jars go above and beyond when it comes to keeping things in top shape – the glass is thick and pigmented to block any harmful UV light, and the seal is scent-proof and airtight. I’ve transferred my loose leaf teas and a few spice mixes, along with some homemade lotions and oils to their screw-top jars. I’ve also been using their oil bottle for basil oil and dressings like the vinaigrette here, all to impressive results. The jars are so pretty too, I love having the uniform black glass on my shelves. Infinity Jars is offering GK readers 15% off all orders, just use code GOLUBKAKITCHEN at checkout until October 28th, 2016 :) Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients for the salad 1 medium sweet potato - cubed 1 medium eggplant - sliced into ½-inch rounds, halved if large 2 tablespoons neutral coconut or untoasted sesame oil sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste 1 tablespoon smoked paprika 8-12 fresh figs - cut in half 1 tablespoon chopped sage leaves 1 bunch kale - stems removed, leaves chopped 1 tablespoon olive oil 1½ cup cooked faro, freekeh or other grain of choice 1½ cup cooked puy lentils or other legumes of choice ¼ cup toasted hazelnuts for the hazelnut vinaigrette ¼ cup toasted hazelnuts - divided 5 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar ½ tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 teaspoon maple syrup a few sage leaves (optional) ⅓ cup olive oil Instructions to make the salad Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Place cubed sweet potato and sliced eggplant into a large bowl, drizzle with oil, add salt, pepper and paprika. Toss to coat and arrange on one or two baking trays - the trays shouldnt be too crowded. Roast for 20 minutes, then mix and roast for another 15 minutes, until soft and golden. Remove from the oven and set aside. Turn on the broiler to high. Broil figs for 4-5 minutes. Remove from the oven and sprinkle with 1 tablespoon chopped sage. Broil for another 1-2 minutes, until caramelized and golden brown at edges. Remove from the oven and set aside. Place chopped kale into a large bowl, add 1 tablespoon olive oil and a pinch of salt, and massage until darkened and wilted. Add cooked farro and lentils to the bowl with kale, top with roasted sweet potato and eggplant. Distribute between bowls, top with figs, drizzle with hazelnut vinaigrette, and garnish with toasted hazelnuts. to make the hazelnut vinaigrette Combine hazelnuts, lemon juice, balsamic vinegar, mustard, maple syrup and sage leaves, if using, in an upright blender. Blend until smooth. Slowly pour olive oil into the mixture, with the motor running on slow, to emulsify. 3.5.3208 This post was created in partnership with Infinity Jars, with all opinions being genuine and our own. Thank you for considering the sponsors that help keep Golubka Kitchen going. You might also like... Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans Beet Mille-Feuille from the La Tartine Gourmande Cookbook Garden Juice Metabolism Boosting Everything Salad .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Flammkuchen with Squash and Chanterelles

September 12 2016 seitan is my motor 

Although we are still enjoying some unusually hot days, autumn produce has been entering the stores, especially pumpkins and squashes. (Which we also call pumpkins in German. I neer know what’s what in English.) Every year I discover a new variety. And even though there is no need for hot soup yet, I bought aRead more The post Flammkuchen with Squash and Chanterelles appeared first on seitan is my motor.

8 Holiday Meals that Skip the Meat

December 21 2015 Meatless Monday 

During the holiday season families around the world gather around the table to share a meal and get into the spirit of the season. While many traditional holiday feasts have meat on the table, this year could be the year you try out a meatless holiday! These savory, hearty meals are fit for any family banquet. Gatherers Pie, In My Bowl Youve heard of shepherds pie (usually made with lamb or mutton) and cottage pie ( a similar dish made with beef). Both are traditional foods of the winter months in many parts of the world, having a layer of protein and vegetables baked under a top layer of mashed potatoes. Turn this recipe into a meatless dish that has all the heartiness and flavor, with tons of nutritional value!   Mushroom Hemp Tartlets, Manitoba Harvest These tasty, crusty tartlets make an excellent starter or horderves for your festive meals. Made with hemp hearts (which add an extra boost of protein and savory umami flavor), mushrooms, and goat cheese, these morsels pair rich flavors with flaky pastry.   Vegducken, Epicurious Now famous on the internet for several seasons, the Turducken (a dish that consists of turkey stuffed with a duck stuffed with a chicken) now has a new twist: a meatless version! The Vegducken is a butternut squash stuffed with an eggplant stuffed with a zucchini. This recipe also includes gravy and stuffing recipes (all meatless, of course) that pair with your freshly-roasted Vegducken.   Wild Rice, Lentil & Cranberry Stuffed Delicata Squash, Oh My Veggies Your meatless main course becomes the main event of the evening with stuffed delicate squash! Go overboard this season with squash boats stuffed with wild rice, lentils and cranberries. Youll get all those holiday flavors and a heaping helping of vitamins and fiber.   Vegan Lentil Shepherds Pie, Ezra Pound Cake Another take on the classic shepherds pie or cottage pie, this lentil pie is 100% vegan and is sure to please even the most ravenous carnivores at your table. This recipe also uses a trendy twist on mashed potatoes for the top layer: cauliflower! Lots of chefs and cooks are experimenting with cauliflower in recipes that have ordinarily called for a variety of other ingredients. Use a mix of mashed potatoes and cauliflower for your version, or experiment with an all cauliflower mash for your table! Heres a note from the recipes creator, a two-cup portion is 400 calories, with 5.5 grams of fat, 16 grams of fiber, 19 grams of protein and more than 100 percent of your daily requirements for vitamins A and C.   Seitan Stuffed with Walnuts, Dried Cranberries, and Mushrooms, Fat Free Vegan Have you discovered seitan? Seitan is made from heat, and has a wonderful texture that soaks up flavor as it cooks. This moist, stuffed seitan has all the flavors of its filling - walnuts, cranberries, mushrooms, and seasonings. Follow the recipes advice for reheating, using the microwave will help keep it moist, the oven will dry it out a bit.   Mushroom Wellington with Spinach, Ramsons & Bramble Youve heard of beef Wellington, a classic culinary feat for students learning to be professional chefs. This mushroom Wellington has all of the flavor and all of the artistry of a classic beef Wellington - just none of the beef! This version of the dish calls for walnuts and oats instead of plain bread crumbs, which adds whole grain vitamins and minerals to an already healthy dish.   Autumn Vegetables w/­­ Balsamic Glaze, Veggie Chick These hearty glazed vegetables make an excellent side dish for your holiday table, late night snack, omelet the next morning, and lunch the following day! Roasted fall/­­winter vegetables are a treat to eat at any meal when they are fresh and in season.   Anytime family gathers around the table its a time for celebration. Enjoy some of thee meatless recipes together, and have a happy holiday! The post 8 Holiday Meals that Skip the Meat appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Gluten-Free Winter Squash Gnocchi

November 23 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Gluten-Free Winter Squash Gnocchi These gnocchi are one of my favorite fall dishes to make for company. The process of gnocchi-making is fun and gratifying, and the result is always a tasty, light and unmistakably autumnal crowd pleaser. These gnocchi are gluten-free (and can be vegan if ghee is substituted with coconut oil), with nutritious buckwheat flour and sweet winter squash acting as main ingredients. Even without eggs, these have a nice pillowy texture, thanks to the softness of pureed squash. The great thing about this recipe is that it can be interpreted and adapted based on the produce you have on hand. There is  a variation on these gnocchi in The Vibrant Table, where I use beets and sweet potato in place of squash. I went for the classic earthy combination of sage and squash for the herbal pairing here, which is hard to beat. I also like to serve these gnocchi alongside chimichurri, one of my favorite simple herb sauces. I like to make homemade sprouted buckwheat flour for this recipe, but you can also use store-bought flour, which is darker in color and has a slightly denser texture, but also a more distinct nutty flavor. I created this recipe as part of a healthy recipe package for Food & Wine online, see the detailed recipe here. I want to take this opportunity to wish all U.S. readers a very Happy Thanksgiving and express my immense gratitude for your readership and support! Here are a few Thanksgiving table ideas: Sorghum Pilaf with Roasted Brussels Sprouts, Cranberries and Grapes Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes and Black Rice Shaved Brussels Sprout, Pomegranate and Lentil Salad Roasted Parsnip and Apple Soup with Radish Greens Gingery Pear Rutabaga Handpies Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats Butternut Squash and Cranberry Cookies

Butternut Squash, Leek and Apple Soup

November 3 2015 My New Roots 

Butternut Squash, Leek and Apple Soup Back in the summer, I was asked to be the guest chef at a restaurant here in Copenhagen for the upcoming fall season. But not just any restaurant: a hyper-local organic restaurant sourcing 95% of their ingredients from within 200 kilometers of their front door, and one that holds classes to educate and inspire city dwellers to eat sustainably all year round. Oh, just kind of up my alley. And it is run by a woman who I clicked with instantaneously, our first conversation touching on everything from mushroom foraging to manifesting ones own reality through the power of positive thinking. I said yes because I was so moved by her ultimate mission, what the restaurant stood for, and not really taking into account that I hadnt cooked in a professional kitchen in many years. But after giving me permission to call the event The Grand Pumpkin Orgy, how could I possibly say no? Fast forward a few months to a couple weeks ago. I am standing at the cutting board preparing vegetables for soup. The soup to be served at the restaurant, which will be full of guests, all there to eat my food. I feel confident and excited, using all of my pumpkin comprehension to develop a menu of stellar proportions, and not letting the true weightiness of the event bog me down. Once cooked, everything goes into the blender. I puree it. I taste it. And its delicious. Without any major adjustments at all, it is exactly what I wanted it to be: clean and pure and tasting of the ingredients it is made with, only better. Then the doubt creeps in. Wait a second. That was easy. Is this really good enough? How can I serve such a simple dish to all these people with undoubtedly high expectations of what this dinner is supposed to be? Why did I ever think I could do this in the first place?! BAH! I brought my recipes in for the chef to review, sheepishly handing them over as if there was something wrong with them; not impressive enough, flashy or complex – just what I believed to be delicious. After a raised eyebrow, he said that he wasnt sure apple and butternut squash would go together. I gulped, but told him as confidently as I could that I believe in the intelligence of the season, and trust that whatever grows together, goes together. Right? The soup was a hit. Clean and pure and tasting of the ingredients it was made with, only better. Not only was the chef impressed (and later excused himself for judging my soup before making it himself), but the guests as well. As I went around to the tables asking everyone how it was, they all reaffirmed my belief that my instincts are not completely out of whack, and that, quite simply, good ingredients make great food. After several years eating locally-grown, seasonal produce Ive learned that you can pretty much step back and let the ingredients do the work for you, since true deliciousness needs little intervention. Cooking like a pro, to me, means respecting the ingredients and doing as little as possible to bring out their tastiness. So, this soup is that soup. The one I served at the restaurant to all of those people that scared me, but also reminded me that simple is best. It is a deep and delicious love song to autumn. The ingredients are inexpensive, widely available and the process is foolproof. Its an oven soup! Thats right: everything cooked together right on a baking sheet so there isnt even a pot to wash. Me likey. Butternut Squsah: the Nutrient Storage Facility Winter squash rocks because it is a virtual storehouse of nutrients. Unlike summer squash (re: zucchini, crooknecks, pattypans), winter squash has had a lot more time to develop and pump itself full of vitamins and minerals throughout its lengthy life on the stem. Were talking oodles more vitamin A (in the form of beta-carotene), vitamin C, manganese, potassium, and even some extra dietary fiber thrown in. This combination of nutrients spells good news for asthma sufferers, those with heart disease, elevated cholesterol, or inflammatory conditions such a rheumatoid and osteoarthritis. Nature designed summer squash to be rather delicate, with a high water content for those hot summer days when we need a cool down. Naturally, their shelf life is rather short during our abundant harvest season when produce is plentiful. On the flip side, winter squash has a tough outer skin and lower water content, which allows it to be stored for a very long time - some varieties up to six months. This means that we can keep these vitamin bombs around for a long time after the first frost to provide our bodies with the nutrition we need to see us through the long months of winter when there is nothing fresh in sight. Put that in your oven and roast it! The Garlicky Rye Bread Croutons, although an additional element to create, are the crowning glory of the dish, and really make it special. If youre not into bread, try toasting some pumpkin seeds for the top, or something else crunchy to add contrast to the silky smooth soup. It begs mentioning that the apple cider vinegar in this recipe is not optional. Why? Because it adds acidity. Acidity is the one thing missing in almost every home cooks food because, well, we are never really taught about its importance. If you read the introduction in my cookbook, I have a section called The Holy Trinity of Flavour explaining that salt, sugar and acid are the three foundation flavours of any successful dish. Adding just a touch of apple cider vinegar or lemon juice to almost anything you make (no kidding!) heightens and brightens the other flavours and creates a surprising balance of tastes. Try it and see for yourself.     Print recipe     Butternut Squash, Leek and Apple Soup with Garlicky Rye Bread Croutons Makes at least 2 quarts /­­ 2 liters, Serves 4-6 Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. melted coconut oil (or ghee) 3 leeks 1 medium onion 5 cloves garlic 1 large butternut squash (mine was about 2 lbs. /­­ 1 kg) 1 large, tart apple 4 - 6 cups /­­ 1-1 1/­­2 liters vegetable broth, as needed 1 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­2 tsp. ground cardamom 1/­­2 tsp. ground star anise apple cider vinegar to taste (start with 1/­­2 tsp. up to 1 Tbsp.) 1 batch Garlicky Rye Bread Crouton (recipe to follow) Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. 2. Prepare all vegetables: chop leeks and onions, peel garlic (but leave it whole), peel butternut and cut into cubes, chop apple. 3. Place all vegetables on a baking sheet with the coconut oil, toss to coat, and set in the oven to roast for 25-35 minutes until tender. 4. Transfer roasted vegetables to a blender and add the spices and hot vegetable stock (you may need to work in batches). Blend on high until completely smooth. Taste, then add salt and apple cider vinegar, blend and taste again. Adjust seasoning to your taste, and add stock until the desired consistency is reached: I like mine quite thin so I use the full 6 cups /­­ 1 1/­­2 liters of stock. 5. Transfer soup to a large cooking pot over medium heat to warm, if necessary. Divide soup equally among bowls and serve with the Garlicky Rye Bread Croutons and freshly cracked black pepper. Garlicky Rye Bread Croutons Serves 4 Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 200g stale dark sourdough, cut into generous cubes (any bread here would work, but make a healthy choice) 1 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee (ghee is definitely the tastiest) 2 fat cloves garlic, finely minced or grated on a microplane a couple pinches flaky sea salt Directions: 1. Melt oil in a small saucepan over low heat. When it is melted, add the garlic and stir to combine. Cook just until the garlic starts to simmer, immediately remove from heat and let cool slightly. Preheat oven to 350°F/­­175°C. 2. Cut bread into generous cubes and place in a medium sized bowl. Pour the garlic oil over the top and toss to coat, using your hands to squish the oil into the bread. Spread out bread cubes on a cookie sheet, sprinkle with salt and place in the oven. Toast for 15-20 minutes, tossing a couple times during cooking. Croutons are ready when they are crisp and golden around the edges. Once cool, store leftovers in an airtight container for up to three days. You guys. I’m making app! It’s almost ready! I can’t wait! The My New Roots iOS app will include your favourites from the blog, plus 5 exclusive app-only holiday recipes, perfect for the upcoming season. Click the link below to go to the App site where you can sign up to be notified when the app is out (soon, I promise!) and receive my brand-new recipe for Crispy Sweet Potato Shoe String Fries with Miso Tahini Gravy, like right now. Thank you for all for encouraging me to do this, and your ongoing support. I like you very much. xo, Sarah B  


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