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Sweet Loren’s is the Perfect Dessert for Meatless Monday

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artificial vegetarian recipes

Sweet Loren’s is the Perfect Dessert for Meatless Monday

September 11 2017 Meatless Monday 

Sweet Loren’s is the Perfect Dessert for Meatless MondayA healthy plant-based diet doesnt have to skip dessert! Loren Brill, founder of Sweet Lorens, built her cookie dough company on a healthy foundation. Her four all-natural cookie dough products contain no hydrogenated oils, no trans fats, no high fructose corn syrup, and no artificial flavors. What Sweet Lorens products do use are whole grains, natural sugar, and high-quality chocolate. Its a health-conscious way to treat yourself on Meatless Monday that wont sabotage your diet! Loren Brill The story of Sweet Lorens explains why Brill focused on using only the best ingredients in her products. After beating cancer, she became very conscious of the foods she ate and their ingredients. To ensure that her own products reflect her personal mission, she doesnt include anything she cant pronounce and sticks to simple, whole-food ingredients in her simple, clean recipes. Brill says: “At Sweet Loren’s, we are on a mission to change the way Americans bake and satisfy their sweet tooth. We’re excited to partner with Meatless Monday and promote our mission to eat better-tasting, better-for-you food while taking care of the Earth. I created a delicious dessert that will pair well with any meatless dinner.  Once a week, you can make a whole meal that is plant-based and completely indulgent!” Sweet Berry Crumble As an added bonus, Brill features additional ways to prepare her cookie dough if youre feeling more adventurous! Check out this video that uses Sweet Lorens new Gluten Free Chocolate Chunk cookie dough to make a guilt-free sweet berry crumble on Meatless Monday. Visit Sweet Lorens web site to see where you can find their products and dont forget to download their coupon for $1.00 off! The post Sweet Loren’s is the Perfect Dessert for Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

16 Delicious Frozen Pops Everyone Will Love

July 29 2017 Oh My Veggies 

There’s nothing quite like an ice cold frozen pop to cool you down on hot summer days. Most store-bought pops are loaded with sugar and artificial flavors though, and they can be a bit boring in the flavor department. Good thing it’s super easy to make your own frozen pops at home! Grab yourself a […]

5 Tips for Taking Beautiful Vegan Food Photos

June 12 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Everybody loves food. We love talking about food, we love eating food, and we love beautiful photos of food. But we don’t want to see someone else’s veggie dinner hastily thrown together on a weekday night; we want to be inspired and tantalized by amazing gourmet experiences. With just a few tricks, you can up your photography game to share edible moments in a way thats artistic, appealing, informative, and inspiring.  Whether it’s for Instagram, HappyCow, or another online platform, here are our five top tips! 1. Find The Best Natural Light The number-one most important aspect of photography is lighting.  Obvious as this may seem, it can be a bit of a challenge in real life to snag that clearly diffused natural luster, especially when at a restaurant or cafe.  Its particularly important to pay attention to this when shooting on an a phone, but its still key regardless of how fancy your camera is.  Light is crucial because it effects the colour of the food, the way the shapes, shadows, and highlights appear, and the spectrum of the background or setting. Youre after diffused natural light: anything that isnt artificial indoor light (which tints food orange) or glaring sunshine (which casts harsh shadows). […] The post 5 Tips for Taking Beautiful Vegan Food Photos appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Strawberry Coconut Cream Pie

April 26 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Strawberry Coconut Cream Pie Strawberry season happens much earlier in Florida than in most places, and it’s already come and gone. Thankfully, I have a friend who shares my enthusiasm for getting my paws on some really good local berries, and is always willing to come along on the hour plus drive to an organic strawberry farm in the area. Something aligned this year, and the strawberry harvest was like nothing we’ve ever seen before. The berries were small, but absolutely explosive in taste – almost unnaturally sweet and as though artificial from the intensity of their strawberry flavor. It was hard to believe that something like that could be produced by the earth and sun alone. We were so astounded by the radioactive berries that we took the journey to the farm twice, since we underestimated the rarity of the situation and didn’t gather enough the first time around. I froze a bunch of the berries, but also went wild with strawberry recipes for the blog. I’m going to spread them out a bit throughout the spring/­­summer, since I know the season happens later for most of you, but hope you guys won’t mind the impending strawberry recipe series. I’ve been wanting to make a coconut cream pie for a long time, but held off until I could figure out a way to make it a bit more noteworthy than just a veganized version of the traditional. Crowning the pie with these beautiful strawberries seemed like the perfect special touch, so I went for it. This pie is nothing short of heavenly. The juiciness of the macerated berries marries so well with the rich, creamy pie base. Think of the perfection that is berries and cream. It’s also worth mentioning that this is an entirely no-bake affair, so if you make this pie in the summer, you won’t need to worry about any oven heat. If you don’t feel like following the recipe for the strawberry topping, you can just top the pie with really good fresh strawberries, or combine your strawberries with a bit of sugar and let them sit to quickly macerate, then proceed to top. I’ll leave you with some wishes for a warm spring and an abundant strawberry season :) Strawberry Coconut Cream Pie   Print Serves: one 9-inch pie Ingredients for the crust 1⅓ cups macadamia nuts 1⅓ cups unsweetened dried coconut flakes 2 tablespoons maple syrup 3 tablespoons coconut oil, plus for oiling the pie dish 1 tablespoon coconut water (from the can used in the coconut cream) pinch of sea salt for the coconut cream two 13.5 oz cans full fat coconut milk - refrigerated overnight 2 teaspoons arrowroot powder 1⅓ cups cashews - soaked for 2-4 hours ½ cup unsweetened dried coconut flakes 1/­­4 cup plus 2 tablespoons maple syrup 2 teaspoons vanilla extract pinch of sea salt 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil for the strawberry topping (adapted from At Home in The Whole Food Kitchen) ½ cup plus 1 teaspoon apple juice 1½ teaspoons agar-agar flakes ½ teaspoon arrowroot powder about 3 cups small to medium strawberries - hulled and halved for medium sz 1 teaspoon coconut sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract coconut flakes - for garnish (optional) Instructions to make the crust Place the macadamia nuts in the freezer 30 minutes prior to making the crust. Put the chilled macadamia nuts and coconut flakes into the bowl of a food processor and pulse to achieve rice-sized pieces. To the food processor, add the maple syrup, coconut oil, coconut water (from the separated can of coconut milk to be used for the coconut cream) and salt, and pulse until the mixture is well-combined and sticking together. Prepare a 9-inch pie pan by oiling it thoroughly. Spoon the crust into the dish and press it against the bottom and sides to create an even crust. Place in the freezer while making the filling, or at least 30 minutes. to make the coconut cream Remove the cans of coconut milk from the refrigerator and open them, the coconut fat should be accumulated at the top of the cans. Scoop out the fat from one can and half of the fat from the second can into a small saucepan. Melt and bring to a simmer over medium low heat. Meanwhile, combine the arrowroot powder with 3 teaspoons of the remaining coconut water from one of the cans in a small bowl and stir to combine. Pour the arrowroot mixture into the simmering coconut fat and stir until the mixture thickens slightly. Remove from the heat and set aside. Combine the cashews, dried coconut, 1⅓ cups of the coconut water remaining in one of the cans, maple syrup, vanilla and salt in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Add the thickened coconut fat, followed by the coconut oil and blend to incorporate. Take the crust out of the freezer and pour the coconut filling into the crust. Put the pie in the refrigerator while preparing the strawberries. to make the strawberry topping Combine ½ cup apple juice and agar-agar in a small sauce pan. Bring to a boil over high heat, lower the heat to a simmer and cook for 5 minutes, or until all the agar flakes are dissolved. In the meantime, combine the arrowroot with the remaining apple juice in a small bowl and slowly drizzle it over the simmering apple juice, whisking until the mixture thickens slightly. Remove from the stove and cover. Combine the strawberries with coconut sugar and vanilla in a medium bowl and toss to combine. Pour the warm agar juice mixture over the strawberries and toss gently but quickly to coat. Remove the coconut cream pie from the refrigerator and top it with the strawberries. Refrigerate until the pie sets, preferably overnight. Serve sprinkled with coconut flakes, if using, slice and serve. Store covered and refrigerated. Notes If you dont feel like following the recipe for the strawberry topping, you can make a simpler one. Either mix the strawberries with a bit of sugar and let them sit to macerate, then top, or just top with really good fresh strawberries if you can find them. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Sweet Potato Toast, Two Ways Raw Lady Apple and Cranberry Cookies Hydrating Fennel, Mango and Avocado Smoothie Raw Strawberry Shortcake .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Strawberry Coconut Cream Pie appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower

November 2 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower This post was created in partnership with San-J. Happy November! It’s so hard to believe that the year is almost over. November in the U.S. means Thanksgiving, and for the rest of the world, those December and January holidays are not so far off as well. We are here to give you some ideas to consider for those festive family dinners, friendsgivings and potlucks, with an emphasis on vegetables, fruit and whole food ingredients. The holidays can be a little tough if you are trying to stay on track with eating well or even simply keeping away from meat/­­dairy/­­gluten. If you aren’t participating in one or more of those categories, chances are, you might feel excluded at a holiday table. And even if you are totally fine with eating those veg-centered sides only, others might find it offensive or feel as though they are not being good hosts, etc. The point is, there is usually a main event to a holiday table, and although to me it’s always been the pie, to most it’s the bird, or another grand platter of some sort of meat. There is a ceremony to getting that platter on the table – it takes time and care to pick out and prepare, which creates anticipation and excitement. Here, I applied that kind of thinking to cauliflower, a whole cauliflower, prepared in a way that feels ritualistic, celebratory and fun, and delicious enough to be a holiday table centerpiece. This cauliflower is slowly stewed whole in a rich, tomato-based sauce with greens, carrots, onions, mushrooms, spices and autumn herbs. Tamari, balsamic and prunes help create body, depth and complexity in flavor. In the end, the cauliflower comes out incredibly tender and cuts like butter – ‘carving’ it is quite a pleasure. It’s incredibly good served over anything starchy, which should be easy since many holiday tables will likely include some sort of potato/­­root mash in their setting. The cauliflower is pictured here served with a delicious celeriac and parsnip mash with crispy sage, which makes for a perfect accompaniment. We will be posting the recipe for the mash this coming weekend, so make sure to stop by for that, it’s a real winner. Tamari, the gluten free soy sauce, is such a staple ingredient in my kitchen, that I feel at a loss whenever I run out. It’s a basic requirement in many Japanese and Asian-inspired dishes, but I use it in all kinds of meals, way beyond Japanese. It’s an essential flavor builder in this cauliflower, for example. I find tamari to be especially great for vegan and vegetarian cooking – it helps immensely with developing flavor depth and complexity when added to vegetables, and of course, it’s an amazing addition to sauces. When it comes to tamari brands, San-J is a classic that’s been around for eight generations, and the brand you will likely see when you search for gluten-free soy sauce in your store. The difference between San-J tamari and regular soy sauce is that tamari contains no wheat, just organic fermented soybeans, while soy sauce usually has 40%-60% wheat. The higher concentration of soybeans in tamari also contributes to its richer flavor and smoother texture. San-J tamari contains no artificial preservatives or additives, the soybeans are non-GMO, and are brewed for up to six months according to traditional Japanese techniques. It really is the best, and I’m so happy to have partnered with San-J on this festive recipe. Enjoy :) Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower   Print Serves: 1 cauliflower head Ingredients 5 prunes - roughly chopped 3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil 1 large yellow onion - sliced 2 medium carrots - diced about 6 cups roughly chopped collard greens about 3 tablespoons tamari - divided 1 lb crimini mushrooms - quartered 5 garlic cloves - sliced 1 chili pepper - seeded and chopped 3-4 sprigs thyme - chopped about 2 tablespoons chopped rosemary handful sage leaves - chopped freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon tomato paste two 28 oz boxes/­­cans of crushed tomatoes 1 large cauliflower head - outer leaves trimmed Instructions Drizzle prunes with balsamic vinegar in a small bowl and set aside. Warm coconut oil in a large pot over medium high heat. Add onion, carrots, collard greens and a splash of tamari and sauté for 10 minutes, until onion is translucent and collard greens are wilted. Add mushrooms and sauté for about 8 minutes, until all their liquid is evaporated. Add garlic, chili, thyme, rosemary, sage and black pepper and saute for 2-3 minutes. Add prunes together with balsamic vinegar, followed by 2 tablespoons tamari and tomato paste and stir around until the liquid evaporates, about 1 minute. Add crushed tomatoes, stir to combine and bring to a near boil. Carefully drop cauliflower into the sauce and spoon plenty of sauce on top of the cauliflower to coat it completely. Stir some of the vegetables out from under the cauliflower to ensure that its covered with the sauce as much as possible. The top of the cauliflower may peek out a little and thats ok. Bring the sauce back to a boil, adjust the heat to a slow simmer, cover and cook for 40-50 minutes, until the cauliflower is completely cooked and soft throughout. Scoop the simmering sauce over the cauliflower every now and then while its cooking. Remove the cauliflower from the pot, slice and serve it warm with plenty of sauce, over vegetable mash or any grains of choice. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Black Bean Chocolate and Fig Cookies Banana Toffee Tart Butternut Squash Spaghetti with Creamy Almond Butter Sauce Lemongrass Mango Curry with Toasted Pumpkin Seeds .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vinegar 101: Types of Vinegar, Health Benefits, and How to Cook With It

November 16 2015 Vegetarian Times 

Vinegar 101: Types of Vinegar, Health Benefits, and How to Cook With It Derived from the French vinaigre (meaning aged wine), vinegar is a staple in most pantries worldwide. With dozens of varieties readily available, you can use your favorite type to elevate nearly any meal – by creating marinades, emulsifying vinaigrettes, seasoning dishes to brighten flavors, or even making reductions. How its made The process of producing vinegar includes inoculation, fermentation and aging. An alcoholic liquid is acted upon by the Acetobacter bacteria to form an acidic solution. It evolves into a self-preserving substance due to its high acidity. Fermentation of wine into vinegar is triggered by a mother, or other ambient bacteria, transforming sugars into alcohol into acetic acid; a vinegar mother is a harmless cellulose structure produced by acetic acid that occurs naturally in unpasteurized vinegars. The process may take from 20 hours up to several months, depending on a variety of factors. Types of Vinegars Rice: With a 4% acidity, rice vinegar is great for pickling, dressings, or seasoning sushi rice. (Check out our Garlic and Kale Soup that uses Brown Rice Vinegar.) Balsamic: Made from the concentrated juice of white Trebbiano grapes and aged in casks, balsamic works well in glazes, reductions and marinades with its 6-8% acidity. (Try our Sicilian-Style Roasted Vegetables with Balsamic Syrup.) Apple Cider: With a 5% acidity, this ones best for seasoning more subtle dishes, as an infusion, or drizzled over grain or bean salads. (Use it to make Carolina-Style Barbecue Sandwiches.) Wine: With a 6-8% acidity, this vinegar adds a touch of umami, and works well wherever a stronger flavor is desired. (Make Minestrone with Sun Dried Tomatoes and White Beans.) Coconut: Made from fermented coconut water or sap, coconut vinegar has a 4% acidity, and is perfect for a splash of brightness when making nut-based cream sauces or a stone fruit chutney. Health Benefits Unpasteurized and unfiltered vinegar is a natural probiotic and can be used to help the body break down fats. Unfiltered apple cider vinegar is used to treat sore throats and upset stomachs, as well as topically for some skin conditions; it is also a natural liver cleanser. In addition, vinegar can get digestive juices flowing and increase appetite, which makes it a great addition to starter courses like salads and chilled soups. (Check out our article: Apple Cider Vinegar: Healing Foods) How to Buy Be sure to carefully examine labels and ingredient lists, and purchase varieties free of additives and artificial coloring. Keep in mind that aged vinegars have stronger flavors. Gradually stock your kitchen with different types of vinegars to determine which you like best for different applications. Culinary Uses Reductions: Reduce over medium heat until mixture coats the back of a spoon. Serve over fresh berries, or when plating an entrée or salad course. (Top Red Pepper Soup with a Balsamic Reduction.) Herb Infusions: Blanch herbs like tarragon, dill or basil, blend with vinegar, and allow to steep for a few days in the fridge. Marinades: Use to tenderize and flavor vegetables like mushrooms, zucchini and eggplant before grilling, along with fresh garlic, ginger and herbs. Quick Pickle: Add three parts vinegar to one part water to a small saucepan and bring to a boil, adding a splash of sweetener of your choice, a pinch of salt, and red chili flakes for extra spice.  Pour over cut produce and allow to sit for at least 30 minutes, or overnight in the refrigerator. (Try our Hot-and-Sour Celery Pickles.) Baking: Can be used as a leavener, eliciting a chemical reaction to produce carbon dioxide to give cake batters a lift. Poaching eggs: Adding a tablespoon to the cooking water with prevent eggs from spreading. Ceviche: Mix with oil, garlic and herbs, and toss with mushrooms or avocado for a refreshing twist. Serve with tortilla crisps. Enhance color: Vinegar brightens reds and purples, like cabbage and beets or red pearl onions. Chef Olivia Roszkowski is a graduate of NGIs Chefs Training Program and a full-time instructor. Olivia holds a Bachelors degree in Neuroscience and Behavior from Columbia University and has worked at various well-known NYC restaurants, including The Mercer Kitchen and Momofuku Ssam Bar. Olivia is a master at root-to-frond cooking.       

Starbucks Adds Real Pumpkin to Latte (Plus Pumpkin Recipes)

August 18 2015 Vegetarian Times 

Starbucks Adds Real Pumpkin to Latte (Plus Pumpkin Recipes) Pumpkin spice lattes are our clear cut sign that fall is well on its way. Fortunately, this year, Starbucks has decided to include real pumpkin in the popular drink along with ditching caramel coloring. In 2014, it was a hot topic that the latte did not contain any pumpkin but instead, natural and artificial flavors, according to The Atlantic. The exact date is yet to be announced, although according to NBC, it is said to be coming soon. In the meantime, here are five delicious recipes to satisfy your pumpkin craving: Pumpkin Recipes Mexican Mocha Pudding with Pumpkin Cream   Pumpkin, Leek, and Mushroom Pitzas Pumpkin Parfaits with Oat Crunch Chocolate-Crusted Pumpkin Pie Mini Pumpkin-Sage Balls Which of these pumpkin recipes are you going to try? 

Ramen Revisited + How to make Dashi

March 31 2015 My New Roots 

Ramen Revisited + How to make Dashi My parents made my lunch every day that I was in school from the time I was barely old enough to hold a brown paper bag, right up until my last days of high school. It was always exactly the same format, with slight variations: sandwich, juice box, granola bar, piece of fruit. Pretty standard fare for most of my peer group if I remember correctly, and I never complained about it. That is until the day I peered over my bologna-on-a-bun to see Alexis at the popular kids table in the junior high cafeteria slurping over what looked like a rather foreign and intriguing styrofoam cup of something hot and tasty. Oh, thats Mr. Noodles, my best friend Julie said, and went on to explain that all you had to do was pour boiling water into the cup and wait a few minutes before eating the noodle soup-like meal. I looked down at my cold, relatively flavourless, pedestrian food and felt left out. Not only was I totally un-cool, but suddenly my lunch was too. Could life get any worse?! I ran home and told my mom about the cup noodles and begged her to buy some at the store, promising her that this could not only save her time, but most importantly, my lunchroom reputation. Dont you want me to be popular?!, I wailed. Convinced this was my ticket to the promised land of spin-the-bottle and weekend shopping mall hang-outs, I persuaded her to invest the fifty cents on a couple trials and see what all the fuss was about. When she came home I had the kettle boiled and ready to get down to business. Folding back the paper lid, I spotted a magical little package of flavoured powder inside, which I read was meant to be emptied into the cup before adding the water. A couple shriveled, token peas fell out amongst the dust and my mom looked pleased to see green. The boiling water was added, I closed the lid again and waited - the longest four minutes of my life thus far. But oh, what ceremony! What rapture! The timer on my ironman wristwatch beeped, I stirred the cup, and dug in. It was salty. Very salty. Thats about all I can recall. The noodles, semi-cooked and crispy in parts were underwhelming and bland, while the broth, if I can all it that, was shockingly saline. But none of that mattered. I would have eaten cow dung if it meant sitting next to Alexis. I finally had the answer to the question of cafeteria coolness. Needless to say, eating ramen did not initiate me into the popular crowd, nor did it inspire a great love of this ubiquitous, cheap eat canonized by hung-over college kids everywhere. Until very recently this had been my only experience with ramen. But when yet another ramen recipe request landed in my inbox, I knew it was time to revisit this famous dish. It needs to be said that instant ramen is a far cry from its traditional roots of noodles in broth, which when prepared properly with care and intention, can be utterly delicious. I suppose its like most things that go from revered, regional dish to the freezer section of the gas stations grocery aisle, or worse. Shouldnt these things receive a different name or label in respect to the original recipe? Its somewhat maddening, but I surrender to the fact that there is only so much I can change in this world. The backbone of all ramen is the broth, or dashi. Dashi is a clear stock that is traditionally made using kombu, Japanese sea kelp, and katsoubushi or bonito, dried fish. Other dashi bases can include shiitake mushrooms, and because my recipes are plant based, Ill be showing you how to make this variety and the kombu one today. Once you have this base, you can spike your dashi with shallots, garlic, ginger, miso, etc. but today were keeping things simple and I leave the fun and improvisation to your ramen-hungry minds. Toppings vary widely, but vegetarian ingredients can include noodles (obviously), mushrooms, strips of nori or other tasty sea veggies, greens, spring onions, shredded cabbage, kimchi, garlic, and the ever-so-popular soft-boiled egg. If you are vegan, simply leave this ingredient out – it’s the only animal product in the recipe and still delicious without it. The one thing I love about ramen is its versatility and infinitely customizable combinations to suit every season, taste, and budget. On Salt, Sodium and Finding a Balance The big bad deal with packaged ramen and its accompanying powdered broth or flavour packet is the incredibly high sodium content, some brands containing an entire days worth in just one serving! On the flip side, making your own dashi allows you to control the sodium level and provide you with balanced saltiness for overall wellbeing. Sodium is not only important to us, our survival depends on it. Its role in the human body is to work in conjunction with potassium to maintain cellular fluid levels, acid/­­alkaline balance, and keep the nerves and muscles functioning properly. Sodium plays a role in hydrochloric acid production in the stomach, and is used during the transport of amino acids from the gut to the blood. Because sodium is needed to maintain blood fluid volume, excessive sodium can result in increased blood volume and elevated blood pressure, especially if the kidneys are compromised in any way and unable to clear it efficiently. Hypertension and premenstrual problems are more frequent in people who have a high salt intake, especially when there is a relatively low level of potassium in the diet to counteract it. Virtually all whole unprocessed plant foods contain more potassium than sodium. Grains, legumes, fruits and vegetables, especially leafy greens, offer ten to several hundred times more potassium, and yet the average American is said to be deficient in potassium. Although there is no standard ratio of sodium to potassium to recommend, eating a balanced, whole foods diet (surprise!) is the best way to achieve equilibrium. So how much sodium should be eating in a day? First it needs to be established that sodium and salt are two different things. The salt we consume is in fact a combination of two ions, sodium and chloride, in percentages of roughly 40% and 60%. Most nutrition experts agree that sodium intake on a daily basis should not exceed 2 grams per day. This amount is equal to 5 grams of salt, or 1 teaspoon. Yup. Thats it. Put into those terms, its easy to see how one could overdo it...by lunch hour. To avoid excess sodium intake, limit processed foods. As I mentioned above, a little recon revealed that some instant ramen brands cover the daily sodium base in just one serving. Yikes! Sodium lurks in some very unexpected places, so be savvy and read labels. To be extra cautious avoid high-salt foods such as commercially-prepared pickles, olives, and saurkraut, canned and instant soups, processed cheese, condiments like ketchup, barbeque sauce, gravy, alfredo sauce, salad dressings, mayonnaise, soy sauce, snacks foods like chips, salted peanuts and pretzels, crackers, and boxed breakfast cereal. Remember, cooking for yourself is the only way to know exactly what you are getting in your food. There are a few things that need to be mentioned about this recipe. First, you need to start the process the night before (or the morning of) by simply soaking the dashi ingredients in water and set in the fridge. This is how you make the broth. You can hurry the process by cooking the ingredients in hot water if youre in a rush, but the results are better if you follow this slower method (plus, your fridge does all the work). I will also say that traditional dashi is delicate and mild-flavoured, unlike the instant dashi that is saltier and stronger due to the addition of artificial, chemical flavour enhancers. When you try the dashi for the first time, try not to compare it to the ramen broth youve had in the past - this is the real deal. Appreciate its clean, pure taste and it subtlety, and add tamari or miso only as needed to enhance the natural flavour. Second, you can make and enjoy the dashi bases separately if you like, or combine the two for a more complex flavour. I really like the combination of the kombu and shiitake dashi together. They both contain good amounts of umami, so united they deliver a deep, multifaceted taste experience without the meat. Third, get organic ingredients if you can. Sea vegetables and mushrooms are both like little sponges in their respective environments so finding the cleanest and highest quality you can is a good idea. Finally, purchase the most high-vibe ramen noodles you can find. The other reason I was inspired to write this recipe and post was because of all the incredibly awesome ramen Ive seen at the health food store. Made with whole grains, some of them even gluten-free, I couldnt say no! Now, you could make your own noodles if you like (this is an art I greatly admire) but in the interest of saving a smidgen of time, buy yourself some noodles and get to the ramen even faster.     Print recipe     Ramen Revisited + How to make Dashi Serves 4 (each dashi recipe below serves 2) Dashi 4 cups /­­ 1 liter water : 60g dried shiitake mushrooms (do not use fresh) 4 cups /­­ 1 liter water : 20g kombu Directions: For the kombu dashi, place .7oz /­­ 20g of kombu in 4 cups /­­ 1 liter of water overnight in the fridge. In the morning, discard the kombu, strain the remaining liquid and warm it in a pot on the stove until just barely simmering. Serve. For the shiitake dashi, remove any dirt or debris from the dried mushrooms and place in 4 cups /­­ 1 liter of water. It is important to submerge the mushrooms, so place something on top of them, such as a smaller glass lid, and set them in the fridge overnight. In the morning, remove the mushrooms, squeezing out as much liquid from them as you can. Set the mushrooms aside, strain the remaining liquid and warm it in a pot on the stove until just barely simmering. Serve. Ramen 3-4 bunches baby bok choy, quickly stir-fried in a little shallot and garlic 2 carrots, julienned 2 spring onions, sliced 2 soft-boiled or medium eggs (to suit your taste) (optional) 1 pack whole grain ramen noodles (gluten-free, if desired) To serve dried or fresh chilies tamari or miso, to taste (use discretion!) Directions: 1. Prepare all the ingredients: stir-fry the bok choy or other greens, julienne the carrots, slice the spring onions, slice the rehydrated shiitake mushrooms, soft boil the eggs. 2. Bring a pot of water to the boil. Add the noodles and cook according to the package instructions. 3. While the noodles are cooking, ladle the broth into the bowls. Add the hot noodles and all other ingredients. Take a moment to arrange the food in a pleasing way, sit, and enjoy.   *   *   *   *   *   * Hey everyone! Mybook comes out today!!! I am so ridiculously excited to see this day arrive and the book arrive in your homes and kitchens. The reviews have been so positive so far and for that, I thank you. Please note that although most stores in North America that are carrying the book should have it in stock today, some may take a few days to longer. If you want to purchase the book online, there are many retailers listed here. I would like to take this time to acknowledge the couple of misprints in the book. During the editing process the following mistakes were made: on page 21, the ghee recipe is labeled vegan. On page 241-242 buckwheat and spelt switched places so that buckwheat is in the gluten-containing section of the grains chapter, while spelt is in the gluten-free section. In other news, my Vancouver tour dates and events have been confirmed! Here is where and when you can find me in Van city (this will be my first time there, can you believe it?!). Click the links for more details and ticket information. April 15: Burdock and Co. Collaborative Dinner + Book Signing April 16: Whole Foods Cambie Cooking Demo + Book Signing April 17: Interview + Afternoon Tea with CBCs Sheryl MacKay Barbara Jos Books to Cooks Dinner Event + Book Signing Looking forward to seeing you all there! Also, check out my most recent interview over at the gorgeous site, The Coveteur.

Stefanie Sacks SaysWhat’s Really in Your Food

December 15 2014 Meatless Monday 

Stefanie Sacks SaysWhat’s Really in Your Food On January 1, Stefanie Sacks will release the highly anticipated What The Fork Are You Eating? An Action Plan for Your Pantry and Plate. Within the pages, Stefanie provides an aisle-by-aisle rundown of how to shop for healthier items and create simple, nutritious, and delicious meals. It is a book that challenges the assumptions we make when we see descriptors like natural, low-fat, and sugar-free used on packaging. And the book is an attempt to show how small changes in diet can make a big difference. It seems safe to assume that statements on food packaging are vetted and will invariably help you make healthy choices. Yet some of those seemingly healthy offerings contain pesticides, chemical preservatives, and artificial flavors and coloring that negatively affect your health. In What the Fork Are You Eating?, Stephanie identifies the most offensive ingredients in our food and shows how we can cut (or at least minimize) them from our diets. The book is an overview of whats really in your food and its an action plan with 50 delicious recipes. As a culinary nutritionist, author, radio show host, educator, speaker, and consultant, Stefanie Sacks has studied food and nutrition for over 25 years. She earned her Masters of Science in nutrition education from Columbia University. Then she went on to become a Certified Nutrition Specialist and Certified Dietitian Nutritionist and graduate of the Natural Gourmet Institute for Health and Culinary Arts. Not only is she a seasoned culinary nutritionist, shes also a blogger, a radio host, and a longtime friend of Meatless Monday. On her radio program Stirring the Pot with Stefanie Sacks, she recently sat down with Sid Lerner, Founder and Chairman of the Monday Campaigns to discuss the Meatless Monday initiative and how to define sustainable eating. We have a much larger responsibility, Stefanie said during the broadcast, and if we can all just do a little something we can start to feel some movement. America is the fattest and sickest nation and so it would benefit everyone if they jumped on the Meatless Monday Band Wagon. It would make a difference not only for your health but also for the environment. Set to release January first, What the Fork Are You Eating? could very well help you commit to a healthy-eating plan as a New Years resolution. The post Stefanie Sacks Says What’s Really in Your Food appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Sarah Bs Bubble Tea

August 19 2014 My New Roots 

Sarah Bs Bubble Tea I get some pretty interesting recipe requests from you, my readers, and although I receive far more than I could ever fulfill, I do like to rise to the occasion. I am especially inclined to answer the call if more than one person asks for the same thing: gluten-free vegan lasagna, healthy cookies, and easy breakfasts are just a few of the cravings Ive tried to satisfy. It seems that over the past year, bubble tea has become a popular item for health-ifying, and Ive gotten several emails about this very thing. How can we take a pretty sugar-laden, artificially-coloured-and-flavoured beverage and turn it into something beneficial, light, and refreshing? Here I am to the rescue! But can I make a confession? Ive never actually tried it before. Most of the time I do my research in order to gear up before making something out of my wheelhouse, but this time it was just too much to swallow. I actually did go to a teashop though, with my best intentions to sample a bevy of bubbles. I walked in, saw all the crazy colours, dubious juices and syrups, pulled a 180 and headed straight to the health food store instead. I did leave with bubble tea straws, of course. That much I know is essential. So, that all said, if I get this totally wrong, I do apologize. This is my version and I quite like it. Sarah Bs bubble tea is not pretending to by anything other than what it is - a bubble tea all its own. Tapioca Pearls of Wisdom What makes those darn bubbles anyway? Its tapioca, in fact. Tapioca is the dried starch from the root of the cassava plant, a tuber native to South America. It has a naturally sweet taste, which is why it is so often used in candies and desserts, most familiar of them being tapioca pudding. Tapioca also the amazing ability to absorb and thicken liquid. Being naturally gluten-free, it is has become a popular gelling agent to use in foods, as opposed to fillers containing wheat. You can use tapioca flour /­­ starch /­­ powder in place of arrowroot or cornstarch in most recipes. Tapioca is a staple food in many countries throughout the world due to its high concentration of carbohydrates, low levels of fat and dietary cholesterol, and its vitamin and mineral balance. Key nutrients in tapioca include calcium to support bone health, magnesium to help control inflammation, phosphorus for protein synthesis, and vitamin A for glowing skin. You can find tapioca at most health food stores where it is often sold in powder, flaked, or pearled form. For bubble tea, look for large pearls instead of the small ones that are typically used to make tapioca pudding. Make sure that the only ingredient in the pearls is tapioca starch, and organic if possible. Many novelty pearls contain food coulouring and flavouring agents, and its best to avoid those for obvious reasons. Natural peals are pure white and are almost completely flavourless, except for a hint of sweetness. Peaches and plums have just come into season, so Ive decided to use those as the fruit base for my teas. You can use whatever is available where you are of course, and match the brewed tea flavours accordingly. I chose chamomile to pair up with the peach and green tea to go with the plum. These were really delicious combinations, but are by no means the only options. Rooibos would be tasty with peaches too, and maybe jasmine with plums? Im just guessing here - get creative!     Print recipe     Sarah B’s Peach and Plum Bubble Tea Serves 4-6  Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup large pearl tapioca 6 cups water, divided 2 - 3 Tbsp. maple syrup or raw honey (to your taste) 4 peaches 4 plums 2 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 Tbsp. dried chamomile flowers (or 2 chamomile tea bags) 1 Tbsp. loose leaf green tea (or 2 green tea bags) milk of your choice for serving (optional) Directions: 1. Bring 3 cups /­­ 750ml water to a roiling boil, add the tapioca pearls and stir. Reduce the heat to simmer and let cook for 25-30 minutes, then turn off the heat and let sit covered, for another 30 minutes until the pearls are translucent (if a few of them have slightly white centers, this is okay, but test one to make sure that it isnt powdery in the middle). 2. While the pearls are cooking, add 3 cups /­­ 750 ml of cold water to a large glass jar or container. Stir in the liquid sweetener of your choice to dissolve. Once the pearls have cooked, add them to the jar of cold sweetened water and let sit in the fridge until ready to use. If the water does not entirely cover the pearls, add just enough water to do so. 3. Brew the tea. Bring enough water for 4 cups of tea to the boil. Let cool slightly and pour over tea bags (I used two different tea pots for the two different flavours). Let steep for at least 10 minutes. Remove tea bags and discard. 4. Peel the peaches and plums. Add peaches and 1 teaspoon lemon juice to a blender and blend on high until totally creamy and smooth. Repeat with plums and remaining lemon juice. Set aside. 5. To serve the tea, place desired amount of tapioca pearls in each glass, fill 3 glasses about half full with chamomile and the others with green tea. Spoon peach purée into the chamomile glasses and plum purée into the green tea glasses. Add a squirt of milk if desired. Stir with a large straw, sweeten to taste and enjoy. So what else do you want to know about? What other kooky experiments will you have me diving into? Bring ‘em on! If you are so inclined to send me an email, type “recipe request” as the subject line and I’ll squirrel it away for a time when I’m a bit stumped for what to make next. And you never know, I may just answer your call. Hope you are all having a gorgeous summer! Sorry for the radio silence on my end – I’ve been giving the cookbook so much attention, it’s hard to keep the blog up to speed. I promise it will be worth the wait though. Good golly am I excited!!! *   *   *   *   *   * Show me your bubble tea on Instagram: #MNRbubbletea

Fed Up Takes Onthe American Diet

May 12 2014 Meatless Monday 

Fed Up Takes Onthe American DietOf all the messages presented in Fed Up, there are three facts most people will find surprising: all calories are not created equal; excessive weight and poor health are directly related to diet; and exercise alone is not enough to reverse our current obesity epidemic. These facts are what make Fed Up, a new documentary about food and childhood obesity, so refreshing. While much of the conversation around health in America talks about the effects of our diet, Fed Up focuses on the cause. And the cause is the food were eating. Why Fed Up is so interesting to Meatless Monday is because, like cutting meat one day a week, we can address many of our preventable health problems by introducing small, sustainable changes over time. If consumers had better information, if students were taught basic nutrition in school, and, as author and food advocate Michael Pollan suggests in the film, if people simply returned to cooking most of their own food, we could begin the process of reversing this epidemic. Director Stephanie Soechtig, producer Laurie David, and Executive Producer and narrator Katie Couric, backed by the leading names in medicine, research, food advocacy and public health, offer a fast-paced history of the food crisis in America. The message behind “Fed Up,” similar to Meatless Monday, is we need to change our eating habits. At Meatless Monday, we advocate reducing meat consumption by 15% as a sustainable way to improve your diet and reduce the incidences of diseases linked to excessive meat consumption. And in “Fed Up,” according to Dr. Robert Lustig, Professor of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco, there is a safe level of sugar that can consumed everyday. The problem is, there are added sugars in 80% of our food supply and the average consumer is simply eating too much sugar. Both campaigns suggest people can take charge of their health in one simple way: cook more at home using whole, unprocessed, plant-based ingredients. For example, on Meatless Mondays, we advocate getting protein from plant-based sources such as nuts, seeds and legumes. The experts in “Fed Up” would recommend that most of the sugar in your diet come from whole sources like fruits and vegetables, instead of added sugar and processed foods. To help us each understand just how pervasive added sugar is in our diets, The Monday Campaigns is teaming up with Katie Couric and the producers of “Fed Up” to encourage everyone to take the  10-Day Fed Up Challenge, which starts Monday May 12th. Participants will be challenged to avoid all added sugars, including honey, molasses, agave, high fructose corn syrup, and even artificial sugars. And by signing up, youll receive an email update from the Fed Up team each day with new tips on how to sustain healthy eating habits, including a few from us here at The Monday Campaigns. Because so much of  “Fed Up” deals with childhood obesity, The Monday Campaigns initiative to get more families cooking together, The Kids Cook Monday, is especially excited to be partnering with the film by providing information for families and delicious recipes the whole family can make every week. And to help sustain your healthy eating habits, use the power of Monday by following these tips: - Commit to continuing the Fed Up Challenge one day a week, each Monday. Fasting from sugar one day a week will serve as a reminder to read labels and monitor your overall sugar intake on other days of the week and to choose nutritious foods like fruits, vegetables, nuts, legumes and whole grains. - On Mondays, plan your weekly meals. When we dont plan ahead, were much more likely to rely on processed convenience foods, which are precisely the foods that are contributing to our chronic health problems. - Use Meatless Monday to not only help you cut down on your meat intake, but amp up your consumption of nutritious, all-natural fruits and vegetables. Commit to trying a new item of produce each week and browse our recipe section to find a new dish that features your selection. - If you are a parent, participate in The Kids Cook Monday. Use Monday as an opportunity to start conversations with your kids about health, nutrition and where food comes from. Sign up for The Family Dinner Date, The Kids Cook Mondays weekly newsletter that delivers a new family cooking experience every week. - As the film depicts, many communities are saturated with sugar-laden products and other processed foods. Use Monday as a rallying day to change your food-scape for the better. Talk to your school board about improving the food in your childs school, or organize a community-wide Meatless Monday potluck. As our research shows, Monday is the day that people are most open to these changes.   The post Fed Up Takes On the American Diet appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Valentine Rawlos

February 9 2014 My New Roots 

Valentine Rawlos For a girl who is decidedly not into Valentines Day, I bet youre already confused. Well, me too. Lets blame my overflowing sentimentality these days - Ive realized motherhood can do a real number on your sappy side - but one of the few times Ive been out of the house alone in the last few months I found a heart-shaped chocolate mold at the dollar store and didnt even think twice about it. Nope. I knew exactly what I wanted to make. Rolos. No wait, rawlos. A major childhood throwback made over into the healthiest chocolates I could possibly invent. I had done the nut buttercup thing, but hadnt tackled caramel before, so this seemed as good a time as any. Coincidentally, its almost Valentines Day. Not that I care. If you havent ventured into raw chocolate making before, you are going to want to marry me (Im taken). Its so easy and so versatile, plus actually healthy. Healing fats, nutritious sweeteners and antioxidant-rich cacao are all that these little chocolate-caramel bombs are made of. No schwaggy unpronounceables. No weird waxes or emulsifiers or artificial flavours and colours. If you really care about your valentine, this year make them something that will love them as much as you do! Like I said, I was aiming for a Rolo thing and I am very happy with the results. The chocolate of course, is out of this world. Dark and rich and so intense. The caramel inside was the question mark, but it turned out perfectly: creamy and sweet and just runny enough. I added some salt to the caramel to make these a little more to my taste, but you can leave it out if you like. I almost feel embarrassed calling this a recipe because it really is that simple, but youre into that eh? If you cant get your hands on cacao butter, just use coconut oil in its place. They wont have the exact same melt-in-your-mouth quality, but it will certainly work in a pinch. And please make sure that your coconut oil is flavour-neutral (i.e. that is does not taste like coconut), otherwise youre going to end up with some very tropical-tasting candies, my friend.     Print recipe     Valentine Rawlos Makes 15, 8ml chocolates Ingredients: Raw Chocolate 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml coconut oil, melted 1 1/­­2 Tbsp. /­­ 20g cacao butter, melted 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. raw honey (or maple syrup) 4 1/­­2 Tbsp. /­­ 30g raw cacao powder 1/­­8 tsp. sea salt Caramel 1/­­4 cup /­­ 55g pitted dates (soak dates in warm water if they are firm, then drain) 2 Tbsp. maple syrup sea salt to taste Directions: 1. In a double boiler or heatproof bowl over a simmering saucepan of water, melt cacao butter and coconut oil. Remove from heat and whisk in honey until incorporated. Sift in cacao powder and salt (to avoid lumps) and whisk to combine until smooth. 2. In each chocolate mold, spoon in some of the liquid chocolate. Tilt the mold so that it coats the sides. Place in the freezer to set for about 10 minutes. 3. In a food processor blend dates and maple syrup until smooth. Add as much salt as desired, blend and taste. 4. Remove the chocolates from the freezer. Spoon a little of the caramel into each mold on top of the set chocolate. Spoon remaining liquid chocolate over top, covering the caramel completely. Place back it the freezer to set. Wait until the chocolate is totally firm before taking it out of the mold, at least 1 hour. Remove from mold and place chocolates in a tightly sealed container in the freezer for one month (or store them in the mold and remove just before serving). Do not store chocolates at room temperature for more than 1 hour. Whether you’re celebrating Valentine’s Day or not this year,  I hope you give yourself the chance to make these treats for yourself or someone you love. Chocolatey hugs, Sarah B

Carrot Cake Smoothie Bowl

January 12 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Carrot Cake Smoothie Bowl This post was created in partnership with Naked Nutrition. Two carrot-centric recipes in a row? Yes, and I can explain :) I got a whole lot of questions about making last Sunday’s remedy tonic in a blender as opposed to a juicer, so I thought this would be the perfect time to share the recipe for one of my favorite smoothies made with similar ingredients. This one comes together in a few quick minutes with the help of a high-speed blender and tastes very much like carrot cake in a bowl, with the added benefits of raw carrots, ginger, pea protein and spices. Carrot cake is among the desserts I crave most often, but I rarely make or eat it for all the obvious reasons – it’s cake, it’s involved, it’s quite a bit of sugar. Plus, once I figured out that a quick, healthful carrot cake smoothie bowl is a possibility, my cravings for the real deal have subsided. All the ingredients in this one are pantry staples for me. I keep a big bag of carrots on hand for soups and stews, ginger – for tea and as a general immunity saver and digestive, rolled oats – for a variety of breakfasts, and my spice rack is generally overflowing, since spices are key for building flavor in plant-centric cooking. So I know this bowl of goodness is always at arm’s reach, and I end up reaching for it quite often. Another good thing about this smoothie is that while it can most certainly be dessert, it can also easily pass for breakfast. I generally like to include protein powder in all of my smoothies to make a meal out of them and to balance my sugar intake with protein, since smoothies tend to be on the sweet, fruity side. There are so many great powdered protein brands and varieties out there, that I find that aisle in the grocery store to be quite an overwhelming place. I’m especially stumped by lengthy lists of ingredients – they look great on paper, but I always end up wondering if that tiny percentage of broccoli powder or sprouted-anything powder could offer much in terms of nutrition. I’ve been using Naked Nutrition’s plant-based protein powders for a few months now, and truly love everything about the brand, from their philosophy rooted in simplicity, to the high quality of their ingredients. All of their plant-based protein powders have no more than three whole-food ingredients with no added artificial sweeteners, flavors or colors. They carry a variety of plant sources for protein like pea, rice and even peanut butter (!), and have simple flavor options like unflavored/­­unsweetened, along with chocolate and vanilla. Naked Nutrition’s flavored powders are sweetened with coconut sugar, while I’ve found that many other healthy protein powder brands use stevia. As much as I aspire to love stevia, I haven’t been able to get on board with it at all – its flavor is the only thing I can taste when I add it to absolutely anything, so coconut sugar has been my #1 powdered natural sweetener choice for years. For this smoothie bowl, I like using either the vanilla pea protein or the chocolate one, but vanilla is my favorite for this recipe, since it goes very well with the carrot cake spices. I also love the naked rice when I don’t want any flavor or sweetener, and I can’t wait to try baking with the choc peanut butter. Can you tell I’m enthusiastic about this company? If you aren’t vegan, Naked Nutrition offers single ingredient grass-fed whey and casein proteins that are also undoubtedly great. Golubka Kitchen readers get 10% off all orders on Naked Nutrition + free shipping – use code SPINACH at checkout. Carrot Cake Smoothie Bowl   Print Serves: 2-3 Ingredients for the smoothie 2 medium carrots - peeled 1 frozen banana 2-3 dates 1-inch piece ginger ¼ cup rolled oats 1 scoop vanilla protein 1 teaspoon cinnamon ¼ teaspoon nutmeg seeds from 3 cardamom pods 1-1 2/­­2 cups almond milk topping options toasted walnuts toasted desiccated coconut hemp hearts dried mulberries stovetop granola from our tahini-ginger smoothie Instructions Combine all the ingredients in a high-speed blender until smooth. Distribute between bowls, garnish and serve. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Sweet Potato Buckwheat Snack Bars with Cardamom Ginger Marinated Tofu with Citrus Salsa Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules & a Giveaway Black Sesame Cappuccino .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Carrot Cake Smoothie Bowl appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Hoisin Tofu Mushroom Stir Fry with from scratch Vegan Hoisin Sauce

September 7 2016 Vegan Richa 

Hoisin Tofu Mushroom Stir Fry with from scratch Vegan Hoisin SauceHoisin Tofu Mushroom Stir Fry with homemade Hoisin Sauce. Easy 30 minute Weeknight Meal with crisped Tofu, golden crimini mushrooms, broccoli, peppers in from scratch Hoisin sauce. Serve over cooked grains. Vegan Gluten-free Recipe. Pin it for later.  When I haven’t already planned dinner, quick stir fries save the day. Some veggies, crisped tofu or chickpeas, sauce combinations and done. For today’s recipe, the Tofu is pressed to remove excess moisture by wrapping in a kitchen towel for 10-15 minutes, while you prep and chop. Cube the Tofu and crisp it up in a bit of oil. Saute the mushrooms, add other veggies like broccoli and peppers. Add the sauce ingredients and crisped tofu. Bring to a boil and done.  Hoisin sauce is a thick pungent sauce used for stir fries or grilling or as a dipping sauce. There are many vegan hoisin sauce brands available in the market which can be used directly in this stir fry as well. Some of the brand sauces contain artificial food colors or other fillers. I make my own quick hoisin sauce mixture which takes just a few minutes to get the ingredients together.  Use this hoisin sauce to make this Cashew tofu Stir fry. Other easy meals to try Thai Basil Fried Rice, Lentils & Veggies in Thai Peanut Sauce , Chickpea-Tofu and Asparagus curry, and Chickpeas in Turmeric Peanut Butter curry. All quick and easy. Continue reading: Hoisin Tofu Mushroom Stir Fry with from scratch Vegan Hoisin SauceThe post Hoisin Tofu Mushroom Stir Fry with from scratch Vegan Hoisin Sauce appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Grand Budapest Hotel & Courtesan au Chocolat

September 7 2015 seitan is my motor 

Grand Budapest Hotel & Courtesan au ChocolatSince this blog is about food, I rarely get to talk about other things I like. But today’s Vegan MoFo promt is the perfect occasion to change that. I like books and films a lot and I like it even more when films are about books and writers. The Grand Budapest Hotel is a film about writers. Sort of. It’s also a  film about the author Stefan Zweig, whose works have inspired Anderson’s movie. (Also sort of. If you haven’t seen this movie, go watch it, it’s hard to describe. I promise it’s going to be fun!) In addition the director credits several old films, like Grand Hotel. Grand Hotel by the way is based on the fabulous Novel Menschen im Hotel ( Grand Hotel) by  Vicky Baum. There are other novels that could act as the model for this movie, like Hotel Savoy by Joseph Roth.  I have read Zweig’s The World of Yesterday but not the other works Anderson mentions. When I first saw Grand Budapest Hotel I was absolutely amazed by the fictional world Anderson had created. In the movie everything was torn apart and put back together in a way I have never seen before. The setting is a hotel in the fictional Central European country Zubrowka. The town around this hotel has similarities to Eastern European spa towns. Most of the the material was shot in Görlitz though, a small and beautifully renovated town right at the Polish border. It’s not far from Dresden where I live and it has become a popular US-movie location. Dresden also plays a little part in the Grand Budapest Hotel, I recognised a couple of streets and museum halls. In one of the most fascinating scenes in the movie a couple of characters chase each other through such a hall. Then they leave though a door and we find them back in Görlitz or somewhere else, but definitely not behind the museum in Dresden. Admittedly, this movie is not a documentary. And Anderson makes no secret of the fact that “the places [he] had envisioned just didn’t really exist anywhere“. He says he’s interested in the invention, he’s not trying to be realistic. He definitely has accomplished that. I recognised many buildings but couldn’t follow the characters’ paths because they were invented. I recognised the time period Anderson was covering but his interpretation was completely different both from the fictional and non-fictional works I have read about this period before. As I said, he put everything together again in a completely new way, even the tiniest details. The German location names used are funny and absurd and the spelling of many things is only superficially German (or French). I don’t know that much about Wes Anderson but his socialisation outside of Europe seems visible in all these details. (Or maybe he did it on purpose.) For example, there’s a bakery in this movie called Mendl’s. In German this would be Mendl or Mendls Bäckerei. No apostrophe, I would say. At least not back at that time. Then again I might be wrong. I am siding with Konrad Duden here, who published Germany’s most influential dictionary. Thomas Mann on the other hand used apostrophes with genitive cases. So we’re probably lucky he wrote great novels instead of designing and printiong bakery signs. Anyway, Mendl’s supplies everyone with a pastry called courtesan au chocolate, which is again a mix of English and French words. Those courtesans au chocolate are a colourful and elaborate version of the French pastry Religieuse. For the movie this version was invented in a bakery in Görlitz and the recipe is online. The funny thing is that they used a dairy shop in Dresden, Pfunds Molkerei,  as setting for the pastry shop. I’ve only been there once in my pre-vegan days, not to buy cheese, just because it’s an outstanding location and a tourist magnet. I only lasted ten seconds though because it was smelly as hell in there. So I cannot really imagine it turned into a bakery, even if it’s only for a few scenes. Those poor actors. Beautiful pastries smelling like aged cheese. Whatever, let’s finally get to today’s topic: “Make something inspired by a book or film.” I did not only veganise the original recipe, I changed the whole thing. Because  my recipe is how I has imagined the courtesans before learning about the recipe. It’s my version of the story! Note: For the food colouring I tried to go with natural dyes, but I think artificial ones would have been better. My colours came with a taste and I didn’t like both the matcha and the blueberry plus soda versions that much. So if you have access to artificial vegan food dyes, I recommend to use them. P.S.  We’re on the last day of our vacation and I am writing this recipe on the road. The recipe plugin isn’t working that great on our tablet. Sorry if the ingredient list looks a bit confusing. I’ll fix that as soon as we’re home. Print Grand Budapest Hotel & Courtesan au Chocolat IngredientsFor the doughnuts 240 g (2 cups) all-purpose flour 1 1/­­2 teaspoons instant yeast 120 ml (1/­­2 cup) soy milk 50 g (1/­­4 cup) sugar 2 tablespoons oil 1 pinch salt 1.5 to 2 litres of oil, suitable for frying For the ganache 2 tablespoons sugar 1/­­2 tablespoon cornstarch 60 ml (1/­­4 cup) soy milk 160 g chopped dark chocolate For the glaze 150 g (1 1/­­2 cups) powdered sugar, divided vegan red food colouring (I used 1 teaspoon. Adjust according to your package directions.) 1-3 teaspoons water 1 teaspoon matcha powder 2-3 teaspoons lime juice 2-3 teaspoons blueberry juice (from cooked blueberries) 1 pinch baking soda For the icing 55 g (1/­­2 cup) refined coconut oil or shortening, softened 50 g (1/­­2 cup) powdered sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract InstructionsTo make the doughnuts, combine flour and yeast in a bowl. Add milk, sugar, oil, and salt to a small pan and heat until luke warm. Add to the flour mixture and knead for about 7-10 minutes, or until your dough is firm and doesnt stick. Cover the dough and let it rest until doubled in size, about 60-90 minutes. Roll the dough into 4 equally sized pieces and use differently sized cookie cutters to cut each piece into 3 differently sized disks. Note: This is what I did. Its easier just to roll each piece of dough into 3 differently sized balls. Use leftovers to make 4 additional small balls, about the size of a grape. Let the disks or balls rest (covered) until doubled in size. Heat the oil in a pot. If you choose a smaller pot, youll need less oil. Just make sure that the doughnuts will be able to float and not stick to either the bottom of the pot or to each other. Use a candy thermometer. The oil should be around 160°C to 175°C, and definitly not hotter than 180°C. Fry the doughnuts for 1 or 2 minutes, or until crispy and browned. Transfer to some pieces of kitchen paper towels to drain off excess oil. To prepare the ganache, mix sugar and cornstarch and set aside. Place soy milk and chopped chocolate in a small pot. Heat carefully until the chocolate has melted. Make sure the chocolate doesnt burn and stir. Remove from heat and add sugar mixture. Whisk until silky. To fill the doughnuts, use a pastry bag with a long and small pastry tip. Use the tip to poke a hole into the big and medium sized doughnuts and then pipe some of the ganache into them. This takes a little experience but after a couple of doughnuts you should get the hang of it. To make the red glaze combine 50 g (1/­­2 cup) of powdered sugar with red food colouring and 1-3 teaspoons of water, depending on the amount of food colouring you used. The glaze should be silky and not too runny. Dip the small doughnuts into the glaze and let them dry on a cookie rack. To make the green glaze, combine 50 g (1/­­2 cup) of powdered sugar with matcha powder and lemon juice. Dip the medium sized doughnuts into the glaze and let dry. To make the purple glaze, combine 50 g (1/­­2 cup) of powdered sugar with baking soda and blueberry juice. Dip the large doughnuts into the glaze and let dry. The glaze will change its colour after a while and turn purple/­­blue purple. Dip the grape sized dough balls into leftover ganache and let dry. To make the frosting, place coconut oil and powdered sugar in a small food processor. Whip until smooth, add vanilla and whip again. To assemble, piple some frosting onto the large doughnuts and top with a medium sized one. Top the medium sized doughnuts with frosting and add a small one. Place the grape sized dough ball on top. Now try to eat this! 3.1 http:/­­/­­www.seitanismymotor.com/­­2015/­­09/­­grand-budapest-hotel-courtesan-au-chocolat/­­ Copyright (C)2015 All rights reserved. www.seitanismymotor.com      

How I Learned to Love Xanthan Gum (Through Gluten-Free Baking)

June 16 2015 Vegetarian Times 

How I Learned to Love Xanthan Gum (Through Gluten-Free Baking) I am an obsessive label reader. Show me a food product or snack item I havent heard of before, and I wont look at the packaging or calories--Ill zoom straight for the ingredients list. For the longest time, xanthan gum was the scourge of my label searches. It sounded artificial and scary. I equated it with Red Dye # 2 in terms of hidden food dangers. Look! Its in this ice cream! Id point out. And, Can you believe they now put xanthan gum in salad dressings? What is the world coming to? Then I began my gluten-free baking journey. Xanthan gum is a common ingredient in gluten-free recipes. At first, I resisted using it thinking I didnt need that artificial white additive. Turns out, I did. After much, much trial and error, I learned that xanthan gum is one of the best baking ingredients around for mimicking gluten. (It also does some really cool things to sauces.) Its essential for any kind of gluten-free yeast bread. And its not scary at all. Despite the freaky name, xanthan gum is just a dried, powdered plant gel. I guess that soft-serve ice cream is OK to eat after all! If you want to get a better handle on how xanthan gum is used in gluten-free baking please join me in Vegetarian Times online Gluten-Free Vegetarian Cooking course. In it, I share what Ive learned about using xanthan gum in gluten-free baking, plus provide plenty of recipes that use xanthan gum as a gluten stand-in. Too bad all those strange ingredients found in prepared foods arent as harmless as xanthan gum!

Stefanie Sacks SaysWhat’s in Your Food

December 15 2014 Meatless Monday 

Stefanie Sacks SaysWhat’s in Your Food On January 1, Stefanie Sacks will release the highly anticipated What The Fork Are You Eating? An Action Plan for Your Pantry and Plate. Within the pages, Stefanie provides an aisle-by-aisle rundown of how to shop for healthier items and create simple, nutritious, and delicious meals. It is a book that challenges the assumptions we make when we see descriptors like natural, low-fat, and sugar-free used on packaging. And the book is an attempt to show how small changes in diet can make a big difference. It seems safe to assume that statements on food packaging are vetted and will invariably help you make healthy choices. Yet some of those seemingly healthy offerings contain pesticides, chemical preservatives, and artificial flavors and coloring that negatively affect your health. In What the Fork Are You Eating?, Stephanie identifies the most offensive ingredients in our food and shows how we can cut (or at least minimize) them from our diets. The book is an overview of whats really in your food and its an action plan with 50 delicious recipes. As a culinary nutritionist, author, radio show host, educator, speaker, and consultant, Stefanie Sacks has studied food and nutrition for over 25 years. She earned her Masters of Science in nutrition education from Columbia University. Then she went on to become a Certified Nutrition Specialist and Certified Dietitian Nutritionist and graduate of the Natural Gourmet Institute for Health and Culinary Arts. Not only is she a seasoned culinary nutritionist, shes also a blogger, a radio host, and a longtime friend of Meatless Monday. On her radio program Stirring the Pot with Stefanie Sacks, she recently sat down with Sid Lerner, Founder and Chairman of the Monday Campaigns to discuss the Meatless Monday initiative and how to define sustainable eating. We have a much larger responsibility, Stefanie said during the broadcast, and if we can all just do a little something we can start to feel some movement. America is the fattest and sickest nation and so it would benefit everyone if they jumped on the Meatless Monday Band Wagon. It would make a difference not only for your health but also for the environment. Set to release January first, What the Fork Are You Eating? could very well help you commit to a healthy-eating plan as a New Years resolution. The post Stefanie Sacks Says What’s in Your Food appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Raw Chocolate Pots w/ Pistachio Cream + Banana, Ginger Brittle

October 2 2014 Veggie num num 

Theres been a love affair with raw desserts around the place lately and I’m thoroughly on board. With raw nuts and fruits in place of cream and sugar, you can create these rich, creamy and naturally sweet desserts minus the big dose of saturated fat and refined sugar and with a little goodness thrown in to boot. So when Urban Remedy – the brand behind a delicious looking range of raw juices, shakes, snacks and foods – contacted me about trying some of their nourishing products, it made my day! Armed with a big box of tasty raw brittle, including banana, ginger, cacao, and lemon, I headed to the kitchen and came up with a couple of raw desserts to share with you all. The recipe for these Raw Chocolate Pots is up first. Rich, smooth and chocolaty, Ive been making different variations of raw vegan mousse lately after falling in love with recipes from both Green Kitchen Stories and My New Roots. And its so simple to make, providing youve got a good blender or food processor. The banana and avocado create a smooth and creamy dairy-free mousse – plus, in this recipe, the tahini adds an extra element that I love when combined with cacao and the pistachio cream. Not only does the pistachio cream look beautiful but also tastes amazing, seriously amazing! That pistachio flavour really is so good when combined with chocolate and raspberries and topped off with the crunchy Urban Remedy brittle. The range of brittle snacks are tasty and good for you too, made with 100% organic, live ingredients and absolutely no added sugar or artificial stuff. They make a nutritious snack on their own and are a great addition to raw desserts, like this one. If you cant get your hands on some Urban Remedy brittle for this recipe, simply substitute with a little shredded coconut and/­­or dehydrated banana. RAW CHOCOLATE POTS w/­­ PISTACHIO CREAM + BANANA, GINGER BRITTLE Preparation time: 30 minutes (+ 1 hour refrigeration time) /­­/­­ serves 2-4 RAW VEGAN MOUSSE - 1 banana - 1 avocado -  1/­­4 cup tahini - 4 dates (pitted and chopped) - 2 tbs raw cacao powder -  1/­­4 tsp ground cinnamon - pinch of salt flakes - + a little water PISTACHIO CREAM - 1 cup raw pistachio nuts, shelled -  1/­­2 cup raw cashew nuts -  1/­­2 -1 cup water - 1-2 tsp honey or maple syrup (to taste) -  1/­­2 orange, juice - pinch of salt flakes to serve -  1/­­2 cup fresh raspberries -  1/­­4 cup Urban Remedy Banana Brittle -  1/­­4 cup Urban Remedy Ginger Brittle Place the pistachio and cashew nuts in a bowl and add enough water to cover completely. Soak for around 15 minutes. To make the mousse, peel and chop the banana, slice the avocado in half, remove the seed and scoop out the flesh. Add all the mousse ingredients (except the water) to your blender or food processor. Blend on high for a minute or two adding a little water until you have a smooth, creamy mousse. You may need to scrap the sides down once or twice to get everything completely blended. Transfer the mousse to individual glasses and set aside in the refrigerator for around 20-30minutes. Prepare the pistachio cream by straining the nuts and adding them to a blender or food processor with the honey/­­maple syrup, orange juice and salt flakes. Blend on high adding a little water at a time until you have a cream like consistency. It will be more like a runny paste than smooth cream at this stage, so dont worry. Transfer the pistachio cream to a fine mesh sieve and place it over a bowl. Using the back of a spoon, push the blended nuts through the sieve until you are left with nut pulp in the sieve above and a bowl full of smooth pistachio cream underneath. Tip: reserve the nut pulp to use in smoothies or to thicken a vegetable curry (so good!). Remove your individual chocolate pots form the refrigerator and evenly top with the pistachio cream. Return them to the refrigerator for another 20-30 minutes before serving. You can keep them covered in the fridge for up to 24 hours or more. Break the pieces of brittle into smaller chunks and combine them together in a bowl. Just before serving remove your chocolate pots from the fridge, top with a few fresh raspberries and a good sprinkle of the brittle crumb. Alternatively top with shredded coconut and/­­or dehydrated banana. The post Raw Chocolate Pots w/­­ Pistachio Cream + Banana, Ginger Brittle appeared first on Veggie num num.

Is Coffee Good or Bad for Your Health?

August 11 2014 VegKitchen 

Is Coffee Good or Bad for Your Health?Contributed by Kris Gunnars, originally printed on  Authority Nutrition , adapted and reprinted with permission.  The health effects of coffee are controversial. Depending on who you ask, it’s either a super healthy beverage or incredibly harmful. But despite what you may have heard, there are actually plenty of good things to be said about coffee. For example, it is high in antioxidants and linked to a reduced risk of many diseases. However... it also contains caffeine, a stimulant that can cause problems in some people and disrupt sleep. This article takes a detailed look at coffee and its health effects, examining both the pros and cons. Coffee Contains Some Essential Nutrients and is High in Antioxidants Coffee is more than just dark brown water... many of the nutrients in the coffee beans do make it into the drink. A typical 8oz (240 ml) cup of coffee contains (1): - Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin): 11% of the RDA. - Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid): 6% of the RDA. - Vitamin B1 (Thiamin): 2% of the RDA. - Vitamin B3 (Niacin): 2% of the RDA. - Folate: 1% of the RDA. - Manganese: 3% of the RDA. - Potassium: 3% of the RDA. - Magnesium: 2% of the RDA. - Phosphorus: 1% of the RDA. This may not seem like a lot, but try multiplying with 3, 4, or however many cups you drink per day. It can add up to a significant portion of your daily nutrient intake. But where coffee really shines is in its high content of antioxidants. The average person who eats a typical Western diet actually gets more antioxidants from coffee than fruits and vegetables... combined (2, 3). Bottom Line: Coffee contains a small amount of some vitamins and minerals, which add up if you drink many cups per day. It is also high in antioxidants. Coffee Contains Caffeine, A Stimulant That Can Enhance Brain Function and Boost Metabolism Caffeine is the most commonly consumed psychoactive substance in the world (4). Soft drinks, tea and chocolate all contain caffeine, but coffee is the biggest source. The caffeine content of a single cup can range from 30-300 mg, but the average cup is somewhere around 90-100 mg. Caffeine is a known stimulant. In the brain, it blocks the function of an inhibitory neurotransmitter (brain hormone) called Adenosine. By blocking adenosine, caffeine actually increases activity in the brain and the release of other neurotransmitters like norepinephrine and dopamine. This reduces tiredness and makes us feel more alert (5, 6). There are numerous studies showing that caffeine can lead to a short-term boost in brain function... including improved mood, reaction time, vigilance and general cognitive function (7, 8). Caffeine can also boost metabolism (calories burned) by 3-11% and even increase exercise performance by 11-12%, on average (9, 10, 11, 12). However... some of these effects are likely to be short-term. If you drink coffee every day, then you will build a tolerance to it and the effects will be less powerful (13). There are also some downsides to caffeine, which Ill get to in a bit. Bottom Line: The main active compound in coffee is the stimulant caffeine. It can cause a short-term boost in energy levels, brain function, metabolic rate and exercise performance. Coffee May Help Protect Your Brain in Old Age, Leading to Reduced Risk of Alzheimers and Parkinsons Alzheimers disease is the most common neurodegenerative disease and a leading cause of dementia. Studies have shown that coffee drinkers have up to a 65% lower risk of developing Alzheimers disease (14, 15, 16). Parkinsons is the second most common neurodegenerative disease and caused by the death of dopamine-generating neurons in the brain. Coffee drinkers have a 32-60% lower risk of Parkinsons disease. The more coffee people drink, the lower the risk (17, 18, 19, 20). Bottom Line: Several studies show that coffee drinkers have a much lower risk of dementia, Alzheimers disease and Parkinsons disease in old age. Coffee Drinkers Have a Much Lower Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is characterized by elevated blood sugars due to resistance to the effects of insulin. This is a very common disease... it has increased 10-fold in a few decades and now afflicts over 300 million people. Interestingly, coffee drinkers appear to have a significantly reduced risk of developing this disease, some studies showing that coffee drinkers are up to 23-67% less likely to become diabetic (21, 22, 23, 24). In one large review study that looked at 18 studies with 457,922 individuals, each daily cup of coffee was linked to a 7% reduced risk of type 2 diabetes (25). Bottom Line: Numerous studies have shown that coffee drinkers have a significantly lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Coffee Drinkers Have a Lower Risk of Liver Diseases The liver is an incredibly important organ that has hundreds of different functions in the body. It is very sensitive to modern insults like excess alcohol and fructose intake. The end stage of liver damage is called Cirrhosis, and involves most of the liver being replaced with scar tissue. Coffee drinkers have up to an 84% lower risk of developing cirrhosis, with the strongest effect for those who drink 4 or more cups per day (26, 27, 28). Liver cancer is also common... it is the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Coffee drinkers have up to a 40% lower risk of liver cancer (29, 30). Bottom Line: Coffee drinkers have a significantly lower risk of cirrhosis and liver cancer. The more coffee they drink, the lower the risk. Caffeine Can Cause Anxiety and Disrupt Sleep It wouldnt be right to only talk about the good stuff without mentioning the bad. The truth is... there are some important negative aspects to coffee as well (although this depends on the individual). Consuming too much caffeine can lead to jitteriness, anxiety, heart palpitations and may even exacerbate panic attacks (34). If you are sensitive to caffeine and tend to become overstimulated, then perhaps you shouldnt be drinking coffee. Another unwanted side effect is that it can disrupt sleep (35). If coffee reduces the quality of your sleep, then try avoiding coffee late in the day, such as after 2pm. Caffeine can also have some diuretic and blood pressure raising effects, but this usually goes away with regular use. However, an increase in blood pressure of 1-2 mm/­­Hg may persist (36, 37, 38). Bottom Line: Caffeine can have various negative effects, such as causing anxiety and disrupting sleep, but this depends greatly on the individual. Caffeine is Addictive and Missing a Few Cups Can Lead to Withdrawal One issue with caffeine, is that it can lead to addiction in many people. When people consume caffeine regularly, they become tolerant to it. It either stops working as it used to, or a larger dose is needed to get the same effects (39). When people abstain from caffeine, they get withdrawal symptoms like headache, tiredness, brain fog and irritability. This can last for a few days (40, 41). Tolerance and withdrawal are the hallmarks of physical addiction. A lot of people (understandably) dont like the idea of being literally dependant on a chemical substance in order to function properly. Bottom Line: Caffeine is an addictive substance. It can lead to tolerance and well documented withdrawal symptoms like headache, tiredness and irritability. The Difference Between Regular and Decaf Some people opt for decaffeinated coffee instead of regular. The way decaffeinated coffee is usually made, is by rinsing the coffee beans with solvent chemicals. Each time this is done, some percentage of the caffeine dissolves in the solvent and this process is repeated until most of the caffeine has been removed. However, its important to keep in mind that even decaffeinated coffee does containsome caffeine, just much less than regular coffee. Unfortunately, not all of the health benefits of regular coffee apply to decaffeinated coffee. For example, some studies show no reduction in the risk of type 2 diabetes, Parkinsons or liver diseases for people who drink decaffeinated coffee. Bottom Line: Decaffeinated coffee is made by extracting caffeine from the coffee beans using solvents. Decaf does not have all of the same health benefits as regular coffee. Things to Keep in Mind in Order to Maximize The Health Benefits There are some things you can do in order to maximize the beneficial health effects you get from coffee. The most important is to NOT add anything unhealthy to it. This includes sugar and any sort of artificial, chemical-laden creamer. Another important thing is to brew coffee with a paper filter. Unfiltered coffee (such as Turkish or French press) contains cafestol, a substance that can increase cholesterol levels (42, 43). Also keep in mind that some of the coffee drinks at places like Starbucks can contain hundreds of calories and a whole bunch of sugar. These drinks are NOT healthy. Bottom Line: It is important not to put sugar or a chemical-laden creamer in your coffee. Brewing with a paper filter can get rid of a cholesterol-raising compound called Cafestol. Should You be Drinking Coffee? There are some people who would definitely want to avoid or severely limit coffee consumption, especially pregnant women. People with anxiety issues, high blood pressure or insomnia might also want to try limiting coffee for a while to see if it helps. There is also some evidence that people who metabolize caffeine slowly have an increased risk of heart attacks from drinking coffee (44). All that being said... it does seem clear that for the average person, coffee can have important beneficial effects on health. If you dont already drink coffee, then I dont think these benefits are a compelling reason to start doing it. There are downsides as well. But if you already drink coffee and you enjoy it, then the benefits appear to far outweigh the negatives. Take Home Message Its important to keep in mind that many of the studies in the article are observational studies, which can not prove that coffee caused the beneficial effects. But given that the effects are strong and consistent among studies, it is a fairly strong indicator that coffee does in fact play a role. Despite having been demonized in the past, the evidence points to coffee being healthy ... at least for the majority of people. This article was originally printed on Authority Nutrition -- Coffee: Good or Bad? - Here are lots more natural health topics on VegKitchens Nutrition  page.

Turmeric Breakfast Muffins

May 2 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Turmeric Breakfast Muffins We have had an unusually intense relationship with these muffins for the past couple of months. Different varieties of them have been baked almost every weekend morning in our home. I blamed it on that the recipe needed to be perfected, but ahem, this particular version is actually very similar to my first version (they have however been altered a lot in between). The basic idea was pretty clear to me from the beginning; I wanted a muffin that we could enjoy for breakfast without feeling that we actually were eating dessert in the morning (which I am pretty certain most people that eat muffins for breakfast feel). Of course, muffin by definition is a dessert, but I at least only wanted to fill them with ingredients that normally made an appearance on our breakfast table. So, no artificial sweeteners, only bananas and a few dates. I wanted it to be simple to make and I also wanted the recipe to be gluten free. The result is a kind of mash-up between a banana pancake, oatmeal, granola and our turmeric lassi. They have a wonderful rich walnut flavor with a turmeric and blueberry twist. They are sweet, although in a perfectly breakfast kind of way. One muffin leaves you quite satisfied, but I often bring another one as a second breakfast to-go. This recipe can very easily be altered, so I have gathered some recipe notes: o One or two grated carrots can be a delicious addition. o The granola crumble is optional (although very delicious) and can be left out. o If you don’t have any problems with gluten, the buckwheat flour+arrowroot can be replaced with an equal amount of spelt flour. o The eggs can be replaced with chia seeds or flax seeds following the ratio 1 tbsp chia/­­flax + 3 tbsp water = 1 egg. o The blueberries can obviously be replaced with other berries. Blackberries would be good. o If you don’t like or am allergic to walnuts, you can replace them with sunflower seeds. o The dates can be replaced with 3-4 tbsp honey. You can also add a little honey along with the dates if you prefer a sweeter muffin. Turmeric & Blueberry Breakfast Muffins with a Granola Topping Makes 12 large or 15 smaller This makes a rather large batch for our small family, so we usually freeze half of them. Dry ingredients 100 g /­­ 1 cup walnuts 85 g /­­1 cup rolled oats, use gluten free if intolerant 90 g /­­ 2/­­3 cup buckwheat flour + 2 tbsp arrowroot (or potato starch) 1 1/­­2 tsp baking powder 1/­­2 tsp baking soda 1 tbsp turmeric (use a little less if you are not used to the flavor) 1 tsp freshly ground cardamom 1/­­2 tsp sea salt a pinch black pepper Wet ingredients 160 ml /­­ 2/­­3 cup buttermilk or plant yogurt 80 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup olive oil or butter 2 ripe bananas, mashed 5 fresh dates, mashed 3 large eggs A large handful blueberries, frozen or fresh Granola topping 1/­­3 cup rolled oats 2 tbsp olive oil/­­coconut oil 1 tbsp runny honey Preheat the oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Line a muffin pan with paper liners or grease the pan with oil or butter. Add walnuts and rolled oats to a food processor or blender (or mortle) and mix quickly into a coarse flour. Transfer to a large mixing bowl together with the rest of the dry ingredients. Add buttermilk, oil, bananas and dates to the food processor or blender and mix until smooth, then transfer to the mixing bowl with the dry ingredients. Crack the eggs in a separate bowl and beat them for about a minute before adding them as well. Use a spatula to carefully fold everything until combined. Divide the batter into the muffin tins, drop a bunch of blueberries on top of each muffin and gently push them down a bit. Mix together the granola crumble in a small bowl and add it on top of the muffins. Bake for about 18-20 minutes. Best enjoyed still warm from the oven. 

Cheese sticks

March 9 2013 Veganpassion 

Cheese sticks These ones are really delicious. And if they are spared till cooled down, they fit perfectly to every salad, at a buffet, as a half-time snack or for dipping. Vegan cheese isn't easy to find and contains often a lot of chemistry, which doesn't whet ones appetite. But I like the cheese I used here. Well, it doesn't melt like "real" cheese, but there are several tastes offered and it tastes well cold or cooked without any artificial aftertaste. For this recipe I decided for the spicey one. With this the sticks smell and taste lusty appetizingly. For 20 sticks: 10 oz. puff pastry (300g) 1 bunch of mixed herbs (Chervil, Parsley, Dill, mint) 10 green olives marinaded 3 tablespoons olive oil 3 oz. vegan cheese (100g) 2 tablespoons vegan cream white pepper and salt Roll the pastry to a 10x14inch rectangle (25x35cm). Chop the herbs and olives finely, shred the cheese and mix it with the olive oil and cream. Season well. Halve the dough. Spread the herbs-cheese-mixture onto the one half, then lay the other on top. Cut the dough into 20 stripes. Bake them on a pan applied with baking paper for about 30 minutes at 360°F (190°C). Ready! Feasting is that easy :-)


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