apple cider vinegar - vegetarian recipes

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apple cider vinegar vegetarian recipes

The Salad Sandwich

June 3 2021 Golubka Kitchen 

The Salad Sandwich Beach sandwich season is finally here, and doesn’t everything taste better on the beach? Today’s recipe is a tribute to a sandwich you might find at a health food store or co-op that’s been around forever, has an impressive bulk section, an overwhelming assortment of natural bar soap, a tiny juice bar, and a soup/­­salad/­­sandwich takeout operation. This kind of sandwich usually comes on sprouted grain bread, slathered with hummus as the sauce of choice, most definitely has lots of alfalfa sprouts packed inside, and somehow always perfectly hits the spot. This is my version of that – basically a salad, deconstructed and served as a sandwich. It’s super flavorful, filled with all kinds of textures, and makes for such a refreshing, summer meal! The Salad Sandwich   Print Serves: 2 sandwiches Ingredients ½ garlic clove juice from ½ small lemon 1 small-medium carrot, grated 1 small-medium beet, grated ½ teaspoon apple cider vinegar ½ teaspoon sugar sea salt 1 large avocado, pitted and peeled ½ teaspoon Dijon mustard freshly ground black pepper hummus 4 slices of sourdough or sprouted grain bread, toasted if needed 4-6 lettuce leaves sauerkraut or kimchi 1 small cucumber, sliced handful alfalfa sprouts or other sprouts/­­microgreens of choice Instructions Grate the garlic into a medium bowl using a microplane or a fine grater. Pour the lemon juice over the garlic and let sit while preparing the rest of the ingredients, for the garlic to mellow. Put the carrots and beets in another medium bowl, drizzle with the vinegar, sprinkle with sugar and salt to taste, mix to coat. Add the avocado to the bowl with the garlic and lemon juice, mash with a fork. Add the mustard, salt, and pepper to taste, mix to combine. Start assembling the sandwiches. Generously spread the hummus on all 4 bread slices. Distribute the mashed avocado between the two sandwiches, followed by the lettuce, sauerkraut/­­kimchi to taste, cucumber, carrots and beets, and sprouts. Close the sandwiches and enjoy right away, or wrap them up and keep in a cooler. This sandwich is best enjoyed within the first few hours of making it. 3.5.3226 The post The Salad Sandwich appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Radish Salad with Cashew Sour Cream Dressing

April 22 2021 Golubka Kitchen 

Radish Salad with Cashew Sour Cream Dressing Hi friends! Popping in today with this springy radish salad with a cashew sour cream dressing. When I was growing up in Russia, my grandma would make a salad like this all the time during radish season in the spring and early summer. It was super simple – just radishes, cucumbers, and tons of sliced green onion, dressed with sour cream – but it was my absolute favorite. The way that the fatty sour cream counteracts the fresh and sharp flavors of the radishes and green onions is something out of this world. For this vegan variation, I came up with a cashew sour cream dressing, and the resulting salad tasted exactly like the salads of my childhood. I don’t think I would ever be able to tell the difference, if not for the fact that I’m not eating it in my grandma’s cozy kitchen. Hope you’ll give this salad a try, it’s the perfect embodiment of spring! Radish Salad with Cashew Sour Cream Dressing   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients ½ cup cashews ¼ cup + 2 tablespoons water 2 tablespoons lemon juice (from about a half of a large lemon) ½ teaspoon apple cider vinegar ¼ teaspoon onion powder ¼ teaspoon garlic powder sea salt freshly ground black pepper about 20 radishes (from around 2 batches), trimmed and sliced into half-moons 2 Persian (baby) cucumbers, sliced into half-moons 3 scallions, white and green parts, sliced Instructions Make the cashew sour cream dressing. If not using a high-speed blender, soak the cashews in hot water for 15 minutes, then drain (no need to soak if you have a high-powered blender). In an upright blender, combine the cashews, water, lemon juice, apple cider vinegar, onion powder, garlic powder, salt and pepper to taste. Blend on high until very smooth. Taste for salt and pepper, and adjust if needed. Transfer the dressing to a jar and chill in the refrigerator while slicing the vegetables. In a large bowl, combine the radishes, cucumbers, and scallions. Add enough of the sour cream dressing to dress the salad to your liking (you might have some leftover dressing). Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve the salad right away. 3.5.3226 The post Radish Salad with Cashew Sour Cream Dressing appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Pepita Dill Havarti

March 12 2021 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Pepita Dill Havarti Makes about a pound, I think Pepitas have long been my vegan secret weapon. I use them to make cream sauces, to thicken soups and to turn into crumbly parmesan. But heres the dilemma. Theyre green! And kinda no matter what you do, they always lend a pale green hue. So sometimes thats a little bit of a turn off in a cheese base. But, on the other hand, they make such amazing tasting cheese! So I turned to a cheese that was already a little green from herbs: dill havarti. A semi-hard cheese that slices beautifully with a little crumble. Pepitas dont get as creamy as cashew, they have a little texture left even when vitamixed like mad. But that texture actually works in many cheeses. The flavor has a ripeness to it, which you want, and its the perfect backdrop for fresh dill and bright flashes of caraway. It really tastes like a slice of springtime in the forest.  I think this cheese is best kept savory, to be enjoyed in sandwiches and the like. But if you had to twist my arm to make a fruit and cheese plate, I might suggest fresh strawberries for the daring palette. Otherwise, I mean, no one will kick you out of bed for eating this cheese straight up with crackers! Oh and I guess I should mention, this recipe is nut-free. So to everyone who yells at me for using cashews all the time, I forgive you. Gluten and soy-free, too, while we are at it. But really I made it cuz its yummy. Recipe notes: ~ Carrageenan is easy to use! Its a thickener but it also sets. And another wonderful thing about it is that even if you melt it, it sets again. Like what? So if you arent familiar with it, just go for it and get some online because its a really wonderful ingredient that isnt as finicky as, say, agar agar. It sets fast, so make sure you get it from the cheese into the mold immediately or it will set in the pot. ~ You can use any smooth vessel as a mold that can hold 3 cups of liquid. I use a round pyrex. But, you know, use the shape youve got! Silicon molds work great, too. Anything relatively non-stick.  ~ This does melt, but not like really melty melty. I did try it in a grilled cheese and it got soft and tasted good but it still held its shape for the most part. I think if it was grated it would melt even more.  ~ The flavor gets even better over time! Try it two days after making and you will see a big difference. The flavors marry and settle down a bit while also intensifying I don’t know it’s magic. Ingredients 1 1/­­2 cups raw pepitas 1 1/­­2 cup filtered water 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast 2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar 2 tablespoons safflower oil (or any mild tasting oil) 1 1/­­2 teaspoons salt  2 1/­­2 teaspoons kappa carrageenan 1/­­3 cup fresh chopped dill 1 1/­­2 teaspoons caraway seeds Directions Boil pepitas to soften. Place pepitas in a saucepan and cover with water. Bring to boil then simmer 30 minutes. Cool completely and drain.   Blend cooled pepitas, water, nutritional yeast, vinegar, oil and salt until smooth. This could take around 3 minutes, even with a vitamix, so give the motor a rest every once in awhile. If using a regular blender it could take 7 to 10 minutes. The blender will heat everything, so let the mixture cool a bit just so that its not warm to the touch, that way the carrageenan doesnt activate yet. Place in fridge to cool if you like. Then add the carrageenan and blend 20 more seconds.  In a sauce pan over low heat, cook for 8 to 10 minutes, whisking constantly. Alternate between a whisk and a rubber spatula to make sure you scrape the sides of the pot. It will get thick and begin pulling away from the sides. Youll know its done because its thick and holding its shape as you stir it.  Fold in caraway and dill. Pour into mold immediately and smooth the top with a spatula. Cool 30 minutes at room temp. Cover and refrigerate for at least 4 hours to set completely. Invert onto a cutting board and go wild. It tastes best the next day, and even better the day after that!

Earl Gray Chai Pancakes

January 27 2021 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Earl Gray Chai Pancakes Makes 6 big pancakes These pancakes have it all! Masala chai spices like ginger, cardamom and black pepper. And although Ive made chai spiced pancakes before, this time I thought of adding actual tea. Like wow, how brilliant, since “tea” is what chai is. You can use any black tea you like. I used Earl Gray, which came through with its citrus-y notes. Tea is a difficult flavor to infuse so I made a really super concentrated cuppa. Then I tossed a couple of star anise pods into the steeping tea as well, because that is one of those flavors that can be harder to incorporate into chai spiced recipes, what with those big old pods. So the steeping comes in real handy in multiple ways. It also helps to add the turmeric into the infusion to bloom bright and golden. The final results is a nicely spiced pancake and you can actually taste the tea, too. So add these to your pancake repertoire next time you are craving everything. Recipe notes: ~ I have a lot of pancake tips all over the site, but Im not sure Ive ever written this one: If your pancakes arent cooking through, try covering them while cooking. ~ I love cooking pancakes in refined coconut oil! So buttery and yum. But you can cook in oil or vegan butter as well. I recommend Miyoko’s Butter for topping them, too. Ingredients Boiling water 3 earl gray tea bags 2 star anise pods 1/­­2 teaspoon ground turmeric 1 1/­­2 cups all purpose flour 1 tablespoon baking powder 3/­­4 teaspoon ground ginger 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cardamom 1/­­4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/­­8 teaspoon ground black pepper 2 tablespoons sugar 1 teaspoon salt 3/­­4 cup unsweetened soy milk (or vegan milk of choice) 2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar 3 tablespoons safflower oil (or any neutral tasting oil) 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract Refined coconut oil for cooking Directions Place 3 black tea bags in a large mug along with star anise pods. Pour water over tea and let steep for 20 minutes or so. It should be cool enough to use by then. Measure out one cup of liquid.  In a large mixing bowl, sift together flour, baking powder, ginger, cardamom, cinnamon, black pepper, sugar and salt. Make a well in the center. Measure the milk into a measuring cup. Add the vinegar to the milk and let curdle a minute. Add the milk mixture, 1 cup of tea mixture, safflower oil and vanilla to the well. Stir just until incorporated and no large clumps of flour are left.  Preheat a non-stick pan over medium-low heat and let the batter rest for 10 minutes. Lightly coat the pan in coconut oil. Add 1/­­3 cup of batter for each pancake, and cook for about 4 minutes, until puffy, bubbly and matte. Flip the pancakes, adding a new coat of oil to the pan, and cook for another 2 or 3 minutes or so.  Transfer pancakes to a large plate covered with tin foil until ready to serve. To reheat, place pancakes on a baking sheet covered with tin foil in a 300 F degree oven for 5 minutes or so.

BBQ Tempeh Ribs

January 5 2021 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

BBQ Tempeh Ribs Serves 4 Photo By VK Rees Smoky, sticky sweet finger licking ribs! But be sure to lick YOUR OWN fingers, weirdo. These are inspired by my fave vegan BBQ joint in Portland, OR, Homegrown Smoker. Im not saying theyre as good, but they get me there without the airfare. Serve with cornbread or mashed potatoes or mashed sweet potatoes or rice or coleslaw or potato salad or in a hero or all of the above. This recipe is originally from I Can Cook Vegan. Recipe Notes ~Often times, I prefer to steam tempeh before using because it removes bitterness and makes the tempeh more succulent. But you can skip that step here for a few reasons. First, I want the tempeh to be crisp and browned. Secondly, if you sear it on high enough heat, it does cook through and remove the bitterness. Youre left with nutty, meaty, toothsome bites. Use cast iron for best results! ~To make the tempeh look like one long line of ribs, turn the pieces carefully as you cook them so that they stay pretty much in the same order you cut them in. Does that make sense? OK, look at the pics for reference. Ingredients For the BBQ sauce: 2 tablespoons cornstarch 1 cup cold vegetable broth 1 1/­­4 cups ketchup 1/­­3 cup brown sugar 1/­­3 cup tamari or soy sauce 1/­­3 cup apple cider vinegar 2 teaspoons liquid smoke 1 1/­­2 tablespoons garlic powder 1 tablespoon onion powder 1/­­4 teaspoon cayenne For the tempeh: 2 8-oz packages of tempeh sliced into eighths widthwise 2 tablespoons olive oil Directions Make the sauce: In a small saucepot, use a fork to vigorously whisk the cornstarch into the vegetable broth until its mostly dissolved. Add the remaining ingredients and mix well. Place over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until it comes to a boil. Once boiling, lower the heat to a low simmer and let the sauce thicken for about 5 minutes. Remove from the heat. Make the ribs: Preheat a large skillet over medium heat. Drizzle in 1 tablespoon of oil and a pinch of salt. Fry tempeh on one side till browned, about 5 minutes. Drizzle the remaining oil over the tempeh and sprinkle with salt then flip. Brown that side for about 5 minutes.  Pour about 1/­­2 cup of barbeque sauce into the pan and flip to coat. Let it cook and caramelize for about 3 minutes.  Remove from pan and line the ribs up on a plate. Drizzle more warmed barbeque sauce all over them to serve.

Tofu Fresco Cotija

October 23 2020 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Tofu Fresco Cotija Makes about 2 cups photo by Kate Lewis, recipe by llovani This tofu-based cotija is very easy for the beginner vegan cheesemaker. Tangy and crumbly and even a little melty from coconut oil, cotija is the perfect cheese for topping spicy, saucy things like refried beans, fajitas or tucked into tacos. It adds a beautiful splash of brightness to create contrast, and of course, delicious, cheezy flavor. This recipe is from The Modern Love Community Cookzine, which you can download for free! There is also an amazing Chilaquiles recipe in there to crumble this all over. Ingredients 14 oz block extra firm tofu, cubed medium 1/­­3 cup melted refined coconut oil 1/­­4 cup unsweetened plain rice milk 1 1/­­2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast 1 1/­­4 teaspoon fine sea salt 1/­­4 teaspoon garlic powder 1/­­4 teaspoon onion powder Directions In a medium pot, submerge tofu cubes in water. Bring to a boil for five minutes. Drain and allow them to cool completely.  Once cool, use cheesecloth to squeeze water out and get it as dry as possible.  Place tofu and the remaining ingredients in a food processor fit with a metal blade and pulse until it resembles cottage cheese. Lightly grease a 3 cup bowl or pyrex to use as a mold. Transfer cheese to the bowl and press down firmly to make sure there arent any air pockets. Cover and refrigerate for a minimum of 2 hours. When ready to use, it should crumble nicely in your fingers. 

The Absolute Best Recipes You Can Make with Your Forgotten Pantry Staples

May 25 2020 Meatless Monday 

The Absolute Best Recipes You Can Make with Your Forgotten Pantry StaplesYour pantry is full of forgotten treasures: the can of kidney beans hiding behind the rigatoni; the unopened pouch of quinoa tucked off in the corner; the lonely tin of canned corn... But these ingredients, along with other overlooked pantry staples, can be used to make some pretty marvelous meals -- if you know how to prepare them. As more people are cooking at home, the Meatless Monday team set out to ask our followers which of their pantry items theyve found to be the trickiest to cook. Our surveys have revealed that people arent quite sure what to do with canned corn, quinoa and canned kidney beans. We sought the assistance from some of our favorite chefs, bloggers, and Instagram influencers to help us compile a list of superb plant-based recipes featuring popular, yet underutilized, pantry staples. Check out the list below and get cooking! Corn Recipes   TexMex Chickpea Corn Fritters from Kevin Curry - Fit Men Cook When it comes to plant-based patties, fritters always have more fun. These Tex-Mex chickpea corn fritters from Fit Men Cook become nice and crisp after a quick spin in the air fryer (or oven). Canned or frozen corn work for this one, but the big spice blend -- smoked paprika, chili powder, cumin, oregano -- is definitely a must. Source: Fit Men Cook Corn, Avocado, and Tomato Salad from Rachel Paul - The College Nutritionist Want something a little lighter for the summer season? Try this corn, avocado and tomato salad from the College Nutritionist . Source: College Nutritionist Garlicky Corn and Tuna Pasta from Lenny Wu - Vegamelon This isnt you moms tuna casserole. Pairing a vegan protein with sweet corn and spices makes this garlicky corn & tuna pasta from Vegamelon a must try. Source: Vegamelon Easy Vegan Jalape?o Cornbread from Jenn Sebestyen - Veggie Inspired This recipe for vegan jalape?o cornbread from Veggie Inspired uses canned corn and jalape?o for a sweet punch of heat. Source: Veggie Inspired Crockpot Chili from Makenna Hale Corn and chili were meant for each other. This crockpot chili from Makenna Hale is vegan and free of both soy and gluten. Source: Makenna Hale   Vegan Lentil Shepherds Pie from Naturally Zuzu Hearty and delicious, this vegan lentil shepherds pie from Naturally Zuzu will keep your taste buds craving more. Source: Naturally Zuzu Pro tip from Karla Dumas and the Humane Society Culinary Team: Roast canned corn to naturally caramelize it and bring out the sweetness. Season with salt, pepper and lime juice; add beans and cilantro for a quick side dish. Quinoa Recipes   Instant Pot Vegan White Bean Quinoa from Nisha Vora - Rainbow Plant Life You can never have enough chili recipes. This recipe for instant pot vegan white bean quinoa chili from Rainbow Plant Life uses coconut milk and cannellini beans, making it extra creamy and delicious. Source: Rainbow Plant Life Sweet Potato Quinoa Latkes from Joy Bauer Holidays, brunch, late-night snack, doesnt matter; these savory sweet potato latkes from Joy Bauer are the perfect place to put that quinoa. The original recipe calls for egg whites, but to make these latkes completely plant-based, use one of these vegan egg replacements . Source: Joy Bauer Fig and Raisin Quinoa Couscous from My Organic Diary Completely gluten free, this recipe from My Organic Diary marries the flavors of North Africa with protein-packed quinoa. Golden raisins, cinnamon, and figs makes this flavorful side dish perfect for pool-side dining. Source: My Organic Diary Cherry Mint Quinoa Salad from Lisa Drayer In addition to her cherry mint quinoa salad , Lisa Drayer covered the Meatless Monday pantry challenge in her recent CNN article, How to eat less meat and more plants , that also featured Chef Adam Kenworthy s quinoa recipe suggestion and physician and chef Dr. Robert Grahams advice on the health benefits of plant-based eating. Source: Lisa Drayer Peanut Butter Quinoa Cookies from DJ Blatner These peanut butter quinoa cookies from DJ Blatner are seriously inventive and delicious. By using a combination of quinoa, oats, and flax seeds, youre getting a solid helping of fiber packaged in a sweet, nutty cookie. Source: Dawn Jackson Blatner Teriyaki Fried Quinoa from The Foodie Takes Flights Skip the takeout and sauté your own version of fried rice, or, in this case, teriyaki fried quinoa . Throw in a colorful collection of vegetables: corn, carrots, peas, purple cabbage, and youve got yourself a rainbow of a meal courtesy of The Foodie Takes Flight . Source: The Foodie Takes Flight Kidney Bean Recipes   Easy Pantry Pasta Bake from Delicious and Healthy by Maya Clean out the pantry while making a filling family dinner. Use kidney beans (but any can of beans will do), spinach, tomato sauce, and a spice racks-worth of seasonings for this better-for-you easy pantry pasta bake from Delicious and Healthy by Maya . Source: Delicious and Healthy by Maya Comforting Black and Kidney Bean Chili from James - Healthy Living with James Cocoa powder? Cinnamon? Coriander? The unique blend of spices makes this comforting black and kidney bean chili  from Healthy Living with James a unique spin on the classic. Source: Healthy Living with James Zucchini Oat Veggie Patties from Sharon Palmer With a base of kidney beans, shredded zucchini, oats, and seeds, no two bites of these spicy zucchini oat veggie patties from Sharon Palmer will be the same. Source: Sharon Palmer Best Vegan Chili from Hannah - Two Spoons CA Is it really the best vegan chili ? Try this recipe from Two Spoons CA and decide for yourself! Source: Two Spoons CA BBQ Kidney Bean Kale Burgers from Jenn Sebestyen - Veggie Inspired These kidney bean kale burgers from our friend Jenn Sebestyen at Veggie Inspired develop a nice crunchy crust after 40 minutes in the oven. A mixture of tahini, apple cider vinegar, molasses, and liquid smoke give these patties that beloved barbecue flavor without the grill. Source: Veggie Inspired Click here  for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post The Absolute Best Recipes You Can Make with Your Forgotten Pantry Staples appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Plant-Based Swaps to Recreate Classic Comfort Food Dishes

May 18 2020 Meatless Monday 

Plant-Based Swaps to Recreate Classic Comfort Food DishesAnimal products -- whether beef, pork, chicken, dairy or seafood -- are often thought to be necessary for a balanced diet, and, as a result, these ingredients have typically played a prominent role in home cooking.  But meat is not required for good health or good food, and the characteristics that make our favorite meals special -- the texture, the flavor, the spice -- can all be easily replicated with plant-based ingredients. Swapping out meat for plant-based protein enables you to find the essence of a dish and really consider why that BLT is so refreshing and tasty or how that peanut satay finds the right balance of spicy, nutty, and sweet. Because its usually not the animal protein that makes a dish unique or exquisite, but rather the harmony of ingredients and specific techniques that make for the best eating. Below is a list of classic comfort meals that have had their meaty ingredients swapped out for plant-based alternatives. Try a few this Monday, and gain a new appreciation for your favorite foods. Cauliflower Buffalo Wings Capture the spicy kick of Buffalo wings without the bones (and the chicken). This super simple recipe for cauliflower Buffalo wings is a definite crowd pleaser. No need to wait for gameday, whip up a batch this Monday.   Chickpea Meatloaf Meatloaf is the iconic comfort food, a centerpiece of many family meals. But you can easily recreate the tang and texture of meatloaf sans the meat. This recipe for vegan meatloaf from Nora Cooks uses a base of chickpeas to mimic the density and richness of traditional meatloaf. Photo & Recipe: Nora Cooks Grilled Portobello Mushroom Burgers with Garlic Mayo You wont be missing ground beef after tasting this grilled portobello burger . The mushrooms are marinated in a homemade barbecue spice mix and grilled until tender. When served, they are loaded up with sweet grilled red onions and savory garlic and chive mayonnaise. Lentil Bolognese Everyone loves one-pot cooking. Swap out ground beef for lentils in this hearty recipe for lentil Bolognese from Tasty. Serve over pasta or zucchini noodles. Photo & Recipe: Tasty     Mushroom Stroganoff Impress an Eastern European mother-in-law or stubborn eater with this cozy and comforting (and completely plant-based) version of beef stroganoff. Mimic the flavor, texture, and creaminess of beef stroganoff by using succulent baby portobello mushrooms, soy sauce, and your favorite brand of plant-based sour cream. Try this mouth-watering recipe for mushroom stroganoff from Vegan Huggs . Photo & Recipe: Vegan Huggs Quinoa Chili Fries Sometimes youve just got to cave to what you crave, but this recipe for quinoa chili fries doesnt have to be a guilty pleasure. By baking your own French fries and making your own chunky vegetarian quinoa chili, youll still feel light as air even after eating second helping.   Seitan Peanut Satay The perfect balance between nutty, spicy, and sweet: enter the seitan satay with spicy peanut sauce. Swap out traditional chicken breast for oven-roasted seitan; you wont be able to tell the difference. Follow this yummy recipe from seitan peanut satay from Sunnyside Hanne . Photo & Recipe: Sunnyside Hanne   Tempeh BLT Crisp, clean, and classic, who doesnt love a BLT? Marinating the tempeh overnight in a mixture of apple cider vinegar, soy sauce, liquid smoke, maple syrup, and spices gives it the flavor of bacon, while baking it in a hot oven recreates its crisp-yet-chewy texture. Check out this recipe for a tempeh BLT from The Curious Chickpea and get ready for next weekends brunch. Photo & Recipe: The Curious Chickpea Vegetable Paella Paella is known for its copious amounts of seafood, chicken, and chunks of chorizo, but you can replicate the delicate flavors of Spanish paella with roasted red peppers, artichokes, kalamata olives, and a variety of spices. Try this tasty vegetable paella from Cookie and Kate . Photo & Recipe: Cookie and Kate   Veggie Meatballs You wont miss regular meatballs after youve tried these better-for-you veggie meatballs . Featuring hearty lentils, mushrooms and walnuts, this recipe is sure to hit the spot next time a meatball craving hits. Serve with your favorite pesto or marinara sauce with some sautéed broccoli rabe, pasta, or polenta with spiraled greens.     Click here  for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation.   The post Plant-Based Swaps to Recreate Classic Comfort Food Dishes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Classic St. Patrick’s Day Dishes Made Plant-based

March 16 2020 Meatless Monday 

Classic St. Patrick’s Day Dishes Made Plant-basedFor many Americans, St. Patricks Day is a day to celebrate Irish culture -- the traditions, the people, and the cuisine. Youre likely familiar with many of the iconic dishes: shepherds pie, soda bread, braised cabbage, potatoes colcannon, corned beef, etc., but you may not be aware that many classic St. Patricks Day recipes can be made completely plant-based -- yes, even corned beef. Dont believe us? Read on to see how you can make Meatless Monday versions of your favorite St. Patricks Day dishes. Braised Cabbage Cabbage is a humble ingredient, but when gently braised it becomes nice and tender. Cook in butter (non-dairy), vegetable stock, dry wine, and apple cider vinegar for a flavorful side dish. Add a little sugar and carroway seeds for a livelier dish. For the Braised Cabbage recipe, click here. Meaty Mushroom Stew with Garlic Mashed Potatoes Straight from The Meatless Monday Cookbook , this recipe uses cremini and shiitake mushrooms and tamari to recreate the rich umami flavor iconic of traditional slow-cooked Irish stews. Pair the stew with a topping of garlic mashed potatoes and dinner is set. For the Meaty Mushroom Stew recipe, click here. Orange Cranberry Scone The scone is a welcomed reprieve from all of that rich St. Patricks Day food. This recipe is completely plant-based, utilizing coconut oil and coconut milk in place of dairy. Adding pumpkin spice, maple syrup, and orange zest to the sweet scone glaze makes this recipe perfect for any holiday. For the Orange Cranberry Scone recipe, click here.   Potatoes Colcannon A classic Irish side dish, colcannon is a marriage of creamy mashed potatoes and crispy green cabbage. Although traditional recipes call for butter and cream, colcannon can easily be made plant-based by swapping out the butter and heavy cream for plant-based alternatives. For the Potatoes Colcannon recipe, click here .   Shepherds Pie This completely plant-based version of Shepherds Pie can serve as the centerpiece of a St. Patricks Day feast. A smooth, creamy potato topping covers a hearty filling of lentils, cremini mushrooms, and diced veggies. For the Vegan Shepherds Pie recipe, click here. Soda Bread A variety of cuisines have their own version of soda bread, which gets its name from the use of sodium bicarbonate as a leavening agent rather than traditional yeast. This version uses plant-based milk and dairy-free butter to achieve a firm but delicate texture. For the Vegan Irish Soda Bread recipe, click here . Plant-based Corned Beef Yes, it is possible to make corned beef meatless. This recipe uses a seitan-substitute that is heavily spiced and mixed with a homemade beet puree. The loaf is then rubbed with spices and submerged in a slow-cooker brine with mushrooms, garlic, all spice, mustard, beet puree, and white wine vinegar. For the Vegan Corned Beef recipe, click here .   Click here  for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation.   The post Classic St. Patrick’s Day Dishes Made Plant-based appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Miso Kale Scalloped Potatoes

November 27 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegan Miso Kale Scalloped Potatoes Before we get into these delicious potatoes, we want to thank you for your support on our new desserts ebook! It truly means the world to see you guys enjoying it. And in case you missed it, we just released an ebook, filled with our favorite vegan and gluten-free dessert recipes that are great for the holidays and beyond. You can learn more about it and buy yours here. And these potatoes! There’s no such thing as too many ideas for carby vegetable sides in our book, and this one is so tasty. We layer thinly mandolined potatoes with silky kale and bake them in a miso-pine nut sauce, until golden and crispy on top and soft and creamy inside. The result is pure coziness. Wishing all our American friends a great holiday and a great rest of the week to everyone else

Very Berry Quinoa Salad with Cinnamon Toasted Pecans

November 18 2019 Meatless Monday 

This salad is light and fresh yet has plenty of protein from the quinoa and pecans. Fresh summer berries are little powerhouses of vitamins and are super kid-friendly. The toasted pecans take this dish to the next level. This recipe comes to us from The Meatless Monday Family Cookbook by Jenn Sebestyen. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 - For the Quinoa: - 1 cup (173 g) tri-color dry quinoa, rinsed well with cold water (or any color quinoa) - 1 1/­­4 cups (295 ml) water   - For the Cinnamon Toasted Pecans: - 1 1/­­2 tablespoons (30 g) pure maple syrup - 1 tablespoon (9 g) coconut sugar or (15 g) brown sugar -  1/­­2 teaspoon ground cinnamon - Pinch of salt - 1 cup (110 g) pecan halves - 1 teaspoon coconut oil   - For the Salad: - 6 cups (330 g) mixed baby salad greens - 2 cups (weight will vary) fresh mixed berries (blueberries, blackberries, raspberries, strawberries, etc.)   - For the Maple Dijon Vinaigrette: - 3 tablespoons (45 g) Dijon mustard - 2 tablespoons (40 g) pure maple syrup, or to taste - 2 tablespoons (28 ml) apple cider vinegar -  1/­­2 teaspoon salt, or to taste -  1/­­2 cup (120 ml) extra-virgin olive oil   For the Quinoa: Combine the quinoa and water in a small pot and bring to a boil. Cover, reduce the heat to medium-low, and simmer for 12 to 15 minutes until the quinoa is tender and the liquid is absorbed. Fluff with a fork.   For the Cinnamon Toasted Pecans: Line a large plate with parchment paper and set aside. In a small bowl, whisk together the maple syrup, sugar, cinnamon, and salt. Add the pecans and stir to coat evenly. Heat the coconut oil in a nonstick skillet over medium heat. Pour the pecans in the skillet, spreading them out in an even layer. Cook for 4 to 5 minutes, stirring frequently, until toasted. Nuts can burn quickly, so dont walk away at this point! Youll know the pecans are done when you start to smell them. Pour them out onto the parchment-lined plate and spread in an even layer. Let them cool. They will crisp up as they cool.   For the Salad: Combine the mixed baby greens, mixed berries, cooked quinoa, and toasted pecans in a large salad bowl. Mix well. To serve, divide among 4 bowls and drizzle with the Maple Dijon Vinaigrette.   For the Maple Dijon Vinaigrette: In a small bowl, whisk together all the ingredients until smooth. Heat the coconut oil in a nonstick skillet over medium heat. Pour the pecans in the skillet, spreading them out in an even layer. Cook for 4 to 5 minutes, stirring frequently, until toasted. Nuts can burn quickly, so dont walk away at this point! Youll know the pecans are done when you start to smell them. Pour them out onto the parchment-lined plate and spread in an even layer. Let them cool. They will crisp up as they cool.   Swap it! Try using romaine, red leaf lettuce, or arugula instead of the mixed baby greens to change it up. The post Very Berry Quinoa Salad with Cinnamon Toasted Pecans appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Cauliflower and Leek Pie with Onion Crust

November 3 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegan Cauliflower and Leek Pie with Onion Crust Way back in the day when I was first getting interested in vegetarian cooking, I came across Mollie Katzen’s recipe for a Cauliflower Cheese Pie, which completely blew my mind. Maybe you know the one I’m talking about? It’s such a classic. I even developed a little tribute recipe to that pie for our first cookbook. This vegan cauliflower and leek version is not as directly inspired by Katzen’s pie, but I still fondly kept it in mind while working on this recipe. Cooked cauliflower itself already tastes kind of cheesy to me, and when baked in a ‘cheesy’ but also totally plant-based sauce like in this recipe, it’s complete heaven. This pie also features caramelized leeks and an addictive, gluten-free onion-pecan crust that’s packed with flavor. It’s definitely a special enough savory pie for a holiday table, and we can’t wait to make it again for ours. Hope you’ll consider it as well! If you’ve been cooking plant-based for a while, you’ve probably heard that boiled potatoes and carrots make for a surprisingly cheesy sauce, when blended smooth with a bunch of aromatic pantry staples like nutritional yeast, garlic powder, and miso. In this recipe, we also add sun-dried tomatoes and smoked paprika to that kind of sauce, for an extra hint of umami and smokiness. We cut a whole head of cauliflower into florets and brown it, then cook it until soft on the stovetop, where we also caramelize some leeks. The cauliflower, leeks and the sauce then get cozied up into the quickly pre-baked onion pie crust and baked all together. The crust is just 5 ingredients, which is a true achievement for gluten-free baking :) This pie is delicious the day of baking, but the leftovers are also amazing (if not better), so you could definitely make it a day ahead and reheat. We will be making the whole thing on our instagram stories this afternoon, if you’d like to see the whole step-by-step process. Happy November! Wishing you all the warmth and coziness. Vegan Cauliflower and Leek Pie with Onion Crust   Print Serves: one 9-10 pie Ingredients for the crust neutral oil for oiling the pie dish 1¼ cup ground pecans (grinding directions in the recipe) ½ cup tapioca starch pinch sea salt 1 medium onion - roughly chopped 2 tablespoons ground flax seeds for the cheese sauce 1 large or 2 small white potatoes 1 medium carrot 2-3 sun dried tomato halves (soaked in hot water if not oil-packed/­­if very dry) or 1 tablespoon tomato paste ¼ cup non-dairy milk 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar 1 tablespoon miso 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1 teaspoon onion powder 1 teaspoon smoked paprika pinch of sea salt for the cauliflower and leeks avocado oil or olive oil 2 large leeks, white and light green parts only - thinly sliced sea salt red pepper flakes - to taste 1 large head of cauliflower - cut into florets Instructions to make the crust Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a 9-10 pie dish by oiling it well. Place a generous 1 cup of pecans in a food processor and grind into a flour, taking care not to over-grind. Measure out 1¼ cups of the ground pecans and transfer that amount to a large mixing bowl. Save the rest of the ground pecans for a future recipe, or see note. Add the tapioca starch and salt to the bowl, mix to combine. Add the onion to the food processor and puree it. Its okay to have some small onion chunks, but the puree should be pretty uniform. Transfer the onions to a medium bowl, add the ground flax and mix to combine. Let the mixture sit for 10 minutes, letting the flax bloom. Add the mixture to the bowl with the pecan flour and mix well to combine. Transfer the crust dough into the prepared pie dish and form an even pie crust, using a spoon and your hands. Place the crust in a freezer for 15 minutes to set. Cover the crust with parchment paper and baking beans, and blind bake for 15 minutes. Remove the cover and bake for an additional 5 minutes, until the base of the crust is dry to the touch. to make the cheese sauce Combine all the ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth. Take care not to over-blend, so that the starch in the potatoes doesnt give the sauce a gluey texture. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. to prepare the vegetables and bake the pie Preheat the oven to 350° F (175° C). Heat about 1 tablespoon of oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the leeks, a pinch of salt and red pepper flakes and cook the leeks for 8-10 minutes, until they begin to soften. Turn the heat down to low, cover the pan and cook the leeks for another 10 minutes. Remove the lid, turn the heat back up to medium and cook for another 5 minutes, until the leeks are very soft and somewhat caramelized. Transfer the leeks to a bowl and set aside. Wipe the pan clean and heat another tablespoon of oil over medium heat. Add the cauliflower florets along with a pinch of salt and mix to coat. Distribute the cauliflower in a single layer and let sear, undisturbed, for about 3 minutes, or until the undersides are nicely browned. Mix and keep cooking the cauliflower until soft throughout, for about 15 minutes. If your cauliflower is not softening, cover the pan with a lid and turn the heat down to medium-low, letting it steam until soft. Add the caramelized leeks and half of the cheese sauce to the pan and mix to combine. Transfer the cauliflower mixture to the pre-baked crust, carefully evening it out with a spoon. Add the rest of the sauce on top, evening it out. Cover the pie with parchment paper, foil, or a lid and bake for 30 minutes. Uncover and bake for another 5-10 minutes, until slightly browned on top. Let cool well before slicing. Notes If you have any leftover ground pecans, you can make a quick cheesy sprinkle by mixing them with nutritional yeast, sea salt, and black pepper to taste. Sprinkle over this pie, pasta dishes, avocado toast, etc. 3.5.3226 The post Vegan Cauliflower and Leek Pie with Onion Crust appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Celebrate National Mac and Cheese Day!

July 10 2019 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Celebrate National Mac and Cheese Day! Did you know July 14 is National Mac and Cheese Day? I cant think of a better way to celebrate this classic comfort food that to enjoy some delicious vegan mac and cheese. In honor of this special day, Im sharing one of my favorite recipes from my upcoming book, Vegan Mac & Cheese. In the coming weeks, Ill be providing sneak peeks of whats inside the book.  For now, enjoy this recipe for Buffalo Cauliflower Mac and celebrate National Mac and Cheese Day. And, in case you missed it....when you pre-order Vegan Mac & Cheese on Amazon, my publisher will send you free bonus recipes. Buffalo Cauliflower Mac Buffalo cauliflower has been making the rounds, so it should come as no surprise that it turns up in a mac uncheese. The cheesy, saucy macaroni is a perfect foil for the spicy hot cauliflower. Sauce: 1 large russet potato, cut into 1-inch (2.5 cm) chunks 1 large carrot, cut into 1-inch (2.5 cm) chunks 21/­­2 cups (600 ml) vegetable broth 2/­­3 cup (40 g) nutritional yeast 2 tablespoons (30 ml) tamari 1/­­2 teaspoon onion powder 1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder 1/­­4 teaspoon salt Cauliflower: 1 head cauliflower, cored and cut into bite-size pieces Olive oil cooking spray 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1/­­4 teaspoon salt 1/­­3 cup (80 ml) hot pepper sauce, preferably Frank’s RedHot 4 tablespoons (56 g) vegan butter, melted 1 tablespoon (15 ml) apple cider vinegar 1 teaspoon paprika Macaroni: 16 ounces (454 g) elbow macaroni, or other small pasta shape   Sauce: In a medium saucepan over medium-high heat, combine the potato, carrot, and vegetable broth. Bring to a boil and cook for 15 minutes, or until the vegetables are tender when pierced with a fork. Carefully transfer the mixture to a blender or food processor. Add the nutritional yeast, tamari, onion powder, and garlic powder, and salt. Blend until the sauce is smooth. Tasste and add more salt if needed. Set aside. Cauliflower: Preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C). Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Arrange the cauliflower in a single layer on the prepared pan. Spray the cauliflower with cooking spray, then and sprinkle with the garlic powder and salt. Roast for 20 minutes, then transfer to a large bowl and add the hot sauce, butter, vinegar, and paprika. Stir well to coat. Return the cauliflower to the baking sheet and arrange it in a single layer. Bake for 10 minutes longer. Macaroni: Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Add the pasta and cook according to the package directions until al dente. Cook the macaroni in a pot of boiling salted water until it is al dente. Drain well and return it to the pot. Stir in the reserved sauce and place the pot over low heat. Cook over low heat for a few minutes to heat through. Stir in the buffalo cauliflower and gently stir to combine. Serve hot. The post Celebrate National Mac and Cheese Day! appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Meal Plan Mini: Creamy Black Bean Bowls, Cauliflower Tacos, Raspberry Brownies

June 19 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Meal Plan Mini: Creamy Black Bean Bowls, Cauliflower Tacos, Raspberry Brownies So happy to come out with another mini meal plan! This series is one of my absolute favorite things to work on. It definitely takes a lot of planning and energy, but making interconnected recipes that flow into each other is endlessly inspiring and satisfying. This kind of work reminds me that home cooking doesn’t need to be complicated to be good, that leftovers are a true gift, and that food waste is not a necessary part of life (though it’s so hard to avoid!). This mini is even more fun than usual, since it includes a wholesome treat recipe among the savory ones. The whole thing is centered around black beans – a magical ingredient that will make its way into tacos, bowls, and brownies. As usual, we walk you through some simple prep steps and provide a shopping list for all the ingredients. If you enjoy this mini, check out this more wintery black bean meal plan we did a few months ago, as well as all our meal plans. Let’s get started :) Menu - Creamy Black Bean Bowls - Refried Black Bean and Cauliflower Tacos - Black Bean Raspberry Brownie Bites *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free, see the recipes for serving sizes Shopping List (Print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, its got all the ingredients youll need for the recipes in this meal plan mini. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Add whatever other ingredients you’ll need for the week here, if doing shopping for the whole week. Produce - 1 1/­­2 yellow onions - 1 medium red onion - 1 head of garlic (7 cloves) - 2 jalapeno peppers - 2 limes - 1 very large or 2 small heads of cauliflower - pint of cherry tomatoes - about 4 avocados - about 6 oz fresh or frozen raspberries - 1 bunch cilantro - 1 bunch scallions Bulk and Spices - 3 cups dry black beans - 2 cups rice of choice or quinoa - 1 cup untoasted cashews - 2 tablespoons ground flax seeds - black pepper - smoked paprika - chili powder - cumin seeds or ground cumin - bay leaves Staples - sea salt - olive oil or other cooking oil of choice - coconut oil - brown rice vinegar or apple cider vinegar - tahini or other nut butter - vanilla extract - cocoa powder - coconut sugar - baking powder - hot sauce (optional) Other - corn tortillas or other tortillas of choice Basic Prep 1) Cook the beans and make the Creamy Black Beans Pot of Black Beans + Creamy Black Beans   Print inspired by the Mama Eats Ebook Ingredients 3 cups dry black beans sea salt 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 yellow onion - sliced in half 1 jalape?o - slit down the side 5 cloves of garlic - smashed and peeled 2 teaspoons smoked paprika 2 teaspoons chili powder 1½ teaspoons ground cumin freshly ground black pepper 2 bay leaves juice from 1 lime Instructions Soak the beans overnight or up to 24 hours in plenty of purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar. Drain and rinse the beans. Place them in a large soup pot and cover them with purified water by about 2. Add a generous pinch of salt. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 30 minutes. Taste for doneness. If the beans are not completely soft, continue to cook until fully done. Salt at the last 10 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, remove 1½ cups of the beans to an airtight container and refrigerate until ready to make the brownies. Heat the olive oil in a medium skillet over medium heat. Add the onion halves, face down, and the jalape?o. Let sit on the heat for about 4-5 minutes, flipping the jalape?o halfway through, until the vegetables are slightly charred. Add the garlic cloves and let them get fragrant for about 30 seconds to 1 minute. Remove some water from the pot with the cooked beans, so that the beans are just covered by the water (by about 1). Add the charred onion, jalape?o, garlic, and the oil from the pan to the pot. Add the paprika, chili, cumin, another generous pinch of salt, black pepper, and bay leaves, mixing everything in. Bring the beans up to a very strong simmer over medium heat. Let simmer, with the lid askew, for 30-45 minutes, until the bean liquid has reduced and become creamy, and until the beans are buttery soft. The liquid will thicken more once it cools. Turn off the heat and mix in the lime juice. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Remove the jalape?o, onion, and bay leaves. Remove 2 cups of the creamy beans to an airtight container, catching some of the liquid but not too much. These will be used for the Refried Black Bean Cauliflower Tacos (recipe below), so keep them refrigerated until ready to make the recipe. Use the rest of the creamy beans in the Creamy Black Bean Bowls (recipe below). 3.5.3226     2) Cook the Rice or Quinoa Pot of Rice or Quinoa   Print Serves: 6 cups Ingredients 2 cups rice of choice or quinoa sea salt freshly ground black pepper (optional) olive oil (optional) brown rice vinegar (optional) Instructions Cook the rice or quinoa according to the instructions on the package (if your rice came in a package), or any other cooking method you prefer, like in a rice cooker, etc. We like to cook our rice with a generous pinch of salt, a grind of black pepper, a glug of olive oil, and a small splash of brown rice vinegar, which makes it infinitely more flavorful. Use in the Creamy Black Bean Bowls (recipe below). 3.5.3226   3) Make the Quick Pickled Onions Quick Pickled Onions   Print adapted from Simply Vibrant Ingredients ½ cup brown rice vinegar or apple cider vinegar 1 cup warm purified water 1½ teaspoons sea salt 1 medium red onion - thinly sliced Instructions Combine the vinegar, water and salt in a large glass jar. Close the jar and shake to dissolve the salt. Add the onion and shake once again to mix. Let the onions marinate at room temperature for at least 1 hour. The onions will become more flavorful as more time passes. Store refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 1 week. 3.5.3226   4) Make the Cilantro Jalape?o Crema Cilantro Jalape?o Crema   Print Serves: about 1½ cups Ingredients 1 cup untoasted cashews - soaked in water for at least 15 minutes ½ cup purified water juice from 1 lime ¼ - ½ of a jalape?o handful of cilantro (tender stems included) sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the cashews. Place them in an upright blender, along with the purified water, lime juice, jalape?o, cilantro, and sea salt to taste. Blend on high until smooth, adding small splashes of water if the sauce seems too thick. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Keep refrigerated in an airtight container. 3.5.3226   5) Roast the Cauliflower Roasted Cauliflower   Print Ingredients 1 very large or 2 small heads of cauliflower - chopped into bite-sized florets olive oil or other cooking oil of choice sea salt freshly ground black pepper ½ teaspoon cumin seeds 6 scallions - sliced into ½ pieces Instructions Preheat oven too 400° F (200° C). Prepare 2 parchment-lined baking sheets. Distribute the cauliflower between the baking sheets, drizzle with oil and sprinkle with salt, pepper, and cumin seeds. Mix to coat. Place in the oven and roast for 20 minutes. After 20 minutes, flip the cauliflower on both trays and add the scallions, mixing them into the cauliflower. Roast for 10-15 more minutes, or until the cauliflower is very soft and caramelized and the scallions are slightly charred. 3.5.3226     Recipes These bowls are all about the creamy black beans, which make the best case for cooking beans from scratch. They turn out so velvety and flavorful, and you can change up the spices and aromatics based on your preferences. They’re delicious simply served over something starchy like rice or quinoa. But a few of our punchy, colorful toppings from prep day take them to that completely next level. Best part? These bowls come together in no time since you’ve done all the prep. Creamy Black Bean Bowls   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients about 5 cups creamy black beans (recipe above) about 6 cups cooked rice or quinoa (recipe above) quick pickled onions (recipe above) cilantro jalape?o crema (recipe above) other topping suggestions cubed avocado sliced cherry tomatoes fresh cilantro leaves sliced green onion Instructions Serve the warm creamy black beans in individually portioned bowls, over warmed rice/­­quinoa, topped with quick pickled onions, crema, avocado, tomatoes, cilantro, and/­­or green onion. 3.5.3226   We’re so obsessed with these tacos! They repurpose the creamy black beans in a refried bean scenario, which gives them a totally new life. In addition, the tortillas get loaded up with our roasted cauliflower and scallions, quick pickled onions, crema, tomatoes, cilantro, and/­­or any other toppings you like on your tacos. The result is a perfectly filling and flavorful package that we crave constantly. Refried Black Bean and Cauliflower Tacos   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the refried beans olive oil or other cooking oil of choice ½ yellow onion - diced sea salt ½ teaspoon chili powder 1 teaspoon smoked paprika freshly ground black pepper 2 cloves of garlic - minced 2 cups creamy black beans (from above) for the tacos refried black beans (recipe above) warmed corn tortillas or other tortillas of choice warmed roasted cauliflower and scallions (recipe above) cilantro jalape?o crema (recipe above) quick pickled onions (recipe above) cubed avocado sliced cherry tomatoes fresh cilantro leaves hot sauce (optional) Instructions to make the refried beans Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the onion and a pinch of sea salt, and sauté until translucent, about 7 minutes. Add the chili powder, smoked paprika, black pepper, and garlic, and mix everything in for about 30 seconds, until fragrant. Mix in the beans and let them warm through. Mash the beans with a potato masher or a fork right in the skillet, until most of them are mashed, with some whole pieces remaining throughout. Cook for an additional 2 minutes, adding small splashes of water if the beans seem too dry. Taste for salt and adjust when needed. Serve warm in the tacos. to make the tacos Spread a generous amount of black beans in the bottom of each tortilla. Top with the roasted cauliflower and scallions, dollops of crema, quick pickled onions, avocado, tomatoes, cilantro, and hot sauce, if using. Enjoy right away. 3.5.3226   We consider these brownies to be in the snacking category as opposed to being a full-on dessert. They still feel like a treat, but definitely not your most decadent treat in the world. They’re great for lunch boxes, and it’s always a good idea to keep a batch in the freezer for a wholesome dessert option. The raspberries are pretty crucial here. They contribute to the moistness of the brownies, and their tart berry flavor just goes so perfectly with the chocolatey brownies. Black Bean Raspberry Brownie Bites   Print Serves: 12 brownies Ingredients 2 tablespoons ground flax seeds 1½ cups plain cooked black beans (from recipe above) 3 tablespoons soft coconut oil, plus more for oiling the tin 2 tablespoons tahini, almond butter, or other nut butter of choice 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 3/­­4 cup cocoa powder ½ cup + 2 tablespoons coconut sugar 1 1/­­2 teaspoons baking powder pinch of sea salt about 6 oz fresh raspberries (or frozen but not thawed) Instructions Preheat oven to 350°F (175° C). Prepare a 12 hole muffin tin by oiling each hole with soft coconut oil. In a small bowl, combine the ground flax with 6 tablespoons of water. Whisk together and let sit while you prepare the rest of the ingredients. In a large bowl, mash the black beans until smooth. Add the oil, tahini/­­nut butter, vanilla, cocoa, sugar, baking powder, and salt to the bowl. Mix everything together until smooth. Fold in the flax mixture, which should be thickened to a raw egg-like consistency at this point. Carefully fold in the raspberries. You can also do all this mashing and mixing in a food processor if you prefer. Distribute the brownie mixture in the oiled muffin tin, patting it down into the muffin holes somewhat evenly. I like to use slightly dampened hands for this, but you can also use a wetted spoon. Place in the oven and bake for 25-30 minutes, until the brownies are dry to the touch on the outside and fudgy on the inside. Let cool for at least 15 minutes before removing the brownies from the pan. Keep refrigerated or frozen in an air-tight container. 3.5.3226 The post Meal Plan Mini: Creamy Black Bean Bowls, Cauliflower Tacos, Raspberry Brownies appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Everyday Pull-Apart Chick’n Seitan

January 18 2021 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Everyday Pull-Apart Chick’n Seitan Makes 4 pounds This is the layery, flaky textured vegan chicken of your dinnertime dreams! I wanted something comparable to store-bought vegan chickn, but like, better? Its just the thing to simmer away on a Sunday then store and use throughout the week. The recipe is not difficult but it does require a few items, such as cheeseclotch and twine, which will only make you feel more cheffy than you already do. The cheesecloth also gives the outer layer a nice pin-prick texture that sears beautifully. The gist of the recipe is that the seitan dough is processed into a soft dough that is somehow clumpy yet totally holds together. Its then gathered pulled, twisted, bundled and simmered, creating a pull-apart texture that is reminiscent of the finest fakest meat. But it tastes so much better when it comes from your kitchen! The flavoring is subtle and versatile enough for everything from a South Asian stir-fry to an Italian parmesan. Theres just a touch of turmeric to lend luster and brighten up the color, pea protein gives it a good nice meatiness and texture. Would it work with something besides pea protein? I dont know! I didnt try it! But I really think the pea is key. For the simmering broth, use a diluted bullion. Just something lightly flavored to keep the flavors mellow. I’ll post more recipes for how to use it. It takes to marinades well and browns beautifully! Grilled, fried, shredded for soups, it’s so fantastically versatile and soaks up flavor like a champ. PS Thanks to Avocado & Ales, the inventor of Chickwheat, which is the shreddiest of shreddy seitan chickn! I used her method of food processing the seitan to give it a bit of that shreddy texture. If you are looking for realllllly shreddy chickn, check that one out. But Im sure you already have. This one is more chunky and pull apart. Like the title says.  Creating Perfect Simmered Seitan Bundles: A romance era novella ~ This recipe is not difficult. But often when people say something “isn’t difficult”, are they just talking you off the ledge? If it isnt difficult why would you have to even say that? Thus, in short, what I mean is that its not difficult IF you pay attention and read the directions, because every step counts. So read this in bed, the night before you make it, and then dream of perfect little seitan bundles. ~ Part 1: Cheesecloth. First of all, make sure you have cheesecloth and twine. Cut the cheesecloth into the proper sizes before beginning and set it aside. When wrapping, dont go too tight or it will make the chickn denser than intended. It will still be good! But this isnt a boustier. Leave some slack, because the seitan soaks in moisture and plumps up, leading to the layery, light shreds we are going for. If that sounds vague, hows this: make sure you can pull the cheesecloth about 1/­­2 an inch away from the seitan once its wrapped. So, snug and secure, with a little room to breath. ~ Part 2: Mind your broth temp. If the broth is too hot you can water log the seitan, but this is very easy to prevent. Before adding the seitan, bring the broth up to a low boil, then lower the heat so that its not boiling at all, just very hot. Then add the seitan bundles. When you add the seitan, the broth temperature will drop even more. Bring the heat up slightly. During this time, the seitan will be developing a skin which will protect it from becoming, as they say, seitan brains. Once it is on this low heat for about 20 minutes, you can raise the heat to a low boil. Now its really cooking! Cook this way for about 45 more minutes, with the lid ajar, using tongs to rotate the bundles every 15 minutes or so. ~Part 3: Cool it now. The cooling off stage is crucial, as if your seitan is heading from a hot spring to a spa at a ski resort. Turn the heat off and let the seitan cool in the broth. This can take an hour or so, but its worth it for perfectly cooked fake chicken. If you have a cool place to put it, thats great. An open porch? A safe fire escape? OK, now that you have attended the Ladys School For Seitan, you should be well prepared to strike out on your own. Have fun and remember: you were made for this! Ingredients For the Chick’n Seitan: 2 cups water 1 tablespoon olive oil 2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar 1 1/­­2 teaspoons salt 2 teaspoons onion powder 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1/­­2 teaspoon white pepper 1/­­8 teaspoon turmeric 1/­­4 cup nutritional yeast flakes 1/­­2 cup pea protein flour 1 1/­­2 cups vital wheat gluten For the broth: 10 cups chickeny vegetable broth 8 bay leaves Directions Have ready 4 nine-inch double layered cheesecloth squares and twine. In a food processor fit with a metal blade, whiz together water, olive oil, apple cider vinegar, salt, onion powder, garlic powder, white pepper and turmeric. Add nutritional yeast and pea protein and process until smooth, about 30 seconds.  Now add the vital wheat gluten and pulse in. Once it is all incorporated, process on low for about 5 minutes. It will be very stretchy, stringy and pliable. Give the motor a break once in awhile if your processor cant handle it.  Divide the dough into 4 even-ish pieces. From this point, be careful not to overhandle the seitan because you want it to retain its texture, which will allow it to separate nicely once cooked.  Gently roll a glob of gluten into an 8 inch roll. Fold in half, give a twist and pull again so its about 6 inches long. This creates the layers. Wrap in cheesecloth, snugly but not tightly, it will expand. Tie with each end with twine. Proceed with the remaining pieces and let rest while you prepare the broth. In a large (8-quart) pot bring broth to a boil. Lower heat. Add the seitan bundles. Let stew very gently without boiling for about 15 minutes. When skin is set, place the lid ajar for steam to escape and low boil for about 45 more minutes.  Cool completely in broth. Pull apart and use how ever you want! It tastes best if browned in some olive oil first.

Oatmilk Coconut Eggnog

December 23 2020 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Oatmilk Coconut Eggnog Makes about 1 1/­­2 quarts Photo by James Walmsley I love this recipe because its thick without any thickeners, has lots of warming spice and the secret ingredient – apple cider vinegar – lends just the slightest tang that vegan nogs are sometimes missing. The turmeric is there to give that telltale eggy glow but also adds a little flavor. If you have a vanilla bean, definitely scrape it in here instead of the extract. And if you dont want to grate fresh nutmeg no prob, just use pre-ground. No one is judging. But I find it very satisfying to have that little dose of aromatherapy while grating a fresh nutmeg pod. Serve warm or cold, with about 2 ounces rum per each cup of nog if youre feeling boozy.  Ingredients 2 1/­­2 cups plain oatmilk 1/­­2 teaspoon ground turmeric 1/­­4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/­­4 teaspoon ground ginger 1 teaspoon fresh ground nutmeg 1/­­2 cup sugar 2 14 oz cans coconut milk 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract Cinnamon sticks for garnish Directions Preheat oven to 350 F. Line an 8×8 baking pan with parchment paper and spray lightly with cooking spray. In a large mixing bowl, stir together peanut butter, maple syrup, and brown rice syrup, until smooth. A strong fork usually gets the job done, pretty well. Mix in the oil, vanilla, and salt. Mix in the oatmeal and crisp rice cereal. Start with the fork and then wet your hands and knead together well. Be very firm, the cereal should even crunch up a bit as youre kneading, and you should have a compact, slightly crumbly mixture. Add the peanuts and chocolate chips, and once again, knead until well distributed. Transfer the mixture to the prepared pan, and press very firmly and as evenly as you can. Bake for 22 to 25 minutes, the sides should be golden. Remove from oven and let cool completely. Remove from pan by pulling up the sides of the parchment. Now slice into 8 squares and serve! The best way to slice is to use a chefs knife, and press down in one firm motion. Do not saw the bars. Store bars in the fridge in individually plastic wrap and they should keep for at least 5 days.

Pumpkin Spice Pancakes

September 15 2020 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Pumpkin Spice Pancakes Makes 6 six-inch pancakes The most pumpkiniest pancakes Autumn is so bittersweet in the midwest. The bitter part: knowing In a few weeks youll be underdressed in your denim jacket no matter how many flannels youve got on. How all the therapeutic lamps in the world cant replace the feeling of a walk on the beach. And this winter there will be no escape as the pandemic rages on. But the sweet part, at least in the midwest right now: the earthy autumn breeze that somehow feels like it’s the beginning of something, the way it forces you into the moment, and really, the moment is all weve got. Well, except for Ive ALSO got a 6-pack of canned pumpkin puree and a bulk amount of Penzeys Pumpkin Spice. So I am going to make this pumpkin moment count. Today, with pancakes. Recipes Notes ~ If you have an allergy ok, use a different milk (obviously) but I have to admit that soy milk works best for me in pancakes! ~ This recipe uses 1/­­2 of a can of pumpkin puree. I did this so that it’s easy to double by simply just using the full can! I will also post some recipes for using the other 1/­­2 of the can, so stay tuned. ~ I have so many “alternative” flours that I got at the start of the pandemic and now need to use. If you don’t have spelt flour, AP flour will be just fine. Probably even better, honestly. Ingredients 1 3/­­4 cup unsweetened soy milk, divided 2 tablespoons ground flax seed 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar 3/­­4 cup canned pumpkin puree 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 3 tablespoons pure maple syrup 1 1/­­2 cups spelt flour 1 tablespoon pumpkin pie spice 1 tablespoon baking powder 1/­­4 teaspoon baking soda 1/­­2 teaspoon salt Directions 1 – In a large mixing bowl, use a whisk to vigorously mix 1/­­2 cup of milk with the flax seeds and apple cider vinegar for about a minute. It should be thick and viscous. Add the remaining milk, pumpkin puree, olive oil and maple syrup and whisk until smooth.  2 – Sift in the flour, pumpkin pie spice, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Whisk until relatively smooth, some lumps are okay, be careful not to overmix. 3 – Let the batter rest for about 5 minutes. Preheat a large non-stick skillet over medium heat. Lightly spray the pan with cooking oil. Scoop scant 1/­­2 cups of batter into the pan, and then, you know, make pancakes.

High-Vibe Condiment Classics

May 23 2020 My New Roots 

High-Vibe Condiment Classics Summer is fast-approaching (at last!) and I dont know about you, but to me this means grilling, eating outside, and enjoying all of the classic, warm-weather treats. But wait! Did you know that there are all kinds of funky ingredients hiding in the most innocuous places, like your ketchup, mustard and relish?! We shouldnt have to forgo these truly classic condiments just because were walking on the whole foods path. No way! So I decided to do a high-vibe makeover all of the condiments that youd find at a barbecue, picnic, or baseball game: ketchup, mustard, honey mustard, Dijon, relish, mayo and secret sauce, without any refined ingredients, colours, or preservatives. They are entirely vegan (except for the honey mustard), and taste absolutely incredible.  Making your own condiments from scratch is empowering, and you too will see that by whisking up your very own mustard, or blending your very own ketchup that you are incredibly capable in the kitchen! Its a serious delight to realize that youre not only qualified to make things you thought you needed to buy, but that youre also doing yourself a giant favour in cutting questionable ingredients out of your life. When I was a kid, I loved hotdogs with mustard and relish (not ketchup, that was for burgers). The vinegary tang of the yellow mustard with the sweetness of pickle relish perfectly offset the salty squishiness of a microwaved wiener. This was a typical Saturday lunch, with doughnuts for dessert, all washed down with a giant glass of milk. I wanted to recreate that nostalgia, minus pretty much everything else. The flavours bring me back to simple times and simple food. But simple food is not always so simple. Have you read the ingredients on a squeeze bottle of relish lately? Its a complicated collection of chemicals that I certainly wouldnt want in my body. High-fructose corn syrup, natural flavour, and food colouring are just a few of the ingredients that plague most tasty toppings. Food additives are everywhere, especially in shelf-stable products. If youre not going to refrigerate something or preserve it properly, it has to have things in it to prevent it from spoiling. It also has to look appealing and taste good, even after months (or years!) on a grocery store shelf. That is why it is so important to read labels and be discerning about what you choose to buy. This is not to say that these additives are inherently harmful, but they are far from natural, and Im a believer in eating as close to the earth as possible! Luckily my condiments are not only based on whole foods, but they taste amazing and are actually good for you.    Here is a small list of the food additives to watch out for and avoid, if possible. Remember to check the packages of your other summer favourites, like chips, salad dressings, sparkling beverages, soda and juice, ice cream, popsicles, and frozen yogurt.  High Fructose Corn Syrup Sometimes labeled HFCS, this highly-refined artificial sweetener has become the number one source of calories in North America. It is found in almost all processed foods, since it is cheap to make, shelf-stable, super sweet, and highly addictive. Excessive consumption has been linked to obesity, and type 2 diabetes. Watch out for it in condiments, salad dressing, bread, candy, soda, yogurt, breakfast cereals, even canned vegetables and fruit.  Natural Flavours This is a sneaky term meant to throw you off. When you see these words on an ingredient list, they refer to a naturally-derived flavouring agent that has to be extracted from plant or animal sources, designed to enhance the taste of food. Conversely, artificial flavours are synthetically created, with their original sources being manmade chemicals. Natural flavours however, are still made in laboratories by food chemists who can add any numbers of chemicals, including preservatives, solvents and other substances, which are defined as incidental additives, to what they are creating. Food manufacturers are not required to disclose whether these additives come from natural or synthetic sources, and as long as the original flavouring comes from plant or animal material, they can be classified as natural. The point is, natural flavours dont appear to be any healthier than artificial flavours, and they can still contain ingredients that may cause reactions in sensitive individuals, especially children. To avoid them, cut back on packaged products and stick to the real-deal whole foods!  Food Dyes /­­ Colours To make food look bright, fresh, and especially appealing to children, food manufacturers add dyes to obvious things like candy, sports drinks and baked goods, but also not-so-obvious things like condiments (!), pickles, cereals, salad dressing, yogurt, and chocolate milk. Some of these dyes are approved for use in certain countries, while others have banned them, making it challenging for consumers to navigate. The safety of food dyes is controversial, especially in regards to children. Studies have linked them to hyperactivity in sensitive kids, and they may cause allergic reactions in some people. Because most food dyes are found in unhealthy processed foods, its easy to avoid them if youre sticking to a more natural diet.  Hydrogenated /­­ Partially Hydrogenated Oils You know when the World Health Organization plans on eliminating these fats from the global food supply, they must be pretty problematic. Created by forcing hydrogen gas into vegetable fats under extremely high pressure to turn liquid into solid, hydrogenation creates trans fats, which increases the amount of LDL cholesterol, lowers HDL cholesterol, therefore significantly increasing the risk of coronary heart disease. Whats more is that these fats are pro-inflammatory. Although their use has been banned in several countries, trans fats still lurk in many processed foods.  As long as there is less than .5% per serving, it isnt required in to be listed in the ingredients or nutritional information. The best way to avoid them is by cutting out processed foods, especially margarine, coffee creamer, chips and crackers, frozen pizza, fast foods, baked goods, and microwave popcorn.   Health Claims – these are put on the front of the box to lure you in, and can include buzz words like natural, whole grain, low-fat, no added sugar, organic, light, low calorie, gluten-free, and enriched. Terms like these should be a red flag for you, so read the entire label, including the ingredient list, the serving size, the amount and types of sweetener and fat used. Think critically and be selective – if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.  The bottom line?! Stick to whole, or minimally-processed foods and ingredients as often as possible. Its better for you, and your family to make your own from scratch whenever possible. Not to mention, its fun to brag to everyone that youre a condiment master, a yogurt wizard, or a salad dressing whisperer.  I had so much FUN with these recipes! It was a blast to brainstorm which condiments I would attempt to health-ify, experiment with, and eventually master to make them all easy-to-make and delicious. My condiments wont last years in the fridge, but all of them passed the two-week mark with flying colours (all of them natural, of course). As long as youre using clean utensils to scoop out your servings, you shouldnt have a problem keeping these toppings around for a few weeks – ya know, if you can ration them for that long!  Yellow Mustard This was in fact my first attempt at making yellow mustard and it proved to be ridiculously easy! I think Id built it up in my head to be some complicated project, but wow was I mistaken. Just a few simple ingredients, and a little stovetop whisking will get you the brightest, tangiest, most beautiful ballpark mustard of your dreams! I must warn you, from one condiment-master to another, that the bubbling mixture gets darn hot and tends to splatter when its cooking. To avoid scalding yourself, use the pot lid as s shield (insert laughing emoji here).      Print recipe     Yellow Mustard Makes 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml Ingredients:  1 cup /­­ 250ml cold water 3/­­4 cup dry mustard powder 3/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­2 tsp. ground turmeric 1/­­2 tsp. garlic powder 1/­­8 tsp. ground paprika 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml apple cider vinegar Directions: 1. In a small saucepan, whisk together water, dry mustard, salt, turmeric, garlic, and paprika until smooth. Cook the mixture over medium-low to low heat, stirring often, until it bubbles down to a thick paste, 30 to 45 minutes. 2. Whisk the apple cider vinegar into the mustard mixture and continue to cook until its thickened to the desired consistency – this can take between 5 and 15 minutes depending on how thick you like it.  3. Let the mustard cool to room temperature. Transfer the mustard to an airtight glass jar or container, and refrigerate for up to 3 months.  Honey Mustard Depending on how sweet you like your honey mustard, its just the above yellow mustard recipe with as much honey stirred in as you like! I added two tablespoons and it was perfect for me, but if you want even more, got for it. I recommend avoiding very runny honey, since this will loosen the mustard. Instead, opt for something on the thicker side to maintain the consistency. If youre vegan, brown rice or date syrup would be the best choices, since they are more viscous than maple syrup, for example. I love this on sandwiches with lots of fresh veggies and sprouts!     Print recipe     Honey Mustard Makes 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml Ingredients: 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml yellow mustard (recipe above) 2 Tbsp. raw honey Directions: 1. Combine the mustard and the honey. Taste and add more honey if desired. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 3 months.  Grainy Dijon Mustard This style of Dijon is a whole-seed one, which is my favourite because of the great texture and colour variations. Its spicy and complex, and will only get better with time. Keep in mind that this recipe is in two stages, the first one requiring you to soak your mustard seeds the night before you plan on blending.      Print recipe     Grainy Dijon Mustard Makes 1 cup /­­ 250ml  Ingredients: 1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g yellow mustard seeds 1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g black mustard seeds 1/­­2 Tbsp. ground mustard 1/­­3 cup /­­ 75ml white wine vinegar 1/­­3 cup /­­ 75ml apple cider vinegar 2 tsp. maple syrup 1/­­2 tsp. sea salt Directions: 1. Combine all ingredients and refrigerate overnight (for 12-24 hours) to allow the mustard seeds to soften and absorb the flavours. 2. Place mixture in blender and mix on high for a minute or two, until the seeds have broken and the mustard thickens. 3. Transfer contents to a clean jar and enjoy! Dijon will keep for about one month in the refrigerator. Sweet Pickle Relish This was the most anticipated condiment to try and make myself, since its one of my favourites, but also one of the worst offenders for additives. I successfully recreated that gorgeous tang, and succulent texture of commercial relish that I loved so much as a kid. The taste of this one is off the charts! My recipe uses coconut sugar instead of refined sugar and syrups, so the colour is a little darker and browner than the conventional types, but I dont think youll notice – and you certainly wont miss the food colouring!     Print recipe     Sweet Pickle Relish Makes 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 340g finely diced cucumber 1/­­2 cup /­­ 85g finely diced yellow onion 1 tsp. salt, divided  1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml apple cider vinegar  1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g coconut sugar 1/­­4 tsp. garlic powder 1 tsp. yellow mustard seeds 1 tsp. dried dill 1/­­4 tsp. turmeric 1/­­4 red bell pepper, finely diced 1 tsp. arrowroot, dissolved in 2 tsp. water Directions: 1. Toss the cucumber and onion with 3/­­4 teaspoon of salt in a sieve set over a bowl, and let drain for about 3 hours. Next, press the ingredients against side of sieve to release as much liquid as possible, then discard liquid from bowl.  2. Bring the vinegar, coconut sugar, and remaining 1/­­4 teaspoon of salt to a boil in a small saucepan, stirring until sugar has dissolved, then simmer until reduced to about a 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml (just eyeball it), about 3 to 4 minutes. Add the garlic, mustard, dill, and turmeric, stir until fragrant, about 1-2 minutes. 3. Add the drained cucumber and onion mixture, plus diced red bell pepper, and simmer, stirring for about 2 minutes. Make the arrowroot slurry, then whisk it into the relish. Simmer, stirring, 2-3 minutes until noticeably thickened. Turn off the heat and transfer relish to a glass jar or storage container and leave uncovered until it cools to room temperature, then put in the fridge. The relish will keep for up to a month in the fridge.  Tomato Ketchup This ketchup was an old blog post that I revisited and revised. I used to make this recipe in the oven, but my new method eliminates the need to crank up the heat when its probably the last thing you want to do. Instead, the whole thing is made on the stove, then blitzed up in the blender. Its deeply spiced and complex, so much more interesting than store-bought ketchup. The first time I made the new version, I used a good portion of it for a soup base, then added more to a dip – both were delicious, so if you have leftovers, put it to use in an unexpected place. Its tasty with everything!      Print recipe     Tomato Ketchup Makes 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 1 Tbsp. coconut oil (expeller-pressed, flavour neutral)  3 star whole anise (make sure they are whole to remove easily!) 3 bay leaves 1 tsp. ground coriander pinch of chili flakes  1 large onion, chopped  3/­­4 tsp. sea salt  1/­­4 tsp. freshly ground black pepper 3 cloves garlic, minced 2.2 lbs. /­­ 1 kg tomatoes  2 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar 1 Tbsp. maple syrup  Directions: 1. Melt the coconut oil in a medium stockpot, then add the star anise, bay leaves, coriander, and chili flakes. Cook until fragrant about 2 minutes, then add the onions, salt and pepper, and cook until slightly browned, about 10 mins. Next add the add garlic, cook for 1-2 minutes, then add balsamic vinegar, scraping any stuck bits off the bottom of the pot. Add tomatoes and their juices, then bring to a simmer.  2. Cook on low heat for about 60 mins or until reduced and starting to caramelize on the bottom of the pot.  3. Turn off heat and remove bay and anise, add maple syrup. Let cool slightly and transfer to a blender, blend until smooth. Taste, and adjust seasoning to suit your taste.  4. Let cool to room temperature, then transfer to an airtight glass container and store in the fridge. Keeps for about one month.   Aquafaba Mayonnaise This was the most exciting discovery to make: vegan mayo using aquafaba! Aqua faba translates to bean water and its the cooking liquid from chickpeas. Although any can of chickpeas will have this, I make my own, since there are no additives or chemicals that have leached from the can itself. If you cook your own chickpeas from dried, you have aquafaba. Although I wouldnt normally consume large amounts of aquafaba, in this case its used in such a small amount that I think its fine. Plus, did I mention it makes vegan mayo?! The results are so unbelievably shocking and delightful that Im a convert, even though I eat eggs! I highly suggest using the most neutral-tasting olive oil you can find for this recipe. Since it makes up the majority of the flavour of the mayonnaise, a strong-tasting olive oil will overpower the delicate nature of this condiment. I used the one from Pineapple Collaborative, which works perfectly. I also tried avocado oil, grapeseed, and sunflower, but didnt like the results as much as mild olive oil. Its up to you! You can really use whatever you have on hand, just keep in mind that it will really dictate the taste of the final result.      Print recipe     Aquafaba Mayonnaise Makes about 1 cup /­­ 250ml Ingredients: 3 Tbsp. aquafaba 1/­­4 tsp. Dijon mustard 1/­­4 tsp. fine salt 1 1/­­2 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tsp. apple cider vinegar 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml mild olive oil (or other light-tasting oil) Directions: 1. Place the aquafaba in the bottom of a wide-mouth jar. Add the mustard, salt, lemon juice, vinegar, and the olive oil. Allow a minute for the oil to separate into a distinct layer. 2. Insert an immersion blender all the way to the bottom of the jar. (Note: this will not work with an upright blender) Start the blending process on medium speed and do not lift the blender until the mixture has thickened and turned white at the bottom of the jar. Only then, slowly move the blender up, waiting for the oil to incorporate as you go, until you get the texture of mayonnaise. Use immediately; refrigerate leftovers in a tightly sealed jar for up to 1 month. The mayonnaise will thicken slightly once cooled in the fridge. Smoky Secret Sauce This is the creamy, tangy, and perfectly seasoned sauce that most famously adorns the Big Mac burger from McDonalds. Whats best about my version is that it has zero secrets...nothing weird to hide here! I had the most fun with this recipe, since it required a number of the condiments that Id already made as ingredients. I did deviate a tad from the original and added smoked paprika, since I love the added dimension of smoke flavour to anything thats going on grilled food, but Ive also found this to be a stellar salad dressing, especially for chop-style salads that have chunky, less delicate ingredients. I hope you find some fun things to slather it on this summer. Its lip-smakingly tasty!      Print recipe     Smoky Secret Sauce Makes 1 cup /­­ 250ml Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml aquafaba mayonnaise (recipe above) 1 tablespoon yellow mustard (recipe above) 2 tablespoons sweet pickle relish (recipe above) 1 tsp. maple syrup 1/­­2 teaspoon white wine vinegar 1/­­2 teaspoon paprika 1/­­4 tsp. smoked paprika (not traditional, but delicious!) 1/­­4 teaspoon garlic powder 1/­­4 teaspoon onion powder Directions: 1. Fold all ingredients together in a small bowl or jar. Enjoy immediately, and store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for 2-3 weeks.    As a bonus, Ive included this stellar recipe for carrot hot dogs – since youll need a high-vibe wiener to put your condiments on! Hahaaa! I realize that carrot hot dogs are pretty 2018, but Id never tried them before and it was a very amusing undertaking. I looked at a number of recipes online and my version is a mash-up of the ones that sounded the most delicious. My method is also much easier and faster than other versions Ive seen, since its just a braise on the stove and a quick grill (no marinating, steaming, roasting, etc).  The important thing to keep in mind for this recipe, is that the amount of time you braise the carrots for,Im  will be dictated by the girth of the carrots. Mine were more sausage-sized (approx 1.5 or 3.5-3.75 cm) than a typical hot dog wiener, and a 20-minute simmer was the perfect amount. If your carrots are smaller, Id go down to 15 minutes. Insert a sharp knife to check on the doneness after 10 minutes or so, and take them out when they are tender, but way before they get mushy. Remember that youre also going to be grilling them for 10 minutes so they will cook even more, and you dont want them too soft. The final result should be tender all the way through, but shouldnt fall apart in your mouth.     Print recipe     Carrot Hot Dogs Serves 8 Ingredients: 8 large hot dog-sized carrots 8 hot dog buns 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml tamari 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml apple cider vinegar  1 cup /­­ 250ml vegetable broth or 1 tsp. vegetable bullion powder + 1 cup water 2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 2 Tbsp. coconut oil (preferably expeller-pressed, flavour neutral) 1 Tbsp. liquid smoke 2 tsp. yellow mustard 1 tsp. garlic powder 1 tsp. paprika 1/­­2 tsp. onion powder 1/­­2 tsp. ground black pepperWash and peel carrots. Round the edges of the carrot to look more like wieners, if desired.  Direcitons: 1. Whisk all marinade ingredients together in a large stockpot with a lid. Add the peeled carrots and bring to a boil, reduce to a gentle simmer, and cook with the lid on for about 20 minutes (less if your carrots are on the thin side, see headnote). Remove from heat and turn on the grill.  2. Grill the carrots over medium-high, turning every couple of minutes, basting them with the remaining braising liquid if desired. Cook until slightly charred and fragrant, 10 minutes total. Grill or toast the buns. Place a carrot on each bun and enjoy with all of the condiments! I wish you all an incredible summer ahead! I recognize that this season is going to look very different from years past, but as long as were all healthy and the sun is shining, weve got it pretty good. Stay safe out there, and keep fuelling your body with the whole foods it needs to thrive and feel alive!  All love and happy condiment-making, Sarah B The post High-Vibe Condiment Classics appeared first on My New Roots.

The Spring Supper Salad

April 23 2020 My New Roots 

The Spring Supper Salad Greetings, friends! For fun I am resurrecting one of the blog posts I wrote back in 2010 – a warm butter bean salad bowl, garlic-roasted carrots and wild rice. Why I am re-publishing a decade-old recipe? Well, for one I thought that there are a bunch of new followers around here who have never even seen this delight (hello, by the way)! Second, most of you who have been here since the beginning may have forgotten about it. Third, its the ideal pantry staple recipe. And lastly, because its very, very delicious. Creamy butter beans, golden garlic-y carrots coins, chewy wild rice, crisp and bright pickled onions, silky kale, and refreshing dill, all coming together with a lick-your-lips mustardy dressing that is divine on just about everything – this salad and beyond. I’ve also re-named it the Spring Supper Salad because it’s the perfect seasonal transition meal (yea baby, it’s definitely a meal) incorporating both winter and spring produce and flavours, as we make our way into the light of the upswing! Hooray! This recipe brings back so many memories for me. It was around this time that I had been working in restaurants in Copenhagen for about 3 years. I loved my job, and could hardly believe that someone actually paid me to spend all day in a hot, cramped kitchen, cooking a dozen new dishes every day without a menu or recipes – definitely still in the honeymoon phase. I felt confident in the food I was making, applying my deep understanding of nutrition to recipe development, and I used every day to push myself creatively, keenly aware of how fast I was learning and growing. I was certainly in the vortex, and it was a very exciting time of my life.  I started my shift around 8 am, and the majority of my dishes needed to be ready at 12 noon when we opened the doors for lunch. This is a relatively short window of time to pump out 200 servings of anything, but after some years, I developed short cuts that would deliver a lot of flavour in a hurry. One of these short cuts, was garlic oil – the first thing I would make after tying my apron strings, that would act as a marinade, a roasting medium, and a base for soups, stews, dressings and sauces for the entire day. In fact, I dont think that there were many dishes coming off of my station that didnt have garlic in them back then (such an easy way to make things taste good!). This oil sat on my bench and it got tossed into all the things, and all the people kept coming back for more.  One thing I loved using the garlic oil on, was winter veggies. I could toss them in said liquid gold, crank up the oven, and in half an hour, Id have a blistered, glistening pile of roasted rainbow roots to serve, only needing a squeeze of lemon juice and a smattering of fresh herbs to make it presentable. Who wouldnt want to dive into that?! Plus, it was cheap. Like most restaurants, we were always looking at the bottom line and how we could make even the most humble foods taste exquisite. Garlic oil was the ticket.  At the restaurant, my signature move was combining veggies, grains, and beans in exciting ways (which was very novel at the time!) so this dish emerged from a commercial ovens worth of garlic-roasted carrots needing a home. With some tender and creamy butter beans coming off the stove, and some day-old, steamed wild rice calling out to me from the fridge, this combination came together very organically, taking the varied textures, colours, and flavours into consideration.  The secret to this dish is the consistency of the garlic in the oil. Different from mincing garlic and adding it to oil, here you must must must grate it or blend it up together so it becomes almost paste-like. This way, the garlic goes everywhere the oil does, and evenly caramelizes into the most divine, delectable gold, thats mellow and sweet and roast-y. You will not hate it. Stop! Fiber time. Fiber is probably the least sexy and alluring of all the nutrients we hear about. Its all about Protein! Fat! And if you hear about carbohydrates, its probably something ignorant and unfair (I really hate jerks picking on macronutrients, back off!). Fiber seems pretty boring and something only your grandmother cares about, so why do you need to?   One reason that plant-rich diets are so health-sustaining, is not only due to their high fiber content, but their potential for fiber diversity. In the past, fiber has been broken down into two main categories: soluble and insoluble. Whats new and exciting in this field of research, is that we can see that fiber can be broken down into several more categories (viscous, non-viscous, non-starch polysaccharides, resistant starches etc.) each one bringing forth the potential for diversified food sources for our gut bacteria. In short, the greater the diversity of plants we eat, the greater the diversity of our microbiome.  Why does this matter? Because our gut is the foundation for our overall health. If weve got a wide range of troops on the front lines of our immune system, the better our chances are for not just surviving, but thriving. The fiber we eat also feeds our good bacteria, and specific types of fiber feed specific types of bacteria. Enjoy eating the widest variety of plants you can, to ensure that youre supporting the widest variety of good guys in your digestive system. They will repay you in spades Im tellin ya!  The foods with the highest amounts of fiber are beans and lentils, vegetables, fruits, grains, and nuts and seeds (remember that there is no fiber in animal-based foods). Different proportions of soluble, insoluble fiber, as well as viscous /­­ non-viscous fiber, and fermentable fiber can be found in all of these food groups, it is highly recommended that you eat from each of them. And instead of focusing on grams (the minimum daily recommended intake is a measly 25g, not that were talking about that…), we need to focus on diversity. Enjoy as many plant-based foods as you can, and experience the terrain of your body slowly begin to change. Everything comes back to the gut, and not just what you are eating, but what your gut-bacteria are eating too. With this dish, youll be feeding those good guys with fiber from six different plants! Talk about a solid mix. Beans, whole grains, 3 different veggies, plus herbs, add up to serious fiber diversity. Good, good, good fiberations! The fun thing about revisiting this recipe, was seeing if there was anything I would change this time around. I have learned so much and grown incredibly as a cook in the past ten years, so I was surprised that I didnt have many tweaks to make. The only two things I felt this salad needed was a dark leafy green and a pickle – classic Sarah B moves at this point! Since we still dont have any spring greens happening yet, I decided kale was the winner, and obviously it needed to be massaged! I turned the red onions in the original recipe into a quick pickle, as this is another indispensable kitchen technique that Ive learned since posting the first time around. This salad-meal has everything you need and crave from a single bowl: its super flavourful and filling, with all of the textures in the mix to satisfy your noshing desires. The elements can all be made separately, even on separate days, if it seems like too many things to cook at once for a single dish. If you go the rollover route, boil the beans and rice a day or so before (and make extra while youre at it, because meal prep is for winners), and pickle the onions up to a week ahead. The kale can be prepped /­­ massaged a day or so in advance, but the carrots should be roasted right before serving.  If you dont have butter beans, any white bean would work (navy, cannellini, Great Northern, or baby lima beans are some varieties) and if you want to switch up the grain, any kind of rice would work – even millet or quinoa would be delicious! Instead of carrots, use any root veg you have kicking around your crisper: beets, sweet potato, turnip, or winter squash would taste great in the garlic oil. And if dill isnt the herb of your dreams, try substituting it with flat-leaf parsley, cilantro, basil, or tarragon.      Print recipe     Butter Bean, Wild Rice, and Garlic-Roasted Carrot Salad Serves 6-8 Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup wild rice 1 cup dried butter beans 4-5 medium carrots 4 cloves garlic 2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 1 bunch fresh dill sea salt freshly ground black pepper a handful of quick-pickled red onion (recipe follows) 1 batch massaged kale (recipe follows) Dressing: 1 Tbsp. Dijon mustard 1 Tbsp. maple syrup 2 Tbsp. raw apple cider vinegar 3 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil pinch of sea salt Directions: 1. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight. Drain, rinse well and cover with fresh water. Add a teaspoon of sea salt. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, and cook until beans are soft - about 45 minutes. 2. While the beans are cooking, rinse the wild rice well, drain, and put in a pot. Cover rice with 1.5 cups fresh water, add a couple pinches of sea salt, bring to a boil, and reduce to simmer. Cook until rice is chewy-tender - about 45 minutes. You will know the rice is done when the grains open up to reveal their purple-gray inner portion. 3. Preheat the oven to 400F. While the rice is cooking, wash the carrots and slice them on the diagonal into coins, place on a baking sheet. Grate the garlic with a microplane and combine it with the oil. Pour over carrots and toss to coat. Sprinkle with salt. Place in the oven and roast, turning them a few times over the course of 15-20 minutes. The carrots should be cooked but not mushy - al dente! 4. Make the dressing by combining all ingredients together, shake well. 5. Now all the elements come together: Drain and rinse beans in cool water to stop the cooking process. Pour dressing over warm beans and toss. Let sit for 5 minutes or so. Drain the rice if any water remains, cool slightly. Mix with beans. Toss in the carrots, scraping the pan to add garlic oil to the remainder of the ingredients. Throw in the massaged kale, as many pickled onions as you fancy, and an explosion of dill. Cracked black pepper too, if it’s calling to you. 6. Serve immediately and enjoy. Quick-Pickled Red Onion Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml raw apple cider vinegar 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water 2 tsp. fine sea salt 3 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1 medium red onion, thinly sliced Directions: 1. Combine the vinegar, water, salt, and maple syrup in a large jar. Stir to dissolve the salt and syrup. Add the onions to the jar and put them in the fridge. Enjoy after at least 30 minutes, keeps for up to two weeks.  Massaged Kale Ingredients: 3 cups /­­ 90g shredded curly or dino kale Juice of 1/­­2 lemon 2 tsp. extra virgin olive oil 2 pinches of fine sea salt, plus more as needed Directions: 1. In a large bowl, combine the shredded kale, lemon juice, olive oil, and salt. Using your hands, rub and squeeze the kale together as if you are giving it a massage, until the kale leaves are dark green and tender, about 2 minutes. Enjoy immediately in the salad, or store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for up to five days.  I really hope you enjoy this delicious and satisfying meal soon. These days are asking so much of us, and I continue to come back to the kitchen for grounding, clarity, and connection. There are no answers, just presence. And in that presence I find myself over a cutting board, being grateful for just what is front of me, slicing a carrot, then another, saying thank you for simple things. Love to you all. Stay well and safe out there. xo, Sarah B The post The Spring Supper Salad appeared first on My New Roots.

Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff

January 18 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff I really love January. To me, this month has a bright and sparkling clean feel to it. And even though the start of a new year is purely symbolic, it can be such great time to set some concrete intentions and start making lasting changes or small steps in a new direction. This year, much like the past few years, I’m inspired to simplify, minimize, and really think about the things that I bring into my life, and my impact as a consumer. In the past few years, we’ve tackled food waste and figured out a way to compost food scraps that’s sustainable for us. We’ve also done away with a lot of store-bought household products like paper towels and most single-purpose cleaning products, but there is still a lot of work to do in that area. Of course I find that cooking at home is always a top priority when it comes to simplifying in a sane way. Being prepared, having tried and true recipes and techniques under my sleeve, and having some trusted meal components stocked in the fridge or pantry always leads to less stress, less waste, and more enjoyment throughout the week. This Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff doesn’t have any particular ties to these January musings, beside the fact that it’s a cozy, wintery recipe that I’ll gladly plan to cook on any given week this winter. It’s a nostalgic flavor for us, since our family in Russia cooked it quite a bit, but we think that this plant-based version is even better than the original :) Below I’m sharing some of my plans, projects I’d like to tackle, and resources that I’ve found to be super inspiring when it comes to simplifying, minimizing my impact and beyond. Would love to hear yours! Goals: projects I’d like to tackle and a few (small but impactful) new habits I’d like to form this year – Stop buying single-purpose household cleaning products and make my own, super simple ones (key words: super simple). I already do this by making a 1 part vinegar, 1 part water all-purpose cleaner that I use on pretty much all surfaces. I sometimes infuse the vinegar with citrus peels for a week or add a few drops of essential oils for a more refreshing scent. That cleaner works really well for most things. But I’d like to make a few more site-specific mixes as well, since I sometimes panic and end up buying some shower cleaner I don’t actually need. Simply Living Well is an amazing resource for easy, home-care recipes. I’m going to make this shower spray, this floor cleaner, and this glass/­­window cleaner. All those recipes have really basic, interchangeable ingredients, which keeps them from being overwhelming. Please let me know if you have a favorite homemade laundry detergent recipe – still trying to figure that one out. – Repair things I have before buying new. I’ve always liked doing stuff with my hands, so for me this is an inherently relaxing activity that I’d like to make more time for. Right now, our linen duvet cover has decided to rip in many places at once, and instead of buying a new one, the plan is to mend it properly with tonal patches, which can look really cool. Julie O’Rourke has a super comprehensive darning and mending tutorial here in her IG stories (just flip through the doll-making part). Her whole account is super dreamy as well. – Make a pot of beans every single week. I’ve noticed that every time I make a big batch of beans, I end up thanking myself over and over again for all the easy meals I’ve made possible with that one step. I like to cook the beans with aromatics so that I also end up with a delicious broth that I can either eat with the beans or use later for soups, etc. Different kinds of beans yield such different flavor/­­cooking potential, so it’s easy to switch them up every week without getting bored. For example, I cook chickpeas with aromatics, then have them for dinner in their broth with greens and maybe other veggies wilted in. I freeze some of the broth to use later as veggie stock. I then eat the chickpeas as is in veggie bowls/­­salads, make hummus with them, marinate them, make crispy chickpeas, or make falafel/­­veggie burgers. You can of course do all of this with canned beans, but home-cooked ones are much tastier, more cost effective, less wasteful if you buy them in bulk, and the broth that you get from cooking them is super valuable! If I find that I can’t use up all of the beans, I just freeze them in their broth and again set my future self up for success. We have a lot of meal plans centered around whole pots of beans here. Inspiring Resources: – 75 Ways to Create a Low-Waste Home from Simply Living Well and Zero Waste, Plastic Free Alternatives Master List from Paris to Go are chock-full of ideas to slowly chip away at. – Jessie’s Produce Prep Ebook is such a wonderful guide to reducing food waste and enjoying the abundance of the plant food world. – Mama Eats Plants is the queen of low-waste living, vegan cooking, and a generally mindful lifestyle. – Live Planted is a great, short-format podcast about a practical approach to a low-waste lifestyle and much more. – This One Part Podcast interview with Kathryn Kellogg of Going Zero Waste is so full of positivity and details some actionable steps most of us can implement to decrease waste. Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 8 oz package tempeh - crumbled 2 teaspoons tamari 1 teaspoon maple syrup ½ cup cashews - soaked to soften if no high-speed blender 1 tablespoon white or chickpea miso 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar 1 cup purified water sea salt black pepper avocado oil or other cooking oil of choice 1 yellow onion - diced 4 garlic cloves - minced 2 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary 1 tablespoon tomato paste pinch of red pepper flakes (optional) 6 oz portobello mushroom caps (about 3 medium) - sliced into long strips ½ cup red wine 10-12 oz any pasta of choice fresh parsley - for serving (optional) Instructions Put the crumbled tempeh in a bowl. Pour the tamari and maple syrup over it, mix and let sit while making the cashew sauce. In an upright blender, combine the cashews, miso, mustard, apple cider vinegar, water, and salt and pepper to taste. Blend until very smooth. Taste for salt and pepper, adjust if needed. Set aside. Heat some oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the tempeh and stir once to coat with the oil, then let sit uninterrupted for 2-3 minutes, until the undersides are browned. Mix and let sit again for another 3-5 minutes, until browned. Push the tempeh to one side of the pan, if your pan is large enough, or transfer back to a bowl and set aside until later. Add more oil to the pan. Add the onions and a pinch of salt, and sauté for 7-8 minutes, until the onions are translucent. Add the garlic, rosemary, tomato paste, and red pepper flakes, if using. Stir until the garlic is fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the mushrooms, along with another pinch of salt. Sauté until the mushrooms are browned and all the liquid that they release has evaporated, about 8-10 min. Mix the tempeh back in. Add the wine, bring it up to a simmer, and let reduce for about 3 minutes. Add the cashew sauce, stirring it and letting it warm through for a few minutes. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Meanwhile, cook the pasta al dente in well-salted water, according to the directions on the package. Reserve about 1 cup of starchy pasta water for thinning out the sauce. Drain the cooked pasta and add it to the pan with the stroganoff. Start mixing the pasta with the sauce, adding splashes of the starchy pasta water to thin out the sauce and to get it to stick to the pasta, as needed. Enjoy right away, garnished with parsley, if using. 3.5.3226 The post Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Quinoa Pancakes

November 26 2019 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Quinoa Pancakes photo by VK Rees Makes 8 pancakes I put this recipe on Instagram awhile ago so maybe you’ve already made them and know that they are AWESOME! The only reason I put quinoa in my pancakes is for the crunch. Not for the extra protein, I get plenty of that elsewhere, and not just to level up my vegan, Im already level 10. The crunch just gives me life. It also makes the pancakes so very pretty. The quinoa should be cooked al dente for the best experience. And I like red quinoa for the prettiest contrast. First make sure your quinoa is cooked according to package directions and then fully cooled. Maybe do that the night before so you’re ready to go in the morning? Wow, you planned that well. This recipe is from I Can Cook Vegan. Notes ~ To cool quinoa quickly without overcooking it, spread onto a baking sheet and place in the refrigerator. ~ Dont use an electric mixer for the batter. Overmixed pancakes tend to result in a dense pancake. I use a dinner fork to get everything mixed. ~ You have to let the batter rest for ten minutes or so. The vinegar and the baking powder need to react with each other and the gluten needs to settle in and rest. ~Dont crowd the pan. Even in my big cast iron, I dont make more than two pancakes at once. ~ Dont use too much oil in the pan. It will result in a tough exterior. A very thin layer of oil is what you want and a spray can of organic coconut oil works perfectly for this. ~ Preheat the pan for a good ten minutes. I use cast iron and put it on moderate low heat (right around 3 on my stovetop), but you will probably need to adjust a little to get the temp just right. Remember, the temp is not set in stone. Lower and raise in tiny increments as needed. Even turning the dial 1/­­4 inch can result in big changes. ~ Use a measuring cup (with a rounded bottom if possible) to scoop out the batter. And remember to always spray the cup between pancakes, to prevent sticking. 1 cup cooked red quinoa, cooled completely 1 1/­­2 cups all purpose flour 1 tablespoon baking powder 2 tablespoons granulated sugar 1 teaspoon salt 1 1/­­4 cup unsweetened almond milk (or fave non-dairy milk) 2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar 1/­­2 cup water 3 tablespoons canola oil 1/­­2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract Directions First make sure your quinoa is cooked al dente according to package directions and cooled. Then proceed with the recipe. In a large mixing bowl, sift together flour, baking powder, salt and sugar. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients. Measure the milk into a measuring cup. Add the milk, vinegar, water, oil and vanilla to the well in the dry ingredients. Stir with a fork until a thick, lumpy batter forms. That should take about a minute. It doesnt need to be smooth, just make sure you get all the ingredients incorporated. Fold in the quinoa. Preheat the pan over medium-low heat and let the batter rest for 10 minutes. Lightly coat the pan in oil. Add 1/­­3 cup of batter for each pancake, and cook for about 4 minutes, until puffy. Flip the pancakes, adding a new coat of oil to the pan, and cook for another 3 minutes or so. Pancake should be puffed up, and golden brown. Rest pancakes on a large plate loosely covered with tin foil until ready to serve with lots of maple syrup and butter! To reheat, place pancakes in on a baking sheet covered with tin foil in a  300 F degree oven for 5 minutes or so.

Sweet-and-Spicy BBQ Sauce

November 17 2019 Meatless Monday 

A little sweet and a little heat balance perfectly in this easy blender sauce. It will make you want to slather everything in BBQ sauce! This recipe comes to us from The  Meatless Monday Family Cookbook  by Jenn Sebestyen. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! - Makes 1 1/­­2 cups - 6 ounces (170 g) tomato paste -  1/­­4 cup (60 ml) apple cider vinegar -  1/­­4 cup (60 ml) balsamic vinegar - 3 tablespoons (60 g) pure maple syrup - 1-2 chipotle peppers in adobo - 1 teaspoon smoked paprika - 1 teaspoon ground mustard -  1/­­2 teaspoon onion powder -  1/­­4 teaspoon garlic powder -  1/­­2 teaspoon salt, or to taste -  1/­­2 cup (120 ml) water, to thin, or more as needed Place all the ingredients into a blender; use 2 chipotle peppers if you like it spicier. Purée until smooth. Transfer sauce to a pot over medium-high heat and bring to a boil and then reduce the heat to low. Simmer for 15 to 20 minutes until thick, or until the desired consistency is reached. The post Sweet-and-Spicy BBQ Sauce appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Lentil Walnut Tacos with Cashew Sour Cream & Pineapple Avocado Salsa

September 30 2019 Meatless Monday 

Want a tastier taco? The combination of lentils and toasted walnuts in place of animal-protein makes for a cleaner, more complex bite. For the filling, lentils are seasoned with a blend of chili powder, cumin, and smoked paprika and tossed with toasted walnuts. The mixture is topped with a cool, tart cashew sour cream, and a bright pineapple salsa. This recipe comes to us from Carly Paige, founder of FitLiving Eats , author of Simply Swapped Everyday , and one of the finalists of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show Meatless Monday Rapid Fire Challenge. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Makes 8 tacos - 1 15-ounce can cooked lentils - 1 cup walnuts, roughly chopped - 1 tablespoon tomato paste - 1 tablespoon chili powder - 1 tablespoon cumin - 1 tablespoon smoked paprika - 1 teaspoon oregano -  1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 8 romaine lettuce leaves   - Pineapple Avocado Salsa: - 1 cup fresh pineapple, diced - 2 avocados, diced -  1/­­2 jalapeno, seeds removed and diced -  1/­­4 cup red onion, diced -  1/­­4 cup cilantro, chopped - 1 lime, juiced -  1/­­2 teaspoon salt   - Cashew Sour Cream: -  3/­­4 cup cashews, soaked for 4 hours -  1/­­4 cup water - 1 tablespoon lemon juice -  1/­­2 teaspoon apple cider vinegar -  1/­­4 teaspoon salt   To make the lentil walnut taco meat, toast the walnuts in a sauté pan for about 5 minutes on medium-low heat. Add the lentils, spices and tomato paste. Stir to combine and sauté for a few more minutes to let the mixture dry out a bit and become crumbly. Meanwhile, combine the salsa ingredients in a bowl and set aside. To make the cashew sour cream, drain the soaking liquid from the cashews and add the cashews to a blender. Add the remaining ingredients and blend until creamy. To assemble, spoon the taco meat into the romaine leaves. Top with salsa and cashew sour cream. The post Lentil Walnut Tacos with Cashew Sour Cream & Pineapple Avocado Salsa appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Fruit Shrub, The Most Refreshing Summer Drink

June 27 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Fruit Shrub, The Most Refreshing Summer Drink And just like that, summer is here, and so is the very first heat wave. I’m deeply devoted to having warm and cozy drinks every day, but I’ve definitely been icing my matcha and superfood lattes for the past week or so. It also feels very nice to have something chilled and bubbly in the early evening, when it’s still light outside, and the sky is just beginning to turn pretty sunset colors. It’s those little details that make summer so special. For me, that something bubbly is usually kombucha, but I recently learned about fruit shrubs and fell in love. A shrub is a drinking vinegar syrup, which is delicious served over ice with seltzer or as a cocktail component. Today I’m specifically talking about fruit shrubs, which are so easy to make and last a while in the fridge. The flavor is definitely reminiscent of kombucha – fruity with a vinegary acidity, but the preparation requires much less patience than homemade booch. This is very much a no-recipe recipe, since it can be interpreted so many ways, with so many different fruit and aromatics. There’s a video explaining the whole process as well! Follow the ratio provided in the recipe below, using a combination of any of these ingredients. Experimenting with the flavors is the most fun part. Fruit Berries Blueberries Raspberries Strawberries Blackberries Etc. Stone Fruit Plums Peaches Nectarines Cherries Mangoes Etc. Other Apples Pears Pineapple Rhubarb Etc. Aromatics Spices Cinnamon Cloves Ginger (ideally fresh) Peppercorns (black or pink) Star anise Nutmeg Etc. Herbs Basil Mint Cilantro Rosemary Lemon thyme Lemon verbena Tarragon Etc. Citrus Lemon Lime Orange + their zest Etc. Fruit Shrub, The Most Refreshing Summer Drink   Print Serves: about 10-12 oz shrub syrup Ingredients 1 lb fruit of choice (see above for suggestions) ¾ - 1 cup sugar (I like to use raw cane sugar here) any aromatics of choice (see above for suggestions) - to taste 1 cup apple cider vinegar Instructions In a large bowl, combine the fruit and sugar, mixing well. Use a potato masher to gently mash up the fruit in order to get it to start releasing its juices and to break up the skins if present. Add the aromatics like bruised or chopped herbs, spices, citrus juice/­­zest, etc. Cover and set aside for at least 4 hours, or ideally refrigerate overnight, especially if using tougher fruit like apples, pears, rhubarb. Strain the fruit mixture through a fine mesh strainer, making sure to squeeze all the juices out of the pulp. Add the vinegar and mix well. Transfer to an airtight container and keep refrigerated. Enjoy your shrub by filling a glass with ice, adding a splash of the shrub, and topping it with seltzer and/­­or liquor of choice. Notes Most traditional shrub recipes call for a ratio of 1 cup sugar to 1 lb of fruit, but I find that ¾ cup of sugar is enough for me in most cases. This also largely depends on the initial sugar content of the fruit youre using. Experiment and see what you like! 3.5.3226 The post Fruit Shrub, The Most Refreshing Summer Drink appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Adriana Ayales

April 28 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Adriana Ayales Adriana Ayales is a rainforest herbalist from Costa Rica and the founder of herbal apothecary Anima Mundi. We are in love with Adriana’s world and creations, and so excited to share this interview. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Although I love the grounded power of routine, I’m living in a phase of being open and free. With kids, and a beyond full time devotion to running a business, I just ride the waves as they come. I’ve learned to surrender that not everything has to look the way it should look. Lifes situations and patterning moves around like the seasons. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I love getting up before the kids, and sneaking into the kitchen to make myself a healing cup(s) of medicine. First thing I do is a big ole cup of vitamin C rich goodness, sometimes its mangosteen hibiscus with a lemon squeeze, or fresh picked turmeric from the garden grated with ginger, along with camu camu and lemon water. Then I make a seasonal fruit bowl of sorts, with oatmeal, or homemade granola loaded with mineralizing herbs (like nettle or mesquite powder). Followed by my favorite, and not so healthy friend, Coffee. Ah coffee. I cant tell you how wonderful locally grown heirloom coffee is here, paired with deliciously fresh cacao and medicinal mushrooms and homemade almond. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Massaging the face, forehead and skull with warm oil at night is one of the simplest and most restorative practices we can do to induce deep sleep. I love using a mix I make at home of jojoba oil, with rosehip, infused with clary sage and a fine sandalwood. Another one of my all time favorites for evening relaxation is blue lotus. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  Sipping tea mindfully in nature, witnessing time in silence is one of my favorite things. I tap into my feelings, breath, mind, and begin to clear energy. Sustenance -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I do love caffeine. Growing up in Costa Rica has woven me into loving a good cup of locally roasted coffee. Depending on the day, I love adding reishi, or a mix of medicinal mushrooms, raw cacao with mucuna, along with a homemade plant based milk. I also love having an aged puerh, or traditional matcha with added herbs for nourishment, like moringa. -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? Sometimes I do, especially when I’m tired or running on low energy. When im over-worked, or running on stress I definitely crave more carby and sugary things, and this is usually due to skipping a meal, or needing a quick-fix. Some tips I bare in mind during stressful moments that ignite the sweet tooth (or just in general!) are: always go for fruits before you opt for a sugary dessert, always choose low glycemic sweeteners vs. sugar (some faves are coconut sugar, maple syrup, and real stevia extract -- not the synthetic ones!) For carbs avoid empty carbs and refined flours, and opt for ones that are more easily absorbed, like coconut, almond and cassava flour. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness?  Oh my, so many! I seasonally change my herbal intake, but certainly stick with some favorites. I love having my potent singles (single herb tinctures) on me at all times, like shisandra berries and blue lotus. A Brain tonic while I’m working, usually with herbs like gotu kola, ginkgo, brahmi and lion’s mane mushroom. Two that I dose with very often are the Happiness tonic (st johns wort, mucuna, ashwagandha, etc.) and euphoric/­­mood elevating herbs like catuaba, mucunam muira puama and damiana. I also love our Liver formula for daily cleansing and nourishment, like the moringa, burdock, nettles, chlorella. And of course beauty herbs like He Shou Wu, Mangosteen and more! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Absolutely, I love doing a mix between yoga and pilates. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I love the torture! When I feel a little lazy and not like suffering in an intensive workout, I just remind myself how excellent I feel when I finish it. Not just seeing physical results, but especially the mental peace and happiness after working out. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? A feeling of wholeness. When your mood is high, your gut is vibrant, and you feel confident and beautiful. When there is no sense of lack, imbalance or deficiency. When you feel aligned. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I love making my own body and face oils. I usually infuse collagen boosting herbs, and skin strengthening herbs and lather up. I also like to keep things simple, like using cacao butter with coconut oil, or just a fluffy shea butter for deep moisture.  -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Yes! I’m a big fan of eating herbs and supplements that protect the skin, increase our own collagen receptors and help activate our natural glow. The herbs I designed for the vegan collagen formula have been my go-tos for quite sometime. Horsetail, He Shou Wu, Calendula, Nettle seed + leaf, Comfrey, and others like Mangosteen, Camu Camu and Hibiscus are great for the skin too. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? I love making edible masks. Infusing a high potency extract into a raw clay and avocado, along with an activating source like apple cider vinegar, or more protein like flax, and making a smooth paste to lather all over the face, body and even hair is one of my all time favorites. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Visualization is huge for me. Sitting in silence and tuning in is vital, along with the help of nervines and adaptogenic herbs that assist in de-compression like skullcap, blue lotus and ashwagandha. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I like taking a walk or hike in nature, get in the ocean/­­lake/­­river or any kind of body of water. I completely unplug from work, the phone, or computer. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Before the cold kicks in, I take strong echinacea extracts in a soothing tea, mixing turmeric, lemon, grated ginger, apple cider vinegar, garlic and aloe in warm water. It works every time. I make a large batch and dose all day long --  even my kids love it!  -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? This certainly overlaps for me, which can honestly be a bitter sweet reality. I love everything surrounding plants, and its medicinal uses, as well as teaching, and medicine making. I love that my business is all about honoring ancestral ways, plant medicine, the art of herbalism, righteous cultivation, and medicine making. Yet, like any business owner would understand, there are many tasks to the job that are exhausting and certainly not what made you fall in love in the first place. For me personally, Ive learned to reconcile by doing what I love doing the most, medicine making and wildcrafting. I made a commitment to myself in making space for this no matter what, and not disregarding it by prioritizing business with the things that dont really matter in life. Its vital that we take moments in our free time that refine our focus and intention in life, re-align to what inspired the dream, without getting side swept with busy-ness. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Over the last couple years Ive struggled with this because of having babies. Which Im sure a lot of new moms can relate to this! Every time I get a moment between being a mother, wife and business owner, my priority to feel more self loving (and more human!) is yoga. The simple act of getting oxygen, doing conscious breathing, and distracting the monkey mind from its patterning, you become yourself again.  -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Herbs. Integrating plant medicine into everything has significantly changed my body mind and soul. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Off the top of my head I love these: Healing with Whole Foods with Paul Pitchford, Gabriel Cousens’ Spiritual Nutrition, The Body Ecology Diet by Donna Gates, and of course The Medical Medium by Anthony William. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming an herbalist and starting Anima Mundi? Growing up I learned closely with curanderos on plant medicine and rainforest herbalism overall. I then attended herbal schools in California where I learned a lot of native, northern and european herbalism. Life somehow took me to NYC (a place I NEVER thought I would ever go to) after living in California for quite some years, and I started practicing privately as an herbalist. I kept noticing the common trends, symptomology and imbalances folks that came in had, and started developing mother formulas to be able to make large batches. -- How do you approach sourcing herbs for Anima Mundi?  First and foremost we try to create a direct relationship with the people/­­farmers that cultivate. Although we value certification of prime ingredients, there are many ethical wild crafters and farms that do not have special certifications, yet cultivate sustainable practices and have quality products that we also like to support. We are also adamant of supporting local economies as much as possible, particularly with rainforest herbs sourced directly from indigenous people, supporting their craft as well as ethically crafted botanicals. -- What are some of Anima Mundis best sellers? Our plant-based Collagen Booster, Happiness Tonic, Adaptogenic Immortality Tonics, Curam Beauty Elixir, our 100% Coconut Cream Powder, Mushroom Mocha Milk and more...! Fun and Inspiration -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Women Who Run with Wolves Song/­­Album –  Cuatro Vientos /­­ Danit Movie –  Loving the The OA lately! Piece of Art –  Ayahuasca art by Pablo Amaringo Photos by Renee Byrd and from Anima Mundi’s IG /­­ This post contains Amazon Affiliate links. The post Self-Care Interview Series: Adriana Ayales appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.


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