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Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 2

November 2 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 2 Here comes Part 2 of our Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, complete with cozy dinner and dessert recipes for the week. There are stellar homemade veggie burgers, a nourishing stew, and beautifully simple roasted plums for dessert. To see the breakfast and lunch recipes, as well as the grocery shopping list for the entire meal plan, head to Part 1. We hope you’ll find this entire thing useful, and we’d love to hear any feedback you have, as always :) Menu (see Part 1 for breakfast and lunch recipes) Breakfast Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins Lunch Grain Bowl with Marinated Delicata Squash, Coconut Kale, and Lentil Hummus Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup Dinner Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers w/­­ Any Fixings of Choice Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew Dessert Rosemary-Roasted Plums with a Cardamom Sprinkle *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free and will make enough for a week, for 2-3 people Day by Day Prep List Monday Night: Make the Veggie Burgers to have for dinner on Monday, Tuesday, and possibly Wednesday nights. This will be fairly quick, since you’ve already cooked the squash, rice, kale and lentils that are called for in the recipe during prep day. Roast the plums for dessert on Monday or Tuesday night, it’s quick and you will have enough for dessert for the rest of the week. - Make the Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers. - Make the Rosemary-Roasted Plums with Cardamom Sprinkle. Wednesday/­­Thursday night: Once you’ve finished eating the Veggie Burgers, prepare the Brussels Sprouts Stew for dinner starting Wednesday or Thursday night and until the end of the week.  - Make the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew.   Recipes 1. These veggie burgers utilize the lentils, brown rice, squash, and kale that you already cooked during prep day. They are nourishing, satisfying, and cooked in the oven, which means that you won’t have to spend any time frying them on the pan. The flavors are earthy and warming, and the burgers develop really nice, crispy edges as they bake. Enjoy them for dinner with any fixings of choice, on burger buns, inside lettuce wraps, or even alongside a green salad. Make sure to try them with the Lentil and Squash Hummus from Part 1 as well. Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers   Print Serves: 9 veggie burgers Ingredients 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped ½ teaspoon red pepper flakes about 2 tablespoons chopped sage, rosemary and thyme (optional) 4 garlic cloves - minced blanched kale (from part 1) - chopped roughly sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1 cup toasted pumpkin seeds 1½ cups cooked brown rice (from part 1) 1½ cups cooked lentils (from part 1) remaining ½ cup roasted butternut squash (from part 1) 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar or apple cider vinegar Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Warm the coconut oil in a medium pan over medium heat. Add the onion, red pepper flakes and herbs, if using, and sauté for 7 minutes, until the onions are translucent. Add the garlic and cook for another minute, then add the kale, salt and pepper, and stir around for another minute. Add the tomato paste and toss to mix well. Remove the pan from heat. Transfer the pumpkin seeds to a food processor and pulse into small pieces. Add the rice, lentils, squash, vinegar, and the sautéed onion and kale mixture to the food processor. Pulse until well-mixed and combined into a chunky mixture. Taste for salt, add more if needed. Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Use a ½ cup measurement to form burger patties and finish shaping each patty with your hands. Arrange the patties on the prepared baking sheet. Bake for 25-35 minutes, until the burgers look nicely toasted. Serve on burger buns, lettuce wraps, or alongside salad with any burger fixings of choice. Store in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. These burgers also freeze very well. 3.5.3226   2. A pot of good stew is such a great solution to the weekday dinner problem, especially during the colder months. It doesn’t take too long to make and lasts a while in the fridge, only getting better with time. This one is made with so many star ingredients of warming fall fare: mushrooms, carrots, garlic and onion, as well as jarred tomatoes, brussels sprouts and lentils. There’s smoked paprika, too, which ensures a bit of piquancy and depth of flavor. Serve this stew with crusty sourdough bread or over any brown rice, left over from the veggie burgers. Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew   Print Ingredients 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 teaspoon whole cumin seeds 1 large yellow onion - chopped sea salt 1 lb crimini mushrooms - sliced freshly ground black pepper 6 garlic cloves - sliced 1 jalape?o - seeded and chopped 2 medium carrots - sliced 1 lb Brussels sprouts - trimmed and halved (quartered for larger ones) 1 teaspoon smoked paprika kale cooking water from part 1, veggie broth or purified water 2-3 bay leaves (optional) remaining cooked lentils from part 1 - about 1½ cups 28 oz box or can crushed tomatoes 4 cups baby spinach Instructions Warm the coconut oil in a medium saucepan. Add the cumin and sauté for about 1 minute, until fragrant. Add the onion and salt and sauté for 5 minutes, until translucent. Add the mushrooms and black pepper and cook for about 8 minutes, until all the liquid thats released by the mushrooms evaporates. Add the garlic, jalapeno, carrots, Brussels sprouts and paprika, and stir to coat for about 2 minutes. Add enough of the reserved kale cooking liquid (from part 1), veggie broth, or purified water to achieve a thick stew consistency (keep in mind that youll also be adding crushed tomatoes). Add the bay leaves at this point too, if using. Bring to a simmer. Cook, partially covered, for 10 minutes. Add the cooked lentils and crushed tomatoes, bring everything back to a simmer and cook for another 10 minutes. Discard the bay leaves, if using. Add the spinach at the end, and stir it in until wilted. Taste for salt and pepper, adjust if needed. Serve over rice or with crusty sourdough bread. 3.5.3226   3. Roasting up a sizable batch of fruit is a great way to ensure that you’ll have beautiful, healthy dessert for the week. Add a little dollop of ice cream or yogurt (have you tried this coconut one?!), and you’re in business. These plums are roasted with coconut sugar, which brings out their sweetness, and rosemary, which contributes its piney, earthy notes. Besides ice cream/­­yogurt, I love serving the plums with a sprinkling of toasted pumpkin seeds, cardamom and cacao nibs. Another idea: try topping the millet porridge from Part 1 with some of the roasted plums for one of your breakfasts. If you can’t find plums, try a similar roasting technique with apples or pears (and include cinnamon in your sprinkle). Rosemary-Roasted Plums with a Cardamom Sprinkle   Print Ingredients 8 ripe plums - sliced in half and pitted 2 tablespoons coconut sugar 2 tablespoons chopped rosemary ¼ cup toasted pumpkin seeds - roughly chopped 2-3 cardamom pods - shells discarded, ground in a mortar and pestle 1 tablespoon cacao nibs (optional) vanilla ice cream or plain yogurt - for serving Instructions Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Place the plums on the baking sheet, cut side up. Generously sprinkle each plum with the coconut sugar and rosemary. Put in the oven and roast for 20-30 minutes, until soft throughout. Meanwhile, combine the pumpkin seeds, cardamom and cacao nibs in a small bowl. Serve the plums with ice cream/­­yogurt, sprinkled with the pumpkin seed cardamom mixture. 3.5.3226   < < .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 2 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 1

November 1 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 1 This summer, we set out to share one practical, budget-friendly, and non-boring plant-based meal plan per season. Here is our meal plan for the Fall of 2017! We are really excited about the recipes in this one. It all starts out with cooking a pot of lentils and a pot of rice, roasting some winter squash, and prepping some kale. Those foundations then make their way into breakfast, lunch and dinner recipes that will take you through a whole week of nourishing and cozy fall meals. As usual, we are splitting this meal plan into two parts. This first part will focus on weekend prep, as well as breakfast and lunch recipes. Part 2 is here, and it’s all about dinner and dessert recipes. Here we go! Menu (see Part 2 for dinner and dessert recipes) Breakfast Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins Lunch Grain Bowl with Marinated Delicata Squash, Coconut Kale, and Lentil Hummus Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup Dinner Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers w/­­ Any Fixings of Choice Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew Dessert Rosemary-Roasted Plums with a Cardamom Sprinkle *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free and will make enough for a week, for 2-3 people Shopping List (print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, its got all the ingredients youll need for the recipes in this meal plan. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Produce Vegetables - 1 large and 1 medium butternut squashes - 2 medium delicata squashes - 1 lb Brussels sprouts - 2 bunches kale (or 1 very large bunch) - 4 cups baby spinach - 1 jalape?o pepper - 1 lb crimini mushrooms - 2 medium carrots - 3 large yellow onions - 2 heads of garlic Fruits - 2-3 green apples - 1 lemon - 1-2 limes (if using in place of brown rice vinegar for the marinated delicata) - 8 ripe plums Herbs  - rosemary - sage - green onions (optional) - thyme (optional) Other - 3 cups almond milk or other plant milk of choice - 1 13.5 oz can unsweetened Thai coconut milk - 1 28 oz can or box crushed tomatoes - 1 cup brown rice flour or other gluten free flour - sesame tahini - white sweet miso - burger fixings like buns, lettuce, or anything else you like w/­­ your veggie burgers - vanilla ice cream or plain yogurt to serve with the roasted plums (optional) - crackers to snack on with the hummus or sourdough bread to eat with the hummus, soup or stew (optional) Bulk - 2 1/­­4 cups dried green lentils - 3/­­4 cup millet - 1 1/­­2 cups brown rice (2 cups if using rice for the grain bowl) - 1 cup other grain of choice for the grain bowl, or 1/­­2 more cup of brown rice - 5-7 Medjool dates - 2 cups pumpkin seeds – toasted - unsweetened coconut flakes (optional) - cacao nibs (optional) Pantry /­­ Refrigerator Staples - neutral coconut oil - apple cider vinegar - brown rice vinegar (if not using limes for delicata marinade) - balsamic vinegar (optional) - tamari - olive oil - toasted sesame oil - tomato paste - coconut sugar - sea salt - maple syrup or honey - sriracha/­­chili sauce of choice - baking soda - baking powder Spices - whole cumin seeds - whole coriander seeds - green cardamom pods - smoked paprika - black peppercorns - turmeric - red pepper flakes - bay leaves (optional) Day by Day Prep List Saturday Night (Night Before Main Prep Day): These are just quick tasks that need to be done the day before your main prep day. Soaking grains and lentils helps rid them of phytic acid, which makes them easier to digest. It also kickstarts the germination process, making the grains and lentils more nutritious. - Soak 3/­­4 cup of dried millet overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. - Soak 2 1/­­4 cups of lentils overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. - Soak 1 1/­­2 cups of brown rice (2 cups if you are using it for the grain bowl) overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. - If not using brown rice for the grain bowl, soak 1 cup of another grain of choice for the grain bowl in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. Sunday (Main Prep Day): This is your main prep day, which you can also split into multiple days, depending on your schedule. You will find all the recipes for this prep day in this post, which includes two breakfast options and two lunch options for the whole week, as well as some simple prep for the dinners for the coming week. - Roast the butternut and delicata squashes to be used in Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash, Apple and Squash Muffins, Lentil and Squash Hummus, Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup, Veggie Burgers, and Grain Bowl. - Cook the lentils to be used in the Lentil and Squash Hummus, Veggie Burgers, and the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew. - Cook the brown rice to use in the Veggie Burgers and the Grain Bowl, if that’s your grain of choice for the bowl. - If you chose another grain for the grain bowl, cook it now as well. - Cook the kale and coconut kale to be used in the Grain Bowl and Veggie Burgers. - Make the Lentil and Squash Hummus to be used in the Grain Bowl, on the Veggie Burgers, and on crackers/­­bread as a snack throughout the week. - Marinate the roasted delicata squash to use in the Grain Bowl. - Make the Simple Butternut Squash and Apple Soup. - Bake the Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins. - You can also cook the Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash for your breakfasts ahead of time, but I suggest making it in the morning. It’s pretty quick. Monday Night: Make the Veggie Burgers to have for dinner on Monday, Tuesday, and possibly Wednesday nights. This will be fairly quick, since you’ve already cooked the squash, rice, kale and lentils that are called for in the recipe during prep day. Roast the plums for dessert on Monday or Tuesday night, it’s quick and you will have enough for dessert for the rest of the week. The recipes for the Veggie Burgers, Brussels Sprout Stew and the Roasted Plums are in Part 2.  - Make the Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers. - Make the Rosemary-Roasted Plums with Cardamom Sprinkle. Wednesday/­­Thursday night: Once you’ve finished eating the Veggie Burgers, prepare the Brussels Sprouts Stew for dinner starting Wednesday or Thursday night and until the end of the week. The recipe for the stew is in Part 2.  - Make the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew.   Prep 1. Winter squash is a beautifully versatile vegetable that can be used in millions of ways in both sweet and savory dishes. It’s always a great idea to roast a bunch of squash on the weekend, to use in all kinds of dishes throughout the week. In this meal plan, we use Butternut and Delicata Squashes in the Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash, Apple and Squash Muffins, Lentil and Squash Hummus, Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup, Veggie Burgers, and Grain Bowl. See what I mean? It really is a super-vegetable. Roasted Butternut and Delicata Squashes   Print Ingredients 1 large and 1 medium butternut squash - cut in half lengthwise and seeded 2 medium delicata squashes - seeded and sliced into ½-inch rings neutral coconut oil - soft sea salt freshly ground black pepper Instructions Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare 2-3 parchment paper-lined baking sheets. Arrange all the squashes on the baking sheets in a single layer. Oil them with the coconut oil and sprinkle with salt and paper. Roast the delicata squash for 10 minutes, then flip all the rings and roast for another 15-20 minutes, until cooked through and golden on both sides. Delicata squash skins are edible, so no need to peel off the skin. Roast the butternut squashes at the same time, for about 40 minutes or until soft throughout. You should end up with about 3 cups of roasted mashed squash flesh from the large butternut squash, which you will use for the hummus, muffins, porridge and burgers. The remaining 1 medium butternut squash will be used for the Simple Squash and Apple Soup. 3.5.3226   2. A pot of lentils, cooked on the weekend, can easily take you through a week of meals. They are nourishing, affordable, and can work as a base for so many meals. In this meal plan, we use French lentils in the Lentil and Squash Hummus, Veggie Burgers, and the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew. Pot of Lentils   Print Ingredients 2¼ cups dried French lentils - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the lentils. Place them into a medium-large pot, cover with purified water, and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook for about 15-20 minutes, or until soft, but still intact. Add salt at the last 5 minutes. Drain and use in recipes right away or store in an airtight container for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   3. Similarly to lentils, a pot of rice or any other grains, prepared on the weekend, can help you pave the way to quicker and better meals throughout the week. In this meal plan, we use brown rice in the Veggie Burgers and the Grain Bowl (if that’s the grain you chose for your bowl). Serve any leftover rice with the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew. If you chose a different grain for your grain bowl, cook it now as well. Pot of Brown Rice   Print Ingredients 1½ cups brown rice (2 cups if using rice for your grain bowl) - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar 2½ cups filtered water (3½ cups if cooking 2 cups of rice) sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the rice. Combine it with the water and plenty of sea salt in a medium pot, cover with a lid and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 25-40 minutes, until all the water is absorbed and the rice is cooked. Use in recipes right away or store refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   4. Blanching kale is one of my favorite, low maintenance ways of prepping a whole bunch of it for the week. In this meal plan, it will be used for the Coconut Kale and the Veggie Burgers. I also like to use the leftover kale cooking water for soups, stews, etc. In this meal plan, you can use the leftover kale broth for the Coconut Kale, the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew and even the Simple Squash and Apple Soup. Half of this blanched kale gets stored away for later use in the Veggie Burgers, while the other half becomes the Coconut Kale for our grain bowl lunch. You’re going to love the coconut kale – it’s velvety, creamy, and keeps well throughout the week. Blanched Kale and Coconut Kale   Print Ingredients 2 bunches (or 1 very large bunch) kale of choice sea salt 1 can unsweetened Thai coconut milk Instructions Separate the kale leaves from the stems. Wash and tear the leaves into roughly bite-sized pieces. Reserve the stems to use in homemade vegetable broth in the future, if desired. Place the torn kale leaves in a large pot and cover with purified water. Add salt and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes. Drain the kale, reserving the cooking liquid for the Coconut Kale and the Brussels Sprouts Tomato Stew. Return half of the kale to the same pot. Squeeze the other half of the kale dry and store it away in an air-tight container, in the refrigerator, to use later in the veggie burgers. Add ½ cup of the reserved kale cooking liquid and 1 can of coconut milk to the pot. Bring to a strong simmer and cook for 10-20 minutes, until creamy. Add more of the kale cooking liquid throughout the cooking time, if needed. Taste for salt and adjust, if needed. Eat right away or store refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   5. The good news is, you already have all the important ingredients prepared for this hummus – you’ve cooked the lentils and roasted the squash, which you’re going to puree with autumn herbs, garlic, tahini, lemon juice, and olive oil. Though for efficiency’s sake, we use lentils instead of the traditional chickpeas here, the spread still very much tastes like hummus. And not just any hummus – it’s fresh, savory, earthy hummus that’s better than anything you can get at the store. Use it throughout the week in the Grain Bowl, on top of the Veggie Burgers, or as a quick snack with some crackers. Lentil and Squash Hummus   Print Ingredients ¼ cup plus 2 tablespoons olive oil - divided 4-5 cloves of garlic - peeled and sliced 1-2 tablespoons chopped herbs, such as rosemary, sage and thyme 1 cup roasted mashed butternut squash (from the large butternut squash from above) sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1½ cups cooked green lentils (from above) juice from 1 lemon ¼ cup sesame tahini 3-4 tablespoons cold water toasted pumpkin seeds - for garnish (optional) Instructions Warm 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a small sauté pan over medium heat. Add garlic and herbs and sauté for about a minute, until garlic is fragrant and cooked, but not burnt. Add the squash, salt and pepper, and toss to coat. Stir around for a minute or so for the flavors to mix. Add the mixture to a food processor or a high-speed blender like a Vitamix. Add the lentils to the food processor/­­blender, followed by the lemon juice, sesame tahini, and more salt, to taste. Process until smooth, scraping the walls if needed. With the motor still running, pour in ¼ cup of the olive oil through the funnel, followed by the cold water. Pour in the water 1 tablespoon at a time until you achieve a desired, creamy consistency. Sprinkle the hummus with the toasted pumpkin seeds when serving, if using. Store the hummus in the refrigerator in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   6. Marinating vegetables is one of my favorite preparations, especially if I’m cooking ahead. It’s as easy as mixing up a marinade, and the veggies will only get more flavorful with each passing day. This miso-marinated delicata squash has got it all – it’s a little sweet, a little savory, and a bit spicy. It’s the perfect, powerful component to a memorable grain bowl, which is how it’s utilized in this meal plan. If you are planning on eating this squash at work/­­social settings, you might need to be cautious with the garlic – the squash is still really good without it! Miso-Marinated Delicata Squash   Print Ingredients 2 sliced and roasted delicata squashes (from above) 2 tablespoons white sweet miso paste 1 tablespoon maple syrup or honey (not vegan) 2 teaspoons chili sauce, such as sriracha 4 tablespoons brown rice vinegar or lime juice 1 tablespoon tamari 2 teaspoons sesame oil 1 garlic clove - minced (optional) 1 tablespoon finely chopped green onion (optional) Instructions Place the sliced and roasted delicata squash in a shallow dish. In a small bowl, combine the miso with the maple syrup and sriracha, and mix until smooth. Add the rice vinegar/­­lime juice, tamari, and sesame oil, and mix until smooth. Mix in the sesame seeds, garlic and green onion, if using. Pour the marinade over the delicata squash and toss to coat. Cover and let marinate at room temperature for 1-3 hours. Keep refrigerated for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   Recipes 1. These gluten-free muffins make for a great breakfast or snack. They are very subtly sweet – sweetened only with dates – and get their soft, crumbly texture from the roasted squash that’s hiding in the batter. There are pockets of cubed apple throughout, and the pumpkin seeds on top add a nice bit of crunch. Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins   Print Serves: 10 medium-sized or 12 small muffins Ingredients 1½ tablespoons neutral coconut oil, plus more for oiling the pan ¾ cup brown rice flour or other gluten-free flour pinch of sea salt 1 teaspoon baking powder ½ teaspoon baking soda 5-7 soft Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in 1 cup of hot water for 10 minutes ½ cup roasted mashed butternut squash (from the large butternut squash from above) 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar 1-2 Granny Smith apples - peeled and finely cubed (optionally slice some of the apple to decorate the tops of muffins) 2 tablespoons chopped sage leaves (optional) pumpkin seeds - for sprinkling Instructions Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Prepare a muffin pan by thoroughly oiling the holes or lining it with paper muffin liners. Combine the flour, salt, baking powder and baking soda in a medium bowl. Put the dates in an upright blender, together with their soaking water. Add the squash and blend until smooth. Add the coconut oil and vinegar and pulse to combine. Pour the wet mixture into the bowl with the dry ingredients and quickly stir to mix. Fold in cubed apples and sage, if using. Fill the muffin holes with the batter until each hole is about ⅔ full. Sprinkle each muffin with pumpkin seeds and decorate with apple slices, if using. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until a toothpick comes out clean. Let cool a little, then remove the muffins from the pan and let them cool on a cooling rack. Enjoy right away or store in an air-tight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   2. This millet porridge is warming, cozy, satisfying, and overall perfect for chilly fall mornings. Millet is a humble and affordable gluten-free grain, but it has the potential to be quite creamy and luxurious when cooked in plant milk with turmeric and squash. The porridge is pictured here topped with some of the roasted plums from Part 2 of this meal plan, which makes it even more special. Turmeric Millet Porridge   Print Ingredients 2 tablespoons coconut oil or ghee (not vegan) 1 teaspoon turmeric a few grinds of black pepper (to activate the turmeric) ¾ cup millet - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar 1½ tablespoons coconut sugar pinch of sea salt 4 cups almond milk or other plant milk (or 3 cups milk and 1 cup water) - divided 1 cup roasted butternut squash (from the large butternut squash from above) toasted pumpkin seeds and coconut flakes - for serving (optional) Instructions Warm the oil/­­ghee in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the turmeric and black pepper, and stir around for about a minute. Add the millet, coconut sugar, salt and 3 cups of plant milk (or 2 cups of milk and 1 cup of water). Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 20 minutes. Stir periodically to prevent the porridge from sticking to the bottom. In the meantime, blend the squash and the remaining 1 cup of plant milk in a high-speed blender. Mix the blended mixture into the porridge after the 20 minutes of cooking and stir to combine. Simmer everything for another couple of minutes. (Alternatively, skip blending the squash and the remaining plant milk in a blender and add both the squash and the rest of the milk to the porridge, stirring to warm everything through. This will result in a less smooth porridge with some pockets of squash, which I like as a nice change from a smooth porridge). Serve the porridge topped with toasted pumpkin seeds and coconut flakes, if desired. Store in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. Reheat gently over medium low heat with more ghee/­­coconut oil and a splash of plant milk or water. 3.5.3226   3. This grain bowl will come together very quickly during a weekday lunch, since you’ve already gotten all the components ready during prep day. As an alternative to the bowl, you can spread the hummus on some sourdough bread and top that with the squash for an open-faced sandwich, with the coconut kale on the side. Marinated Delicata Squash, Coconut Kale, and Lentil Hummus Grain Bowl   Print Ingredients cooked brown rice or another grain of choice (from above) coconut kale (from above) miso-marinated delicata squash (from above) lentil and squash hummus (from above) toasted pumpkin seeds Instructions Heat up the rice and coconut kale in a pan or saucepan with a bit of oil or water. You can also gently heat the miso-marinated squash, but be careful not to heat it too much because of the miso. Serve all the components together in a bowl, sprinkled with toasted pumpkin seeds. 3.5.3226   4. Our second lunch option is a very lovely and very simple pureed fall soup, with flavors of butternut squash, green apple, and autumn herbs. Simple Butternut Squash and Apple Soup   Print Ingredients 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped 1 green apple - peeled, cored and chopped 2 garlic cloves - sliced 1 teaspoon coriander seeds - preferably freshly ground about 1 tablespoon chopped sage and rosemary sea salt freshly ground black pepper flesh from 1 medium roasted butternut squash (from above) Instructions Warm the oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion, apple, garlic, coriander and herbs, if using, and sauté everything for 10 minutes. Scoop the flesh out of the roasted squash and add it to the saucepan, followed by the sea salt, pepper and 3 cups of purified water. Bring to a boil and simmer for 10 minutes, until all the flavors are combined well. Carefully blend everything in an upright blender until smooth. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve right away or store in an airtight container for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226 Continue to Dinner and Dessert Recipes > > >  You might also like... Moroccan Stew and Sunshine Crackers from The First Mess + a Giveaway Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies Squash Noodle Soup with Healing Turmeric-Ginger Broth, Roasted Carrots... Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 2 .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 1 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut + Giveaway

September 27 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut + GiveawayThis post was created in partnership with Raw Rutes, fermenting crock giveaway below. I grew up with home-pickling and fermenting as the norm. Food in the Soviet Union was not only scarce, but also highly seasonal, so if you didn’t take care to preserve some tomatoes or cucumbers for the winter, you wouldn’t be able to taste any until the next summer. My mom made sure to stock our cool basement with jars of pickles, tomatoes, and fruit preserves every summer, as did pretty much every woman around. Other common fermentation projects included kombucha (or the ‘tea mushroom’ as we call it) way before it was cool, kefir, and of course sauerkraut. I can’t say that I’ve continued all these traditions. I do make my own kombucha, but I can’t motivate myself to do a big batch of pickles, and you can buy such good ones in the store anyways. Same goes for tomatoes, especially since California grown ones are available all year round, and will do if a big craving hits. Sauerkraut is a different story though, because it takes very little work, and the return is so good. I’ve fermented sauerkraut in jars and in big pots, inventing weighted contraptions out of any appropriately-sized object I could find, but what I’ve always dreamed about is a nice, clay fermenting crock with custom weights that fit inside perfectly. The two things that have stopped me from getting a proper fermenting crock were the hefty price tag and the considerable size that they usually come in, which is not very countertop-friendly. I was incredibly excited when Raw Rutes reached out about their Yaozu 2 Liter Fermenting Crock, because it addressed those two points perfectly. It’s petite and sits on my countertops very compactly, yet it can still fit two small-medium heads of shredded cabbage. It’s also quite a bit more affordable than traditional crocks. I love that it’s a clean white too, because they are often brown – not my favorite color, at least for my kitchen. If you’re not familiar with fermenting crocks, the main thing to know is that they make the whole fermenting process really easy and safe. All you have to do is shred whatever vegetables/­­fruits you want to ferment, salt them with either salt or salty brine until they are covered with water, weigh them down, and leave them be for a few weeks while they magically transform. The natural clay that the Yaozu crock is made with makes the environment clean and safe, and the water channel up top takes away the need for an airlock. The crock comes with clay weights, which fit inside perfectly, and ensure that all your veggies are submerged in the brine, which prevents any mold from developing. It’s truly a magical pot. For my first fermenting project, I wanted to do a sauerkraut that was a bit more colorful and exciting than the traditional kind. I used purple cabbage together with blueberries and apple, with a bit of coriander seeds for extra interest in flavor. It took about a week and a half, and came out really delicious. The predominant flavor is of sauerkraut, but there are juicy, sweet and salty bursts from the blueberries, as well as a bit of crunch and sourness from the apple. I can’t wait to experiment more. I even know my next project – the fruit kimchi from Sandor Ellix Katz’ book, The Art of Fermentation. Making your own kraut/­­any fermented vegetables is a really addicting activity. Once you try your first batch, you won’t be able to stop, which is great, since fermented foods are so nourishing. Probiotics are on the tip of everyone’s tongue nowadays – we’ve all heard that having a balanced microbiome is key for good health. Completing little fermenting projects at home and enjoying the results daily is the perfect, incredibly affordable way to contribute to that gut health of yours :) Giveaway: Raw Rutes, the charming online shop full of back-to-basics kitchen tools, is giving away their Yaozu 2 Liter Fermenting Crock to one Golubka Kitchen reader. To enter to win, leave a comment here with your favorite item from the Raw Rutes offering or favorite fermented food until October 11th, 2017 (USA only). Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut   Print Serves: about 2 large jars Ingredients 2 small-medium heads of red cabbage 2-3 tablespoons sea salt 2 green apples - peeled and sliced into 1-inch sticks 12 oz blueberries 2 teaspoons coriander seeds (optional) Instructions Rinse your cabbages and remove the outer leaves. Save a few of the leaves and set them aside. Cut the cabbages in half and cut out the core. Cut each cabbage half into quarters and shred on a mandolin slicer or with a sharp knife. Put the shredded cabbage in a large bowl and mix in the salt, then massage it well until the cabbage starts to release juices. Let the cabbage sit in the bowl for about 30 minutes to release more juices. Mix in the apple slices, blueberries, and coriander with your hands. Pack everything tightly into your fermenting crock using your fist. Cover the surface with the reserved cabbage leaves - this will make sure that nothing will float to the top. Place the ceramic weights on top. At this time, all the contents of the crock, including the ceramic weights, should be completely submerged in juices. If thats not happening, let everything sit for a few more hours and see if the cabbage releases more juices to submerge. If there is still not enough liquid after a few hours, make brine with 1 cup filtered water and 1 teaspoon sea salt. Pour the brine into the crock, until the weights are just covered with the liquid. Its important to have everything submerged in liquid at all times to prevent any mold from forming. Pour brine or filtered water into the water channel and cover the crock with its lid. Let everything ferment for 1-2 weeks, tasting periodically, until the flavor is sour to your liking. Refill the water in the water channel as it evaporates. After a few days of fermenting, the brine should be nice and bubbly. If you have a cool basement, you can also start out the fermentation in a warmer room for the first week, and then move the crock to the basement to finish off the process (the basement should not be too cold!). Once your sauerkraut is done, pack it into clean glass jars, covered with brine, and keep it refrigerated. Save some of leftover brine to use as a starter in your next fermentation project, which will kick-start the process much quicker. You can also take little shots of the brine for a nice probiotic, booster. Have fun! 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Chocolate Brownie and Cherry Ice Cream Sandwiches

August 23 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Chocolate Brownie and Cherry Ice Cream Sandwiches We’re trying to get all of this summer’s most successful ice cream recipes out while it’s still prime time for frozen treats :) This one is our absolute dream-come-true ice cream sandwich with a no-bake chocolate brownie crust and a vanilla and cherry ice cream interior. Give us cherries and chocolate any time, and we’re in heaven. The chocolate brownie crust is no joke here – it’s rich, soft and so fudgy, very much like the real deal. All of that is achieved with a magical combination of coconut flour, tahini and cacao, sweetened with dates and banana. It’s a totally oven-free affair, too, which is always a bonus. The interior of the sandwich is store-bought, dairy-free vanilla ice cream (this one is my favorite), studded with fresh cherries. There’s a bit of waiting around for the layers to freeze, but otherwise, this sandwich is surprisingly easy and really fun to put together. The recipe makes sixteen sandwiches, and of course they keep well in the freezer. Make these, and you’ll have the tastiest, homemade dessert around your kitchen for a few weeks, possibly. Hope you’ll give this one a try! I will be making my third batch this coming weekend :) Chocolate Brownie and Cherry Ice Cream Sandwiches   Print Serves: 16 sandwiches Ingredients for the brownie 1½ cups tahini or any other nut/­­seed butter, or even a blend of two butters 6 large, soft Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in hot water for 10 minutes 2 ripe but firm bananas - try to choose ones that are not too ripe or overly sweet ½ cup raw cacao powder pinch of sea salt splash of vanilla extract (optional) ¼ cup coconut flour for the ice cream 2 pints dairy-free vanilla ice cream 1½ cups frozen or fresh, pitted cherries (we used frozen ones from Trader Joes, which are really sweet and juicy) Instructions to make the brownie Spoon the tahini into a food processor. Drain the dates, reserving the soaking liquid and add them to the food processor, followed by the bananas. Process until smooth. Add the rest of the brownie ingredients to the food processor and process until well combined. Add 1-2 tablespoons of the date soaking liquid if your processor needs help to get going. Transfer the mixture into a mixing bowl and finish mixing with a spoon, if needed. You should have about 3 cups of the brownie mix total. Cover a 9 x 9, rimmed baking dish with parchment paper, extending the edges of the paper up the sides. Spread half of the brownie mixture over the bottom of the pan in an even layer with wet hands. Carefully lift out this first brownie layer from the pan by the extended edges of the parchment paper and place it onto a cutting board. Transfer the board into the freezer. Re-line the same dish with parchment paper, extending the edges of the paper up the sides. Make the second brownie layer with the remaining mixture. Leave it in the dish and place in the freezer. Let the brownie layers freeze while you are mixing the ice cream. to prepare the ice cream Remove the ice cream from the freezer and let it soften at room temperature, until its just spreadable. Take care not to over-thaw. Scoop the ice cream into a mixing bowl and stir it until evenly smooth and creamy. Fold in the cherries. to assemble the sandwich Check your brownie layers and make sure that they have solidified in the freezer, so that you can spread the ice cream layer over them, without smudging the brownie. Remove the dish with the brownie layer from the freezer and spread the ice cream over the brownie in an even layer. Remove the cutting board with the other brownie layer from the freezer and quickly invert the brownie over the ice cream to make the top layer. Peel off the parchment paper. Lightly press on the brownie to adhere all the layers together. Place the dish back in the freezer until completely frozen, preferably overnight or at least 4 hours. When your sandwich is ready to be cut, take the pan out of the freezer and lift out the sandwich onto a cutting board, using the extended edges of the parchment paper. Run your knife under hot water. Optionally, trim off the uneven edges for a cleaner appearance. Slice the sandwich in half lengthwise and crosswise,into 4 large squares. Proceed to slice each square diagonally into triangles, then slice each triangle in half one more time to end up with 16 triangular sandwiches. Enjoy right away or keep frozen. Remove from the freezer 5-10 minutes prior to eating. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Gluten-Free Winter Squash Gnocchi

November 23 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Gluten-Free Winter Squash Gnocchi These gnocchi are one of my favorite fall dishes to make for company. The process of gnocchi-making is fun and gratifying, and the result is always a tasty, light and unmistakably autumnal crowd pleaser. These gnocchi are gluten-free (and can be vegan if ghee is substituted with coconut oil), with nutritious buckwheat flour and sweet winter squash acting as main ingredients. Even without eggs, these have a nice pillowy texture, thanks to the softness of pureed squash. The great thing about this recipe is that it can be interpreted and adapted based on the produce you have on hand. There is  a variation on these gnocchi in The Vibrant Table, where I use beets and sweet potato in place of squash. I went for the classic earthy combination of sage and squash for the herbal pairing here, which is hard to beat. I also like to serve these gnocchi alongside chimichurri, one of my favorite simple herb sauces. I like to make homemade sprouted buckwheat flour for this recipe, but you can also use store-bought flour, which is darker in color and has a slightly denser texture, but also a more distinct nutty flavor. I created this recipe as part of a healthy recipe package for Food & Wine online, see the detailed recipe here. I want to take this opportunity to wish all U.S. readers a very Happy Thanksgiving and express my immense gratitude for your readership and support! Here are a few Thanksgiving table ideas: Sorghum Pilaf with Roasted Brussels Sprouts, Cranberries and Grapes Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes and Black Rice Shaved Brussels Sprout, Pomegranate and Lentil Salad Roasted Parsnip and Apple Soup with Radish Greens Gingery Pear Rutabaga Handpies Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats Butternut Squash and Cranberry Cookies

12 Warming Fall Harvest Soups and Stews

October 7 2015 VegKitchen 

12 Warming Fall Harvest Soups and StewsWhen the autumn chill sets in and it gets dark early, theres nothing more comforting than a warming bowl of soup or stew filled with harvest vegetables. This selection of 12 vegan fall soups and stews feature potatoes and sweet potatoes, harder squashes, corn, greens, and more -- nicely spiced and aromatic. Some of these recipes are longer-cooking than late summer soups, but none are at all difficult to make. Make a big pot on the weekend and enjoy leftovers when you come home from work on Monday and Tuesday. These soups are great to pack into a Thermos to take to work or school, too. Moroccan-Style Vegetable Stew, above, looks as good as it tastes. Its a wonderful way to warm up cool season dinners, with sweet sugar pumpkin or butternut squash in an aromatic broth.  Nourishing and sublimely satisfying, Curried Red Lentil Soup with Sweet Potatoes and Greens incorporates falls first sweet potatoes with seasonal greens. Red lentils, which cook to a warm golden color, are available in natural food stores and ethnic groceries. Another bountiful bowlful based on red lentils, Curried Red Lentil, Pumpkin, and Cauliflower Soup. Adding a couple of cups of pumpkin or butternut squash puree adds to the orange-y goodness of this soup Potato, Corn, and Green Chile Soup is a nondairy version of a contemporary classic from the American Southwest. Its filling, so it can serve as a centerpiece of a meal, served with a salad or salad-y wraps. Miso Soup with Sweet Potatoes and Greens (choose from spinach, arugula, watercress, or tatsoi) synergize nicely in this miso soup. This one’s a little lighter than most of the soups and stews on this list, but not at all less satisfying. In Kale, Yellow Squash, and Sweet Potato Stew, the deep greens contrasted with the yellow of the squash and the orange of the sweet potato, makes for an attractive and nourishing dish for the autumn harvest. Squash, Sweet Potato, and Corn Chowder is a hearty soup thats especially perfect for fall. Though this admittedly involves a bit of prep, none of it is difficult. Its a great soup to make on a quiet Sunday -- youll be happy to come home to it during the week! Broccoli-Apple Soup with Cashew or Peanut Butter is luscious and nutty with an almost undetectable hint of mellow sweetness from the apple; nut butter gives it a rich flavor. In my home, this has long been a fall favorite. Almond-Brussels Sprouts Soup is elegant and richly flavored, featuring brussels sprouts and a myriad of other veggies. You can use cashew butter or peanut butter in place of almond butter for equally delectable results. In this luscious Creamy Golden Potato-Squash Soup, onions, garlic, winter squash, and silken tofu are all enveloped in the familiar flavor of potatoes, making it a wonderful vehicle for getting a lot of nourishing ingredients into eaters of all ages. Though beet borscht is often eaten cold, the addition of potatoes creates a more robust version for fall in this Hot Potato and Beet Borscht. Unless you are fond of grating, doing so in a food processor makes the job much easier. African-Inspired Quinoa-Peanut Stew has several elements of a certain style of traditional African soups--chiles, sweet potato, and a creamy peanut base. The grain of choice in an African soup like this would likely be millet, but here, quinoa makes for a delightful fusion.  

6 Hearty Vegan Soups Under 200 Calories Per Serving

October 17 2014 VegKitchen 

6 Hearty Vegan Soups Under 200 Calories Per ServingStarting a meal with a veggie-packed vegan soup fills you up in a good way. Hardy vegetables (especially roots and cruciferous veggies), grains, beans, peas, and lentils are quite filling, yet low in calories. Veggie-filled soups contains more water then other dishes, keeping you hydrated, which also helps maintain healthy. They’re quite appetizing, yet at the same time help curb appetite for foods that may not benefit you or which you may be tempted to overeat. Because soups based on vegetables and/­­or legumes are high in fiber, they also keep you full for a long time. Pureed soups, like a vegan cream or broccoli or carrot soup, will really amp up your veggie intake in one meal. They can be a nice first course or a  a complete meal with a hearty salad featuring beans or lentils. Plant-based soups are filled with vitamins and other nutrients. All in one delicious bowl, you can get a great part of your daily needs of protein, fiber, vitamins A, C, and the B vitamins, folate, iron, calcium, potassium, zinc, folic acid, and antioxidants, depending on which particular ingredients you use. Spice your soups up as you wish, to boost flavor as well as increase health benefits. Here are a half dozen soups that so hearty that their modest calorie count is truly surprising. There are many variations on Tortilla Soup, a southwestern classic. The common denominator is a crisp corn tortilla garnish. This veggie-filled rendition is a light and pleasant way to begin a meal with a southwestern theme. See the photo at the top of this post. Like Minestrone, Italian Pasta and Bean Soup is a classic, sometimes referred to as  pasta e fagiole. Its a meal in a bowl that you can complete easily with fresh garlic bread and a big salad.  The earthy flavor of these protein-packed legumes shines in this basic rendition of Hearty Lentil Soup. Make sure to see the variations listed below the recipe. This is perfect as a soup centerpiece,  An appetizing, mildly spiced mélange of nourishing ingredients, Pink Bean, Quinoa, and Spinach Soup makes a stellar centerpiece for a soup-based meal, as its done in 30 minutes or less. Everything about this Butternut Squash and Apple Soup says fall harvest, from its warm golden color to its slightly sweet, fresh flavor. Once youve got the squash baked, it cooks fairly quickly. Of course, you can enjoy this throughout winter as well. Heres the comforting Classic Mushroom-Barley Soup. Its nothing fancy, but always so satisfying. Change it up by using different kinds of mushrooms.    

Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin – Holiday Recipe Month

October 27 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin – Holiday Recipe Month This post is created in partnership with Truffle Toast Home. Hey! It’s good to be back after a week off. We are going to try something different with the way we post recipes here from week to week. Instead of presenting you with a random assortment of whatever dishes strike our fancy, we are going to have more focused themes to center our recipes around. We are doing this to be more purposeful, exploratory and thorough with our recipe development, and to learn alongside our readers as we cook and elaborate on our themes. Ultimately, we want our recipes to be more useful to you, to help you avoid the dead end of making a recipe once and then never again, and to start more of a conversation and community around your suggestions for these themes. The themes can be based on all kinds of circumstances, from the time of year to a particular ingredient, type of dish, or a feeling we are shooting for. So, without further ado, starting with today’s post and until the end of this year, we will be focusing on holiday recipes – indulgent but healthy, full of whole foods and plant power, festive and fun. There will be things to serve at your holiday table, bring to a potluck, or even gift as a present. We are so excited to get this going! We came back from a peaceful week in a North Carolina cabin (including some photos from the trip here) to an empty, disassembled kitchen and just today sold our stove on Craigslist unexpectedly fast. I am basically left with very little to nothing in terms of cooking space and equipment and feel a bit at a loss. I did set up a small cooking nook in our garage, but I’m hoping I won’t have to be there too long, as the kitchen renovations are well on their way. Thankfully, we got a bunch of holiday recipes pinned down while in NC (always-working-on-vacation-club here), starting with this lovely gratin. It’s a perfect side dish for the holiday table for so many reasons – there are seasonal Brussels sprouts and sweet potato, it’s a single dish affair and simple in preparation, which will give you time to focus on other more elaborate main dishes, it’s quite striking in color, and so impressively tasty. It’s also worth mentioning that this is my new favorite treatment for Brussels sprouts. They stew in the spiced turmeric coconut milk and become incredibly tender, silky, almost buttery. I have an inkling that this would be a great dish for converting Brussels sprout skeptics into lovers. Besides the Brussels, there is a middle layer of sweet, caramelized onions, along with thinly sliced sweet potato, which gets slightly crispy at the edges after some time in the oven, then finished with a grating of garlic, pecans and nutmeg. So good! Truffle Toast Home is a well-curated online shop for wine and specialty food accessories. They sent me a set of their stainless steel graters to try out, and I put them to the test while making this gratin. The set includes a fine grater, coarse grater and a shaver, all of which are hand held and great for finishing off all kinds of dishes. I used the shaver for the thinner shavings of sweet potato (I also sliced some), the coarse grater for garlic and pecans, and the finest one for grating whole nutmeg – all were a pleasure to work with. I was especially happy about how effortlessly I was able to grate the nutmeg, because at times grating whole nutmeg can seem like a daunting task. So whether you are in the market for some good graters or need a gift/­­stocking stuffer idea, consider these Truffle Toast Home ones. They come in a very presentable, gift-ready drawstring pouch, too ;) To get 20% off your grater order, use code CUC7MCNV at checkout here until November 25th, 2016. Enjoy! Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients 1½ tablespoons neutral coconut oil - divided, plus more for oiling baking pan 1 large yellow onion - sliced sea salt - to taste 3 large sweet potatoes - thinly sliced or shredded on mandolin 1 lb Brussels sprouts - thinly sliced or shredded 2 large garlic cloves - shredded or minced, divided freshly ground black pepper - to taste 1 can unsweetened coconut milk 1 tablespoon curry powder - preferably homemade, or to taste ⅓ cup pecans or walnuts - chopped or shredded whole nutmeg - to taste, for grating on top (optional) Instructions Warm 1 tablespoon coconut oil over medium heat in a medium sauté pan. Add onion and a pinch of salt and sauté until caramelized and lightly golden, for about 15 minutes. Set aside. Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a medium baking dish or 10-inch cast-iron pan by oiling it with coconut oil. Arrange half of the sweet potatoes on the bottom of the dish/­­pan. Scatter caramelized onion on top. Combine Brussels sprouts, 1 garlic clove, pinch of salt, freshly ground black pepper and the remaining ½ tbsp of coconut oil in a mixing bowl, toss to coat. Spread Brussels sprouts in a layer on top of the onions. Arrange the rest of the sweet potatoes on top. Combine coconut milk and curry powder, whisk or blend to mix. Pour mixture over the gratin. Combine pecans with the rest of the garlic, sea salt and black pepper to taste. Sprinkle the mixture on top of the potatoes. Cover your baking dish or pan with a lid or foil and bake for 25 minutes. Take off the cover and continue to bake for another 30 minutes, or until soft throughout. Garnish by grating nutmeg on top and serve right away. Leftovers are delicious when reheated in the pan, with some coconut oil and covered, over medium-low heat, or at 350° F in the oven for about 10-15 minutes. Notes 1. If you dont have curry, you might have all the spices to mix your own curry. Use a mixture of turmeric (1 teaspoon), cumin seeds (1 tablespoon), 5 crushed cardamom pods and a pinch of red pepper flakes instead of pre-made curry powder. Adjust amounts of spices to your taste if desired. Fresh turmeric root is also an excellent addition here, when blended with coconut milk and other spices. 2. I find that the best and most convenient way of preparing this gratin is baking it in a cast-iron pan. In the absence of my own kitchen and dishes, I made it in baking dishes for this post. 3.5.3208 This post was created in partnership with Truffle Toast Home, with all opinions being genuine and our own. Thank you for considering the sponsors that help keep Golubka Kitchen going. You might also like... Tile Flatbreads Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Givea... Roasted Parsnip and Apple Soup with Radish Greens Daikon Radish Pasta With Corn and Tomatoes in Creamy Coconut Sauce .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin – Holiday Recipe Month appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Butternut Squash, Leek and Apple Soup

November 3 2015 My New Roots 

Butternut Squash, Leek and Apple Soup Back in the summer, I was asked to be the guest chef at a restaurant here in Copenhagen for the upcoming fall season. But not just any restaurant: a hyper-local organic restaurant sourcing 95% of their ingredients from within 200 kilometers of their front door, and one that holds classes to educate and inspire city dwellers to eat sustainably all year round. Oh, just kind of up my alley. And it is run by a woman who I clicked with instantaneously, our first conversation touching on everything from mushroom foraging to manifesting ones own reality through the power of positive thinking. I said yes because I was so moved by her ultimate mission, what the restaurant stood for, and not really taking into account that I hadnt cooked in a professional kitchen in many years. But after giving me permission to call the event The Grand Pumpkin Orgy, how could I possibly say no? Fast forward a few months to a couple weeks ago. I am standing at the cutting board preparing vegetables for soup. The soup to be served at the restaurant, which will be full of guests, all there to eat my food. I feel confident and excited, using all of my pumpkin comprehension to develop a menu of stellar proportions, and not letting the true weightiness of the event bog me down. Once cooked, everything goes into the blender. I puree it. I taste it. And its delicious. Without any major adjustments at all, it is exactly what I wanted it to be: clean and pure and tasting of the ingredients it is made with, only better. Then the doubt creeps in. Wait a second. That was easy. Is this really good enough? How can I serve such a simple dish to all these people with undoubtedly high expectations of what this dinner is supposed to be? Why did I ever think I could do this in the first place?! BAH! I brought my recipes in for the chef to review, sheepishly handing them over as if there was something wrong with them; not impressive enough, flashy or complex – just what I believed to be delicious. After a raised eyebrow, he said that he wasnt sure apple and butternut squash would go together. I gulped, but told him as confidently as I could that I believe in the intelligence of the season, and trust that whatever grows together, goes together. Right? The soup was a hit. Clean and pure and tasting of the ingredients it was made with, only better. Not only was the chef impressed (and later excused himself for judging my soup before making it himself), but the guests as well. As I went around to the tables asking everyone how it was, they all reaffirmed my belief that my instincts are not completely out of whack, and that, quite simply, good ingredients make great food. After several years eating locally-grown, seasonal produce Ive learned that you can pretty much step back and let the ingredients do the work for you, since true deliciousness needs little intervention. Cooking like a pro, to me, means respecting the ingredients and doing as little as possible to bring out their tastiness. So, this soup is that soup. The one I served at the restaurant to all of those people that scared me, but also reminded me that simple is best. It is a deep and delicious love song to autumn. The ingredients are inexpensive, widely available and the process is foolproof. Its an oven soup! Thats right: everything cooked together right on a baking sheet so there isnt even a pot to wash. Me likey. Butternut Squsah: the Nutrient Storage Facility Winter squash rocks because it is a virtual storehouse of nutrients. Unlike summer squash (re: zucchini, crooknecks, pattypans), winter squash has had a lot more time to develop and pump itself full of vitamins and minerals throughout its lengthy life on the stem. Were talking oodles more vitamin A (in the form of beta-carotene), vitamin C, manganese, potassium, and even some extra dietary fiber thrown in. This combination of nutrients spells good news for asthma sufferers, those with heart disease, elevated cholesterol, or inflammatory conditions such a rheumatoid and osteoarthritis. Nature designed summer squash to be rather delicate, with a high water content for those hot summer days when we need a cool down. Naturally, their shelf life is rather short during our abundant harvest season when produce is plentiful. On the flip side, winter squash has a tough outer skin and lower water content, which allows it to be stored for a very long time - some varieties up to six months. This means that we can keep these vitamin bombs around for a long time after the first frost to provide our bodies with the nutrition we need to see us through the long months of winter when there is nothing fresh in sight. Put that in your oven and roast it! The Garlicky Rye Bread Croutons, although an additional element to create, are the crowning glory of the dish, and really make it special. If youre not into bread, try toasting some pumpkin seeds for the top, or something else crunchy to add contrast to the silky smooth soup. It begs mentioning that the apple cider vinegar in this recipe is not optional. Why? Because it adds acidity. Acidity is the one thing missing in almost every home cooks food because, well, we are never really taught about its importance. If you read the introduction in my cookbook, I have a section called The Holy Trinity of Flavour explaining that salt, sugar and acid are the three foundation flavours of any successful dish. Adding just a touch of apple cider vinegar or lemon juice to almost anything you make (no kidding!) heightens and brightens the other flavours and creates a surprising balance of tastes. Try it and see for yourself.     Print recipe     Butternut Squash, Leek and Apple Soup with Garlicky Rye Bread Croutons Makes at least 2 quarts /­­ 2 liters, Serves 4-6 Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. melted coconut oil (or ghee) 3 leeks 1 medium onion 5 cloves garlic 1 large butternut squash (mine was about 2 lbs. /­­ 1 kg) 1 large, tart apple 4 - 6 cups /­­ 1-1 1/­­2 liters vegetable broth, as needed 1 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­2 tsp. ground cardamom 1/­­2 tsp. ground star anise apple cider vinegar to taste (start with 1/­­2 tsp. up to 1 Tbsp.) 1 batch Garlicky Rye Bread Crouton (recipe to follow) Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. 2. Prepare all vegetables: chop leeks and onions, peel garlic (but leave it whole), peel butternut and cut into cubes, chop apple. 3. Place all vegetables on a baking sheet with the coconut oil, toss to coat, and set in the oven to roast for 25-35 minutes until tender. 4. Transfer roasted vegetables to a blender and add the spices and hot vegetable stock (you may need to work in batches). Blend on high until completely smooth. Taste, then add salt and apple cider vinegar, blend and taste again. Adjust seasoning to your taste, and add stock until the desired consistency is reached: I like mine quite thin so I use the full 6 cups /­­ 1 1/­­2 liters of stock. 5. Transfer soup to a large cooking pot over medium heat to warm, if necessary. Divide soup equally among bowls and serve with the Garlicky Rye Bread Croutons and freshly cracked black pepper. Garlicky Rye Bread Croutons Serves 4 Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 200g stale dark sourdough, cut into generous cubes (any bread here would work, but make a healthy choice) 1 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee (ghee is definitely the tastiest) 2 fat cloves garlic, finely minced or grated on a microplane a couple pinches flaky sea salt Directions: 1. Melt oil in a small saucepan over low heat. When it is melted, add the garlic and stir to combine. Cook just until the garlic starts to simmer, immediately remove from heat and let cool slightly. Preheat oven to 350°F/­­175°C. 2. Cut bread into generous cubes and place in a medium sized bowl. Pour the garlic oil over the top and toss to coat, using your hands to squish the oil into the bread. Spread out bread cubes on a cookie sheet, sprinkle with salt and place in the oven. Toast for 15-20 minutes, tossing a couple times during cooking. Croutons are ready when they are crisp and golden around the edges. Once cool, store leftovers in an airtight container for up to three days. You guys. I’m making app! It’s almost ready! I can’t wait! The My New Roots iOS app will include your favourites from the blog, plus 5 exclusive app-only holiday recipes, perfect for the upcoming season. Click the link below to go to the App site where you can sign up to be notified when the app is out (soon, I promise!) and receive my brand-new recipe for Crispy Sweet Potato Shoe String Fries with Miso Tahini Gravy, like right now. Thank you for all for encouraging me to do this, and your ongoing support. I like you very much. xo, Sarah B  

8 Delicious Vegan Entreés Featuring Peanut Butter

July 30 2015 VegKitchen 

8 Delicious Vegan Entreés Featuring Peanut ButterEverything tastes better with peanut butter! Except, of course, for those with peanut allergies. Luscious and high in protein, peanut butter isnt only for PBJ sandwiches or desserts (though its awesome in both -- see our listing of sweet treats using it) Here are 7 tasty ways to use it in vegan main dishes. First off, heres an easy rendition of Cold Peanut Butter Sesame Noodles (above), with a dollop of tahini and a dash of spice. Delicious as a summer dinner served with an easy tofu dish and a simple salad of tomatoes, cucumbers, and basil. Another noodle dish, Kid-Friendly Peanut Butter Noodles is designed for kids whose preference runs to milder flavors. Adults can enjoy this basic recipe as well by spicing up their portion with hot sauce like Sriracha, or dried hot red pepper flakes, and a sprinkling of scallion. According to Isa Moskowitz, Curried Peanut Sauce Bowl with Tofu and Kale is the peanut sauce of the gods: a gingery peanut sauce with curry powder that will have you licking the spoon, then licking your plate ... Robin Robertsons West African Spinach with Spicy Peanut Sauce is delicious served over rice or couscous. Let your own heat tolerance be your guide on the amount of chiles to use. Admittedly rich, this traditional Southern-style Virginia Peanut Soup has an intensely nutty flavor. Even served in moderate portions, its immensely satisfying, and you can build a meal around it. Another soup you can look forward to that’s especially good for fall (but which can be enjoyed any time of year) is Broccoli-Apple Soup with Cashew or Peanut Butter. So rich and comforting, and filling enough to be a main dish serves with fresh bread and salad. In Dr. Joel Fuhrmans Spicy Thai Braised Kale and Tofu, peanut butter is the key to creating this tasty, nutrition-packed dish. Serve with brown rice or quinoa and a colorful salad for a great weeknight meal. Tempeh is a great source of protein, and peanut butter enhances its fermented flavor in this tasty Tempeh Satay with Asian Greens. Serve with your favorite grain.


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