artichoke - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Brown Rice and Apples Salad

Custard cake recipe | eggless custard cream cake | custard powder cake

Oats idli recipe | instant oats idli | steamed oatmeal idli

Hendrix College Serves Up First-Ever Hearty Meatless Monday Breakfast Spread










artichoke vegetarian recipes

One-Pot Sicilian Couscous

November 6 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

One-Pot Sicilian CouscousIsraeli (pearl) couscous is larger than regular couscous, giving it more flavor and texture. It is especially delicious in this One-Pot Sicilian Couscous dish from One-Dish Vegan made with chickpeas, olives, and an assortment of vegetables. One-Pot Sicilian Couscous Israeli (pearl) couscous is larger than regular couscous, giving it more flavor and texture. It is especially delicious in this Sicilian-spiced dish made with chickpeas, olives, and an assortment of vegetables. - 1 tablespoon (15 ml) olive oil or 1/­­4 cup (60 ml) water - 1 onion, finely chopped - 1 carrot, thinly sliced - 1 red bell pepper, chopped - 3 garlic cloves, minced - 4 plum tomatoes, chopped or 1 can (14 ounces, or 400 g) of diced tomatoes, undrained - 1 teaspoon dried basil -  1/­­2 teaspoon ground saffron or turmeric -  1/­­4 teaspoon ground paprika - 1 1/­­2 cups (246 g) cooked chickpeas or 1 can (15.5 ounces, or 440 g) of chickpeas, rinsed and drained - 1 1/­­4 cup (219 g) uncooked Israeli (pearl) couscous - 2 cups (475 ml) vegetable broth -  1/­­4 teaspoon red pepper flakes - Salt - 1 jar (12 ounces, or 340 g ) of marinated artichoke hearts, drained and chopped -  1/­­2 cup (85 g) Kalamata olives, halved and pitted - 2 tablespoons (28 ml) fresh lemon juice - Freshly ground black pepper - 2 tablespoons minced fresh (8 g) parsley or (5 g) basil - Heat the olive oil or water in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat. Add the onion, carrot, bell pepper, and garlic. Cook, stirring, for 5 minutes to soften the vegetables. Stir in the tomatoes, dried basil, saffron, and paprika. Stir in the chickpeas, couscous, broth, and red pepper flakes. Season with salt to taste. Bring to a boil and then reduce the heat to a simmer, cover, and cook for 10 minutes. - Remove from the heat and let stand, covered, for 10 minutes longer or until all the liquid has been absorbed. Add the artichoke hearts, olives, and lemon juice and season with black pepper just before serving. Fluff the couscous with a fork. Sprinkle with parsley and serve hot. From One-Dish Vegan by Robin Robertson (C) 2018 Quarto Publishing Group USA Inc. Used with permission. The post One-Pot Sicilian Couscous appeared first on Robin Robertson.

One-Dish Vegan Revised and Expanded Edition

October 2 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

One-Dish Vegan Revised and Expanded EditionMany of you may be familiar with the first edition of One-Dish Vegan that came out over five years ago.  I’m excited to announce the publication of the Revised and Expanded Edition. In it, you will find all of the favorites you’ve come to love, along with 25 all-new recipes, and more for a total of 175 fast and convenient one-dish meals, all beautifully photographed, and ready to get you cooking. The bold and vibrant recipes range from the most popular categories of one-dish dining like stews, chilis, and casseroles, to a host of stove top sautes and stir-fries. You will also enjoy substantial salads, as well as pastas and other noodle-based dishes. Convenience and easy cleanup are key in One-Dish Vegan; not only can each meal be served and enjoyed in a single dish, but most can also be prepared in a single container. Now you can spend more time eating and less time cleaning. The 25 all-new recipes in One-Dish Vegan Revised and Expanded Edition include: - Easy Ramen Bowls - Cheesy Cauliflower Soup - Panzanella Salad with White Beans and Artichokes - Barbecued Jackfruit with Sweet Potatoes and Cauliflower - Jungle Curry - Thai Coconut Rice with Edamame and Asparagus - Vegan Shakshuka - Jackfruit Stroganoff - Millet and Chickpea Curry - One-Pot Sicilian Couscous - Spicy Korean Stir-Fry - Lobster Mushroom Newburg - Vegetable Donburi - Coconut Curry Noodles and Butternut Squash - Black Bean Tortilla Casserole - Layered Brunch Bake - Shepherd’s Pie, Two Ways - Nacho-Chilaquile Bake - Lentil Tourtiere   The recipes in One-Dish Vegan Revised and Expanded Edition are at once homey and adventurous, comforting and surprising. Above all, they demonstrate that it really is possible to get a complete vegan meal into one dish, full of good-for-you nutrients and bright, satisfying flavors. One-Dish Vegan Revised and Expanded Edition will be released on October 9 and is now available for pre-order. The post One-Dish Vegan Revised and Expanded Edition appeared first on Robin Robertson.

ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

August 29 2018 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on KickstarterThe Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA just launched on Kickstarter! watch the video: PRE-ORDER the ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2NrnNXl This year I traveled to Ethiopia in the weeks before Easter - one of several special times of fasting, when the majority of the country eats entirely vegan! I explored the central cities, traveled overland to the north, went trekking in the highlands and stayed with families in remote villages. As with all my travels and culinary research, I am extremely grateful for the privilege to learn, share & exchange, and be guided & supported by many families and professional cooks who invited me in their kitchens and shared amazing meals with me. Since returning to Berlin, I’ve been cooking Ethiopian and Eritrean food practically non-stop, recreating recipes and dishes, constantly inviting friends and guests to my cooking studio for lunch and dinner parties. Abebech showing me traditional village cooking in the Ethiopian Highlands. Making Injera for the first time in Ethiopia The Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA is my newest cookbook with original recipes, artwork, photography and stories inspired by these latest culinary adventures. It includes over 70 recipes based on the mouth-watering meals in bustling cities & towns, at road-stop eateries, and in rural highland villages. As with my previous 5 cookbooks, I have written, illustrated, cooked, photographed, and designed this book myself. The Lotus and the Artichoke is the ultimate combination of my passions: art, travel, vegan cooking, and photography. The ETHIOPIA Cookbook at a glance: - My 6th cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide - 140 pages with 70+ recipes and over 60 full-page color photos - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by my travels and culinary adventures in East Africa - Also based on experiences with international communities of Europe (London, Paris, and Berlin) and North America (Philadelphia, New York, and Washington D.C.) and over 25 years of vegan cooking - Ethiopian & Eritrean classics, familiar restaurant & family favourites, delicious delights, wonders & surprises, and creative culinary experiments - Discover new flavors, tasty spices, and cooking skills - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients (Cook everything, anywhere!) - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Doro Wat – spicy seitan stew Spinach Dinach Butecha – Chickpea “Egg” Salad Minchet Abish – spicy soy mince & walnuts Duba Wot – pumpkin stew Shimbra Asa – chickpea “fish” Asa (Jackfruit) Tibs Fosolia – green beans & carrots Pizza Lalibela Ingudai Tibs – spicy mushrooms Shepherd’s Pie – lentil filling & mashed potato topping Ambasha – sweet bread Recipes in The Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA - Traditional Berbere spice mix (simple + advanced) - Nitir Qibe – spiced butter/­­oil - Mitmita – extra hot spice mix - Yewot Qimen – black pepper spice mix - Shiro – chickpea/­­bean spice mix - Data (Yekarya Delleh) – roasted chili, garlic, onion & herb sauce - Traditional Injera – Ethiopian sourdough crepe - Quick Injera - Ambasha - sweet raisin bread - Doro Dabo – baked stuffed bread - Difo Dabo - spiced bread - Pizza Lalibela - with tomato sauce & roasted potato topping - Sambosa – savory pastry with lentil filling - Senig Karia – roasted spicy stuffed chilies - Injera Firfir – traditional flatbread with spicy tomato sauce - Yesuf Fitfit – chopped injera & lemon sunflower seed dressing - Kita (Injekita) – sweet breakfast flatbread & jam - Chornake /­­ Pasty – fried bread - Genfo – roasted wheat & barley porridge - Selata - super simple salad - Selata Delux - with mango, dates, avocado mixed greens & lentils - Butecha - chickpea “egg” salad - Selata Timtim - tomato salad - Selata Dinich - potato salad - Selata Bekarot - carrot salad - Telba - roasted flax dressing - Shiro Wot - chickpea puree - Misir Wot – red lentils - Doro Wot – spicy seitan - Soy Tibs - spicy soymeat strips - Ingudai Wot - spicy mushrooms - Bamia - spicy okra - Minchet Abish - spicy soy mince & walnuts - Shimbra Asa – spicy chickpea “fish” - Kik Alicha – yellow lentils - Atakilt Alicha – cabbage, carrots & potatoes - Keysir - beet root - Duba Alicha - pumpkin stew - Tikr Gomen - greens with garlic - Spinach Dinich - spinach & roasted potatoes - Fosolia – green beans & carrots - Asa Tibs – lemon pepper jackfruit fritters - Tofu Alicha - batter fried tofu in mild garlic & onion sauce - Ingudai Alicha – mushrooms w/­­ creamy cashew, lemon, pepper, thyme, parsley - Peppers & Potatoes - garlic ginger stir-fry - Inkulal Firfir – spicy tofu scramble & tomatoes - Ful – fava beans - Ayib – cottage cheese - Bedergan – roasted eggplant - Vegetable Lentil Soup - Vegetable Pasta – spaghetti with mixed chopped vegetables - Macaroni Firfir – noodles with garlic onion tomato sauce on injera - Shepherd’s Pie – lentil filling & mashed potato topping - Ethiopian Mashed Potatoes - Traditional Coffee Ceremony - Spiced Black Tea - Roiboos tea with lemon, ginger &cardamon - Mango Moringa Banana Smoothie - Injera w/­­ dates - Banana Bread - Fasting Muffins - Rooibos Tea Ice Cream Video: Justin P. Moore Music: Nils Kercher Nanfulle from Ancient Intimations (live) (C)2016 Ancient Pulse Music PRE-ORDER the ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2NrnNXl The post ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Kitchen-Sink Capellini

January 2 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Kitchen-Sink CapelliniAs the name implies, theres everything but the kitchen sink in this delicious Kitchen-Sink Capellini, including artichoke hearts, Kalamata olives, and two kinds of tomatoes. Made with quick-cooking capellini, this meal is ready in just minutes with a complex flavor that belies its speedy preparation.   Kitchen-Sink Capellini As the name implies, theres everything but the kitchen sink in this delicious pasta dish, including artichoke hearts, Kalamata olives, and two kinds of tomatoes. Made with quick-cooking capellini, this meal is ready in just minutes with a complex flavor that belies its speedy preparation. - 8 ounces capellini or angel hair pasta - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 3 garlic cloves, finely minced - 2 14-ounce cans fire-roasted diced tomatoes, undrained - 1 16-ounce can cannellini beans, drained and rinsed - 1/­­3 cup oil-packed or reconstituted sun-dried tomatoes, cut into thin strips - 1 6-ounce jar marinated artichoke hearts, drained and chopped - 1/­­2 cup Kalamata olives, pitted and halved - 4 cups baby spinach or 1 cup chopped frozen spinach, thawed and squeezed (optional) - 2 tablespoons fresh chopped basil or 1 teaspoon dried - Salt and ground black pepper - 1/­­4 cup toasted pine nuts or chopped walnuts - Cook the pasta in a pot of boiling salted water until just tender, about 4 minutes. Drain the pasta in a colander. Drizzle with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil, toss to coat, and set aside. - In the same pot in which you cooked the pasta, heat the remaining 1 tablespoon of the oil over medium heat. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant, 30 seconds. Stir in the diced tomatoes, cannellini beans, artichoke hearts, olives, spinach (if using), basil, and salt and pepper to taste. Cook over medium heat until hot and well combined, about 5 minutes. Add the reserved pasta and toss gentle to combine and heat through. Serve hot sprinkled with the pine nuts. Recipe from Cook the Pantry (C) 2015 by Robin Robertson. Photo by Annie Oliverio. Used by permission Vegan Heritage Press LLC. Save Save The post Kitchen-Sink Capellini appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Vegan Paella from the Pantry

December 19 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Vegan Paella from the PantryThis vegan paella is the ultimate in delicious pantry cooking. The quickest way to get it on the table is by having cooked rice on hand. If you have cooked rice in the freezer, it defrosts quickly in the microwave. You can also substitute a quick-cooking grain such as quinoa, if you prefer. Paella from the Pantry This vegan paella is the ultimate in delicious pantry cooking. - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 large yellow onion, chopped - 3 cloves garlic cloves, minced - 1 cup vegetable broth - 1 pinch saffron threads or ground annatto or turmeric, for color - 1 teaspoon smoked paprika - 1 teaspoon dried oregano - 1/­­2 teaspoon red pepper flakes - 1 28-ounce can diced fire-roasted tomatoes, undrained - Salt and freshly ground black pepper - 1 cup frozen green peas, thawed - 1 1/­­2 cups cooked chickpeas, or 1 (15.5-ounce) can chickpeas, drained and rinsed - 2 1/­­2 to 3 cups cooked rice - 1 6-ounce jar marinated artichoke hearts, drained and chopped - 1 6-ounce jar roasted red bell pepper, drained and chopped - 1/­­2 cup sliced pimiento-stuffed green olives - 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley - Heat the oil in a large saucepan or Dutch oven over medium heat. Add the onion and cook for 5 minutes to soften. Add the garlic and cook 1 minute longer. Stir in the broth, saffron, paprika, bay leaf, oregano, red pepper flakes, and tomatoes and their juice. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat to medium. Season with salt and pepper to taste, cover, and simmer for 8 minutes. Stir in the peas, chickpeas, cooked rice, artichoke hearts, roasted red bell pepper, olives, and parsley. Cook 3 to 5 minutes longer, stirring gently, to heat through. Taste and adjust the seasonings, if needed. Serve hot. Recipe from Cook the Pantry (C) 2015 by Robin Robertson. Photo by Annie Oliverio. Used by permission Vegan Heritage Press LLC. The post Vegan Paella from the Pantry appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Giardiniera Mac and Cheese

September 26 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Giardiniera Mac and Cheese Italian pickled mixed vegetables, called giardiniera, can be quite tart, so its best to drain and rinse before using. You can make this mac and cheese without the gardiniera or with the addition of cooked vegetables, frozen, thawed green peas, or marinated artichoke hearts. You can also make this ahead and then cover and pop it in the oven to reheat.   Giardiniera Mac and Cheese - 8 to 12 ounces fiore pasta or other bite-sized pasta shape - 2 1/­­2 cups giardiniera vegetables, drained and coarsely chopped - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1/­­3 cup panko crumbs - 1 1/­­2 cups unsweetened almond milk - 1/­­3 cup raw cashew pieces, soaked and drained - 2 tablespoons cornstarch or tapioca flour - 1/­­4 cup nutritional yeast flakes - 1 tablespoon mellow white miso - 1 heaped tablespoon tomato paste - 2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar or lemon juice - 3/­­4 teaspoon mustard powder - 1/­­2 teaspoon smoked paprika - 1/­­2 teaspoon onion powder - 1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder - 1 small clove minced garlic - 1/­­4 teaspoon ground turmeric - 1 teaspoon salt, or to taste - Cook the pasta in a pot of boiling salted water until it is al dente. About 3 minutes before the pasta is done cooking, stir in the giardiniera. Drain and leave in the strainer. - Heat the oil in a small skillet over medium-high heat. Add the panko crumbs, stirring to coat with the oil. Cook, stirring for a few minutes until the crumbs are toasted. Remove from the heat and set aside. - In a blender, combine all of the remaining ingredients and blend until smooth and creamy. Pour the sauce into the pot in which the pasta was cooked and cook stirring, over medium-high heat, until the sauce is hot, bubbly, and thickened, about 4 minutes. Add the pasta and vegetables to the sauce, stirring gently to combine and heat through. Transfer to a casserole dish and sprinkle with the reserved panko. Serve hot. Recipe from Cook the Pantry (C) 2015 by Robin Robertson. Photo by Annie Oliverio. Used by permission Vegan Heritage Press LLC. The post Giardiniera Mac and Cheese appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Vegan Fettuccine Alfredo with Mushrooms. Nut-free

August 27 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Fettuccine Alfredo with Mushrooms. Nut-freeThe Best Vegan Mushroom Garlic Alfredo with no nuts. Garlicky, Creamy, Amazing Vegan Fettuccine Alfredo. Nut-free, Easily Gluten-free, soy-free. 21 gm of protein per serving! This Fettuccine Alfredo packs a flavor punch with the browned mushrooms, wine, herbs, and creamyness from cauliflower, potato and hemp seeds.  I have several nut-free alfredo options on the blog and this is an addition to the list. You can use Cauliflower Alfredo  Lasagna, Pumpkin seed Alfredo or my garlic sauce with the mushroom mixture too.  Mushrooms add an amazing flavor. They are cooked to caramelize with onions then simmered with wine and vegan worcestershire sauce. The alfredo is blended up and added to simmer with the browning mushrooms, so the sauce picks up that caramelized flavor. Delicious, Smooth and amazing. Garnish with fresh basil and pepper flakes and serve. Continue reading: Vegan Fettuccine Alfredo with Mushrooms. Nut-freeThe post Vegan Fettuccine Alfredo with Mushrooms. Nut-free appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Cold Linguine with Artichokes and Roasted Peppers

August 4 2017 VegKitchen 

Cold Linguine with Artichokes and Roasted Peppers This cold linguine salad features vibrant flavors provided by artichoke hearts, roasted peppers, artichoke hearts, sun-dried tomatoes, and lots of fresh parsley. It will hold up well on hot days or when being transported to a potluck. If you prefer to have it warm, by all means, do so. Simply skip the step of rinsing the pasta […] The post Cold Linguine with Artichokes and Roasted Peppers appeared first on VegKitchen.

Heart of Palm and Artichoke Cakes

July 25 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Heart of Palm and Artichoke Cakes These delectable Heart of Palm and Artichoke Cakes are crisp on the outside and moist and flaky on the inside with a flavor that is remarkably similar to traditional crab cakes thanks to Old Bay seasoning and a dash of nori flakes. This recipe makes six to eight cakes (depending on how big you like them) that can be enjoyed as a main dish, in sandwiches (theyre even good cold!), or as a component in Seitan Oscar.   Heart Of Palm And Artichoke Cakes - 1 tablespoon olive oil, plus more for frying -  1/­­2 cup minced onion -  1/­­4 cup minced celery - 2 teaspoons minced garlic - 1 (14-ounce) jar hearts of palm, well drained, patted dry, and roughly chopped - 1 (6-ounce) jar marinated artichoke hearts, well drained, patted dry, and roughly chopped - 2 teaspoons Old Bay seasoning - 1 tablespoon cornstarch - 1 teaspoon nori or dulse flakes -  1/­­4 cup vegan mayo -  3/­­4 cup panko bread crumbs - Lemon wedges, for serving -  Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the onion and celery and cook until softened, 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute longer. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool.  -  In a large bowl, combine the hearts of palm, artichoke hearts, Old Bay seasoning, cornstarch, nori flakes, and mayo. Add the cooled onion mixture and 1/­­4 cup of the panko, and mix well. Divide the mixture into 6 to 8 portions and shape into small patties. -  Place the remaining 1/­­2 cup panko in a shallow bowl. Coat the patties with the bread crumbs and refrigerate or freeze for 20 minutes or longer. -  Heat a thin layer of oil in a medium skillet over medium-high heat until hot and shimmering. Carefully place the patties in the skillet and cook until golden brown on each side, 3 to 4 minutes per side. Transfer the cooked patties to a plate. Serve hot with lemon wedges. Text excerpted from VEGANIZE IT! (C) 2017 by Robin Robertson. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. Photo by William and Susan Brinson. The post Heart of Palm and Artichoke Cakes appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Grilling on Meatless Monday

July 3 2017 Meatless Monday 

Grilling on Meatless MondayIts that time of year again, when we fire up the grill and take our dinners outside! Usually, meat is in the spotlight for a cookout, but if youre looking for a lighter spread for the hot weather, seek out the produce section! Many seasonal vegetables turn out great after some time on the grill - sometimes they even produce some unexpected flavors! This Monday, for the July 4th holiday weekend, follow these tips for great vegetables on the grill! Think outside the box. When it comes to grilling vegetables, you cant go wrong with the usual suspects - peppers, eggplant, onions, and zucchini. But many more vegetables - and fruits - are delicious after being grilled. Try artichokes and romaine lettuce or avocados and cucumbers! Experiment with seasonings. While the combination of olive oil, salt, and pepper is a classic way to bring out the flavor of grilled veggies, seasonings provide flavor options from around the globe! You can go as mild, savory, or spicy as you want with Caribbean-style jerk seasoning, Italian seasoning, Mexican-style, Indian-style… be creative! Use stand-ins for meat. Sometimes people will still miss burgers and hot dogs despite the best veggie platter, but those cravings can still be satisfied with meatless options. Swap out burgers for portabella mushrooms, or use vegetarian versions of hot dogs, meat crumbles, and bacon to add a savory flavor. Grilling firm tofu or tempeh will not only provide protein but also absorb the flavor from the veggies and smoke. Download our Meatless Monday Burger Cookbook for even more ideas. Try different delivery systems. Veggies are great on their own, but they can be even better when served as part of a meal. Grilled veggies are perfect for tacos - fajitas, anyone? - and dont rule out grilling pizza! Try skewers for shish kabobs or throw grilled veggies in a salad. Dont forget dessert! Vegetables dont own the grilling game. Several fruits take on great new flavors after being grilled when the heat makes them caramelize. Pineapples and stone fruits, like peaches, plums and apricots, are perfect for grilling. But less expected choices like watermelons, grapes, apples, strawberries, and bananas also work great on the grill. Just be careful - fruits will cook a lot faster, so keep an eye on them and let them rest a bit before eating! The post Grilling on Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Potato Pesto Pizza with Basil Spinach Pesto, Garlic and Pepper

May 30 2017 Vegan Richa 

Potato Pesto Pizza with Basil Spinach Pesto, Garlic and PepperEasy Potato Pesto Pizza with Thin Crust. Basil Spinach Pesto makes for a refreshing Pizza base topping with thin potato slices, onion and garlic. Bake or make on the grill. Vegan Soyfree Recipe.  Its not really pizza season with the crazy heat, but this is one delicious Pizza you want to make come sun or rain. Thin crust, loads of fresh pesto, potatoes, onions or leek, thinly sliced garlic, loads of pepper. Delicious! Bake or grill it up if you’d rather not start up the oven. This flatbread Pizza works well with sliced potato or sweet potato and onions.  I use my 20 Minute Pizza Crust with Spelt flour for this flatbread pizza. The dough is rolled out into thin rustic crusts to make 2 medium size pizzas. I use a quick basil spinach cashew pesto as the base. Spread the pesto, sliced potato, onion and garlic. Add other toppings such as veggie crumbles or vegan sausage or artichokes. a Drizzle of extra virgin olive oil and bake to make a crisp refreshing Summery Pizza. Continue reading: Potato Pesto Pizza with Basil Spinach Pesto, Garlic and PepperThe post Potato Pesto Pizza with Basil Spinach Pesto, Garlic and Pepper appeared first on Vegan Richa.

5-Minute Vegan Artichoke Dip

May 17 2017 VegKitchen 

5-Minute Vegan Artichoke Dip If you like artichokes, youll love this tangy vegan sour cream artichoke dip. And being to make it in 5 minutes flat makes it even more appealing. We used Follow Your Heart vegan sour cream, but you can use any brand your natural foods store carries. (when you have more than 5 minutes to spare until […] The post 5-Minute Vegan Artichoke Dip appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegan Menu: Spanish Vegetable Stew

May 8 2017 VegKitchen 

Vegan Menu: Spanish Vegetable Stew Yes, it’s spring, but evenings can still be chilly and/­­or rainy, so this warming Spanish Vegetable Stew is just the thing for this week’s vegan menu. A classic seasonal stew (menestra de verduras), it has many regional variations, and can be made with different vegetables according to season. Constant ingredients include potatoes, carrots, and green peas; artichokes […] The post Vegan Menu: Spanish Vegetable Stew appeared first on VegKitchen.

Spring into Fresh Tastes – 14 Seasonal Springtime Recipes for Meatless Monday

May 1 2017 Meatless Monday 

Spring into Fresh Tastes – 14 Seasonal Springtime Recipes for Meatless MondayThe days are getting longer, the sun is getting warmer and already its time for seasonal produce to bring its garden-fresh flavors to our tables. Weve rounded up some of our favorite Meatless Monday springtime recipes to share with you this week. Special thanks to our family of bloggers and supporters who contributed these delicious recipes. Enjoy! Spring Vegetable Flatbread Pizza | Mom’s Kitchen Handbook   Green Goddess Avocado Toasts | Feed Me Phoebe   Roasted Asparagus with Gremolata | Kayln’s Kitchen   Spring Vegetable Gallettes | Apron Strings   Spring Ragu | The Meat Free Monday Cookbook   Green Buddha Bowl with Spinach and Asparagus | Driftwood Gardens   Spring Onion, Pea and Mint Soup | Morning Berries   Tomato & Asparagus Salad with Fried Goat Cheese Rounds | Craving Something Healthy   Greek-Style Fava Beans with Dill | California Greek Girl   Fast and Easy Spring Minestrone with Spinach Pesto | JoyFoodly   Farro and Pea Salad with Lemon-Mint Vinaigrette | Grab A Plate   California Avocado Ramen | La Fuji Mama   Fava Bean Crostini | A Little Yumminess   Pepper-Stuffed Artichokes | Chickadee Says The post Spring into Fresh Tastes – 14 Seasonal Springtime Recipes for Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

VegReady: A Ready-To-Eat Vegan Meal Delivery Service Coming To Your Plate Soon!

December 21 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

We are excited to share VegReady, a vegan meal delivery service. A lot of people want to make a change to a plant-based lifestyle, but give up because they find it too hard. VegReady wants to make that lifestyle easier, and more exciting. VegReady carefully sources ingredients, cooks them to perfection, and delivers meals right to your door. Every meal is ready to eat, and easy to travel with. Great for a busy lifestyle! VegReady meals are always plant-based, non-GMO, and gluten-free. VegReady focuses on healthy ingredients sourced from four regions of the world. Their meals contain perfectly cooked quinoa, sautéed greens and savory vegetables. They are currently running a Kickstarter crowdfunding campaign that will bring these meals to market. With their goal of $25,000, VegReady can further develop their meals to give their customers the best possible vegan experience. Check out their inspiring video here:     By pre-ordering VegReady meals in this early stage you have the opportunity for huge savings. VegReady meals are customizable and come in many flavors such as mango & jalop?no, artichoke & hearts of palm, zucchini, peppers & onion and many more. Using recipes endorsed by doctors and derived from medical studies, their […] The post VegReady: A Ready-To-Eat Vegan Meal Delivery Service Coming To Your Plate Soon! appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Three exquisite places in the world to enjoy a vegan afternoon tea

November 6 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Being a lover of all things vegan, travel and afternoon tea has seen me seek out the world’s absolute top experiences for spoiling oneself while partaking in this very British tradition with a vegan twist.   These are in my opinion, the three most exquisite places in the world, where you can enjoy an vegan afternoon tea in an elegant setting:   Fortnum & Mason, London   This very British institution actually offers a vegan afternoon tea menu that you do not have to pre-order in anyway. You still have to book a table, or course but Fortnum & Mason actually offers a complete vegan afternoon tea menu as a compliment to their ordinary menu. I visited just last week and enjoyed their warm service and got spoiled, pampered and stuffed to the hilt! You get five different finger sandwiches and of course, if you want more of any kind, just ask for it. My favourite was the artichoke and salsa verde. Two favourites in one.   The scones were warm and delicious, the desserts plentiful and beautifully made, if you go dont miss the calvados and apple loaf. I cant recommend this place enough.   New York Café, Budapest […] The post Three exquisite places in the world to enjoy a vegan afternoon tea appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King

September 17 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Today’s self-care dialogue is with LA artist and meditation teacher, Lauren Spencer King. We first learned about Lauren a few years ago, when we came across her bimonthly moon writings that ring incredibly true and clear up a lot of things for us every month. Since then, we’ve fallen in love with Lauren’s art and meditation work, which is centered around breath work and her extensive knowledge about the healing powers of minerals. Lauren was kind enough to open up a space for us in her 4 day online meditation workshop for stress and anxiety, and we had the most lovely and calming time following her techniques and suggestions, which we often use to this day. Lauren’s self-care routine is as inspiring as it is down to earth, with a focus on finding the wisdom in the inner self. In this interview, Lauren tells us about the Ayurvedic cleanse she’s on, what minerals she keeps next to her bed, her ideas about exercise and beauty, why she sees the concept of a work-life balance as a myth, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I think in my everyday things do feel open and free, its part of the benefit of being an artist and working for yourself. But, I do find routine within that freedom. Days are also made up of habits (good and bad), and trying to prioritize things that are important and meaningful. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I like to have a few hours to wake up and start my day. I like the quiet of the mornings, the possibility of a new day. Sometimes if I happen to wake up really early for some reason, like 5:00am, I like to read in bed for a bit, or watch a scary movie early in the morning. Its weird... I know. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? On good nights I am in bed early and read before I go to sleep. I love reading in bed, there is something about it that feels so intimate. On a not so good night I will work too late, and fall asleep to a movie. I do like to sleep with a few minerals next to my bed, some make their way under my pillow at certain times: purple fluorite to relax my mind, danburite for sweet dreams, aquamarine for calming, a piece of dream quartz, and a piece of shungite that is next to my phone (on airplane mode). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: I am on an Ayurvedic cleanse right now. I have been working with this great Ayurvedic practitioner, her name is Meredith Carter. Years ago I did panchakarma (here), and if I could afford it I would do it annually. Its incredible. What I am doing now is like panchakarma lite! Breakfast – In the morning I make homemade almond milk. I will warm the almond milk and mix in my herbs and adaptogens, sometimes I will add fresh turmeric. I have been obsessed with making sweet potato toasts. I will top them with tahini and a cooked fruit compote (been loving cherry, wild blueberry, or pear ginger), with some pistachio nuts or pumpkin seeds. If I need some protein then I will eat two eggs toped with basil, and a tangerine. Lunch – I make fresh dahl with special non-heating spices and ghee, all of which I get from Surya Spa, they have the best mung beans and spices. Dahl is very healing. I will have a bowl full with some steamed chard or beet greens, black lava sea salt, toasted pumpkin seeds and lots of parsley or coriander on top. Snack – right now cherries are in season and they are making me so happy, I will have a bowl full of them with a handful of pistachios (lets be honest, like 1/­­2 a bag, I love pistachios). And some fresh ginger tea. Or I will make some beet hummus and have that with my favorite almond crackers. Dinner – I have been getting really into making soups! My two favorite are a green soup made with celery /­­ chard /­­ beet greens /­­ asparagus /­­ Japanese sweet potato. And a kabocha /­­ carrot /­­ginger soup. Or I will cook a big artichoke and dip the leaves into a melted ghee, lemon dip. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? None, I have never even had a cup of coffee. I usually have a huge jar of warm water with lemon or fresh ginger in the morning. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to when I was younger, until I developed all sorts of health problems because of it, some that I still deal with even over a decade later. I was living in Paris and eating nothing but delicious breads and sweets! It really took a toll on my body and since then I have cut both out. But, I still dream of flaky French almond croissants. Maybe in another life I will get to enjoy them again. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I love eating a spoonful of Chyawanprash in the morning. My good friend who runs Rebbl and develops all of their delicious drinks sent me a wellness mixture, it has very high grade reshi, ashwaganda and maca in it. I have that every morning. I love QuintEssentials 3.3 minerals. I also swear by Alexis Smarts flower remedies, she is amazing! I also almost always tend to all ailments physical and emotional with a homeopathic remedy from her. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I have an aversion to most forms of exercise, especially any kind of class where an instructor is wearing a headset and yells things at you like, Its almost swimsuit season, ladies. But sometimes I get into a routine where I go to yoga. I like to take hikes and go on walks, and I love to dance. But, my favorite is swimming. Recently I was swimming laps, and was having one of those days where I was feeling very unkind and judgmental of my body, and there was this older man in the lane next to me, he was a very serious swimmer, he might have even been a swim coach at some point, you could just tell. And I stopped to catch my breathe and he asked me how I had such a strong breaststroke. I told him it was because I was on swim team for years as a kid and maybe because I was tall. We talked for a bit about it and then I got back to my laps. And I started to think that in day to day life what I criticize most about my body in other contexts I use to my advantage. In this case, that my un-slender legs and bigger hips and butt actually made me a stronger swimmer and made my stroke more powerful. It really changed the way I thought about my body. I try to remember this. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I really love natural beauty, which to me means being whole and owning all of who you are. You know, there are times when I see someone crying, and they dont maybe look their best, but they are so beautiful to me, because they are so present and authentic. Bodies arent meant to be perfect, thats not why we have them. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I love oils and go through different phases of them on my face and body. Right now at night I use a hazelnut or arnica oil from a Paris apothecary for my face. I am also completely obsessed with Sans Ceuticalss Activator 7 Oil. I use it everywhere – body, face and hair! I dont really wear make up but when I do it is from RMS. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I either dry brush or do abhyanga massage with basil oil every day, its more for the internal lymphatic system, but it makes my skin really nice. Eating well and drinking enough water are also key. And a little sun is always nice. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. I love using my jade face roller to refine the tone of my skin as well as relieve some tension I carry in my jaw. I also am into my second year of no bra, for the most part. For a few reasons, one of them being that they actually arent good for your body. No products with chemicals. My mum was a natural beauty, she really taught me what that was, she had a style that was all her own. She was radiant from the inside out. I sometimes think this is something you are born with. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Stress is often what I teach most about in class, because it has been the biggest teacher to me. I feel I am always at a growing edge with it. I try not to over schedule myself. Rest is a big part of being healthy for me. I have gone through some very difficult periods in my life of having sever adrenal fatigue, which comes from stress of all kinds. So, I have to listen really carefully not to push myself too hard, despite at times wanting to ignore my limitations. Recently I have been working with someone to understand the deeper level of stress that I unconsciously take on from people around me and from living in a city. It has been fascinating. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Yes, sometimes stress can not be avoided, like when I have a show, or need to be on the computer all day, or travel. Those are the big ones for me. I have to really work hard to stay grounded. Its really all sorts of little things, that when I do them really add up. And I just do the best I can, its not about perfection. Even stopping to dance the stress out of my body for five minuets really helps. Stress is more physical than we think. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Stop everything. Get into bed in something comfy with socks. Sleeping as much as I can. Raw garlic. Olive Leaf supplements. Colloidal silver. Apple Cider Vinegar if I have a sore throat. Hot shower (or bath) with eucalyptus oil. Thieves oil on my chest and throat. Lots of water. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? I honestly think this idea of work /­­ life balance is a myth. At least it is for me. Sometimes its only about working on Fields of Study, sometimes I am all about being in the studio, sometimes its more relaxing and I can see friends and go on a trip or a weekend getaway. There is balance within the year if I am lucky. I recently just let this idea go, I was making myself feel so bad trying to make that ideal happen on a daily or even weekly timeline. I am also a bit of a workaholic, never feeling like I am doing enough. Thats something I am trying to work on. But, this pressure for balance seems like a modern day version of the women can have it all mantra. There are always compromises and I think its more empowering if we own that and voice it and have conversations about it. Instead of silently thinking that there is something wrong with us. Motivation -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Its not one single thing, but if it was it would be learning to listen to my body. My health and understanding of health has come from a bumpy road of making lots little shifts. I dont believe in a one size fits all mentality for health. I think we are all different and in every moment we need different things. I am wary of the companies and self proclaimed health gurus out there right now that give sometimes ill informed blanket recommendations. I think it is up to us to empower ourselves and take the time to learn about our bodies and ourselves. Its important to have support and create a team of people that can help you. I have an amazing doctor, a homeopathist, an Ayurvedic practitioner, a woman who I do energy work with, and a therapist that have all at different times saved my life in various ways. It can take time, but finding the people that resonate with your understanding of health is key. I have learned so much about my body and what health and healing is from working with all of them. And remembering that deep and true healing takes time. Its always a process. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. What came to mind was this movie Agnes Martin made called Gabriel. Its terribly long and boring. It is about the boy on a walk in nature, and it is very stripped down and minimal, no dialog and most of the movie is silent, it has one tiny part with music. But, I think it relates to the way I think about self-care in a way because it is about listening to the subtleties, and how all of that gets lost when there is a lot going on. Once I really started refining my diet, routine, relationship to my energy, my intuition, etc... I started to really be able to notice those subtle changes and messages my body was sending me, and as time goes on I keep going deeper and deeper. Its like in Martins paintings, when color is introduced, it feels monumental. Like for me, bananas are just too sweet now. Knowledge -- You are well-versed in so many amazing practices! Could you tell us a little bit about each of them: – Your art (would love to know more about your process on the mineral paintings) After graduate school I started making my own watercolors out of historical pigments, mostly from minerals and some earth pigments. I taught myself how to make paints the way they were made for centuries before there were synthetic colors. The mineral monochromes are just one aspect of the work I make, and they are about many things. But, the main ones are a redirection of how we think about representation. I think of them as representational paintings, as they are made of the very thing they are depicting: malachite, azurite, agate, epidote... They are also about an interest in the healing powers of art. They are made with the intention that the viewer and the space receive the same healing properties of the minerals and the earth from which they are sourced. I usually pair them with a highly rendered graphite drawings or watercolors. –  Fields of Study and mineral meditations Some years back after teaching meditation for a bit I was longing for an alternative to what I was seeing in the ways of spiritual teachings and mediation work, both in approach and aesthetic. I wanted to support people and teach them tools they could use in their every day life, while also creating a container for all the things I was interested in and all the things that I brought into my own spiritual practice, which I feel I am always shaping and discovering. Something that would allow for a deep conversation that also had breadth, and was based in every day life and could be accessible. Something that could be malleable and evolve as I did. And Fields of Study was born. I originally wanted to open up a non-profit space that would be like a modern day community center with classes and workshops for the community, as well as have a little shop and a residency space. And someday this might happen. But for now its just me – working to change the world, one person at a time. I say this with some humor, but its also a very real desire to be in service and help instigate change. The same goes for how I teach about minerals, I want to present an alternative, something that resonates with me and represents how I grew up with minerals in my home because of my mother, who was a silversmith. The goal of all those workshops is really to show people that they know more than they think they do, about most things, minerals included. And its not really about helping people feel like they know everything, but showing them that when they ask and they trust themselves they can source the answers. The participants really end up teaching the workshop, which I think is pretty amazing. – Your Moon writings I have been writing about the moon twice a month for about six years now. It really came out of a desire to understand its energy on a deeper level, and also to check in with myself about what I was feeling on a bimonthly basis. Its hard to take credit for the writing as I feel I have gotten to a place with it where I just sit down to write and something comes through me. As out there as that sounds, thats really what happens. I just listen as best as I can, I have gotten pretty good at listening. Writing in this way has really strengthened my intuition, its really incredible. Its also nice to get conformations from people when they write to tell me how right on it was for them. It reminds me that we are all connected. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Swimming in the ocean. The hot springs in Ojai or a trip to Joshua Tree. A bad movie. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Golden Bough and She by Robert A Johnson Song/­­Album – Gamelan Orchestra music, JD Emmanuel, and Neil Youngs album Harvest Moon, particularly Natural Beauty. Its my favorite song. Movie – The Color of Pomegranates Piece of Art – Fragonard, Brancusi, and John McCracken. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? Funny enough I just re-read this essay from The White Album where she talks about her packing list related to her being a journalist. At the very end she mentions that the one thing she never had was a watch, which she supposes is some reflection of the climate of the late 60s. But, a watch is the thing I always have, perhaps that says something about me and the times we are living in now. When I travel I also always wear this gold Victorian compass. You never know when you will have to find your way home. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? My Ayurvedic practitioner – Meredith Carter, my Homeopath – Alexis Smart, or anyone of the ladies on the @onigiriemoji Instagram feed I am a part of. Its a feed where a group of friends post what they are cooking and eating. Also, I wish you could have interviewed my mum, she was the best cook, I wish I learned more about cooking from her. Photos by Lauren Spencer King, Claire Cottrell and from Lauren’s shop. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Artichoke Pizza with Spinach Pesto

August 22 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Artichoke Pizza with Spinach Pesto If you make your toppings ahead of time and have your dough at room temperature, this Artichoke Pizza with Spinach Pesto can be assembled and baked in just minutes.   Artichoke Pizza with Spinach Pesto - 1 pizza dough, storebought (I like Trader Joes brand) or homemade (page 79), at room temperature - 1 1/­­2 cups cooked or 1 (15.5-ounce) can white beans, drained and rinsed - 2 tablespoons water - 2 tablespoons lemon juice - 3 tablespoons nutritional yeast - 1/­­2 teaspoon dried basil - 1/­­2 teaspoon dried oregano - Salt and freshly ground black pepper - 4 cups coarsely chopped spinach - 1/­­2 cup fresh basil leaves - 1/­­3 cup almonds or walnuts - 1 (6-ounce) jar marinated artichoke hearts, well drained - Place the oven rack in the bottom position of the oven. Preheat the oven to 450°F. Stretch the dough onto a baking sheet or pizza stone. Use your fingertips to form a rim around the perimeter of the crust. Bake the crust for 10 minutes, then remove from the oven. - In a food processor, combine the white beans and 2 of the garlic cloves and process to a paste. Add the water, lemon juice, nutritional yeast, basil, and oregano, and salt and pep- per to taste. Blend until smooth. Spread the mixture evenly on top of the partially-baked pizza crust, dough, to within 1/­­2-inch of the edge, and set aside. -  In the same food processor, combine the spinach, basil, 3 remaining garlic cloves, and almonds and process to a paste. Add 1/­­2 teaspoon of salt, and process until smooth. The pesto should be thick. Drop the pesto, by the spoonful, onto the white bean topping, spreading the pesto out slightly so its not too thick in any one place. Arrange the arti- choke hearts on top of the pizza, on top of and in between the pesto. Bake the pizza for an additional 5 minutes, or until the pizza is hot and the crust is nicely browned. Serve hot. Recipe from Cook the Pantry (C) 2015 by Robin Robertson. Photo by Annie Oliverio. Used by permission Vegan Heritage Press LLC. The post Artichoke Pizza with Spinach Pesto appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Mega Veggie Vegan Chili

July 31 2017 FatFree Vegan Kitchen  

Mega Veggie Vegan Chili My husband’s birthday was last Friday, and I thought I’d be sharing his birthday cake (a carrot cake) with you rather than veggie chili, but in cooking (as in all things) it doesn’t pay to take things for granted. The cake was not a success. It sank in the middle and was only edible because vegan cakes have no eggs, so eating it wouldn’t poison us. My husband actually liked it, but I can’t share a recipe that doesn’t work even when I think I know how to fix it. I’ll be working on that recipe later, when I’ve gotten over the disappointment. But his birthday did lead to a recipe, however indirectly. In our family, the birthday person gets to choose where to eat, and D chose to go to Mellow Mushroom for the vegan version of their Mega Veggie pizza: thick crust, red sauce, artichokes, broccoli, mushrooms, peppers, olives, dripping with gooey vegan cheese. It’s the kind of food I don’t cook, so you can see why he requested it on his special day.(...) Read the rest of Mega Veggie Vegan Chili (706 words) (C) svoisin for FatFree Vegan Kitchen, 2017. | Permalink | 11 comments Post tags: Eat-to-Live, Pressure Cooker, Soy-free The post Mega Veggie Vegan Chili appeared first on FatFree Vegan Kitchen.

INDIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

July 7 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

INDIA vegan cookbook on KickstarterMy newest cookbook, The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA just launched on Kickstarter! watch the video: PRE-ORDER the the INDIA cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2uGbsog My new INDIA cookbook has been years in the making - with recipes, stories, artwork & photographs inspired by 8 trips to my most favourite country. It’s a culinary love story of my favorite cuisine - based on a total of nearly two years in India and 25 years of devotion to Indian cooking. My first trip to India was in 2001: mostly North India and Nepal. I spent 4 months on that journey, then another 6 weeks in South India in 2006. I visited twice more, in 2009 & 2010, followed by living and working for a year (as an art teacher) in Central India, returning to Berlin in 2011. In Autumn 2016 & Spring 2017, I went back to India to taste and explore the last regions (and cuisines) of India still waiting for me. I traveled across Kashmir & Ladakh, trekking through mountain villages and exploring towns and cities, staying mostly with families and cooking together in their kitchens. Then I went deep into the Northeast: West Bengal, Assam, Sikkim, and Nagaland. I even met with world famous chefs at their restaurants - and homes - for incredible eats and great times in the kitchen. Now I’m back in Berlin, recreating the culinary wonders of the Indian subcontinent in my own kitchen. As with my previous 4 cookbooks, I have written, illustrated, cooked, photographed, and designed this book myself. It’s a labor of love and the ultimate combination of my passions: art, travel, vegan cooking, and photography. I’m back on Kickstarter for my 5th international cookbook project. You can join the crowdfunding which makes everything possible. It’s an adventure in itself, complete with backer-only updates, behind the scenes sneak peaks, exclusive travel videos & stories, recipe testing groups, and more. Pre-order a signed copy of The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA (including worldwide shipping, stickers & e-book for EUR25!) My INDIA Cookbook at a glance: - My 5th cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide - 192 pages with 90+ recipes and over 70 full-page color photos - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by 8 trips /­­ 21+ months of travel around India and over 25 years vegan cooking experience - Total variety of regional cuisines: Rajasthani, Gujarati, Punjabi, Kashmiri, Sindhi, Maharashtrian, Tamil, Kerelan, Karnatakan, Goan, Hyderbadi, Bengali, Assamese, Sikkimese, Ladakhi, Tibetan, Nepali - Indian classics & family favorites, timeless treats, new culinary wonders, mind-blowing mega-metropolitan snacks, fabulous village feasts, scrumptious street food, and insanely delicious desserts - Discover new flavors, tasty spices, and awesome cooking skills - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients (Cook everything, anywhere!) - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Shahi Bengan – Roasted Stuffed Eggplant Gobi Pakoras – Batter-fried Cauliflower Saag Paneer – Spinach & Fried Tofu Cubes Pani Puri – Street Food Favorite Aloo Paratha – Grilled Potato-Stuffed Flatbreads Shahi Paneer – fried tofu cubes in creamy tomato sauce Seitan Vindaloo – Goan Tangy Curry Samosas! Fried Potato-Stuffed Pastries Gajur Halava – Bengali Carrot Pudding Gulab Jamuns – Doughballs in Rose Syrup Berry Halava – Fruity Semolina Dessert Recipes in The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA: - Garam Masala, Sambar Masala, Chaat Masala & Panch Puran - Tamarind Ginger, Pineapple, Tomato, Coconut, Chili & Bhang Chutneys - Aam Achar – Mango Pickle - Amitar Khar – Assamese papaya starter - Handvo – Gujurati zucchini cake - Uttapam – South Indian rice & lentil pancakes with tomatoes - Idly Paper Dosa – Karnatakan crispy rice & lentil crepes - Rava Dosa – Tamil semolina crepes - Dahi Vada Chaat – lentil cakes with yogurt & chutney - Hariali Paneer Tikka – Punjabi tofu skewers with spices & herbs - Gobi Pakora – batter-fried cauliflower - Mirchi Vada – Rajasthani batter-fried chillies - Aloo Tikka – spicy, fried potato cakes - Samosa – vegetable-stuffed fried pastry - Pani Puri – potato-stuffed fried pastry with tamarind spice water - Pav Bhaji - spicy vegetable mash with fresh baked buns - Momos – Tibetan vegetable dumplings - Shapaley – Tibetan vegetable pies - Kolkota Kathi Roll – spicy soymeat & shredded cabbage wrap - Sambar Bandhgobi Rolls – stuffed cabbage leaves - Aloo Dum – Kashmiri tomato potato curry - Shahi Tamatar – roasted stuffed tomatoes - Shahi Bengan – roasted stuffed eggplant - Shahi Mirch – roasted stuffed peppers - Shahi Paneer – tofu cubes in creamy, tomato curry - Paneer Jalfrezi – spicy tofu cubes - Saag Paneer – spinach & tofu cubes - Mutter Paneer - peas & tofu cubes - Xaak – Assamese greens, potatoes & cherry tomatoes - Bengan Bhartha – Kashmiri roasted aubergine - Malai Kofta – potato dumplings in creamy tomato curry - Bindi Aloo Tawa Masala – spicy stir-fried okra & potatoes - Khumb Kaju Makhani – Rajasthani cashew mushroom curry - Shukto – Bengali eggplant, potato & plantains - Pumpkin Posto – Bengali squash in creamy poppy seed curry - Seitan Vindaloo – Goan tangy curry - Black Sesame Seitan – Assamese spicy curry - Tamatar Pitika – Assamese tomatoes with herbs & spices - Aloo Pitika – Assamese potatoes with herbs & spices - Bol Tenga – Assames lentil dumplings in tangy curry - Mas Tenga – Assamese tangy jackfruit curry - Chupke – Tibetan dumpling soup - Tarka Dal – Punjabi lentil curry - Chana Masala – spicy chickpeas - Rajma - Kashmiri red kidney bean curry - Lobia Palak – black-eyed peas with lemon & spinach - Golden Rice - with turmeric & spices - Chana Pulao – rice with chickpeas - Pulihora – Tamil tamarind rice with peanuts & spices - Classic Biryani – Kashmiri rice dish with vegetables, nuts & spices - Jackfruit Biryani – Tamil coconut rice dish with spicy jackfruit - Tupula Bhaat – Assamese sticky rice steamed in banana leaves - Aloo Paratha – grilled flatbread stuffed with potatoes - Tibetan Bread – fried breakfast snack - Makki Roti – grilled cornbread - Roti – wholewheat grilled flatbread - Garlic Naan – traditional baked flatbread - Poori – deep-fried flatbreads - Date Ladoo – date & nut sweets - Besan Ladoo – chickpea sweet - Gajur Halava – spiced carrot pudding - Berry Halava – strawberry & blueberry semolina sweet - Mysore Pak – traditional sweet squares - Gulab Jamun – deep-fried dough balls in rose syrup - Rasmalai – cheese balls in saffron mango milk - Jalebi – fried, syrupy sweet - Peda – lemon cashew creamy sweet - Kheer – Kashmiri rice pudding with cardamom, nuts & raisins - Mishti Doi - Bengali sweet curd - Shrikand - Maharashtran yogurt dessert - Pista Kulfi – pistachio ice cream - Pitha – Bengali sesame & date pastry - Narikol Ladoo – Assamese shredded coconut balls - Kadala Parippu – Keralan sweet chana dal dessert - Ginger Chai – spiced black tea - Kahwa – Kashmiri green tea with almond & saffron - Badam Dudh – almond milk with cardamom & cinnamon - Anjoor Kaju Dudh – cashew shake with fig & date - Strawberry Mint Lassi – yogurt smoothie The post INDIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Potato Pesto Pizza with Vegan Basil Spinach Pesto

May 30 2017 Vegan Richa 

Potato Pesto Pizza with Vegan Basil Spinach PestoEasy Potato Pesto Pizza with 20 min Thin Crust. Basil Spinach Pesto makes for a refreshing Pizza Sauce Topped with thin potato slices, onion and garlic. Bake or make on the grill. Vegan Pesto Pizza Soyfree Recipe.  Its not really pizza season with the crazy heat, but this is one delicious Pizza you want to make come sun or rain. Thin crust, loads of fresh pesto, potatoes, onions or leek, thinly sliced garlic, loads of pepper. Delicious! Bake or grill it up if you’d rather not start up the oven. This flatbread Pizza works well with sliced potato or sweet potato and onions.  I use my 20 Minute Pizza Crust with Spelt flour for this flatbread pizza. The dough is rolled out into thin rustic crusts to make 2 medium size pizzas. I use a quick basil spinach cashew pesto as the base. Spread the pesto, sliced potato, onion and garlic. Add other toppings such as veggie crumbles or vegan sausage or artichokes. a Drizzle of extra virgin olive oil and bake to make a crisp refreshing Summery Pizza. Continue reading: Potato Pesto Pizza with Vegan Basil Spinach PestoThe post Potato Pesto Pizza with Vegan Basil Spinach Pesto appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Ready-to-Eat Vegan Spreads You’ve Got to Try

May 24 2017 VegKitchen 

Ready-to-Eat Vegan Spreads You’ve Got to Try It can be fun to make tasty spreads when the mood strikes, but sometimes that mood doesnt. Thats when these delicious ready-to-eat vegan spreads come in handy. Just add fresh bread, whole-grain crackers, or healthy chips. Here, we’re going to sample sesame spreads, artichoke pesto, vegan cream cheese, vegan butter, and guacamole. All of Sesame Kingdoms […] The post Ready-to-Eat Vegan Spreads You’ve Got to Try appeared first on VegKitchen.

Grilled Artichokes

May 15 2017 Meatless Monday 

These grilled artichokes are fragrant, crispy and packed with nutrition! This recipe comes to us from Sharon Palmer, the Plant-Powered Dietitian. Serves 2     - 2 large artichokes - 1 1/­­2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil - 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar - 2 cloves garlic, minced - 1 1/­­2 teaspoons Herbes de Provence (or any herbs you like) - Salt and pepper to taste Prepare artichokes by rinsing, then trimming 1 inch off tops and 1/­­2 inch off stems. Slice in half lengthwise. With metal spoon, scoop out blossom portion (the choke). Place artichokes in medium pot with water and cook 10 minutes, until almost tender. Drain, then place artichokes in baking dish. Whisk together extra-virgin olive oil, balsamic vinegar, garlic, Herbes de Provence, and salt and pepper. Drizzle vinaigrette over artichokes and allow to marinate about 30 minutes. Place artichokes cut side up on hot grill (or grill pan) for 2-3 minutes, then turn over and grill 5 minutes, until golden brown. Serve immediately. The post Grilled Artichokes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Spring Ragu

May 1 2017 Meatless Monday 

A ragu is basically a well-seasoned stew. This one takes its flavor from the tarragon, which brings out the best in the array of seasonal vegetables. This recipe was created by Stephanie Alexander and can be found in The Meat Free Monday Cookbook. Serves 3-4 - 8 garlic cloves, whole and unpeeled - 2 pounds fresh fava beans in pods, shelled - ice cubes - 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, chopped - 4 trimmed and cooked artichoke hearts, - halved or quartered, depending on size - 12 baby turnips, peeled - 1 cup vegetable stock - 1 pound peas in pods, shelled - 2 teaspoons coarsely chopped - French tarragon - 1 tablespoon finely chopped flat-leaf parsley - freshly ground black pepper Put the garlic in a saucepan and cover with water. Bring slowly to a boil over low-medium heat, then drain. Repeat this process and then slip the skins off each clove and set aside in a bowl. Refill the saucepan with water and return to a boil over high heat, and drop the fava beans into the boiling water for 1 minute only. Immediately drain in a colander and tip into a bowl of ice-cold water. Then peel the beans. Reserve until needed. Melt half of the butter in a sauté pan over a medium heat. Once it starts to froth, add the artichoke pieces, turnips, and peeled garlic, and sauté until the artichoke pieces become golden flecked with brown. Add the vegetable stock and peas, then cook, covered, for 5 minutes. Uncover, scatter with the beans and herbs, and shake gently to mix; there should be very little liquid remaining in the pan. If it still looks sloppy, increase the heat to high and continue to shake the pan. Add the remaining butter to form a small amount of sauce. Taste for seasoning; there probably wont be any need to add salt. Grind over some black pepper and serve at once. The post Spring Ragu appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Recipes Your Non-Vegan Partner will Love

April 7 2017 VegKitchen 

Vegan Recipes Your Non-Vegan Partner will Love Vegan diets arent without hot dogs, pizza, favored Chinese restaurant dishes and even facsimiles of bacon, of course. So its time to show your non vegan partner what vegan cooking can do. The post Vegan Recipes Your Non-Vegan Partner will Love appeared first on Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes: VegKitchen.com.


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