asparagus - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Vegan Spice Cake – Applesauce Spice Cake

Paneer 65 recipe | paneer fry recipe | how to make hotel style paneer 65

Gujarati dal recipe | gujarati tuvar dal | gujarati toor dal

Shortcut Apple Steel Cut Oats + A Day of Eating Video










asparagus vegetarian recipes

Easy Homemade Cashew-Oat Yogurt

October 24 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Easy Homemade Cashew-Oat Yogurt This is a recipe that we’ve been excited to share for a while! The number of plant-based yogurt options has been growing like crazy on health food store shelves, which is amazing, and I always love seeing how companies innovate in this field. Still, I rarely buy yogurt. There are a few things that I find less than ideal about it: the single-use (mostly plastic) packaging, the presence of weird ingredients or additives (gums, etc.), and/­­or the price, which can often be quite steep. Knowing that I can easily make really good vegan yogurt at home is another huge reason. This recipe takes care of a few common problems that I’ve personally noticed when it comes to homemade, plant-based yogurt making: it’s not at all finicky (unlike coconut yogurt), and it’s not overly bland (looking at you, 100% cashew yogurt). Coconut yogurt is notoriously tricky to make at home. The ingredients couldn’t be simpler (just coconut milk + probiotic), but achieving the right texture is not easy. It’s common for coconut yogurt to refuse to thicken and remain the texture of milk, albeit a probiotic one. This is when you start getting into the nuances of which brand coconut milk works and which doesn’t, and what probiotic capsules to use. Not very universal. There are some incredible coconut yogurt brands out on the market (like Anita’s and Coconut Cult), but they are very expensive, hard to find, and honestly so incredibly rich that I can only handle one spoonful at a time. On the other hand, perfectly creamy cashew yogurt is very easy to make at home, but I find it to be pretty bland. It can also end up being fairly pricey to put together, since you are only using cashews, water, and probiotic, and you need quite a bit of cashews to bulk it up. Enter this cashew-oat yogurt recipe! It’s foolproof in my experience, always comes out luxuriously creamy, and has an interesting yogurt-y savoriness from the addition of oats. You don’t have to use as many cashews, which cuts down on price, and it seems to work with many probiotic brands. Here are a few more things to expect from this yogurt: - This yogurt does not taste like dairy yogurt, but it does have a satisfyingly creamy, fatty body, which goes well with fresh fruit, much like regular yogurt. - The texture of this yogurt is unique. It’s not fluffy like well-made coconut yogurt and not pudding-like, like store-bought yogurt that contains gums. It’s thick but pourable. - The flavor is unique, too. The cashews contribute fattiness and richness. The oats, once fermented with a probiotic, acquire a pleasantly sour, almost cheesy/­­yogurt-y type of flavor that I personally find delicious. We hope you’ll give it a try :) Easy Homemade Cashew-Oat Yogurt   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 cup raw cashews or cashew pieces - soaked in purified water for 4 hours or overnight ⅓ cup gluten-free, old-fashioned rolled oats - soaked in ½ cup purified water overnight ¾ cup purified water 2 probiotic capsules (I use this one) Instructions Drain and rinse the cashews. Combine them with the soaked oats (the oats should absorb the water by now, so no need to drain) and water in an upright, high-speed blender and blend until smooth. Pour into a glass container, leaving some room at the top for the yogurt to expand. Open the probiotic capsules and pour the powder into the yogurt mixture. Stir with a wooden (or any non-metal) spoon to incorporate thoroughly. Cover the container with a piece of cheesecloth or breathable fabric, fixing it in place with a rubber band (or I use my nut milk bags here) and let culture in a dark place (no direct sunlight), at room temperature for 24 hours. Taste the yogurt. If it tastes good and yogurt-like enough to you, its ready. If not, leave it to culture more, for up to 48 hours total. The timing will depend on the temperature in your house and the probiotic you use. Once ready, keep refrigerated in an air-tight container. Notes When you are ready to make the next batch of this yogurt, you can save a few tablespoons of yogurt and use it as a starter for your new batch. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Banana Toffee Tart Cauliflower Pesto Pasta Yellow Split Pea Chowder from Power Plates Asian Flavoured Veggie Burgers with Asparagus Fries .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Easy Homemade Cashew-Oat Yogurt appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

One-Dish Vegan Revised and Expanded Edition

October 2 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

One-Dish Vegan Revised and Expanded EditionMany of you may be familiar with the first edition of One-Dish Vegan that came out over five years ago.  I’m excited to announce the publication of the Revised and Expanded Edition. In it, you will find all of the favorites you’ve come to love, along with 25 all-new recipes, and more for a total of 175 fast and convenient one-dish meals, all beautifully photographed, and ready to get you cooking. The bold and vibrant recipes range from the most popular categories of one-dish dining like stews, chilis, and casseroles, to a host of stove top sautes and stir-fries. You will also enjoy substantial salads, as well as pastas and other noodle-based dishes. Convenience and easy cleanup are key in One-Dish Vegan; not only can each meal be served and enjoyed in a single dish, but most can also be prepared in a single container. Now you can spend more time eating and less time cleaning. The 25 all-new recipes in One-Dish Vegan Revised and Expanded Edition include: - Easy Ramen Bowls - Cheesy Cauliflower Soup - Panzanella Salad with White Beans and Artichokes - Barbecued Jackfruit with Sweet Potatoes and Cauliflower - Jungle Curry - Thai Coconut Rice with Edamame and Asparagus - Vegan Shakshuka - Jackfruit Stroganoff - Millet and Chickpea Curry - One-Pot Sicilian Couscous - Spicy Korean Stir-Fry - Lobster Mushroom Newburg - Vegetable Donburi - Coconut Curry Noodles and Butternut Squash - Black Bean Tortilla Casserole - Layered Brunch Bake - Shepherd’s Pie, Two Ways - Nacho-Chilaquile Bake - Lentil Tourtiere   The recipes in One-Dish Vegan Revised and Expanded Edition are at once homey and adventurous, comforting and surprising. Above all, they demonstrate that it really is possible to get a complete vegan meal into one dish, full of good-for-you nutrients and bright, satisfying flavors. One-Dish Vegan Revised and Expanded Edition will be released on October 9 and is now available for pre-order. The post One-Dish Vegan Revised and Expanded Edition appeared first on Robin Robertson.

English Garden Salad

August 7 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

English Garden SaladLittle gem lettuce has spoiled me for other types of lettuce--its everything we love about butter and romaine lettuce, all in one compact little head-- and it’s perfect for this English Garden Salad. If you cant find Little Gem lettuce, substitute another type of lettuce, such as Boston or Bibb. English Garden Salad Little gem lettuce has spoiled me for other types of lettuce--its everything we love about butter and romaine lettuce, all in one compact little head. If you cant find Little Gem lettuce, substitute another type of lettuce, such as Boston or Bibb. - 4 ounces thin asparagus or young green beans trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces - 1 cup green peas, fresh or frozen - 2 to 3 heads Little Gem lettuce or other tender lettuce, coarsely chopped (about 5 cups total) - 4 cherry or grape tomatoes, halved lengthwise - 1/­­2 English cucumber, thinly sliced - 4 red radishes, trimmed and thinly sliced - 1 tablespoon chopped fresh tarragon leaves - 1 tablespoon snipped fresh chives - 1 tablespoon torn small fresh mint leaves - 3 tablespoons olive oil - 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice or white wine vinegar - 1/­­4 teaspoon salt - 1/­­8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper - Pinch sugar - Steam the asparagus and peas over boiling water, using a steamer pot with a perforated insert until crisp-tender, 2 to 3 minute. Run cold water over the vegetables to stop the cooking process, then drain and pat dry. - Transfer the cooled vegetables to a large bowl. Add the lettuce, tomatoes, cucumbers, radishes, and fresh herbs. - In a small bowl, combine the oil, lemon juice, salt, pepper, and sugar. Drizzle over the salad and toss gently to combine. Serve immediately. This recipe is from Vegan Without Borders (C) Robin Robertson, 2014, Andrews McMeel Publishing, photo by Sara Remington.   The post English Garden Salad appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Smörg?st?rta - Savory Rye Sandwich Cake

June 23 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Smörg?st?rta - Savory Rye Sandwich Cake Hey friends and happy midsummer! We spent midsummer eve at a friends house, dancing like frogs around a flower covered midsummer pole. It’s one of many weird traditions that we do in Sweden on this longest day of the year. Today we are off to Noma (as in one of the coolest restaurants on earth) to test their new plant focused menu that is launching next week. We’re very excited - obviously for Noma, but also for eating a fancy dinner together with zero kids around. Before we are leaving, I wanted to post this little recipe that we uploaded to our youtube a few days ago. Just like frog dance, this savory layered sandwich cake is also a very Swedish thing. It is called smörg?st?rta and is traditionally made by layering white bread with mayonnaise, creme cheese, whipped cream, dill, chives, shrimps, salmon and a bunch of other stuff. It’s basically like a sandwich gone wild. Even if we are not completely sold on the very heavy traditional version, there is something intriguing about the concept of a sandwich cake. So we made our own version, using rye bread and three colorful and fresh (but still quite rich) spreads in between. One green spread with avocado, dill and peas. One white spread with egg, sauerkraut and creme fraiche. And one purple spread with beans, beetroot and sunflower seeds. We cover it with cream cheese with a sting of horseradish and lots of finely sliced veggies and flowers. It looks great, is fun to make and really delicious. Sandwich cake FTW! Check out this recipe video to see how we make it. This is the perfect savory dish to make for a party, brunch or gathering with friends. You can easily half the recipe or make it vegan by skipping the egg layer and replacing the cream cheese with coconut cream. If you want to try a gluten-free version of this cake you could either simply use a gluten free bread, or bake 4 trays of our vegetable flatbreads (this option is a little time consuming but would probably taste amazing). Smörg?st?rta (Savory Rye Sandwich Cake) Serves 12-16 Green Spread 300 g /­­ 2 cups cup green peas 1 small lemon, juice 1 bunch dill, chopped 2 avocados, flesh scooped out 2 tbsp olive oil 1 large pinch salt White Spread 6 hard-boiled eggs 250 g /­­ 1 cup creme fraice or sour cream 2 tbsp capers 4 tbsp sauerkraut a pinch black pepper Purple Spread 1 cup sunflower seeds, soaked for an hour in water 1 x 400 g tin white beans, drained and rinsed 2 cooked beetroots, roughly chopped 1 small lemon, juice 4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil salt and pepper Assembling 36 slices of sourdough rye bread (or bread of choice), thinly sliced 500 g cream cheese 1 tbsp grated horseradish Decoration 1 avocado, sliced or shaped into a rose 1/­­2 cucumber, sliced thinly 1 small bunch of asparagus, thinly shaved 1 lemon, halved and thinly sliced mache lettuce chives, finely chopped Start by making the spreads. Add all the ingredients for the green spread to a food processor and mix until smooth (or use a bowl and a hand blender). Taste and adjust the flavour to your liking. Transfer to a bowl and clean the food processor. For the white spread, peel and roughly chop the eggs, place in a bowl and gently stir through cr?me fraiche, capers, sauerkraut and a little black pepper. Set aside. Drain and rinse the sunflower seeds for the purple spreads and add them to the food processor (or use bowl and hand blender) along with beans, beetroot, lemon juice, olive oil and a good grind of salt and pepper. Pulse a couple of times until combined but still a little chunky. To assemble: Trim any hard ends off the bread and line up the rye slices so you have a rectangle, 3 slices wide and 3 slices long. Spread the green spread evenly on top and then place another layer of bread. Now layer they white spread evenly on top. Place another layer of bread, followed by the purple spread. Place the final 9 slices of rye on top. Add cream cheese to a mixing bowl and grate in the horseradish. Whisk to make sure it’s incorporated, taste and add more if desired. Use a palette style knife to cover the cake with a layer of cream cheese. Decorate with an avocado rose, ribbons of cucumber, shaved asparagus, machet lettuce, slices of lemons, chives and flowers. Or whatever you think looks good. Tip: You can make this cake 12-24 hours ahead and store in the fridge to let the spreads soak into the bread and soften it up a bit. Then add the cream cheese and decorations right before serving.

Garlicky White Bean & Asparagus Soup

April 8 2018 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Garlicky White Bean & Asparagus Soup Sometimes it snows in April. And sometimes it’s 17 degrees in April. And sometimes the trees aren’t even thinking of budding even though it’s April. 2018 is one of those times. But you know, why wait for the weather to comply? I am ready for Spring, and so bring on the asparagus! But make it hot and in a bowl because I can still see my breath outside. One bite and your surroundings transform into springtime. Birds start singing, bunnies start hopping around, you know the drill. Its a magical stalk and pureeing with white beans brings out the fresh flavor even more! This soup manages to be simple and also impressively elegant. This recipe is for a new cookbook I’m working on of easy recipes, for January 2019! Photos by Vanessa Rees, styling by meeeee.

One Pan Brussels Sprout and Red Lentil Pie with a Root Vegetable Crust

December 27 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. Since this is our last recipe of 2017, we wanted to make sure that it’s a special one. It needed to check all the boxes we usually try to check with our recipes: nourishing, delicious, seasonal, beautiful, convenient, and a little bit unexpected. This veggie and lentil-centered one pan pie is all of those things. It’s very cozy and fun to prepare, too. If I had a choice, most of my savory dishes would be one-pan dishes :) Convenience is hard to beat. That little bit of initial effort you put into assembling all the ingredients for a single-pan dish pays off incredibly well when you end up with a big meal, plus a ton of leftovers for the week, having only used one pan or pot in the process. This one-pan dish is something like a vegetable pot pie, but the crust is made up of thinly mandolined winter roots – potatoes, sweet potatoes, and celery root. The filling is shredded Brussels sprouts, mushrooms, and red lentils (you can add barley, too, for a grain component) that cooks in a mixture of healing spices and coconut milk. The whole thing is packed with a great variety of plants. It’s perfect for those looking to up their intake of vegetables after the holidays, but still wanting to keep their cooking hearty and cozy. The ingredient that takes this dish into the complete meal category are the red lentils. Vegetable dishes are great on their own, but adding any kind of pulses (lentils, beans, chickpeas, dry peas) to your plant-centric meals will up their nutrition and ability to satisfy quite a bit. Pulses are incredibly nutrient-dense, like superfoods, but they are also very affordable, unlike most other superfoods, so it’s a win-win all around. Try adding about a half a cup of pulses to your meals a few times a week – your cooking will greatly benefit from them, and you’ll be on your way to discovering a whole new world of deliciousness (of you haven’t already, of course). Head here for more of our recipes using pulses, and be sure to check out Half Cup Habit. Happy New Year! Thank you so much for visiting GK, trying out our recipes, and reading up on the self-care series. It all means so much to us .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post One Pan Brussels Sprout and Red Lentil Pie with a Root Vegetable Crust appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Bites

October 25 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Bites This post was created in Partnership with Nuts.com Coming to you with my favorite, easy treat as of late. Though the desserts section of our recipe index has plenty of bar recipes of all kinds (check out our lemon bars, ‘twix’ bars, matcha lime bars, etc.), I can’t stop coming back to them as one of my favorite dessert formats. These cookie dough ones are a little different though – they are shaped into perfectly indulgent, bite-sized treats. They are: made with pantry ingredients, low-maintenance in preparation, gluten-free and vegan, and they really do taste like cookie dough! Since the concept of eating raw cookie dough is non-existent where I come from, I was very skeptical when I first found out about it some years ago. My mind was quickly changed when I tried one of the crazy Ben & Jerry’s flavors involving chunks of cookie dough, dispersed throughout their ice cream. I get it now. I really do. Our cookie dough is a bit less indulgent and more nourishing than the average, but still tastes rich and perfectly decadent. It’s made with flours that are okay to eat in their raw form – almond (made of just almonds) and coconut (made of coconut pulp), and the buttery element comes from tahini or cashew butter. Once mixed with a bit of coconut oil, maple syrup and cacao nibs, it’s remarkable how much the stuff actually tastes like chocolate chip cookie dough. Add a coating of tahini chocolate to that, and you’re in business. I haven’t yet met anyone who wasn’t immediately impressed by these bites. All the ingredients for this recipe come straight from my favorite online bulk foods shop, Nuts.com. Though we often talk about them on this blog, I never tire of marveling at their amazing selection. It’s true bulk food heaven. They also take real pride in the quality of their ingredients, and it really shows. I haven’t been able to find juicier dried fruit anywhere else. AND they roast their nuts the same day they are shipped! I love seeing that type of care put into businesses, and I’m always grateful to have Nuts.com as a sponsor. Hope you’ll give these bites a try! Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Bites   Print Ingredients for the chocolate chip cookie dough ½ cup almond flour ½ cup coconut flour generous pinch of sea salt 1 tablespoon maca powder (optional) ½ cup tahini, cashew butter, or a mixture of both 2 tablespoons coconut oil 2-3 tablespoons maple syrup ¼ cup cacao nibs for the chocolate layer ½ cup dark chocolate chips 1-2 tablespoons tahini or cashew butter 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 tablespoon maca powder (optional) Instructions to make the chocolate chip cookie dough Prepare an 8 x 8 square dish and line it with parchment paper, extending the edges up the sides for easy removal later on. Combine the almond and coconut flours with the salt, maca powder, if using, tahini/­­cashew butter, coconut oil, and maple syrup in a food processor. Mix until well-combined. Transfer the mixture to a bowl and fold in the cacao nibs. You can also mix all the ingredients by hand in a bowl. Press the cookie dough mixture into the bottom of the lined dish to create an even layer. to make the chocolate layer and assemble Melt the chocolate chips on a double boiler. With the heat still on, add in the tahini/­­cashew butter, coconut oil, and maca, if using. Stir everything together until smooth and turn off the heat. Pour the chocolate mixture over the cookie dough layer in the baking dish. Spread into an even layer with a spoon. Place the dish into the refrigerator for at least 20 minutes, or until the chocolate layer is hardened. Lift the cookie out of the dish, using the extended sides of the parchment paper, and place it onto a cutting board. Start by cutting the cookie in half lengthwise and crosswise with a sharp knife. Then continue cutting each piece in half until you have 1 cookie dough bites. Alternatively, make them any shape or size you want. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... Asian Flavoured Veggie Burgers with Asparagus Fries Rooibos Poached Pear Tart Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices Roasted Yellow Plum and Rosemary Popsicles .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Bites appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Cream of Asparagus Soup

September 20 2017 VegKitchen 

Vegan Cream of Asparagus Soup This gorgeous vegan cream of asparagus soup is a nice introduction to meals as a first course, since it’s nice and light. It used to be that asparagus was primarily available in spring (and that’s still when it’s best and less expensive), but now that it’s become more year-round, you can enjoy this soup nearly […] The post Vegan Cream of Asparagus Soup appeared first on VegKitchen.

Red Lentil Gazpacho

July 26 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Red Lentil Gazpacho This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. There’s something about the act of making gazpacho that makes me feel like I’m taking full advantage of summer. The chilled soup is definitely a constant on our family’s summer menu, simply because it combines the best of all worlds – it’s incredibly refreshing, packed with sun-grown produce, and such a breeze to make. Since I’m always feeling the urge to experiment in the kitchen, I try to switch up our gazpacho recipe pretty much every year. Some favorites have included this strawberry gazpacho, as well as ones made with tomatillos and watermelon. This summer, I’m all about this unexpected lentil version. It might sound a bit strange to puree lentils into gazpacho, but I assure you that it makes for some seriously tasty and nourishing soup. Red lentils were basically made for gazpacho, not only because of their color, but also because they seamlessly blend in with the rest of the ingredients, while contributing some extra savoriness. Lentils also do a great job of making the soup more filling and satisfying, since they fall into the category of pulses (together with chickpeas, beans and dry peas), which are protein and fiber-packed little superfoods. We’ve been working with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada this year on creating some simple, weekday-friendly pulse recipes, as part of their Half-Cup Habit program. Making a habit of incorporating at least 1/­­2 cup of cooked pulses in your cooking a few days a week is a great idea, since you’ll end up with sustainable, nourishing and affordable meals. This gazpacho is a great place to start, as well as our White Bean ‘Tuna’ Sandwich, Smoky Chickpea Croutons, or any recipes on the Pulses website. Hope you’ll give this gazpacho a try :) Red Lentil Gazpacho   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients ½ cup red lentils - soaked overnight 3 garlic cloves - divided 1½ cups water 2 bay leaves (optional) sea salt 3-5 large to medium heirloom tomatoes - roughly chopped 1 medium cucumber - peeled and roughly chopped 1 red bell pepper - seeded and roughly chopped, reserve some for garnish 1 small red chili pepper - seeded, or ¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes ¼ cup soft sun-dried tomatoes juice of 1 lemon freshly ground black pepper basil - for serving microgreens - for serving (optional) Instructions Drain and rinse the lentils. Smash 2 garlic cloves with the back of a knife and peel. Combine the lentils, garlic, water and bay leaves, if using, in a medium soup pot. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to a simmer and cook, partially covered, for about 5-7 minutes, or until lentils are soft and most of the water is absorbed. Add salt at the end and discard the bay leaves. Combine the lentils and cooked garlic, remaining raw garlic clove, tomatoes, cucumber, peppers, sun-dried tomatoes, lemon juice, salt and pepper to taste in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Taste and adjust salt if needed. Chill very well before serving. Serve garnished with basil leaves, microgreens, if using, and the reserved chopped bell pepper. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Green Skillet Pizza with Asparagus and Pesto Tile Flatbreads Clementine Fudge Cake Spring Vareniki .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Red Lentil Gazpacho appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Ginger Roasted Leeks & Asparagus

June 12 2017 Meatless Monday 

Leeks are sliced paper thin and marinated with lemon juice, soy sauce and freshly grated ginger. Roasted asparagus makes the perfect canvas for the salty sour leeks in a side dish which celebrates springs bounty. This recipe comes to us from JL goes Vegan. Serves 4 - 1 bunch asparagus - 1 leek - juice of 1/­­2 a lemon - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 tablespoon coconut aminos* - or - 1 tablespoon low sodium soy sauce - 1 teaspoon ginger, grated *Coconut aminos is a soy sauce substitute with 65% less sodium. Found in health food stores. Low sodium soy sauce can be substituted if coconut aminos are unavailable. Snap the bottom ends off of each asparagus spear. Slice the leek in slices as thin as possible with a madoline or a knife. Rinse the leek slices thoroughly. Toss the asparagus and thinly sliced leeks in a shallow dish with the lemon juice, olive oil, grated ginger and the coconut aminos or soy sauce. Let marinate for 20 minutes. Preheat an oven to 400 degrees. Roast the asparagus and leeks in their marinade for 8-10 minutes, or until the asparagus is cooked to preference. Divide into 4 portions and enjoy on the side. The post Ginger Roasted Leeks & Asparagus appeared first on Meatless Monday.

First-Ever Musical Meatless Monday Event in Baltimore a Great Success

May 29 2017 Meatless Monday 

First-Ever Musical Meatless Monday Event in Baltimore a Great Success Credit: Nellaware Photography  The Black Vegetarian Society of Maryland (BVSM) hosted the first-ever Musical Meatless Monday event in Baltimore at Northwestern High School on Monday, May 1st. The mission of the evening was to expose people to the global Meatless Monday movement in a relaxed and entertaining environment where they could enjoy a meatless meal and learn about the benefits of plant-based eating. Our goal is for people to connect with their inner compassion, their soul, when eating and to understand the important decisions they are making when choosing the foods they eat, said Naijha Wright-Brown, executive director of BVSMD and host of the evening. Credit: Nellaware Photography  The event received a Certificate of Recognition from the City of Baltimores Mayor, Catherine Pugh, and exceeded expectations in terms of number of attendees and receptiveness of the plant-based meal and product samples. Two-hundred-fifty guests enjoyed a delicious plant-centered dinner including brussel sprouts, asparagus, brown rice, quinoa, collards, kidney beans and two versions of kale salad. Musical Meatless Monday entertainment featured special guest eco-hip hop artist and vegan raw food chef, DJ Cavem. DJ 5Starr, the students of Northwestern High School, local artist and soulful songstress, Mova Kween rounded out the festivities. Guests heard firsthand about Meatless Monday and plant-based eating from speakers representing Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, City Weeds, and the Humane Society of the United States. With the rousing success of the event, the Black Vegetarian Society of Maryland is planning another bash for later this year. Stay tuned to find out more! Credit: Nellaware Photography  The post First-Ever Musical Meatless Monday Event in Baltimore a Great Success appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Salsa Verde Quinoa & Veggies Dinner

May 19 2017 VegKitchen 

Salsa Verde Quinoa & Veggies Dinner When you have a delicious, nourishing (and quick) dish like Salsa Verde Quinoa Pilaf as the centerpiece of a dinner plate, the rest of the meal comes together quickly. Here, weve completed the veg-centric meal with a late spring flavor, though it can be enjoyed almost any time of year. Asparagus used to be a […] The post Salsa Verde Quinoa & Veggies Dinner appeared first on VegKitchen.

Egg White Omelet with Seared Asparagus

May 15 2017 Oh My Veggies 

This egg white omelet makes for a delicious healthy breakfast thats low in calories but packed with flavor and protein.

Babamesco Dip

May 7 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Babamesco Dip Baba ganoush + romesco = babamesco! One fine day, I had some but not all of the ingredients to make romesco, as well as a few baba-ganoush appropriate items, and I was craving some kind of powerful dip/­­spread/­­sauce. I combined the two and ended up with something really special. I’m pretty sure that everyone who sampled it loved it, and that goofy name that I threw out in the moment really stuck. I’ve had friends call me and seriously ask me when I’ll be making another batch of babamesco. Now I can’t imagine calling it by any other name. A few ways it can be used: as a dip for pita chips, sandwich spread, pizza sauce, veggie bowl component, sauce for vegetables (try it with grilled ramps or roasted cauliflower). There’s a step-by-step video above and some weekend links below. Happy Sunday :) Dimes Spiced Porridge on Munchies – can’t wait to make this someday soon! Tortus Copenhagen – this ceramicist’s instagram is addicting. The potter’s wheel videos are so meditative and satisfying. Unsweetened Miso Chocolate Bar – Valentina used our almost savory raw chocolate recipe as a starting point for her own unsweetened chocolate bar, and it looks amazing. Margaret Atwood on What ‘The Handmaids Tale’ Means Today – have you been watching the show?! I find it to be so eerily believable. Loved this article from the author about how the novel relates to the world today, and this bit: ‘One of my rules was that I would not put any events into the book that had not already happened in what James Joyce called the nightmare of history, nor any technology not already available. No imaginary gizmos, no imaginary laws, no imaginary atrocities.’ Jessica Koslow of Sqirl – interviewed on Apiece Apart Woman Simplicity City – our favorite fashion instagram that draws from the past Babamesco   Print Serves: around 4 cups Ingredients 2 red bell peppers 1 small eggplant or 3 small Japanese eggplants - sliced in half 1 head of garlic neutral coconut oil or olive oil, plus more for garnish sea salt freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons tahini juice of 1 lemon handful of parsley, plus more for garnish zaatar - to garnish (optional) microgreens - to garnish (optional) Instructions Place the bell peppers on a baking sheet and turn your broiler to high. Broil the peppers for 2-4 minutes, flipping every minute or so, until the skin is blistered and the peppers are soft. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool. Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C) and prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Place the eggplant on the sheet. Break the head of garlic into cloves and place them next to the eggplant, with the skins intact. Drizzle the eggplant and garlic cloves with oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper and mix with your hands to coat. Place in the oven. The garlic should be done after about 15 minutes, while the eggplant may need another 5-10 minutes until its ready, a total of 20-25 minutes. Once the bell peppers are cool enough to handle, peel off their skin and remove the core and seeds. Slip the skin off the roasted garlic cloves. Scoop the eggplant flesh out of the skin and discard the skin. In a food processor, combine the roasted pepper, eggplant, garlic, tahini, lemon juice, salt and pepper until just smooth. Add in the parsley and pulse to incorporate. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve the babamesco with a drizzle of olive oil, a sprinkling of zaatar and microgreens, if using. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Asian Flavoured Veggie Burgers with Asparagus Fries Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash Raw Apricot Lavender Tart and a Giveaway Superfood Cherry Garcia Pops with a Chocolate Core - Ice... .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Babamesco Dip appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Spring Picnic Bread

April 16 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Spring Picnic Bread Picnic season is finally upon us and we have been kicking it off with two new favorite things. The first one is a bike and the other is a bread. We have been dreaming of a Danish cargo bike for years and years, and last month we finally splurged on this one. It’s the perfect vehicle for us because we can fit all three kids in it with seatbelts and all. It’s ideal to bring home heavy grocery bags with. And it’s environmentally friendly. All practicalities aside, it is also so much fun to ride around with and we are roaming from playground to picnic spots without a hitch. Just packing a few blankets, a big smoothie, a rhubarb compote and this beauty of a bread. We created this recipe for all type of picnic situations. We wanted something spring-y and savory that tasted awesome and could manage a bumpy bike ride. It’s basically like a savory muffin that we bake in a sheet pan. It serves many, is easy to make, super moist and flavorful and you can make lots of variations on it (although I love the look of thinly shaved asparagus on top). Needless to say, this is also ideal for a brunch or or other weekend gatherings. Just like a foccacia, the bread acts as a base and you can play around with all kind of toppings. Here are a few variations: o Swap some of the potatoes in the bread with grated carrots, parsnip or swede. o A teaspoon of mustard in the batter adds some complexity to the flavor. o Any fresh herbs can be mixed into the batter. o Olives or capers could be good on top. Spinach could also be used instead of asparagus. o You can use a dairy free yogurt instead of buttermilk and leave out the feta cheese if you prefer it dairy free. o We havent tried a vegan version but replacing the eggs with chia eggs (1 egg = 1 tablespoons chia seed + 3 tablespoons water) has worked for us on similar recipes. Asparagus & Potato Picnic Bread Serves 12 Dry Ingredients 100 g /­­ 1 cup oat flour (or the same amount rolled oats, blitzed into flour in a food processor) 100 g /­­ 3/­­4 cup rice flour (or buckwheat flour or spelt flour) 1 1/­­2 tsp baking powder 1 tsp sea salt flakes Wet Ingredients 3 free-range eggs 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup olive oil or coconut oil, at room temperature 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup cultured buttermilk (or yogurt or plant-based yogurt) 1-2 spring onions 3-4 potatoes (2 cups /­­ 250 g grated) 1 handful fresh parsley, finely chopped 100 g feta cheese Topping 3 raw asparagus 1/­­3 cup pumpkin seeds 2 tsp quality olive oil 2 tsp honey a handful chive Preheat the oven to 180°C /­­ 350°F bake mode and grease a 30 x 22 cm /­­ 12 x 9 inch tray or line it with parchment paper. Add all the dry ingredients to a large mixing bowl and stir until combined. Make a well in the centre and set aside while preparing the wet ingredients. Whisk eggs in a separate bowl, then add oil and buttermilk. Finely chop the onion. Peel the potatoes, grate them coarsely and add them to the wet mixture along with the onion and parsley. Crumble in half of the feta cheese. Give it a good stir and then pour the wet mixture into the bowl with the flours. Use a wooden spoon or spatula to combine the batter and then pour it onto the tray. Use a peeler to shave the asparagus into thin ribbons and spread them out over the batter. Crumble the remaining feta cheese on top. Combine pumpkin seeds, oil and honey and sprinkle them on top as well, along with the chive. Bake for approximately 40 minutes or until golden and a skewer inserted in the centre of the cake comes out clean. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool slightly in the tin before transferring to a wire wrack to cool completely. Store the cake at room temperature in an airtight container and it will keep for a few days. Great to bring on a picnic and serve with a tangy rhubarb compote or chutney. Enjoy!

Roasted Veggie Grain Platter

March 27 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Roasted Veggie Grain Platter Hi, David here. I’ll get to the recipe soon but first I just wanted to share a little scene from last night. Isac was watching a baking program for kids and as I was tucking him in, he thoroughly explained the whole process of making croissants to me. You have so much butter in croissants, dad. Like, a lot. You put it on the dough and fold it over the butter like this. And you hit it with the rolling pin like this, bam bam bam. When it comes to numbers and letters, he can be a little clueless, but the fact that our three year-old had memorized all the details in croissant baking from just watching it once on tv, made me all happy and proud. I’m not saying that mastering a croissant is more important than math, but teaching our kids how to cook has been one of the things I’ve really looked forward to as a dad. And he is really into it. The little kids stove has long been his favorite toy both at home and in kindergarten an he often serves imaginary pancakes to all his friends. I’ve promised him that we will make croissants together tonight so I’m off to prep a dough right after this (making the rye croissants from Green Kitchen Travels). I’ll report back with how it goes. Today’s recipe doesn’t have anything to do with croissants but Isac does play a little part as kitchen helper in the video below. So, the recipe. There is one obvious reason why grain bowls have become so popular in the last couple of years. Their looks. If you don’t know what a grain bowl is, it’s basically a mix of roasted and raw vegetables on a bed of grains and herbs arranged in a bowl. The mix of vegetables often make these bowls super colorful and therefore also very popular on instagram. Grain bowls are however more then just pretty. They are hearty and provide a variety of textures and flavors. They are also very easy to adapt to what you have at home and what’s in season. We often make grain bowls for lunch, with any cooked grain, millet or quinoa as the bed, adding leftover vegetables from the fridge on top. In this recipe, we have taken the grain bowl concept and turned it into a platter. It’s topped with roasted and fresh spring vegetables, feta cheese, egg halves and hazelnuts. It’s a beautiful dish and a great one to make for Easter dinner. If you want to take the Easter concept even further, you could add roasted asparagus as well. We use an organic five-grain mix (emmer wheat, barley, gamut, brown rice and oat groats) from Zeta as the grain base but if you can’t find something similar, go with your favorite grain. Grains thrive with flavor friends, so we have paired these with a quick salsa made from marinated bell peppers, olives, capers, herbs and lemon. And stirred in a bit of feta cheese and toasted hazelnuts as well. It’s all there, flavours, looks and textures. Roasted Veggie Grain Platter with Bell Pepper Salsa Serves 4 To make this vegan, you can simply skip the eggs and feta cheese. 1 x 250 g bag Zeta 5-grain mix (or grains of choice) Roasted vegetables: 1 bunch carrots 3 purple spring onions or 2 red onions 2 small zucchini 1 tbsp olive oil sea salt Bell pepper & olive salsa: 100 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup grilled marinated bell pepper 100 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup Lecchino olives 3 tbsp capers 5-6 stalks fresh parsley and mint 1/­­2 lemon, juice 4 tbsp olive oil Topping: 2-3 medium soft boiled eggs 150 g feta cheese 100 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup hazelnuts, toasted and chopped 2 handfuls mache lettuce 6 heirloom cherry tomatoes, halved 1 bunch radishes Preheat the oven at 200°C /­­ 400°F and cover a baking tray with baking paper. Peal or clean the carrots and trim off the outer layer of the onion. Cut the onion lengthwise and the zucchini in bite-size pieces. Place the vegetables on the tray. Drizzle with oil and salt and roast for 15-20 minutes. Cook the grains in a large bowl of salted water according to the instructions on the package and drain in a sieve once they are ready. Make the salsa by chopping all the ingredients finely. Place in a bowl, squeeze over lemon juice and drizzle with oil. Fold the salsa into the grains, reserving some of it for serving. Crumble 2/­­3 of the feta cheese into the grains and half of the hazelnuts. Toss so everything is mixed. Pour the grains onto a platter, top with the roasted vegetables, lettuce, tomatoes, radishes, egg halves, feta cheese and hazelnuts. Drizzle with olive oil and serve with the remaining salsa and some sourdough bread on the side. Disclosure: We were compensated by Zeta for creating this recipe and video using some of their products. All words are our own. 

Sweet Potato Galette with Magic Green Sauce

November 29 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Sweet Potato Galette with Magic Green Sauce I love galette. It really is the lazy wo/­­man’s pie. I love that galette crust requires the least amount of fuss of all the crusts, and that the messier it looks, the better. I love that galette filling can be any good combination of vegetables, fruit and herbs, and that it can be as minimal or grand as one wants. This sweet potato version falls on the minimal side of the galette spectrum, yet it is completely lovely and delicious. There are layers of caramelized onions, thinly sliced sweet potato, and sage, all enveloped by a rustic spelt dough. We love to eat it with our favorite, magic green sauce, which is a savior for any leftover herbs in your refrigerator that are fated to end up in the trash or compost.  The green sauce is something I make every week. It’s sort of a cross between pesto and chimichurri, but made with pumpkin seeds as a more affordable alternative to pine nuts, and umami-fied with a bit of miso. You can make it with pretty much any herbs you have on hand. I usually make mine with parsley, but it also does well with the addition of cilantro, basil, tarragon, sage, and even rosemary. You can add in things like carrot or radish tops, too, which normally get thrown away, but are perfectly good to eat. I don’t discriminate against soft herb stems in this sauce either, and whirl them all in. For instance, if I’m using parsley leaves for a recipe, I’ll save the stems for this sauce instead of throwing them away. I’ll do the same with most other herbs. The sauce is a nice brightener for pretty much any savory dish. It’s great on toast, in pasta, on roasted vegetables, with eggs, and it’s absolutely delicious on this galette. I hope you’ll give it a try :) Sweet Potato Galette   Print Serves: two 7 galettes Ingredients for the filling 1 large yellow onion - halved and sliced lengthwise about 3 tablespoons melted neutral coconut oil - divided 1 medium sweet potato - mandolined or thinly sliced into rounds sea salt and freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons chopped sage leaves for the dough 1½ cups (150g) sprouted spelt flour or whole spelt flour, plus more for rolling the dough 1 teaspoon coconut sugar pinch of sea salt 3 tablespoons melted neutral coconut oil ½ cup plus 2 tablespoons hot purified water 1 tablespoon finely chopped sage Instructions to caramelize the onions Start by caramelizing the onions. Heat 1 tablespoon of coconut oil in a sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add the onions and sauté until translucent, for 3-5 minutes. Add a pinch of salt, turn down the heat to medium low and cook the onions, stirring periodically, for 30-40 minutes, until caramelized and golden brown. Make the dough while the onions are caramelizing. to make the dough While the onions are caramelizing, place the flour in a medium mixing bowl, add the sugar and salt, and mix with a fork to combine. Make a well in the center of the flour mixture, and pour in the oil. Pour the hot water over the oil, stirring with a fork and slowly incorporating the flour into the liquid. Add the chopped sage and mix it in. When all the flour has been incorporated, turn out the dough onto a floured surface and knead with your hands until smooth. Add more water, 1 teaspoon at a time, if the dough appears too dry. Take care not to add too much water, give the flour a chance to absorb the initial amount of water first. Divide the dough in half. Flatten each piece into a round disc, wrap them in plastic wrap or place into a floured bowl and cover with a damp kitchen towel. Let rest at room temperature for 30 minutes. to assemble and bake Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Line a large baking sheet or two medium baking sheets by covering them with parchment paper. Roll out the dough on a floured surface, one portion at a time, into ⅛-thick circular sheets, about 9 in diameter. Place one sheet of dough on the prepared baking sheet, keeping it to one side to make room for the second galette (if you are using two baking sheets, you dont have to worry about this). Brush the dough with the remaining melted coconut oil and sprinkle it with about ½ tablespoon of chopped sage. Arrange half of the caramelized onions in the center of the sheet of dough, followed by half of the sweet potato slices (arrange those in a spiral or any other pattern you prefer), leaving a 1-2 inch border of dough all around. Brush the sweet potato slices with melted coconut oil as you arrange them, in small sections, making sure that they are well oiled. Once arranged, generously sprinkle the sweet potato with sea salt and pepper, and another ½ tablespoon of chopped sage. Fold over the edges of the galette, working circularly, until the galette has a folded border. Brush the edges with melted coconut oil. Repeat this process with the second portion of the dough and remaining sweet potato and sage. Drizzle any leftover melted oil over the filling of both galettes. Trasnfer the baking sheet(s) to the oven and bake for about 45 minutes, until the potatoes are cooked through and golden. Remove the galettes from the oven, let them cool slightly, slice and serve with the magic green sauce (recipe below). 3.5.3226     Magic Green Sauce   Print Serves: about 1½ cups Ingredients 1 large or 2 small bunches of parsley - roughly chopped, including stems 7 or more sprigs of sage - roughly chopped, including stems ½ cup toasted pumpkin seeds 2 tablespoons lemon juice (from about half a lemon) ¼ cup olive oil 1 heaping tablespoon white miso generous pinch of red pepper flakes sea salt - to taste splash of red wine vinegar (optional) 1 clove garlic - roughly chopped (optional) Instructions Combine all the ingredients in a high-speed blender or a food processor until smooth. Keep the sauce refrigerated in an air-tight container, it will last for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Raw Colour Wheel Wraps Peach and Raspberry Summer Tart and a Guest Post for Scandi Foodie Tahini Ice Cream Bars with Miso Caramel and Chocolate - Ice Cream Sund... Welcome Summer Multigrain Salad with Strawberries and Asparagus .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Sweet Potato Galette with Magic Green Sauce appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

How to Cook Farro, the Hearty & Healthy Ancient Grain

October 10 2017 VegKitchen 

How to Cook Farro, the Hearty & Healthy Ancient Grain If you keep up with food trends, youve likely heard about farro, one of several ancient grains that have made a comeback in recent years. Farro takes its place among grains like quinoa, einkorn, ka?iwa, teff, and others that have been around for millennia, and which have become more widely available in the general marketplace. […] The post How to Cook Farro, the Hearty & Healthy Ancient Grain appeared first on VegKitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King

September 17 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Today’s self-care dialogue is with LA artist and meditation teacher, Lauren Spencer King. We first learned about Lauren a few years ago, when we came across her bimonthly moon writings that ring incredibly true and clear up a lot of things for us every month. Since then, we’ve fallen in love with Lauren’s art and meditation work, which is centered around breath work and her extensive knowledge about the healing powers of minerals. Lauren was kind enough to open up a space for us in her 4 day online meditation workshop for stress and anxiety, and we had the most lovely and calming time following her techniques and suggestions, which we often use to this day. Lauren’s self-care routine is as inspiring as it is down to earth, with a focus on finding the wisdom in the inner self. In this interview, Lauren tells us about the Ayurvedic cleanse she’s on, what minerals she keeps next to her bed, her ideas about exercise and beauty, why she sees the concept of a work-life balance as a myth, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I think in my everyday things do feel open and free, its part of the benefit of being an artist and working for yourself. But, I do find routine within that freedom. Days are also made up of habits (good and bad), and trying to prioritize things that are important and meaningful. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I like to have a few hours to wake up and start my day. I like the quiet of the mornings, the possibility of a new day. Sometimes if I happen to wake up really early for some reason, like 5:00am, I like to read in bed for a bit, or watch a scary movie early in the morning. Its weird... I know. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? On good nights I am in bed early and read before I go to sleep. I love reading in bed, there is something about it that feels so intimate. On a not so good night I will work too late, and fall asleep to a movie. I do like to sleep with a few minerals next to my bed, some make their way under my pillow at certain times: purple fluorite to relax my mind, danburite for sweet dreams, aquamarine for calming, a piece of dream quartz, and a piece of shungite that is next to my phone (on airplane mode). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: I am on an Ayurvedic cleanse right now. I have been working with this great Ayurvedic practitioner, her name is Meredith Carter. Years ago I did panchakarma (here), and if I could afford it I would do it annually. Its incredible. What I am doing now is like panchakarma lite! Breakfast – In the morning I make homemade almond milk. I will warm the almond milk and mix in my herbs and adaptogens, sometimes I will add fresh turmeric. I have been obsessed with making sweet potato toasts. I will top them with tahini and a cooked fruit compote (been loving cherry, wild blueberry, or pear ginger), with some pistachio nuts or pumpkin seeds. If I need some protein then I will eat two eggs toped with basil, and a tangerine. Lunch – I make fresh dahl with special non-heating spices and ghee, all of which I get from Surya Spa, they have the best mung beans and spices. Dahl is very healing. I will have a bowl full with some steamed chard or beet greens, black lava sea salt, toasted pumpkin seeds and lots of parsley or coriander on top. Snack – right now cherries are in season and they are making me so happy, I will have a bowl full of them with a handful of pistachios (lets be honest, like 1/­­2 a bag, I love pistachios). And some fresh ginger tea. Or I will make some beet hummus and have that with my favorite almond crackers. Dinner – I have been getting really into making soups! My two favorite are a green soup made with celery /­­ chard /­­ beet greens /­­ asparagus /­­ Japanese sweet potato. And a kabocha /­­ carrot /­­ginger soup. Or I will cook a big artichoke and dip the leaves into a melted ghee, lemon dip. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? None, I have never even had a cup of coffee. I usually have a huge jar of warm water with lemon or fresh ginger in the morning. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to when I was younger, until I developed all sorts of health problems because of it, some that I still deal with even over a decade later. I was living in Paris and eating nothing but delicious breads and sweets! It really took a toll on my body and since then I have cut both out. But, I still dream of flaky French almond croissants. Maybe in another life I will get to enjoy them again. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I love eating a spoonful of Chyawanprash in the morning. My good friend who runs Rebbl and develops all of their delicious drinks sent me a wellness mixture, it has very high grade reshi, ashwaganda and maca in it. I have that every morning. I love QuintEssentials 3.3 minerals. I also swear by Alexis Smarts flower remedies, she is amazing! I also almost always tend to all ailments physical and emotional with a homeopathic remedy from her. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I have an aversion to most forms of exercise, especially any kind of class where an instructor is wearing a headset and yells things at you like, Its almost swimsuit season, ladies. But sometimes I get into a routine where I go to yoga. I like to take hikes and go on walks, and I love to dance. But, my favorite is swimming. Recently I was swimming laps, and was having one of those days where I was feeling very unkind and judgmental of my body, and there was this older man in the lane next to me, he was a very serious swimmer, he might have even been a swim coach at some point, you could just tell. And I stopped to catch my breathe and he asked me how I had such a strong breaststroke. I told him it was because I was on swim team for years as a kid and maybe because I was tall. We talked for a bit about it and then I got back to my laps. And I started to think that in day to day life what I criticize most about my body in other contexts I use to my advantage. In this case, that my un-slender legs and bigger hips and butt actually made me a stronger swimmer and made my stroke more powerful. It really changed the way I thought about my body. I try to remember this. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I really love natural beauty, which to me means being whole and owning all of who you are. You know, there are times when I see someone crying, and they dont maybe look their best, but they are so beautiful to me, because they are so present and authentic. Bodies arent meant to be perfect, thats not why we have them. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I love oils and go through different phases of them on my face and body. Right now at night I use a hazelnut or arnica oil from a Paris apothecary for my face. I am also completely obsessed with Sans Ceuticalss Activator 7 Oil. I use it everywhere – body, face and hair! I dont really wear make up but when I do it is from RMS. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I either dry brush or do abhyanga massage with basil oil every day, its more for the internal lymphatic system, but it makes my skin really nice. Eating well and drinking enough water are also key. And a little sun is always nice. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. I love using my jade face roller to refine the tone of my skin as well as relieve some tension I carry in my jaw. I also am into my second year of no bra, for the most part. For a few reasons, one of them being that they actually arent good for your body. No products with chemicals. My mum was a natural beauty, she really taught me what that was, she had a style that was all her own. She was radiant from the inside out. I sometimes think this is something you are born with. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Stress is often what I teach most about in class, because it has been the biggest teacher to me. I feel I am always at a growing edge with it. I try not to over schedule myself. Rest is a big part of being healthy for me. I have gone through some very difficult periods in my life of having sever adrenal fatigue, which comes from stress of all kinds. So, I have to listen really carefully not to push myself too hard, despite at times wanting to ignore my limitations. Recently I have been working with someone to understand the deeper level of stress that I unconsciously take on from people around me and from living in a city. It has been fascinating. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Yes, sometimes stress can not be avoided, like when I have a show, or need to be on the computer all day, or travel. Those are the big ones for me. I have to really work hard to stay grounded. Its really all sorts of little things, that when I do them really add up. And I just do the best I can, its not about perfection. Even stopping to dance the stress out of my body for five minuets really helps. Stress is more physical than we think. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Stop everything. Get into bed in something comfy with socks. Sleeping as much as I can. Raw garlic. Olive Leaf supplements. Colloidal silver. Apple Cider Vinegar if I have a sore throat. Hot shower (or bath) with eucalyptus oil. Thieves oil on my chest and throat. Lots of water. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? I honestly think this idea of work /­­ life balance is a myth. At least it is for me. Sometimes its only about working on Fields of Study, sometimes I am all about being in the studio, sometimes its more relaxing and I can see friends and go on a trip or a weekend getaway. There is balance within the year if I am lucky. I recently just let this idea go, I was making myself feel so bad trying to make that ideal happen on a daily or even weekly timeline. I am also a bit of a workaholic, never feeling like I am doing enough. Thats something I am trying to work on. But, this pressure for balance seems like a modern day version of the women can have it all mantra. There are always compromises and I think its more empowering if we own that and voice it and have conversations about it. Instead of silently thinking that there is something wrong with us. Motivation -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Its not one single thing, but if it was it would be learning to listen to my body. My health and understanding of health has come from a bumpy road of making lots little shifts. I dont believe in a one size fits all mentality for health. I think we are all different and in every moment we need different things. I am wary of the companies and self proclaimed health gurus out there right now that give sometimes ill informed blanket recommendations. I think it is up to us to empower ourselves and take the time to learn about our bodies and ourselves. Its important to have support and create a team of people that can help you. I have an amazing doctor, a homeopathist, an Ayurvedic practitioner, a woman who I do energy work with, and a therapist that have all at different times saved my life in various ways. It can take time, but finding the people that resonate with your understanding of health is key. I have learned so much about my body and what health and healing is from working with all of them. And remembering that deep and true healing takes time. Its always a process. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. What came to mind was this movie Agnes Martin made called Gabriel. Its terribly long and boring. It is about the boy on a walk in nature, and it is very stripped down and minimal, no dialog and most of the movie is silent, it has one tiny part with music. But, I think it relates to the way I think about self-care in a way because it is about listening to the subtleties, and how all of that gets lost when there is a lot going on. Once I really started refining my diet, routine, relationship to my energy, my intuition, etc... I started to really be able to notice those subtle changes and messages my body was sending me, and as time goes on I keep going deeper and deeper. Its like in Martins paintings, when color is introduced, it feels monumental. Like for me, bananas are just too sweet now. Knowledge -- You are well-versed in so many amazing practices! Could you tell us a little bit about each of them: – Your art (would love to know more about your process on the mineral paintings) After graduate school I started making my own watercolors out of historical pigments, mostly from minerals and some earth pigments. I taught myself how to make paints the way they were made for centuries before there were synthetic colors. The mineral monochromes are just one aspect of the work I make, and they are about many things. But, the main ones are a redirection of how we think about representation. I think of them as representational paintings, as they are made of the very thing they are depicting: malachite, azurite, agate, epidote... They are also about an interest in the healing powers of art. They are made with the intention that the viewer and the space receive the same healing properties of the minerals and the earth from which they are sourced. I usually pair them with a highly rendered graphite drawings or watercolors. –  Fields of Study and mineral meditations Some years back after teaching meditation for a bit I was longing for an alternative to what I was seeing in the ways of spiritual teachings and mediation work, both in approach and aesthetic. I wanted to support people and teach them tools they could use in their every day life, while also creating a container for all the things I was interested in and all the things that I brought into my own spiritual practice, which I feel I am always shaping and discovering. Something that would allow for a deep conversation that also had breadth, and was based in every day life and could be accessible. Something that could be malleable and evolve as I did. And Fields of Study was born. I originally wanted to open up a non-profit space that would be like a modern day community center with classes and workshops for the community, as well as have a little shop and a residency space. And someday this might happen. But for now its just me – working to change the world, one person at a time. I say this with some humor, but its also a very real desire to be in service and help instigate change. The same goes for how I teach about minerals, I want to present an alternative, something that resonates with me and represents how I grew up with minerals in my home because of my mother, who was a silversmith. The goal of all those workshops is really to show people that they know more than they think they do, about most things, minerals included. And its not really about helping people feel like they know everything, but showing them that when they ask and they trust themselves they can source the answers. The participants really end up teaching the workshop, which I think is pretty amazing. – Your Moon writings I have been writing about the moon twice a month for about six years now. It really came out of a desire to understand its energy on a deeper level, and also to check in with myself about what I was feeling on a bimonthly basis. Its hard to take credit for the writing as I feel I have gotten to a place with it where I just sit down to write and something comes through me. As out there as that sounds, thats really what happens. I just listen as best as I can, I have gotten pretty good at listening. Writing in this way has really strengthened my intuition, its really incredible. Its also nice to get conformations from people when they write to tell me how right on it was for them. It reminds me that we are all connected. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Swimming in the ocean. The hot springs in Ojai or a trip to Joshua Tree. A bad movie. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Golden Bough and She by Robert A Johnson Song/­­Album – Gamelan Orchestra music, JD Emmanuel, and Neil Youngs album Harvest Moon, particularly Natural Beauty. Its my favorite song. Movie – The Color of Pomegranates Piece of Art – Fragonard, Brancusi, and John McCracken. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? Funny enough I just re-read this essay from The White Album where she talks about her packing list related to her being a journalist. At the very end she mentions that the one thing she never had was a watch, which she supposes is some reflection of the climate of the late 60s. But, a watch is the thing I always have, perhaps that says something about me and the times we are living in now. When I travel I also always wear this gold Victorian compass. You never know when you will have to find your way home. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? My Ayurvedic practitioner – Meredith Carter, my Homeopath – Alexis Smart, or anyone of the ladies on the @onigiriemoji Instagram feed I am a part of. Its a feed where a group of friends post what they are cooking and eating. Also, I wish you could have interviewed my mum, she was the best cook, I wish I learned more about cooking from her. Photos by Lauren Spencer King, Claire Cottrell and from Lauren’s shop. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Sweet-and-Sour Soba Noodles with Asparagus

June 26 2017 VegKitchen 

Sweet-and-Sour Soba Noodles with Asparagus Sweet-and-sour soba noodles embellished with with asparagus and fresh tomatoes makes a lovely spring or early summer dinner dish. Serve with a simple tofu dish such as Sweet and Savory Sautéd Tofu, and a platter of raw veggies. Photos by Hannah Kaminsky. Serves: 4 to 6 8-ounce package soba (buckwheat) noodles 1 tablespoon safflower or […] The post Sweet-and-Sour Soba Noodles with Asparagus appeared first on VegKitchen.

Summervibes Salad

June 8 2017 Veganpassion 

Summervibes Salad On hot days like today my body is craving for salad. It has to be colorful and fresh and varied with lots of good stuff in it :-). Because I'm in such a good summer mood I named the salad "summervibes". I'm very interested in how you like the combo with asparagus, rocket, strawberries, avocado and watermelon. Just can't get enough of the good stuff! I'd love to hear your creative salad ideas. Have lots of fun with this one and enjoy! Makes 2 portions Preparation time: 10 Minutes Ingredients: 10,5 oz asparagus 4,4 oz rocket 8,8 oz Strawberries 1/­­2 small cucumber 6 radishes 1/­­2 small watermelon (2x 0,4 inch slices) lemon juice balsamic vinegar oilve oil salt hemp seeds/­­pumpkin seeds Peel the lower third of the asparagus and cut them lengthways. Cook in slated water for 7-8 minutes. When the water evaporates toss the asparagus in it, salt it and put it aside. Wash the rocket and cut the cucumber and the radishes in small slices. Cut the watermelon and the strawberries in half. Then sprinkle with lemon juice. Cut avocado in cubes. Serve rocket, fruits and veggies on a plate. Use some balsamic vinegar and sprinkle the salad. Spread with some oil and hemp seeds. Enjoy the summer!

Dijon Grilled Asparagus and Onions

May 29 2017 Meatless Monday 

Spring onions are grilled with asparagus spears for a smoky sweet flavor as well as a stunning presentation. Sliced shallots, white wine vinegar and Dijon mustard provide a savory contrast to season these delectable vegetables. This recipe comes to us from Kristina of Formerchef.com. Serves 8 For the Dijon vinaigrette: - 1/­­2 shallot, thinly sliced - 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar - 3 tablespoons olive oil - 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard - salt and pepper, to taste For the grilled asparagus and onions: - 1 pound asparagus spears, trimmed - 1 pound spring onions*, halved lengthwise - 1 tablespoon olive oil *Spring onions are sweet onion bulbs attached to greens found in farmers markets and the produce section of grocery stores in Spring and Summer.   To make the Dijon vinaigrette: Whisk the sliced shallot, vinegar, olive oil and Dijon mustard together in a small bowl. Season with salt and pepper to taste. To complete the Dijon Grilled Asparagus & Onions: Preheat a grill to medium-high. Toss the trimmed asparagus and halved onions in a large bowl with the tablespoon of olive oil, taking care to ensure all ingredients are evenly coated. Place the asparagus spears and spring onions onto the heated grill, taking care to place the green portion of the spring onions on a cooler part of the grill. Grill, rotating every 2 minutes or so for about 6 minutes, or until the asparagus are tender. Plate the asparagus and onions on a large platter. Drizzle with the Dijon Vinaigrette, divide into 8 portions and enjoy! The post Dijon Grilled Asparagus and Onions appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Portobello Mushroom Pizzas with Hummus

May 17 2017 FatFree Vegan Kitchen  

Portobello Mushroom Pizzas with Hummus I’ve been enjoying my (sort of) new air fryer, but I haven’t been getting as creative with it as other people in my Facebook group have. I’ve done potatoes in fancy ways but mostly plain French fries and hash browns, tempeh bacon, asparagus, and, most successfully, tofu. After weeks of just “winging it,” I decided to take a look at the recipe book that came with my AF (as I abbreviate it) and noticed a non-vegetarian recipe for portobello mushroom pizzas that looked easy to veganize. (...) Read the rest of Portobello Mushroom Pizzas with Hummus (1,036 words) (C) svoisin for FatFree Vegan Kitchen, 2017. | Permalink | No comment Post tags: Air Fryer, Chickpea Recipes, Eat-to-Live, Gluten-free, Soy-free, Under 200 The post Portobello Mushroom Pizzas with Hummus appeared first on FatFree Vegan Kitchen.

Vegetarian Meal Plan | Roasted Strawberry Grilled Cheese, Pad See Ew & Spring Nourish Bowls

May 12 2017 Oh My Veggies 

This weeks vegetarian meal plan includes: roasted strawberry and brie grilled cheese; balsamic roasted veggie baked ziti; vegetarian pad see ew; spring nourish bowls; and roasted asparagus and arugula pizza.

Asparagus Protein Pancakes

May 3 2017 Veganpassion 

Asparagus Protein Pancakes Have you guys ever tried asparagus with pancakes? Delicious! To it a light and creamy sauce....yumm! I'm really into flours from different legumes.Green pea flour, red lentil flour or chickpea flour are so good in a sponge mixture. You can get a nutty taste with pumpkin seeds flour. Try it out! Makes 4 Portions. Preparation time: 30 miuntes For the pancakes: 1 1/­­2 cup legumes flour 1 1/­­2 cup whole spelt flour 1 tsp. baking soda salt 2 1/­­2 cup water oil for baking In a mixing bowl mix both flours, baking powder and salt. Stir in the water and let it stand for 10 minutes. For the veggies: 17 oz asparagus 10 oz champignon 1/­­2 leek 2 tbsp oil salt, pepper, nutmeg Peel off the lower thrid of the asparagus and cut off a size of a thumb. Cook it for 10-12 minutes. Cut the champignons and leek in slices. Heat oil in a pan and roast the veggies and spice it. For the creme: 2 tbsp oil 2 tbsp whole grain flour 1 1/­­2 + 2 tbsp oat milk 1 tbsp apple vinegar salt, pepper, nutmeg a bunch of lemon balm Heat the oil in a pot and stir in flour. While stiring add half of the oat milk. Chop the lemon balm and stir into the sauce. Add the other half of the sauce and spice it. Serve pancakes, veggies and cream and enjoy!


You will enjoy these as well ...

Found an error?
Help to fix it! Tell it us!



Our sites missing something? Suggest new content or features!



Have you any comments?
Send it us!