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apricots vegetarian recipes

Blackberry and Currant Clafoutis

September 14 2018 My New Roots 

Blackberry and Currant Clafoutis The first time I heard the word, I knew I would love it. Clafoutis. Clah. Foo. Tee. It felt so good just to say it, like a laughing cloud floating off my tongue, I was certain it would taste even better. I was right. Clafoutis is a classic French dessert; a custard tart of sorts but without a crust. It is traditionally made with flour, milk, sugar, and eggs, and a fruit, the most popular being black cherries. Arranged in a buttered dish, the fruit is bathed in rich batter and baked, then served lukewarm with a dusting of powdered sugar and sometimes cream. The concept is brilliantly simple and I knew that with a few adjustments, the clafoutis of my dreams could become a reality. For my first cookbook, I took the plunge and came up with an easy, grain-free and dairy-free foolproof recipe that I can honestly say I make more than any other dessert in my repertoire. I always have the batter ingredients on hand, and I always have seasonal fruit, so when I need something sweet on short notice, this dish often makes a delicious appearance. The only teeny issue with my original version, is that it required a food processor to blend up toasted almond flour. When I set out to make a clafoutis a couple weeks ago, we were living pretty simply at the family cottage in Denmark without any kitchen equipment to speak of, and I was left scratching my head. I knew I could simplify the calfoutis even more, so I endeavoured to make it an equipment-free recipe, and edited a couple of steps so that there wasnt even a bowl to wash. Instead of roasting the almonds in the oven, I purchased almond flour, then toasted it in a large skillet over medium heat until golden brown. Then, once the pan had been removed from the heat and cooled a bit, I mixed the remaining ingredients right there in the skillet! The last step was to simply pour the batter into the prepared baking dish with the fruit, and place it in the oven. So easy! The final results were just as good - if not better - than the more complicated version of the recipe. Since blackberries and red currants were absolutely dripping from the bushes around the island, I knew that these two berries, as untraditional as they were, would be delicious in this context. The sweet batter in contrast against the sour-tart, juicy jewels worked so perfectly. Some notes on the recipe: the reason that I measure the fruit out by volume may seem unusual, but its because the physical space that the fruit takes up in the clafoutis is more important than the weight of it. The goal is to fill the bottom almost entirely with few gaps, so that every bite contains tons of juicy fruit pieces.  You are welcome to use any fruit that is available to you, with the exception of anything with a very high water content - melon, citrus, and pineapple make the tart too soggy. I love rhubarb in the spring, cherries in the early summer, stone fruits in the late summer, and figs in the autumn. You can also add spices to the batter, such as cinnamon and cardamom, and even dried fruit like raisins, cranberries, apricots, figs or dates. I have not tried making a clafoutis without eggs. The vegan versions Ive seen online rely on either tofu or aqufaba for body and binding, and Im not overly enthusiastic about either one of those ingredients. Plus, I really love eggs. It may be groovy to try with a coconut milk + chia + arrowroot combo, but I cannot reliably say it would work since Ive never tried it before - this is just a hunch!     Print recipe     Blackberry and Currant Clafoutis Serves 6-8 Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 100g almond flour 3 large organic, free-range eggs 3/­­4 cup /­­ 100g coconut sugar 1 vanilla bean, seeds scraped or 1 tsp. vanilla extract 1 cup /­­ 250ml full-fat coconut milk 1/­­4 tsp. flaky sea salt 4 cups /­­ 1 litre fresh blackberries and currants coconut oil for greasing coconut yogurt or other cool, creamy thing to serve with (optional) Directions: - In a large skillet over medium heat, toast the almond flour, stirring often until golden. Remove pan from stove and let cool. - While the almond flour is cooling, preheat the oven to 350°F /­­ 180°C. Wash the fruit and remove any stems or debris. Rub just a little coconut oil on the bottoms of a 9 /­­ 23cm tart pan or any ovenproof dish. Scatter the fruit in the pan. - Crack eggs into a small bowl and whisk well. - To the skillet with the almond flour, add the eggs, coconut sugar, vanilla, coconut milk and salt and stir until smooth and fully combined. - Pour the batter mixture over the fruits and bake for 45 minutes on the middle rack until risen slightly and golden brown. Serve warm with a dollop of coconut yogurt and more fresh fruit, if desired. Store leftovers in the fridge for up to four days.   I’m sure you’ve noticed that look of the blog has changed a little bit. I felt that it was time for a freshen up, and I hope you take a moment to visit my homepage and have a look around. And for this first post since the redesign, I decided to make a small photo essay to convey the gorgeousness of our village on Bornholm. Bornholm is a small, Danish island in the Baltic sea off the southern tip of Sweden. My husbands family have a cottage there, in an old fish smokery right on the ocean. The light on the island is particularly special, the colour of the sea an unique shade of blue, and the air is soaked with the scent of rose hips, sun-baked rocks, salt water, and elderflower. Its one of my favourite places on earth, and I always leave feeling so inspired, and connected to nature. I hope you enjoy.     *   *   *   *   *   *   Something exciting on the way! Hi friends! I have some very exciting news to share…we are releasing the first official My New Roots Subscription Box! Each box will be filled with ingredients to make one of my vegan and gluten-free recipes, a beautifully designed recipe card, and a few products Ive personally selected that will compliment your cooking experience. And everything about this box – from the packaged products inside right down to the packing tape – was scrupulously selected and designed to have as little environmental impact as possible. Subscriptions will officially open up Friday Oct 5th. Since we only have a limited supply of boxes available, I want to give you the chance to be notified when we launch before I make the announcement across my social platforms. To stay in the loop, visit the this link and enter your email. Everyone who provides their email will also be entered for a chance to receive their first My New Roots box free of charge! 3 emails will be selected from the list at random. Weve been working on this project for a long time and Im so thrilled that its almost here! Thank you in advance for your support and ongoing love for all things MNR. xo, Sarah B   The post Blackberry and Currant Clafoutis appeared first on My New Roots.

10 Recipes for Your Vegan Labor Day Cookout

August 28 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

10 Recipes for Your Vegan Labor Day CookoutWere approaching Labor Day weekend here in the United States. Labor Day is traditionally thought of as the end of summer, even though summer doesnt officially end for another few weeks. Much like Memorial Day and Independence Day, this holiday is usually commemorated with backyard barbecues and picnics in the park. I love to celebrate with salads, sandwiches, seitan ribs, grilled vegetables, and skewers. Ive put together a menu of vegan Labor Day recipes that are perfect for your weekend cookouts. 10 Recipes for Your Vegan Labor Day Cookout One of the great thing about this Pantry Pasta Salad recipe is that the portion size is easy to adjust. To increase the volume, cook an entire pound of pasta and add additional pantry goodies, such as olives, roasted red peppers, or pine nuts. This colorful Roasted Sweet Potato Salad is both a nice change from regular potato salad and an unusual way to serve sweet potatoes. Almond butter provides a creamy richness to the dressing and toasted almonds add crunch. A relative of the sweet potato, jicamas taste similarly to water chestnuts and can be eaten raw or cooked. They are especially good in this sprightly Cilantro-Jicama Slaw. These lip-smacking vegan BBQ Seitan Ribs are messy and fun to eat. Enjoy them with potato salad and coleslaw. Not only does jackfruit lend itself well to shredding for that pulled effect, but its also great at soaking up the zesty barbecue sauce, making it an ideal candidate for these hearty Pulled Jackfruit BBQ Sandwiches. I love the jerk-spiced sides at my favorite Jamaican restaurant, the vegan-friendly Nice Mile in Asheville, North Carolina, but these Jamaican Jerk Vegetable Skewers satisfy my cravings when I’m home. A popular Thai appetizer, satays are usually made with meat, but there are lots of plant-based ingredients that are idea candidates for this skewered and sauced treat. These grilled satays are made with eggplant. These tasty Spice Rubbed Vegetable Skewers are a crowd pleaser whether plated individually or heaped on a platter and served on a buffet. The version of Romesco sauce in this Grilled Vegetables with Almond Romesco Sauce uses a fraction of the olive oil thats in the traditional Spanish sauce. Vary the fruit you use to make these Grilled Fruit Satays with Pineapple-Coconut Peanut Sauce according to the season and your preference - bananas, apricots, and peaches are good choices. The post 10 Recipes for Your Vegan Labor Day Cookout appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats

March 21 2018 My New Roots 

Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats So the big move-in happened, but we are far from moved in. I am writing this from my dirty dining room table, watching and listening to a collection of relative strangers drill, saw, spackle, sand, stain, and paint around me, like a tornado of humans in tool belts. Drywall dust dances in the shafts of light pouring into our new space, as I try to ignore the deafening screech from a floor sander behind a paper-thin plastic partition a few feet away from my head. Ahhh...home renovation. I could go on about the frustrations of living in a construction site, how my filth-tolerance has reached unthinkable heights, and how if I hear someone tell me that it should all be complete in two more weeks I may collapse, but I know that whenever it is done, it will all be worth it. Really and truly. I made these Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats a few days before we relocated from our rental to our home, knowing that I would need to have a stockpile of snacks that didnt require refrigeration, or even cutting, since we would be living without electricity, and I had no idea where to locate a knife in the unpacked boxes stacked high in the basement. Since then, Ive thanked myself every time Ive sunken my teeth into each chewy-crunchy-sticky bite, the cacao releasing its relaxation-inducing alkaloids and minerals into my frazzled bloodstream, the hemp seeds delivering their much-needed anti-inflammatory omega-3s, and the nut butter grounding my nerves with all its protein and healthy fat. In these uncertain times, Ive been certain that a delicious snack was ready to satisfy me at the drop of a hammer. My original inspiration for these bars came from my fellow Canadian health-food blogger and vegan recipe guru Angela Liddon, of Oh She Glows fame. Her Almond Butter Crisp Rice Treats were a fun Sunday afternoon snack project for my four-year old son and I, and since then Ive been making many variations of them. My goal was to add more protein, healthy fats and filling fiber to the bars, so I tossed in heaps of hemp and chia seeds until I found the right balance. Losing their chewy-crisp goodness would have been a real shame, since its the texture of these treats that is so very crave-able! So I tinkered a few times, and found the exact right amount that maintained the satisfying chew. I also wanted to add chocolate. Because chocolate. After nailing the additions, I knew that top needed some flair: not just visually, but something to cut the richness a tad. I had some freeze-dried raspberries kicking around my pantry that I had bought on a whim in the US some months back, and immediately knew that they would be the perfect supplement with their vibrant pink hue and bright acidity. Bingo! Freeze-dried fruit (and vegetables) have been popping up all over the place lately, since they taste incredible, have a long shelf life, and are a nutritiously convenient way of getting another serving of produce a day, especially for kids. However, if you cant find freeze-dried raspberries, or any substitute for that matter, you can easily replace them in this recipe with more traditional dried fruit like goji berries, roughly chopped figs, apricots, or even raisins. You could also top the bars with toasted nuts or seeds, coconut or cacao nibs. Think of these as a blank canvas for your favourite add-on flavours and textures, or keep it as simple as you like. The bars are also delicious as is, and if youre into a dark and rich flavour above all else, simply leave the toppings off. But do not under any circumstance skip the flaky salt – it is key.  Hemp hemp, hooray! Since being back in the homeland and trying to buy as much locally-produced food as possible, Ive been loving on hemp seeds lately - even more than usual! Because of their mild, nutty flavor, they blend so effortlessly with just about any food, sweet or savory. And what they lack in flavor, they make up for in protein and healthy fats, specifically those essential Omegas. Weve all heard about Omega-3s and how important they are for the health of our entire body, helping to prevent cancer asthma, depression, obesity, diabetes and so on. But! There is another star on the block, Omega-6, which seems to be less talked about due to the fact that many of us get enough (or in some cases, too much) of this essential fatty acid. Omega-3 and Omega-6 fasts are essential, meaning that our bodies dont produce them and we need to obtain them from the foods we eat. Sources of Omega-3 fats include flax seeds, pumpkin seeds, walnuts, chia, dark leafy greens, some sea vegetables and cold-water fish. Omega-6 sources include soybean, canola, corn, peanut, sunflower, and sesame oils. You can see from this list that most people in the Western world at least, are getting their fair share of Omega-6 fats, and lacking in Omega-3s. In fact, in North America it is estimated that the population consumes 10 to 20 times more Omega-6 than Omega-3, due to the popularity of processed foods. Although the correct ratio of these fats is still a matter of debate, researchers in this field agree that this ratio is far too high. We should be aiming for an Omega-6 to Omega-3 ratio between 2:1 and 4:1. So why is the balance so important? Because the ratio of Omega-6s to Omega-3s helps determine the flexibility of our cell membranes, meaning that ALL communication throughout the body depends on at least in part on this balance being correct. Coronary heart disease, chronic inflammation, obesity, and healthy genetic processes have all been linked to the delicate equilibrium of essential fatty acids. How can we improve the situation then? Just making simple, small changes to our diets will greatly improve the balance of fats in our bodies. Instead of relying solely on foods high in Omega-6s like peanut butter and foods made with vegetable oils (like corn, sunflower and soybean oil) swap them with foods high in Omega-3s like walnut butter and flaxseed oil, and sprinkle chia seeds on your breakfast bowl or a salad. For omnivores replacing chicken, beef and pork with wild-caught, cold water fish will make a big difference too. But the most ideal food to choose when trying to achieve that perfect balance of these fats then, is hemp! Hemps Omega-6 to Omega-3 ratio is a healthy 3.75:1. You can find hemp in many forms these days: un-hulled and hulled seeds (also known as hemp hearts), hemp oil, hemp flour, hemp protein powder, hemp milk, and hemp seed butter. Remember that choosing hemp in its most natural form (the un-hulled or hulled hemp seeds) is your best bet to ensure a high-quality, whole food product. I like to sprinkle hemp seeds on just about everything, from my breakfast porridge to my salads and sandwiches. They add an amazing creaminess to smoothies, raw custards and cheesecakes. You can even make your own milk from hemp and you dont even need to soak the seeds first! Simply blend 1 part hulled hemp seeds to just under four parts water, with an optional sweetener like maple syrup, dates, or honey, and enjoy. Simple and delicious. You can get the full hemp milk recipe here. The last thing I want to mention is the crisp brown rice. There are a few types of it on the market, and one reason Im happy to be back in Canada, is because they have the right kind. By that I mean really crispy rice crisps. For whatever reason, the ones I found in Europe would always get soggy very quickly, whereas the ones here maintain their crunch even after combining them with wet ingredients like maple syrup and brown rice syrup. Ive also found high-vibe sprouted brown rice crisps over here from a company called One Degree (not sponsored). They work really well too, but cost a fortune. I alternate between those, and the ones Ive found at my local bulk food store that arent sprouted or even organic, but they get the job done when Im renovating a house and feeling strapped for cash. You may need to experiment with a couple kinds before finding the one. In the end, the bars should be relatively crunchy-crisp - not mushy at all (even though they will still be delicious). If you like Rice Crispy Treats, youre going to love these bars. Theyre the grown-up version of your favourite childhood treat, with a mega boost of nourishing superfoods. Its an indulgence you can feel good about feeding both you and your family...but I wont tell anyone if you hide them and eat them all yourself. Ive definitely never done that before. Nope. Never.     Print recipe     Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats Makes about 16 bars Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. virgin coconut oil, plus a little more for greasing 2/­­3 cup /­­ 160ml unsalted nut or seed butter of your choice 2/­­3 cup /­­ 160ml brown rice syrup 2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1 tsp. vanilla extract heaping 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­3 cup /­­ 40g raw cacao powder (or cocoa powder) 4 cups /­­ 200g puffed brown rice crisps 1 cup /­­ 150g hulled hemp seeds 3 Tbsp. chia seeds a few pinches flaky sea salt (Maldon works perfectly) 3-4 Tbsp. freeze-dried raspberries Directions: 1. Rub a little coconut oil in an 7″x11″ (20x30cm) baking pan. 2. Melt the coconut oil in a large saucepan over low heat. Add the nut butter, brown rice syrup, maple syrup, vanilla and fine salt, and stir to combine. Remove from heat. Stir in the cacao powder until thoroughly incorporated. 3. Add the puffed brown rice, hemp seeds, chia, and stir quickly to combine, then pour the mixture into your baking pan and press firmly (using the back of a large spoon or spatula rubbed with a little coconut oil really helps). Once smooth and even, generously sprinkle the top with the freeze-dried raspberries and flaky salt. Place in the fridge or freezer to firm up, then slice into bars or squares and enjoy. Store the bars in a tightly sealed container in the fridge or freezer. Show my your bars on Instagram: #cacaohempcrispytreats *   *   *   *   *   * Hey Toronto! I’ve just launched my first collaborative project since moving back to Canada, with my friends at ELXR Juice Lab: the Activated Power Bowl! This delicious breakfast (or snack!) is made lovingly with activated grains, superfood stir-ins, and tasty toppings. There are three mouthwatering varieties to choose from, or you can build your own bowl. I am so thrilled to offer my fellow Torontonians a vegan, gluten-free, whole food breakfast with activated grains – this is truly the first of its kind! The Activated Power Bowl is available at all four ELXR locations across the city, so if you’re in town go pick one up and enjoy. We had a very successful launch over the weekend – huge thanks to everyone who came out to taste and support! The post Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats appeared first on My New Roots.

Happy Holidays Brussels Sprout Salad

December 22 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Happy Holidays Brussels Sprout Salad Well this feels a bit weird. Writing about winter food in the middle of the night from a cute little house with a tiny swimmingpool in warm and humid Bali, Indonesia. We decided to skip Christmas this year and instead bring the kids on a sort of honeymoon holiday, so we left Stockholm last week and will stay here in Bali for a couple of more weeks. We’re mostly airbnb-ing around the island and have already experienced lots of beautiful places, monsoon down pours mixed with sunshine, excellent tempeh (and crunchy sweet tempeh), creepy insects and countless fruit platters and smoothie bowls. Traveling with three kids is definitely trickier than just one or two but we’re learning and adapting. And at the end of each day it still feels so rewarding seeing the world with them and talking about all the funny and weird travel related subjects that pop-up in their heads. Several years ago we wrote a blog post (and a chapter in our travel book) about traveling with kids and we’re thinking about writing an updated version with more guidelines and tips that we’ve picked up as our crew has grown. Let us know if you’d be interested in that. But enough about that now. The goal of the day was simply to share this little salad before Christmas is over. I realize that it’s a little late and many of you have already planned your holiday menu. But if you happen to be searching for a side dish that also could work as a main salad and is both pretty and damn tasty, you should give this one a try. We have made this recipe a couple of times in the weeks before we left. Crunchy roasted brussels sprouts have always been a popular dish in our house but what we’ve done lately is adding coconut chips to the tray and also dust everything with cinnamon and finely chopped hazelnuts which adds a super nice nuttiness to the dish. Dried apricots offer sweetness and chewiness, lentils make it more filling and blood orange more festive and fresh. We serve this salad with a simple yogurt dressing but you can skip that if you want to make it vegan. Or drizzle with tahini instead. We love this little dish and hope you will too. That’s it. The last post of the year. Have a wonderful holiday with lots of good food and we’ll be back in the beginning of January with more recipes, videos, anecdotes, maybe some Bali photos and what not. Thank you for following along! Hugs and kisses. - David, Luise and the kids. Brussels Sprouts & Blood Orange Salad with Cinnamon & Hazelnut Dust Serves 4 500 g brussels sprouts olive oil or coconut oil 1 tsp ground cinnamon sea salt & pepper 1 handful coconut flakes /­­ chips 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked black lentils 500 ml /­­ 2 cups water, to cook olive oil to drizzle salt and pepper 1/­­2 lemon, juice 2 blood oranges 1 handful dried apricot 1 handful hazelnuts 1 cup natural yoghurt 1/­­2 lemon, juice 1 large handful fresh parsley Preheat the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F. Trim bottom of brussels sprouts and cut them in halves. Place in a bowl, drizzle with a few tablespoons oil, sprinkle with cinnamon and salt and toss to cover all. Place on a baking tray and roast in the oven for 25-30 minutes until they are soft, golden and have crispy edges. A few minutes before the brussels sprouts are done, take out the tray and scatter over a handful of coconut chips, drizzle with oil and cinnamon and place the tray back in the oven and roast until golden. Meanwhile, prepare the lentils. Place rinsed lentils and water in a saucepan and bring to a boil. Lower the heat and let simmer for about 20 minutes, check the exact time, it depends on your specific type lentils. They should be soft and chewy, not mushy. Pour into a sieve to remove any excess water. Place in a bowl and drizzle with olive oil, salt, pepper and a squeeze of lemon juice. Peel and slice the blood oranges, chop the dried apricots and finely chop the toasted hazelnuts. Place the yogurt in a small bowl and stir in lemon juice, chopped parsley, salt and pepper to taste Arrange the roasted brussels sprouts and coconut chips on a serving platter together with the lentils. Add sliced blood oranges and scatter with dried apricot and hazelnut dust. Finely add dollops of yogurt sauce and chopped parsley.

Roasted Pumpkin Garlic Lasagna

October 30 2017 Meatless Monday 

Sugar pumpkin is slow roasted with garlic, then seasoned with oregano and sage in this Autumnal lasagna. Roasted garlic, cardamom and nutmeg deepen flavor of the pumpkin ricotta, while dried cranberries and apricots are sprinkled throughout to lend their complimentary fruit flavors. This recipe comes to us from Donna of Apron Strings. Serves 12 - 1 package lasagna noodles - 1 2 pound sugar pumpkin - 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided - 6 cloves garlic, peeled - 15 ounces part skin ricotta cheese - 1 15 ounce can pumpkin puree* - 1 teaspoon cardamom - 1/­­2 teaspoon nutmeg - 10 green onions, thinly sliced - 1 cup dried, sweetened cranberries - 1/­­2 cup dried apricots, diced - 1 tablespoon dried oregano - 1 tablespoon dried sage - 8 ounces lowfat mozzarella cheese, divided - 4 ounces parmesan cheese, grated *please note that canned pumpkin is not the same as canned pumpkin pie filling, which should not be substituted. Preheat an oven to 350 degrees. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over medium-high heat. When water boils, cook lasagna noodles according to package directions, or until al dente. Scoop the seeds and strings out of the pumpkin. Cut the pumpkin flesh into large chunks. Toss with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil and place on a baking sheet, cut size down. Scatter the garlic cloves over the pumpkin pieces. Roast 60-90 minutes, or until the pumpkin begins to brown and is tender when pricked with a fork. Remove from the oven and let cool slightly. Using a fork, smash the garlic cloves together in a medium sized bowl. Add the pumpkin puree, green onions, cardamom and nutmeg to the bowl. Stir together with the fork. When the pumpkin has cooled, remove its skin and cut into smaller cubes. Line a 13 by 11 inch baking dish with a layer of lasagna noodles. Top 1/­­4 of the ricotta garlic mixture and another layer of noodles. Top the 2nd layer of noodles with about 1/­­4 of the ricotta garlic mixture, then 1/­­3 of the cranberries, 1/­­3 of the diced apricot and 1/­­3 of the roasted pumpkin cubes. Season with 1/­­3 of the oregano and sage. Finish the layer with 1/­­3 of the mozzarella and parmesan cheeses. Repeat this layering process 2 more times, or until you are out of noodles, pumpkin, dried fruit, spices and cheeses. Bake for 30-45 minutes, or until the lasagnas edges are browned and bubbling. The post Roasted Pumpkin Garlic Lasagna appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Dried Fruit and Walnut Energy Balls

August 22 2017 VegKitchen 

Dried Fruit and Walnut Energy Balls We love healthy treats that are as tasty as candy truffles, and these dried fruit and walnut energy balls fit that description. With just a few ingredients, theyre super easy to make, too. Did you you know that walnuts are just about the best source of omega 3 fatty acids? This beneficial fat is hard […] The post Dried Fruit and Walnut Energy Balls appeared first on VegKitchen.

Breakfast Buckwheat Florentines

April 28 2017 My New Roots 

Breakfast Buckwheat Florentines Done is better than perfect. I cant tell you how many times I repeat this to myself on a daily basis, as a sort of mantra to soothe and convince the perfectionist inside me to just follow through. To just put it out there. I almost pushed publish on this blog post yesterday afternoon, but something was holding me back. Two things, in fact. First, the photos werent what I wanted them to be: they were on the boring side without a lot of colour, and not really inspiring. Second, the recipe itself just wasnt there. I was trying to make a vegan yogurt coating with coconut butter and although it was tasty, the texture was all wrong: chunky and gritty. Was it good enough? Probably. Would anyone have noticed what I saw as shortcomings? Probably not. But could I deal with it? Apparently, no. As I was putting the finishing touches on the post, it hit me like a bolt of lightening: I needed to use cashew butter to achieve the silky consistency I was after. Noooo! It was the solution I had been calling in, but to arrive at the witching hour just seemed cruel. How could I start all over at this point? Was I crazy to even try, considering I didnt know for sure that it would work out? With only minutes to make a decision, I hopped on my bike and cycled to the health food store. Again. Cursing myself, my brain, my ridiculous inability to know when to let go, and my insistence that what I put out in the world is my absolute best, really started to annoy me. I bought all the ingredients for the third time, raced home, and got to work. The cookies were the best theyd ever been. Perfect, in fact. But was it worth it? For anyone out there nodding their heads in recognition that they too, have these borderline masochistic tendencies to achieve an arbitrary portrait of perfection, may I ask what it is that drives us to create and then hold it all back if its not exactly what we imagined in our heads? Because nothing is perfect! When do we draw the line and just push publish? Is done really better than perfect? Because done for me it seems like settling for mediocrity a lot of the time. Even if its just a friggin cookie. Im not looking for answers here, just venting I suppose. But if you want to share your similar struggles, feel free in the comments. Its not often I open up or vent in this space, so maybe we can all throw a perfectionist party, and make sure to have these very perfect cookies on the table. Speaking of! Florentines are traditionally almond-centric biscuits, sometimes with the addition of dried fruit like cherries and orange zest, with a rich chocolate coating on the bottom. Because I really love dessert for breakfast, I was motivated to make a morning-appropriate version that wouldnt make me feel like a glutton. I chose to add some buckwheat to the mix since I love to start my day with whole grains, and swapped out the chocolate for a vanilla-cashew butter coating that I basically want to pour over my entire life. Like I mentioned, my original thought was to go with something yogurt-like, but once I made this saucy concoction, there was no need to pretend it was something else. Pure, divine, silky-smooth pleasure glaze! Ahem. I love these cookies because they are so simple to make with just a few ingredients, and incredibly fast. On my third testing, they were done - mixed, baked and glazed – in 20 minutes. If youre in a rush to get your treat fix, leave the cashew coating out of the equation, and youll still have a gorgeously tasty and satisfying little snack. As far as additions and flavours go, these wicked little morsels are kind of a blank slate. I made a couple batches with orange zest and one without. Personally, I really loved the citrusy warmth that the orange lends, and its nod to morning fodder, but you can also omit it for a more neutral taste. Instead, spice them up with cinnamon, cardamom, lemon zest, rose, lavender, coconut etc. I think adding cacao nibs would also be really delicious, as would dried blueberries, dried figs, or apricots. Whatever you choose to do, get ready to be very excited to get up in the morning. Couple these cookies with a turmeric latte, a piece of fruit and youll be good to go. Until 4 oclock when you want another one.     Print recipe     Breakfast Buckwheat Florentines Makes 12 Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup /­­ 90g raw buckwheat groats 1/­­2 cup /­­ 70g slivered almonds (or sunflower seeds) 1/­­3 cup /­­ 45g almond meal 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. coconut oil 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup a couple pinches sea salt zest of 1 organic orange, optional Vanilla Cashew Coating: 1/­­3 cup /­­ 85ml cashew butter 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml coconut oil 1 Tbsp. pure maple syrup seeds from 1 vanilla bean pinch sea salt Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 350°F /­­ 175°C. Line a rimmed cookie sheet with baking paper. 2. In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast buckwheat until golden, about 3 minutes. Transfer buckwheat to a mixing bowl to cool. In the same skillet toast the slivered almonds until golden, about 2 minutes. Transfer them to the bowl of buckwheat to cool, add the almond meal and stir to combine. 3. In the same skillet (no need to wash) over low heat, melt the coconut oil and add the orange zest, if using. Turn off the heat and whisk in the maple syrup and salt. Pour the liquid over the buckwheat and almond mixture and fold to combine. Do not wash the skillet. 4. Using a tablespoon measure, scoop out the florentine cookie mixture and set each one on the lined baking sheet with plenty of space in between (I baked these in 2 batches of six). Using the back of the spoon, flatten the cookies out a little. Place in the oven and bake for 7-10 minutes until the edges are golden and bubbly. Remove from oven and let cool for about 5 minutes. Transfer to a cooling rack and repeat with remaining mixture. 5. While the florentines are baking, make the cashew coating. Melt the coconut oil in the same skillet over low heat, then add the cashew butter and stir well to combine. Once melted, add the vanilla bean and maple syrup. Stir well and turn off the heat. 6. Once the florentines have cooled, make sure that the cashew coating is still liquid. Spoon a couple teaspoons on the bottom of each cookie and spread it as evenly as possible. Place on a lined baking sheet, coating side up in the fridge or freezer to set. Once firm, repeat with remaining coating, except this time place the coating side down on the lined baking sheet. Place in the fridge or freezer to set, then enjoy! Store leftovers in the fridge or freezer in a tightly sealed container for up to two weeks. Once I started editing the new photos for this post, I realized that the last batch of Florentines werent as golden, or as flat as the previous batches. I decided to let that one go. And Im very proud of that. *   *   *   *   *   * Hey Copenhagen! Just a reminder about my first two cookbook events in CPH this Spring. The first will be an intimate talk and demonstration at SLOW Copenhagen, and the second will be a magical, celebratory dinner in collaboration with the local, organic grocer and kitchen, Kost. Click on the images for more info and tickets! Cant wait to see you there.  The post Breakfast Buckwheat Florentines appeared first on My New Roots.

Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake

September 21 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Concord Grape Fruit and Nut CakeThis post was created in partnership with Nuts.com I have a whole lot of cozy fall and holiday recipe ideas bouncing around in my mind, even though it’s still warm out and even though we are still enjoying the sweetest of summer tomatoes daily (I swear the yellow cherry tomatoes truly taste like candy this year). This transitional time is always exciting to me – all the fall produce brings back so many new or forgotten possibilities. I think autumn is much more of vegetable territory than summer – all the stone fruit and berries come in a quick, bright and happy flash, and before we know it, we are left with squash, roots, and sturdy winter greens. But there are still a few sweet gems like apples, pears, figs (fig recipe hopefully coming next week), and grapes to grace our fall cobblers, salads and such, and I plan to take full advantage of them this fall. If you’ve been sticking around this space for a while or have my cookbook, you might know about my love for Concord grapes. I can never resist them at the store or market, being completely mesmerized by the stunning, cloudy berries. Their flavor is lovely too – deep and concentrated, much like the color. The main issue with Concord grapes lies in their prominent seeds. There is no way around them, so I usually end up making juice or compote with Concords – anything where the seeds can be strained out. I did so for this fruit and nut cake, where a myriad of dried fruit is gently cooked in Concord grape juice to soften the fruit’s skin and infuse them with the grape flavor. It’s worth mentioning here that, in the absence of Concord grapes, you can use all kinds of fruit juice for this cake – regular grapes, oranges or even apples would make for a fine juice substitute. This cake is dense and punctuated by comforting flavors of toasted nuts, along with aromatic sweetness from dried fruit and Concord grape juice. A small slice goes a long way. There is no added sugar, as the dried fruit and grape juice bring plenty of sweet to the plate. This is the kind of cake that can serve many purposes. It would make for a perfect edible holiday present, whether brought whole to a festive potluck, or divided into smaller, rectangular cakes, wrapped, tied with a ribbon and gifted. Little squares of this cake would also make a nice addition to a fancy cheese plate, if you’re into that kind of thing. Or it can simply be enjoyed as a dessert at home – it keeps well refrigerated for a good amount of time, and a slice makes for a good component to a kid’s school lunch (or adult’s work snack!). You can get crazy with the decorating like I did here, or not decorate it at all, depending on the occasion. I’ve been shopping on nuts.com for years (since the days when they were still called nuts online) and was thrilled to collaborate on a post with them. All the dried fruit and nuts in this cake came from their online store, which made for extra-delicious results, because their products are consistently fresh and delicious. If you aren’t familiar with nuts.com, they are a family-owned, premium bulk nut and dried fruit supplier, and so much more than that, really. The business has been in the family for three generations now, starting with a stand at a farmer’s market back in 1929,  and they’ve built up an amazingly extensive catalogue of natural bulk foods. In addition to nuts/­­dried fruit, they carry grains, beans, flours, teas, snacks, superfood powders, spices, and more. I feel like a kid in a candy store when I’m on their website. Their dried fruit are the juiciest I’ve ever gotten anywhere, and both Paloma and I are hooked on their dried mango. They also freshly roast their nuts the same day they are shipped out to customers, which is just so cool. The best news is that Nuts.com has a great offer for GK readers – follow this link and choose four free gifts (like chia seeds, goji berries, hemp protein powder, habanero pistachios and more) to receive together with an order of $25 or more. Enjoy :) Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake   Print Serves: one 10 cake Ingredients for the cake (inspiration from At Home in the Whole Foods Kitchen) 4 cups mixed dried fruit - figs, prunes, apricots, raisins - chopped (no need to chop raisins) 4 Medjool dates or 6-8 regular dates - pitted and chopped 1½ cups freshly squeezed Concord grape juice or other fruit juice - hot 1 teaspoon cinnamon ¼ teaspoon nutmeg other spices such as ground cardamom, cloves and allspice - to taste (optional) 1 tablespoon vanilla extract (optional) 1¼ cup toasted almonds - ground ½ cup toasted hazelnuts - chopped ½ cup toasted pecans or walnuts - chopped neutral coconut oil or other vegetable oil for oiling parchment paper for the decoration (all optional) cashews pumpkin seeds pistachios pecans dried apricots dried lemon slices dried cantaloupe dried mango Instructions to make the cake Preheat oven to 300° F (150° C). Place 1½ cup of mixed dried fruit and all the dates into a medium bowl. Pour hot Concord grape/­­fruit juice over them, cover and let soak for 15 minutes. Place the remaining 2½ cups of dried fruit into a medium saucepan and set aside. Drain the soaked fruit into a strainer, over the saucepan with the dried fruit, pouring the soaking juice into the saucepan. Bring contents of the saucepan to a boil over high heat, adjust the heat to a simmer and cook until most of the juice is absorbed, about 8-12 minutes. Transfer the cooked fruit into a food processor, add spices and vanilla extract, if using, and blend until smooth. Transfer into a large bowl, add ground almonds and mix to combine. Stir in soaked fruit, chopped hazelnuts and pecans/­­walnuts, mixing well. Line a 10 cake pan with well-oiled parchment paper and press the fruit-nut mixture into the pan, evening it out with a spoon. Optionally, decorate with nuts and dried fruit to your liking. Bake for 1 hour, until firm. Let cool completely before slicing. The cake stores very well refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 2 weeks. Notes 1. In the absence of Concord grapes, any other grapes, oranges or apples can be used to make juice for this cake. 2. If you dont have a juicer for juicing grapes, blend them in a blender and strain through a fine mesh strainer to get rid of any seeds and skins. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Raw Fruity Panna Cotta, Easter Style Raw Greenylicious Herb Soup and BBQ Grissini by Earthsprout Raw Lady Apple and Cranberry Cookies Simple Spicy Strawberry Gazpacho .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Rose and Rhubarb Frozen Yogurt - Ice Cream Sunday

May 22 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Rose and Rhubarb Frozen Yogurt - Ice Cream Sunday I think I first got the desire to make rhubarb frozen yogurt when I saw a photo of Nigel Slater’s Rhubarb Eton Mess. Slater always does the most amazing things with rhubarb, making me dream about the days when the blushing pink bunches will appear at the market. Since those days are fully upon us, I went ahead and made this treat for the weekend, in celebration of rhubarb season and its elusiveness. I couldn’t resist appointing rose as a component of this frozen yogurt for two reasons – for one, rhubarb and rose has always sounded like the most magical combination that I’ve been thinking about for years, and secondly, I’ve had some beautiful dried roses sitting in my pantry without getting any use for too long. Yogurt is a complete weakness for me and all members of my family – we always have some in the fridge to use for breakfast and snacks. I like to make my own, whether with real milk or coconut, but I also love trying new brands. There seem to be many great yogurt companies out there today, which make it very easy to be a happy consumer – if you’re curious, I like Maple Hill, Wallaby, Seven Stars and Anita’s Coconut Yogurt is a delicious vegan variety. Frozen yogurt is one of the easiest frozen treats to make, especially if you have an ice cream maker (I’ve had an older model of this ice cream maker for years and it’s one of my favorite kitchen appliances). All it takes is some good yogurt, whatever secondary ingredients you choose for flavor, and a quick whirl in the machine. With this possibility in mind, you are always less than an hour away from a dessert that many consider to be a treat to only acquire outside of the home. This batch matched my very high expectations. The first spoonful I had made me stop in my tracks and close my eyes for a second or two. I’ve always found rose flavor to be very invigorating, and combined with the subtle tartness of the rhubarb and creamy tanginess of the yogurt, this is dessert and aromatherapy all in one bowl. Since I make so much ice cream/­­popsicles/­­frozen yogurt, we’ve decided that Sunday posts will be reserved for frozen treats of all kinds. We hope that will make you smile. Rose and Rhubarb Frozen Yogurt   Print Serves: 6-10 Ingredients 1½ lb rhubarb - sliced ½ cup dried rose petals (optional) ½ cup maple syrup - divided 32 oz Greek yogurt (I used Wallaby for this batch) 2 tablespoons rose water Instructions In a medium saucepan, combine rhubarb with rose petals, if using, and ¼ cup maple syrup. Bring to a boil over medium heat, reduce to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes, until rhubarb is soft. Let cool to room temperature and chill in the refrigerator for about an hour. Combine well-chilled yogurt with half of the rose-rhubarb mixture, remaining ¼ cup of the maple syrup and rose water. Process in an ice cream maker for 20 minutes or according to the manufacturers instructions. Spoon into a container, alternating between layers of frozen yogurt and the remaining rose-rhubarb mixture. Eat right away as soft serve or place in the freezer and make sure to remove from the freezer 10-15 minutes before serving. Notes If you dont have an ice cream maker, you can make popsicles. Just pour the final rhubarb-yogurt mixture into popsicle molds and freeze. Rose petals are optional, rose water gives plenty of flavor. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Roasted Yellow Plum and Rosemary Popsicles Lavender Ice Cream with Apricots Poached in Blueberry Sauce Homemade Yogurt and Frozen Yogurt Lemongrass Raspberry Pops Tarragon and Mint Ice Cream .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Rose and Rhubarb Frozen Yogurt - Ice Cream Sunday appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Farro with Apricots, Fresh Mozzarella and Red Walnuts

December 21 2015 Meatless Monday 

This dish brings together sweet apricots, hearty, nutritious farro and crunchy walnuts in a beautiful presentation. Lemon olive oil and lime vinegar give this simple dish a special touch but you can also use what you have in your pantry and add a bit zing with citrus zest. This recipe comes to us from Priscilla of She’s Cookin’. Serves 4-6 - 1 cup of cooked farro (about 1/­­3 cup uncooked) - 2 tablespoons lemon olive oil - 1 tablespoon kafir lime vinegar (substitute apple cider vinegar if unavailable) - 8 apricots, halved - 1 tablespoon honey - 8 ounces Ciliegine fresh mozzarella - 1/­­2 cup red walnut pieces - 1 tablespoon thinly sliced mint Prepare the farro according to package directions. Allow to cool. Combine one cup farro with lemon olive oil and vinegar. Slice the apricots in half lengthwise, twist to separate, remove the seed. Place the apricot halves on a baking sheet, brush with honey, put one mozzarella ball in the middle of each, broil for 2-3 minutes until the cheese is melted. Arrange the farro on a platter, top with apricots. Sprinkle with red walnuts and mint. The post Farro with Apricots, Fresh Mozzarella and Red Walnuts appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Lavender Milkshake and Chamomile Latte

July 20 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Lavender Milkshake and Chamomile Latte Cooking with edible flowers has been one of my greatest pleasures in the kitchen. Floral infusions provide amazing flavor and can add beneficial, healing properties to any dish or drink. My favorite was the Rose Ice Cream and Rose Petal Mille Feuille I made a few years ago with organic rose petals and the purest essential rose oil from my perfume maker friend. The oil was so concentrated that a tiny drop turned a portion of ice cream into a magical bowl of aromatherapy. Here are two refreshing drinks we’ve been enjoying this summer, featuring some of the most loved, calming culinary flowers – lavender and chamomile. Chamomile is an amazing little flower, and its oils are anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antifungal and antiallergenic. It has long been used as a sleep aid all over the world. Having a cup of chamomile tea before bed has become one of my daily rituals – it really does the job of getting me ready for some wholesome rest. Lately, I’ve been loving this creamy chamomile latte. My favorite way to enjoy it this summer is cold, but it also makes for a comforting warm drink for the cooler parts of the year. Lavender, with its own share of antiseptic and anti-inflammatory properties, is king of the aromatherapy world – even the smallest whiff sends a relaxation signal to the mind. This milkshake combines lavender and blueberries, as the two are a match made in heaven. Drink it as a refreshing mid-afternoon snack after some time in the sun or even as dessert after dinner. The most important variable when cooking with dried edible flowers is their freshness. If a flower is freshly dried, a little of it will go a long way, while older dried flowers have likely lost their potency. It’s also important to remember that the best way to extract the beneficial oils from herbs such as chamomile and lavender is gently heating them in a double boiler for longer periods of time. Directly pouring boiling water over the herbs is a harsher method, which kills off many of their benefits. We are off to Sochi for the last stretch of our Russian vacation. Black Sea, here we come. Chamomile Latte serves 2 1 1/­­2 cups water 4 tablespoons dried German chamomile flowers – make sure to get them from a store with a good rotation 1/­­2 cup almond milk (I like homemade unsweetened) honey to taste – optional Combine water with chamomile in a small, heatproof bowl. Place the bowl into a heavy bottomed pot or pan. Add water to the pan, making sure that water level in the pan is lower than the bowl. Bring water in the pan to a simmer and simmer for 15 minutes. Let cool enough for safe handling. Strain chamomile tea, mix with almond milk and honey, if using. For an extra creamy and foamy consistency, blend the tea and almond milk in a blender. Drink warm or chilled in the fridge. I like it best cold and unsweetened. Lavender Milkshake serves 2 1 1/­­2 cups almond milk or other plant milk (I like homemade unsweetened almond milk) 1 tablespoon edible dried lavender flowers (make sure to get them from a store with a good rotation – flowers should be lavender, rather then grey in color, with a fresh, strong aroma) 6-8 scoops of your favorite vanilla, blueberry or lavender ice-cream handful of fresh or frozen blueberries – optional, for color handful of ice cubes – optional, for smoother texture splash of maple syrup – optional, to taste seeds of 1 vanilla bean or splash of vanilla extract – optional Combine almond milk and lavender flowers in a small saucepan and bring to a boil. Remove from heat, cover and let cool. Strain and chill in the refrigerator. Combine lavender milk and the rest of ingredients in a blender and blend to a smooth and thick milkshake consistency. If your lavender flowers are very fresh and aromatic, you can skip the infusion step and simply blend almond milk, 1/­­2 tablespoon (or to taste) lavender and blueberries, in a high speed blender until completely smooth. Then add the rest of ingredients and blend to a smooth and thick milkshake consistency.  

Sarah B’s Breakfast (Cookie) Bars

July 5 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Sarah B’s Breakfast (Cookie) Bars I am guessing that Sarah B from My New Roots hardly needs any introduction? She is one of the most inspiring voices on the plant-based recipe scene, always with a smile and a smoothie on hand. Her way of reinventing traditional dishes into healthier versions of themselves is downright amazing. And if that wasn’t enough, she is one of the nicest and most positive persons we have met. Her long awaited cookbook has the same concept as the blog, but is printed on beautiful paper and with the recipes divided into seasons (five of them!). There are plenty of inspiration for all flavours here and we have lots of dog-eared recipes yet to try. If you enjoy our type of cooking, you are going to love this book. It’s a gem. I am not sure why we chose to feature this exact recipe, a more colourful one would probably be more representative for the book. I guess we were intrigued by the thought of eating giant shaped cookies for breakfast. The fact that they are vegan and had a can of white beans in them, probably also sparked our curiosity. Sarah writes that its time to ditch the plastic packaged breakfast bars as they are filled with too much stuff that doesn’t do us any favours. Her bars (or cookies) are loaded with whole-food fiber, protein, healthy fats, real fruit, and as we mentioned above, even beans. We have already made these quite a few times. They have a mild orange flavour and a really good and satisfying taste. They seemed a little crumbly to us at first but turned out to hold together very well when baked. We find them perfect to make for a pantry cleaning, as almost any kind of nuts, seeds and dried fruit can be added. We also made one version where we subbed the maple syrup with a ripe banana and two dates. Baby Isac loves them too, and since they are filled with so much good stuff, we love making them for him. Fully Loaded Breakfast Bars (Recipe from My New Roots: Inspired Plant-Based Recipes for Every Season) Makes 10 large bars (although we make our bars slightly smaller than Sarah and get 12 bars from one batch.) 1 tablespoon chia seeds 3 1/­­4 cups /­­ 325 g gluten-free rolled oats 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon fine sea salt 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 250 g cooked white beans, such as navy, white kidney, or Great Northern (about one 15-ounce /­­ 250 g can) 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60 ml coconut oil, melted 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60 ml pure maple syrup or raw honey Grated zest of 1 organic orange 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60 ml unsweetened applesauce 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/­­3 cup /­­ 60 g chopped unsulphured dried apricots 1/­­4 cup /­­ 30 g  raisins 1/­­4 cup /­­ 35 g pumpkin seeds 2 cups /­­ 60 g organic, non-GMO cornflakes (optional) Preheat the oven to 350°F /­­ 180°C. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and set it aside. Combine the chia seeds with 3 tablespoons water in a small bowl, and set aside for 15 minutes to gel. Pulse 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 125 g of the oats in a food processor until they resemble a very rough flour. Transfer the flour to a large mixing bowl and whisk in the remaining 2 cups /­­ 200 g oats, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. Pulse the beans with the coconut oil in the food processor until the mixture is creamy. Add the maple syrup, orange zest, chia gel, applesauce, and vanilla extract, and pulse until smooth. Pour the bean puree over the oats mixture and stir until everything starts to come together. Add the apricots, raisins, pumpkin seeds, and cornflakes and stir to combine--you may need to use your hands at this point. Shape the dough into 10 equal balls, and then flatten each one into a patty shape. Transfer them to the prepared baking sheet. Bake for 15 to 18 minutes, until the bars are golden. Let cool completely before enjoying. The bars can be stored in an airtight container at room temperature for 1 week, or in the freezer for up to 1 month. ************* PS! We are coming to London last weekend of September for two different events. We will be talking at the Food Blogger Connect conference at Chiswick House on Friday 25th and Saturday 26th September. We are also excited to be talking and cooking at the Fare Healthy festival at Borough Market on Sunday 27th September. Check out their websites for tickets and more info.

Warm Summer Fruit Salad

June 14 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Warm Summer Fruit Salad If my 15 year younger self would see me know. I am sitting here writing a text that is trying to sell the idea of a warm fruit salad. Young David would have told me  that I was an idiot: “Why heat fruit when you can have it chilled?!” You see, young David hated warm fruit. And I mean. Truly. Hated.  Back then, I could binge eat platters of fresh fruit, but cook or bake it and I wouldn’t touch it. Even apple pie, the one dish that every normal person loves, made my stomach turn upside down. I sometimes allowed myself to eat the part of the crust that hadn’t been touched by the fruit, but my tongue cringed from the bare thought of warm apple in my mouth. And now I’m all of a sudden very excited about this fruit salad that has taken a quick detour through the oven. What happened? I would love to say that this recipe was the game changer. But truth be told, I think I just slowly learned to appreciate warm fruit, recipe by recipe. Anyway, apart from the fact that I used to hate warm fruit and now swear by this dessert. Apart from the fact that this recipe is dead-simple. Apart from the fact that it includes some of the best bounty of the season and tastes like summer in your mouth. Yes, apart from all that, this fruit salad is also covered in grated dark chocolate (that melts!), coconut flakes and salted almonds (that pairs oh so well with dark chocolate). And if you are still not  convinced to try it out, we created this little video as a final selling point:  This is originally a Swedish dessert called Gino served with strawberries, kiwis and bananas with white chocolate on top. Our version is quite different, but t he choice of fruit and measurements are really just suggestions here, add or subtract fruit to your liking. Peaches or pineapple would also be good baked. Or raspberries? We use fruit in season here, but baking fruit is also a great way to increase the flavours during the winter season. Luise and I haven’t entirely agreed on the baking time. Personally I think the fruit only should be heated quickly, so it’s still quite firm. Just 5-6 minutes or enough time for the chocolate to melt. Luise however prefers the fruit to be more baked and a bit softer so the juices and flavours come together more. That’s about 10-12 minutes. But we’ll leave that decision to you (in the photos and video it’s baked after Luise’s preference). Warm Summer Fruit Salad Serves 4 1 cup almonds + 1 tbsp boiled water mixed with 1 tsp salt (or store-bought salted almonds) 3 kiwi fruits 3 apricots 2 bananas, peel 10 strawberries 10 cherries, pitted 2 plums, remove stones 1 lime, juice 1 oz /­­ 30 g dark chocolate (70% or darker) 1/­­3 cup dried unsweetened coconut flakes Preheat the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F. Prepare the almonds by placing them in a mixing bowl, pour the hot salted water over the almonds and combine until all almonds are covered. Place the almonds in a baking tray and roast in the oven for 10-15 minutes or until slightly golden and crunchy. Set aside. Prepare the fruit by cutting them into bitesize pieces. Place the fruit in a baking dish and add the lime juice, toss to mix. Chop the almonds and sprinkle over the fruit salad. Grate the chocolate, it should almost cover the fruit salad. Sprinkle with coconut flakes and place the dish in the oven. Bake for 5-10 minutes, until the chocolate has melted and the fruit is warm and juicy (not mushy). Serve in bowls with plain yogurt or a dollop of ice cream.

Zucchini, Apricot, & Almond Salad

May 31 2015 VegKitchen 

Zucchini, Apricot, & Almond SaladInspiration can come from anywhere at any time. One evening I was watching Anthony Bourdains show, Parts Unknown, and he was highlighting the foods of Israel and Palestine. At one meal, he was served a raw zucchini salad with apricots. I have no idea what the other ingredients were in this dish, but I had a bunch of fresh apricots that needed eating. Roasting the apricots brings out their flavor and sweetness. A tangy apricot dressing over strips of zucchini sounded like a quick and delicious summer meal. Contributed by Ann Oliverio, from  Crave, Eat, Heal: Plant-Based Whole Food Recipes to Satisfy Every Appetite* reprinted with permission (C) 2015 Front Table Books. Serves: 2 to 4 - 4 fresh apricots, pitted and roughly chopped - 2 medium-sized zucchini, ends trimmed, cut into ribbons or 2-inch matchsticks - 1/­­4 cup white wine vinegar - 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard - 1 small clove garlic, peeled - 1/­­4 cup slivered almonds - 3 to 4 dried apricots, minced - Fresh mint, minced, optional Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Place the apricots in a small baking dish and bake for 15-20 minutes, or until soft. Set aside to cool. In a high-speed or regular blender, add the roasted apricots, white wine vinegar, mustard, and garlic and process until smooth. Taste and adjust the seasonings. Put the zucchini and dried apricots in a medium-sized bowl and add about half of the dressing. Toss to coat – adding more dressing, if desired. Divide the salad between 2 or 4 plates and sprinkle with slivered almonds and mint. Serve. Variation: Shred the zucchini if you prefer – just make sure to squeeze out the water, otherwise the dressing will be diluted. - Visit Annie Oliverio at An Unrefined Vegan. - Here are more Super Savory Salads.

Vegan Gluten free Christmas Cake – Fruit Cake

December 18 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Gluten free Christmas Cake – Fruit CakeVegan Gluten free Christmas Cake Fruit Cake full of nuts, dried fruits, candied ginger. Soft, Flavorful and great for gifting. Vegan Soyfree Recipe.  I am not sure why fruit cakes have a bad rap. They used to be a treat we would wait for around Christmas. Soft, Sweet, full of fun stuff for us kids I guess. Maybe we just lucked out with a fabulous bakery. I make versions of my Spelt spiced fruit cake if not baking a load of cookies every year. This version is adapted from spelt flour version. I use almond flour and rice flour to keep it gluten-free. The cake keeps well refrigerated for a few weeks if you use liquor or a week with orange juice. Serve as is or with a bourbon/­­rum glaze! Add nuts or seeds that you like, some dates, apricots, cherries. I also added some roasted sunflower seeds and chia seeds, so the cake is also great to snack on. Continue reading: Vegan Gluten free Christmas Cake – Fruit CakeThe post Vegan Gluten free Christmas Cake – Fruit Cake appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Farewell to Copenhagen Carrot Cake

October 21 2017 My New Roots 

Farewell to Copenhagen Carrot Cake Boil the kettle and make a cup of tea folks, this is going to be a big one! First of all, I have to begin this post by saying THANK YOU. My New Roots is officially 10 years old and I couldnt have done it without your support, enthusiasm, and full-on LOVE for this little blog. And especially after the last couple of posts when I really opened up about my recent struggles, I felt so supported, and saw that so many of you did as well. It reminded me of the strong community that this has become, and the power of people when they come together with a common goal of true wellness. If you had told me an entire decade ago that my deeply passionate, unabashedly nerdy, and nearly ignored internet musings would end up turning into a full-on career, brand, cookbooks, online classes, app, poster shop and retreat company I never, ever would have believed you. But reading my first post again, it’s just as relevant today as ever, eerily almost as if I had written it last week. I guess I had a strong vision in mind and just kept trucking, kept trusting, that it would resonate with someone. But here we are, a third of my life later, and it’s not just someone, but so many of you. And all of my dreams continue to be born and manifest because of you. That offhanded suggestion from an old boyfriend who thought I could use an outlet for all that health talk I kept spewing, was really onto something. Thanks, dude. Secondly...and this is really big news...I am moving back to Canada! Yes, after nine years of delicious life in Copenhagen, my old roots are pulling me home and I am so very ready. This whole thing has been in the works for a few months now, but I didnt really feel like putting it out there until it was real. Well lemme tell ya, when putting my familys life in 50 boxes and shoving them into a shipping container, shiz got real, real fast. What a crazy feeling it is, and totally overwhelming with all the emotions that relocating your entire life is. So, if things have been (and continue to be) quiet around here, its because Ive been sorting through all the details that an international move entails. I send my gratitude for your patience. The next chapter of my life will be completely different from the last, that is for sure. To change things up dramatically, my family and I will be living out of the city in fact, near-ish to Toronto, where I am originally from. I knew that I would end up living in the country at some point, but not so soon! It was more a when I retire kind of thing. But funny what happens when you have kids and they need s-p-a-c-e, your priorities seem to shift to accommodate the little ones. Plus, I feel the need to be on the ground again (Ive been living in a fourth-floor apartment for nine years now!), so we bought a house to get closer to earth in every sense, plant a garden, lay in the grass - our own grass - and enjoy the quiet and safety of a little community. Im really excited for everything that is to come, and feeling so grateful for the divine unfolding. But will I miss Copenhagen? Obvi. This city, and my home here, is where I have spent my entire adult life. The walls of my beloved kitchen that my husband and I built ourselves, have held space for two cookbooks, online classes, countless dinner parties, bleary-eyed breakfasts, and even the birth of our son for crying out loud! And although My New Roots began in Toronto, it flourished here and truly became something on Danish ground. The Scandinavian culture has had a profound influence on me, my aesthetic, and how I see the world now. Having Europe at my doorstep with all its history, architecture, fine arts, culture, and attitude has been an enormous privilege and deeply inspiring. And can we talk about the light? Oh the light! How my camera and I will miss the very special way the sun slants here. Its unlike anything Ive seen before. Anyway, I promise to keep you all posted as we leave one fabulous country for the next. I wont have a working kitchen for some months, but Ill stay as active as I can on Instagram so you can keep up with my kitchen renovations...I know youll want to see all that house porn. Tee hee. Okay, now for the main event. I MADE A CARROT CAKE. Successfully. It is delicious. I feel like I have finally achieved one of my biggest culinary goals ever, and its so appropriate that we celebrate ten years of this blog with a recipe that has challenged me for nearly as long. If you remember back to when I used to post giant layer cakes for my birthday, I ran into trouble in 2013, when I attempted three different versions, which all failed, and ended up making nut butter sandwiches instead. Since then, the headcount has continued to rise, yet some ridiculously stubborn part of me wont give up. In the past Ive almost always used spelt flour for baking, and if any of you have tried one of my famous layer cakes, youll know this has worked well. I was after the same crumb that you can achieve with wholegrain spelt, but wanted the cake to be gluten-free, so I started by using an all-purpose gluten-free flour. It was a total disaster. The cake turned out gummy and inedible, and the frosting, which I tried to make with cooked quinoa (dont ask) was just weird. The next route I tried was with almond flour, since Ive been eating a more low-grain diet for the past few months and I wanted the cake to reflect that. Before testing it out, I assumed that almond flour would make things really dense and heavy, but lo and behold it creates a crumb that is so fluffy, and really gives this feeling of deep satisfaction. Im obsessed. The only thing that I dont like about almond flour is the high price, and the fact that almonds are a very water-intensive crop to grow. But, this is a cake after all, therefore a special treat, therefore not something you have all the time. The initial carrot cake experiments with almond flour were good, but borderline too rich. Plus, since Id ditched the quinoa frosting idea and knew Id be taking the cashew road, I felt like a nut frosting on top of a nut cake was just, well, too nutty. To reconcile my relationship with coconut flour, I cut the dry ingredients with a tad to see what would happen. Not only was the cake just as good, but the texture was better and I liked the flavor the coconut flour provided. We are friends again. The Cashew Coconut frosting for this cake is what Canadians would affectionately call a twofer. Bahahaha! (I really do amuse myself). For everyone else out there, in long form, this refers to a two-for-one deal. You can make this recipe once, but have the frosting come out two ways depending on its temperature. Pretty groovy, eh? If you use the frosting right after making it, it will be loose and glossy, almost glaze-like. If you prefer a traditional-style frosting that is thicker and stiffer, all you need to do is put the mixture in the fridge overnight to achieve this consistency. I chose to go with the room temperature version since I hadnt really worked with it like that before. It provided a more even layer, but its also a little harder to control. Either way its delicious, so dont worry about making the wrong choice...there isnt one! The flavour is major: Im talking soooo cream cheese-like that even I was confused. If youre not feeling the chunky carrot cake vibes, please look away now, because the cake of my dreams is loaded with pineapple, walnuts, and bursting with warm spice and citrus zest. I went to town! Instead of using questionably-edible canned pineapple, I used the dried, unsweetened version from the health food store. This stuff ain’t cheap, but again, cake splurge. If you cant find pineapple like this, dates, raisins, dried figs or apricots would also be good, but Id skip the soaking step. Instead of walnuts you could use pecans, macadamias, or even pumpkin seeds. Altogether this carrot cake is moist, decadent, and satisfying with so many layers of flavour and texture that just wont quit. Ive learned a lot in the past decade, and this cake is an expression of that. Its something to be proud of, and something to share. Thanks for sticking by me while I worked out the kinks…now its time to celebrate all the things!     Print recipe     Farewell to Copenhagen Carrot Cake Serves 10-12 Ingredients: 2/­­3 cup /­­ 60g dried, unsweetened pineapple, plus more for garnish if desired 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 200g lightly packed grated carrots (about 3 medium) 1 cup /­­ 100g walnuts, plus more for garnish if desired 3 cups /­­ 300g almond flour (not almond meal) 2/­­3 cup /­­ 100g coconut flour 1 1/­­2 tsp. baking soda 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1 Tbsp. ground cinnamon 2 tsp. ground ginger 1 tsp. ground cardamom 1/­­2 tsp. ground nutmeg 1 cup /­­ 250ml eggs, at room temperature (about 4-5 large eggs) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml odourless coconut oil, melted 1 cup /­­ 250ml pure maple syrup 2 tsp. vanilla extract zest of 1 orange and 1 lemon (try to find organic, if possible) Cashew Coconut Frosting: 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 200g raw cashews, soaked for 4 hours 3 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml coconut cream from the top of a can of coconut milk 1 Tbsp. coconut oil 2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt Directions: 1. Pour just-boiled water over the dried pineapple (do not soak the pineapple youre using for garnish). Preheat the oven to 325°F/­­160°C. Lightly grease two 7 /­­ 18cm spring form cake pans with coconut oil. 2. Wash carrots well and grate them on a box grater. Set aside. Roughly chop the walnuts. 3. In a large mixing bowl, combine the almond flour, coconut flour, baking soda, salt cinnamon, ginger, cardamom and nutmeg. 4. In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together the eggs, coconut oil, maple syrup, and vanilla extract. 5. Drain the soaked pineapple and squeeze with your hands to remove excess liquid. Roughly chop. 6. Pour the wet ingredients over the dry ingredients and stir to combine. Zest the orange and lemon into the bowl. Add the carrots, soaked pineapple, and chopped walnuts and fold to incorporate. 7. Spoon roughly half of the batter into one of the prepared cake pans, then add the remaining batter to the second one. Place in the oven in the middle rack and set the timer for 40 minutes. Cakes are ready when they are golden brown and pass the toothpick test (bake for longer if necessary, up to one hour - cover cake with aluminum foil if you need to bake for longer so that the top doesnt burn). Remove cakes from the oven and let cool completely. 8. While the cakes are baking, make the frosting. Drain and rinse the cashews. Add them to a high-speed blender along with the other ingredients (you can use a normal blender or food processor, but the frosting wont be as smooth). If the frosting is too thick, add more coconut cream or a teeny bit of water and blend again. Chill in the fridge (frosting can be made one day ahead if you want it to be thicker). 9. To frost and decorate, spread a generous amount of frosting over one half of the cake. Carefully lay the second half on top, and spread remaining frosting over the top and on the sides. Decorate with remaining dried pineapple and walnuts, if desired. Serve and enjoy! Cake will keep for 5 days, covered in the fridge. Who knows what the future holds - the world seems so crazy these days - but I do know that I still have steam in me to keep going with this heart project, if youre all still up for reading and cooking from it. Words cannot describe my gratitude for you, allowing me to pursue my biggest dreams and expose my shadowy bits as well. I hope you know how much I love you. I truly do. Here’s to another ten years… xo, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   * Okay friends, there are still a couple spaces left for the next Wild Heart High Spirit retreat in Portugal! Its this November 5-11, hosted at the ridiculously beautiful Sublime Comporta hotel (guys, Ive been there and this place is NEXT LEVEL). I will be teaching cooking classes outside in the organic garden (pictured above!) and giving nutrition seminars daily, with yoga and movement classes twice a day with my dear friend and deeply talented friend, Mikkala Marilyn Kissi of Living Yolates. The kitchen is exclusively making My New Roots recipes for the week, so we can all enjoy these meals without having to lift a finger. Enjoy your private pool, open spa, horseback riding on the beach, bonfire nights and dancing under the stars. Come and get inspired to live your best life! Well show you how. Click here for more info, and see you in magical Portugal! The post Farewell to Copenhagen Carrot Cake appeared first on My New Roots.

Grilling on Meatless Monday

July 3 2017 Meatless Monday 

Grilling on Meatless MondayIts that time of year again, when we fire up the grill and take our dinners outside! Usually, meat is in the spotlight for a cookout, but if youre looking for a lighter spread for the hot weather, seek out the produce section! Many seasonal vegetables turn out great after some time on the grill - sometimes they even produce some unexpected flavors! This Monday, for the July 4th holiday weekend, follow these tips for great vegetables on the grill! Think outside the box. When it comes to grilling vegetables, you cant go wrong with the usual suspects - peppers, eggplant, onions, and zucchini. But many more vegetables - and fruits - are delicious after being grilled. Try artichokes and romaine lettuce or avocados and cucumbers! Experiment with seasonings. While the combination of olive oil, salt, and pepper is a classic way to bring out the flavor of grilled veggies, seasonings provide flavor options from around the globe! You can go as mild, savory, or spicy as you want with Caribbean-style jerk seasoning, Italian seasoning, Mexican-style, Indian-style… be creative! Use stand-ins for meat. Sometimes people will still miss burgers and hot dogs despite the best veggie platter, but those cravings can still be satisfied with meatless options. Swap out burgers for portabella mushrooms, or use vegetarian versions of hot dogs, meat crumbles, and bacon to add a savory flavor. Grilling firm tofu or tempeh will not only provide protein but also absorb the flavor from the veggies and smoke. Download our Meatless Monday Burger Cookbook for even more ideas. Try different delivery systems. Veggies are great on their own, but they can be even better when served as part of a meal. Grilled veggies are perfect for tacos - fajitas, anyone? - and dont rule out grilling pizza! Try skewers for shish kabobs or throw grilled veggies in a salad. Dont forget dessert! Vegetables dont own the grilling game. Several fruits take on great new flavors after being grilled when the heat makes them caramelize. Pineapples and stone fruits, like peaches, plums and apricots, are perfect for grilling. But less expected choices like watermelons, grapes, apples, strawberries, and bananas also work great on the grill. Just be careful - fruits will cook a lot faster, so keep an eye on them and let them rest a bit before eating! The post Grilling on Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Pumpkin Juice

October 28 2016 VegKitchen 

Pumpkin Juice Theres more to pumpkin juice than just breaking into a haunted pumpkin patch, fending off the zombies, and juicing a pumpkin. This Harry Potter-inspired version simmers spices, fresh ginger and vanilla bean - with apple juice to infuse it. Then its blended with soaked dried apricots, pumpkin purée and a little nutmeg.The post Pumpkin Juice appeared first on Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes: VegKitchen.com.

Maple Cinnamon Grain-Free Granola

August 9 2016 My New Roots 

Maple Cinnamon Grain-Free Granola Cruising the health food store a few months back, I happened upon a bag of locally made, grain-free granola that really spoke to me. Something about its un-designed packaging, its minimalistic ingredients and flagrant chunks flirting with me through the cellophane window, begged me to take it home. The $15 price tag begged me to leave it on the shelf. So I went and perused the tea section, while spiritually distracted by the promise of crunchy sunflower seed clusters and juicy raisins. I went back. I picked up the bag and walked swiftly to the cash register so that I wouldnt change my mind on the way there. I bought it, ran home, tore open that bag and sat gorging myself on handful after handful of total luxury granola bliss. I did again the next week. And the following week too. It took about five rounds of $15 granola before I realized, firstly, how insane it was that I, Sarah Britton, would spend such a preposterous amount of money on something like breakfast cereal, and second, that I wouldnt just figure out how to make it myself. Grain-free granola is nothing new, but nothing Id ever tried making before since I love grains so very much. But as I tend to enjoy grain-centric breakfasts, pouring a bunch of mostly-oat granola on top of mostly-oat porridge seemed like oat overkill, ya know? It didnt take long to perfect this recipe and secure its place as a rotating staple in my household. I eat it on all kinds of things besides porridge too. Its great on top of chia pudding, smoothie bowls, chopped fruit, coconut yogurt, waffles and pancakes, and ice cream (the healthy kind, of course). And like all other granolas, this stuff is pretty addictive. Im warning you. This recipe is excitingly versatile, so dont get too caught up on the ingredients themselves - instead think of them as inspiration. If youre allergic to nuts, or you simply want to cut down on the cost of this recipe, simply swap out the nuts for more seeds. You can also replace the coconut if youre so inclined, use another spice instead of cinnamon, honey instead of maple syrup...you get the idea. Just make sure that whatever you choose to alter is substituted with the same amount of something else. If you dig dried fruit, chop up a bunch and add it to the mix after it’s cooled down. Apricots, figs, mulberries, and raisins are some of my favourites with this mix.        Print recipe     Maple Cinnamon Grain-free Granola Makes 8 cups /­­ 2 liters Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 275g raw nuts (I used almonds and hazelnuts) 2 cups /­­ 250g raw, shelled sunflower seeds 1 cup /­­ 80g unsweetened desiccated coconut 1 cup /­­ 60g large flaked coconut 3 Tbsp. chia seeds 1 Tbsp. ground cinnamon 3/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml expeller-pressed coconut oil, melted 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml maple syrup 1 tsp. vanilla extract (optional) Directions: 1.  Preheat oven to 300°F /­­ 150°C. Line two rimmed baking sheets with baking paper. 2. Add the nuts to your food processor and pulse to roughly chop. Add sunflower seeds and pulse to chop, until all nuts and seeds are about the same size. If you dont have a food processor, this step can be done by hand. 3. Place chopped nuts and seeds in a large mixing bowl. Combine the coconut, chia seeds, cinnamon, salt. Pour in the coconut oil, maple syrup and vanilla extract. Mix well to coat. Divide the mixture in half and spread out evenly onto the lined baking sheets (you can do this on one baking sheet if that is all you have, but in my experience it cooks more evenly with two). 4. Bake for 30-35 minutes, stirring a couple times from the 15-minute mark. The granola is ready when it is golden and fragrant. It will crisp up outside the oven as it cools. 5. Store fully-cooled granola in an airtight glass container at room temperature for up to one month.      This recipe was included in my online video series, Healthy Kickstart, that I produced with my friends over at Cody! If you’d like to see me making this recipe in the flesh, and the many other breakfast delights (such as the Grab-and-Go Carrot Bread below), click here. I had such a blast with this series, as I feel passionate about helping you to create mornings that are as delicious, vibrant and easy as possible! I hope you all enjoy. Deep gratitude for all of your ongoing support of My New Roots! In light, Sarah B Show me your Maple Cinnamon Grain-free Granola on Instagram: #MNRgrainfreegranola The post Maple Cinnamon Grain-Free Granola appeared first on My New Roots.

Cherry-Hemp Muesli

April 7 2016 VegKitchen 

This is a simple European-inspired breakfast cereal that is easy to make and convenient to keep on hand for a Quick breakfast. Its especially great to take with you when traveling. I find the dates balance out the tartness of the cherries quite nicely, but you can substitute either with your favorite dried fruits, such as apricots, apples, and cranberries.

Dal Stuffed Sweet Potatoes

September 9 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Dal Stuffed Sweet Potatoes One of the first recipes we posted on this blog, soon six years ago(!), was an Indian lentil soup. Looking back on that photo and the short text that came with it, I definitely feel that we have learned a whole bit about food photography, recipe writing and blogging during these years. But one thing that stands strong from that old post is the actual recipe. We still make that lentil soup often, most regularly during the cold months (which in Scandinavia translates to 9 out of 12 months). Everyone in our family likes it and its a very quick and hassle-free recipe to cook when you also have to keep an eye on two kids running laps around the apartment (or one of them is running and the other one is toddling and wobbling after her). My point is that lentil stew or dal, as it is called in India, has always been one of our favourite comfort food and we just haven’t posted it enough here on the blog. So when we were approached by Swedish spice company Santa Maria, asking us to create a few recipes for their new range of organic and fair-trade spices, we immediately realised that this was the perfect opportunity to make another dal. Anyone that has cooked a dal knows that the spices play a really central role in the recipe. We updated our old recipe a bit and decided on a new way of serving it - stuffed inside baked sweet potatoes. This is extraordinary comfort food with warm, sweet flavours that contrast the tangy yogurt and fresh pomegranate seeds on top. Santa Maria actually had a film crew in our house while we shot this recipe and have released a little video and some additional photos along with the recipes on their site. Stuffed Sweet Potato with Dal Serves 4 It’s a quite generous serving of dal so you will probably (hopefully) end up with some leftovers. You will thank us the day after, it tastes even better then. 4 medium sized sweet potatoes 3 tbsp butter, ghee or coconut oil 3 cloves garlic, peeled and minced 1 yellow onion, peeled and finely chopped 4 dried apricots, roughly chopped 1 tbsp fresh ginger, grated 1 tbsp organic turmeric 2 tsp organic cardamom 1/­­2 tsp organic chili flakes 2 carrots, sliced 1 2/­­3 cups /­­ 400 ml /­­  red lentils 4 cups /­­ 1 liter water 1 tsp sea salt flakes 2 fresh tomatoes, cut in boats 70 g spinach or baby spinach Topping 1/­­2 cup natural yogurt 1/­­2 cup toasted pumpkin seeds or sprouted green lentils 1 pomegranate, seeds fresh coriander/­­cilantro Preheat the oven at 400°F/­­200°C. Give each sweet potato a tiny slit at the top and place them on a baking pan. Bake for about 45-60 minutes or until the skin is crisp and the flesh is soft. Prepare the dal while the potatoes are in the oven. Place a large pot on medium heat. Add butter, onion, garlic, apricots, ginger, turmeric, cardamom and chili flakes. Saute for a few minutes, until the onion is soft and the kitchen has a lovely scent from all the spices. You can add a splash of water if they start to get burned.  Add carrots and lentils and let cook for two more minutes, then add water and salt and give it a good stir. Decrease the heat when it starts to boil, put the lid on and let simmer for 15-20 minutes (depending on the lentils). Stir occasionally to make sure the lentils aren’t getting burned. Add more water if needed. Remove from the heat when the lentils almost have dissolved, add tomatoes and spinach. Taste and add more salt or spices if needed. Place each sweet potato on a plate. Make a cut at the top and squeeze the ends together to open. Add a couple of spoonfuls lentil stew in the potato (you can carve out some flesh if you prefer more filling but we just fill it with as much as we can fit, messy is good). Top with yogurt, pumpkin seeds, pomegranate seeds, fresh cilantro and some black pepper. Serve while hot.

July 2015 Produce Picks: 5 Fruits and Vegetables to Use Now

July 10 2015 VegKitchen 

July 2015 Produce Picks: 5 Fruits and Vegetables to Use NowApricots – with all the melons and berries bursting onto the markets, dont forget about the stone fruits, especially apricots. These diminutive, smooth fruits often get overlooked, and theres more to do with them aside from eating out of hand or using in fruit salads, in both sweet and savory preparations. Here are a few: - Zucchini, Apricot, & Almond Salad - Lavender-Nut Chevre-Stuffed Apricots - Israeli Couscous Summer Pilaf Cherries – July brings out the best in these beloved sweet fruits. The best way to enjoy cherries is to just eat them out of hand, but there are other ways to use them other than putting them out in a bowl, though admittedly, pitting them can be a bit of a pain. Try some of these recipes; a few call for frozen cherries but of course, you can substitute fresh: - Cherry-Pomegranate Refrigerator Jam - Cherry-Basil Crumble Bars - Chocolate Cherry Bomb Smoothie - Kale Salad with Cherries and Lime Dressing Green beans – the season for fresh tender green beans is unfairly short; whereas these days you can get decent asparagus and greens all year round, it seems like midsummer is still the true season for perfect green beans that arent stringy and gnarly. Take full advantage! Youll find lots of ideas in our Green Beans category. Beets – Though available year round, midsummer is the time to get bigger bunches at great prices. Beets are a favorite among VegKitchen visitors, as several of our beet features are among our most popular. Beets can be a bit perplexing to prepare, so you may find How to Cook Beets (or use them raw) useful. Make sure to look for summer varieties like golden and chiogga beets. Youll find lots of great ways to use them in our Beets category. And if youd like a more curated set of our favorites, here are 5 Delicious Recipes for Using Beets. Eggplant – Eggplant lovers rejoice in midsummer, as this versatile veggie becomes widely available in all shapes and sizes, including your standard dark purple variety, plus white, striped, and the slender Japanese type. Youll find lots of tasty ways to use it in Eggplant: An Extravaganza of Recipes. For a curated set of ideas, see 6 Satisfying Eggplant Recipes.

Warm Summer Fruit Salad + Video

June 14 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Warm Summer Fruit Salad + Video If my 15 year younger self would see me know. I am sitting here writing a text that praises a warm fruit salad. Young David would have told me  that I was an idiot: “Why heat fruit when you can have it cold?!” You see, young David wasn’t very fond of warm fruit. At all.  Back then, I could binge eat bowls of fresh fruit, but cook or bake it and I wouldn’t touch it. Even apple pie, the one dish that every normal person loves, made my stomach turn upside down. I sometimes allowed myself to eat the part of the crust that hadn’t been touched by the fruit, but my tongue cringed from the bare thought of warm apple in my mouth. And now I’m all of a sudden ridiculously excited about this fruit salad that has taken a quick tour through a hot oven. What happened? I would love to say that this recipe was the game changer. But truth be told, I think I just slowly learned to appreciate warm fruit, recipe by recipe. Apart from the fact that I used to hate warm fruit and now swear by this dessert. Apart from the fact that this recipe is dead-simple and can be prepared in no-time. And apart from the fact that it includes some of the best bounty of the season and you will get all these summer-bonanza-feelings just by preparing it. Yes, apart from all that, this fruit salad is also covered in grated dark chocolate (that melts!), coconut flakes and salted almonds (that pairs oh so well with dark chocolate). Young David might not approve, but old David thinks this is pretty darn good and would like you all to give it a try. If you are still not  convinced, we created this video for our youtube channel as a final selling point:  The original Swedish version of this dessert is called Gino. It’s baked strawberries, kiwis and bananas with white chocolate on top. Our version is quite different, but t he choice of fruit and measurements are really just suggestions here, add or subtract fruit to your liking. Peaches or pineapple would also be good baked. Or raspberries. We have used fruit in season, but baking fruit is also a great way to increase the flavours during the winter season. Luise and I haven’t entirely agreed on the baking time. Personally I think the fruit only should be heated quickly, so it’s still quite firm. Just 5-6 minutes or enough time for the chocolate to melt. Luise however prefers the fruit to be more baked and a bit softer so the juices and flavours come together more. That’s about 10-12 minutes. But we’ll leave that decision to you (in the photos and video it’s baked after Luise’s preference). Warm Summer Fruit Salad with Dark Chocolate & Salted Almonds Serves 4 1 cup almonds + 1 tbsp boiled water mixed with 1 tsp salt (or store-bought salted almonds) 3 kiwi fruits 3 apricots 2 bananas, peel 10 strawberries 10 cherries, pitted 2 plums, remove stones 1 lime, juice 1 oz /­­ 30 g dark chocolate (70% or darker) 1/­­3 cup dried unsweetened coconut flakes Preheat the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F. Prepare the almonds by placing them in a mixing bowl, pour the hot salted water over the almonds and combine until all almonds are covered. Place the almonds in a baking tray and roast in the oven for 10-15 minutes or until slightly golden and crunchy. Set aside. Prepare the fruit by cutting them into bitesize pieces. Place the fruit in a baking dish and add the lime juice, toss to mix. Chop the almonds and sprinkle over the fruit salad. Grate the chocolate until it covers the fruit. Sprinkle with coconut flakes and place the dish in the oven. Bake for 5-10 minutes, until the chocolate has melted and the fruit is warm and juicy (not mushy). Serve in bowls with a dollop thick plain yogurt or ice cream.

How to Pick, Prep, and Cook with Apricots

June 9 2015 Vegetarian Times 

How to Pick, Prep, and Cook with Apricots A member of the stone fruit family thanks to its stone-?like pit, the sweet-tart apricot is so much more than ?a peach wannabe. Pick Harbingers of summer, apricots are often available at markets before other stone fruits. For superior flavor and aroma, look for the Blenheim variety, says Bruce Steele of Winfield Farm in Buellton, Calif. He suggests selecting apricots that are slightly yielding to the touch (but not mushy). Place unripe apricots in a paper bag at room temperature for one to two days. The delicate fruit will continue to ripen quicker than other stone fruits, so enjoy apricots promptly, or store in the refrigerator for up to three days; to prevent bruising, try not to stack them. Prep Remove pits by running a paring knife around the fruit following its natural seam, then gently twist the halves apart, and pop out the kernel. ?If not using right away, brush the cut sides with lemon juice to prevent the flesh from discoloring. Apricots can be enjoyed raw, while grilling, baking, or simmering intensifies their natural sweetness. Steele suggests using these fruits for jellies or preserves due to their fleeting season and short shelf life. If a recipe calls for peeling apricots, slice an X in the skin, then submerge the fruit in boiling water for 30 seconds, and remove with a slotted spoon. Once cooled, the skin will peel off effortlessly. Try This 1. For a spicy-sweet riff on gazpacho, blend together apricots, cucumber, scallions, mint, jalape?o, olive oil, red wine vinegar, and a pinch of salt; add water as needed, and serve garnished with diced avocado. 2. Toss together a salad of sliced apricots, chickpeas, arugula, mint, sliced red onion, chopped almonds, and feta cheese; serve with an orange-ginger vinaigrette. 3. Blend together apricots, ricotta cheese, lemon juice, and vanilla extract; pour into ice pop molds, and freeze. 4. Chop apricots and combine with berries and apricot preserves for a sweet take on salsa (pictured).  Whats your favorite way to use apricots? Share in the comments below!

How to Pick, Prep, and Cook with Okra

May 20 2015 Vegetarian Times 

How to Pick, Prep, and Cook with Okra Okras popularity extends throughout the Mediterranean, Southeast Asia, and the Southern United States. When cut, the ridged okra pod oozes a sticky substance that thickens stews, such as Creole gumbo or Middle Eastern bamya. Pick  Look for okra that is bright green in color without blemishes or dark spots. Check that pods are pliable, but firm. The smaller the okra, the more tender, so choose pods 3 to 4 inches in length, advises Erin Bullock of Mud Creek Farm in Victor, N.Y. Okras shelf life is short; youll want to cook it within a day or two of purchase. Refrigerate okra in a ventilated bag to prevent exposure to dry air and moisture, and wait until preparing to wash pods. Prep Using a chefs or paring knife, slice off the stem of the okra, and prepare the pod whole, or else cut it into slivers or thin rounds. Cooking okra whole, pan searing it at high heat, stewing, or braising ?will reduce its stickiness before eating. Try This 1. ?Stew okra in a tagine of eggplant, tomatoes, bell peppers, black olives, and dried apricots with preserved lemon, cinnamon, and cumin; serve over couscous. 2. ?Marinate okra in basil pesto with red bell peppers, zucchini, red onion rings, and eggplant. Grill the vegetables, and serve with balsamic reduction. 3. ?Braise okra in coconut milk, Thai chile paste, and kaffir lime leaves; garnish with fresh basil.  What’s your favorite way to use okra? Share in the comments below!


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