aluminum foil - vegetarian recipes

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aluminum foil vegetarian recipes

Aloo Palak Paratha (Flatbread with Potato and Spinach stuffing)

July 22 2018 Manjula's kitchen 

Aloo Palak Paratha (Flatbread with Potato and Spinach stuffing) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Aloo Palak Paratha (Bread with Potato and Spinach Stuffing) Aloo Palak Ka Paratha, a flat bread with a potato spinach stuffing. This paratha is a perfect breakfast treat for the family and friends. Aloo Palak ka Paratha also makes a good lunch box meal to take to work or school. My favorite way to serve Aloo Palak Ka Paratha, with yogurt, or Tomato chutney. For Dough - 1 cup whole wheat flour (Chapati ka atta) - 2 tsp oil (canola oil or vegetable oil) - 1/­­4 tsp salt - 1/­­3 cup water (use as needed) Filling - 1 cup mashed potatoes (boiled peeled and roughly mashed ) - 1 cup spinach finely chopped - 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 1/­­2 tsp mango powder (aamchoor) - 1/­­4 tsp salt - 1/­­2 tsp chili flakes - 1/­­4 tsp garam masala Also Need - 1/­­4 cup whole wheat flour for rolling the paratha - 2 Tbsp oil for cooking the paratha Tips - Potatoes should not be over cooked, they should be tender, if potatoes are over cooks they absorbed extra water that will make the filling very moist and difficult to roll. - Before chopping the spinach remove all the stems wash and pat dry. - If filling is too moist mix 1-2 tablespoons besan. Making Dough -  Mix flour salt and oil add water as needed to make soft dough. Knead the dough well on a lightly oiled surface, dough should be soft but not sticking to your fingers. Cover the dough with a damp cloth and set aside for at least 15 minutes. Making Filling - Mashed potato should be at room temperature, mix all the ingredients for filling together and mix it well. Taste the filling and adjust the salt pepper to taste. Making Paratha Divide the dough into four equal parts and form into balls. Divide the aloo palak filling into four parts filling should be about the same size as dough balls. - Roll dough ball into a 3 circle. Place a filling ball in the center. Pull the edges of the dough to wrap it around the filling. Repeat to make all four balls. Let the filled balls settle three to four minutes. Meanwhile heat a heavy skillet on medium high heat until moderately hot. To test, sprinkle water on the skillet. If the water sizzles right away, the skillet is ready. - Press the filled ball lightly on dry whole wheat flour from both sides.Using a rolling pin, roll the balls lightly to make six-inch circles, keeping the sealed side of the ball on top. If the dough sticks to the rolling pin or rolling surface, lightly dust the parathas with dry flour. - Place the paratha on the skillet. When the paratha starts to change color and begins to puff up, flip it over. You will notice some golden-brown spots. - After few seconds, drizzle one teaspoon of oil over the paratha. Flip the paratha again and lightly press the puffed areas with a spatula. Flip again and press with a spatula making sure the paratha is golden-brown on both sides. Repeat for the remaining parathas. -  Paratha are best served hot and crispy. They will be soft if not served hot. If you are not going to serve them right away, cool them on a wire rack to keep them from getting soggy. - Parathas can be kept unrefrigerated for up to two days wrapped in aluminum foil or in a covered container. For later use, parathas can be refrigerated three to four days or frozen for up to a month. Re-heat using a skillet or oven.   The post Aloo Palak Paratha (Flatbread with Potato and Spinach stuffing) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Smoked Portobello Bacon

July 6 2018 Vegan Dad 

Smoked Portobello Bacon This is the best thing I have tasted in a while. Mushrooms are bursting with umami, and together with the saltiness of the brine and the smokiness of the smoking the overall effect is very bacony. We have been enjoying them on BLTs (which will be even more awesome when our own tomatoes ripen), veggie burgers, and in scrambled tofu.  INGREDIENTS - 6-8 large portobello mushroom caps - 1 recipe brine - 3 cups applewood chips METHOD 1. Wash the mushrooms and thickly slice (about 1/­­2).  2. Place sliced mushrooms in a large freezer bag, pour in brine, and seal. Lay bag flat in an appropriately sized casserole dish (this way of the bag leaks you wont have a disaster on your hands). 3. Refrigerate for at least 24 hours, turning the bag over regularly to ensure all the pieces get evenly marinated.  ON SMOKING DAY: you can smoke these in a smoker, if you have one, per its instructions. Or, you can turn your BBQ into a smoker per these instructions. 1. Soak the applewood chips (or smoking chips of your choice) in water for 30 mins. If you like, use foil to cover the holes in your BBQ lid where the rotisserie is supposed to go so that too much smoke does not escape. 2. Use a smoke box, or make a smoking packet out of aluminum foil--wrap the chips in foil and poke holes in it to allow the smoke to escape. Dont make the packet too big--you want some depth to your chips so they can smoulder and smoke away without burning up too fast. 3. Remove the grill from one side of the BBQ and place the packet on the heat plates over the burner. Turn the burner on high. 4. While the packet is heating, place the mushroom slices on the opposite grill and bun warming rack. I like to place mine on an old cooling rack and then place that on top of the grill.  5. Once the packet begins to smoke, reduce the heat and close the lid. You want to keep the temperature between 250 and 300 for about 45 mins, but you also want the chips to keep smoking. Basically this means a higher heat at the beginning and then lower heat towards the end as the chips burn. If the chips stop smoking too early, just raise the heat to get them going again and then lower it.  6. The bacon will be done in about 45 mins. The outside should be leathery but the pieces should not be dried out. Remove smaller pieces first if necessary.  The bacon can be stored in the fridge and fried up (if you want) when needed. I like the thicker slices because they dont dry out on the grill and can be sliced thinner later if necessary. 

Stuffed Squash with Brazil Nuts and Pistachios

November 7 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Stuffed Squash with Brazil Nuts and Pistachios This flavorful and colorful Stuffed Squash with Brazil Nuts and Pistachios makes an attractive entrée for a Thanksgiving dinner. Use a dense, sweet, orange-fleshed squash such as buttercup, acorn, or kabocha for the best results with this recipe. I like to use Brazil nut butter, but you can use any type of nut butter that you prefer. Stuffed Squash with Brazil Nuts and Pistachios  This flavorful and colorful Stuffed Squash makes an attractive entrée for a Thanksgiving dinner.  - 1 tablespoon olive oil or 1/­­4 cup water - 1 yellow onion, minced - 2 cloves garlic, minced - 2 cups cooked brown rice - 1 cup cooked wild rice - 1/­­3 cup Brazil nut butter - 1/­­4 cup sweetened dried cranberries - 2 tablespoons chopped pistachio nuts - 2 tablespoons chopped Brazil nuts - 1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley - 1 teaspoon dried tarragon - Salt and ground black pepper - 1 large winter squash, halved and seeded (such as buttercup, acorn, or kabocha) - 1 1/­­2 cups hot water - Preheat the oven to 350°F. Heat the oil or water in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the onion, cover, and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. - Stir in the rice, wild rice, Brazil nut butter, cranberries, nuts, parsley, tarragon, and salt and pepper to taste. Mix well and spoon the mixture into the squash cavities -  Place the squash halves in a baking dish, stuffing sides up. Add the water to the bottom of the baking dish and cover tightly with a lid or aluminum foil. Bake until the squash is tender, about 1 1/­­2 hours. From The Nut Butter Cookbook by Robin Robertson. (C)2014 Robin Robertson. Used by permission from Vegan Heritage Press. Photo by Lori Maffei. Save Save The post Stuffed Squash with Brazil Nuts and Pistachios appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Grilled Philly Cheese Mushroom Sandwich

November 6 2017 Meatless Monday 

Philly may be famous for their cheesesteaks, but if a craving hits and you want to keep it meatless, this mushroom sandwich can be just as satisfying! Often found proudly parading as a meatless burger, Portabellas are widely considered the “meatiest” mushroom. This recipe comes to us from our friends at The Mushroom Council. Serves 4. - 4 large Portabella mushrooms, sliced - 1 large red onion, sliced - 2 bell peppers, core and seeds removed, quartered - 2 tablespoons canola oil - 1 teaspoon grilled steak seasoning - 4 Italian rolls, split length wise, toasted - 8 slices provolone or American cheese or 4 ounces processed cheese spread Heat grill to medium, about 365°. Brush both sides of mushrooms, onions and bell peppers with oil and season with steak seasoning. Place on grill and close cover, cook 5 minutes on each side. Remove onions and peppers from grill, thinly slice as desired. Place on aluminum foil and return to grill to keep warm. Remove mushrooms and thinly slice. Lightly toast bun on grill. Remove peppers, onions and mushrooms and combine. Place cheese on each split roll, top mushroom mixture. Turn grill off and place sandwiches on grill with lid closed, 5 minutes or until cheese is fully melted. Cut in half and serve immediately. The post Grilled Philly Cheese Mushroom Sandwich appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Farewell to Copenhagen Carrot Cake

October 21 2017 My New Roots 

Farewell to Copenhagen Carrot Cake Boil the kettle and make a cup of tea folks, this is going to be a big one! First of all, I have to begin this post by saying THANK YOU. My New Roots is officially 10 years old and I couldnt have done it without your support, enthusiasm, and full-on LOVE for this little blog. And especially after the last couple of posts when I really opened up about my recent struggles, I felt so supported, and saw that so many of you did as well. It reminded me of the strong community that this has become, and the power of people when they come together with a common goal of true wellness. If you had told me an entire decade ago that my deeply passionate, unabashedly nerdy, and nearly ignored internet musings would end up turning into a full-on career, brand, cookbooks, online classes, app, poster shop and retreat company I never, ever would have believed you. But reading my first post again, it’s just as relevant today as ever, eerily almost as if I had written it last week. I guess I had a strong vision in mind and just kept trucking, kept trusting, that it would resonate with someone. But here we are, a third of my life later, and it’s not just someone, but so many of you. And all of my dreams continue to be born and manifest because of you. That offhanded suggestion from an old boyfriend who thought I could use an outlet for all that health talk I kept spewing, was really onto something. Thanks, dude. Secondly...and this is really big news...I am moving back to Canada! Yes, after nine years of delicious life in Copenhagen, my old roots are pulling me home and I am so very ready. This whole thing has been in the works for a few months now, but I didnt really feel like putting it out there until it was real. Well lemme tell ya, when putting my familys life in 50 boxes and shoving them into a shipping container, shiz got real, real fast. What a crazy feeling it is, and totally overwhelming with all the emotions that relocating your entire life is. So, if things have been (and continue to be) quiet around here, its because Ive been sorting through all the details that an international move entails. I send my gratitude for your patience. The next chapter of my life will be completely different from the last, that is for sure. To change things up dramatically, my family and I will be living out of the city in fact, near-ish to Toronto, where I am originally from. I knew that I would end up living in the country at some point, but not so soon! It was more a when I retire kind of thing. But funny what happens when you have kids and they need s-p-a-c-e, your priorities seem to shift to accommodate the little ones. Plus, I feel the need to be on the ground again (Ive been living in a fourth-floor apartment for nine years now!), so we bought a house to get closer to earth in every sense, plant a garden, lay in the grass - our own grass - and enjoy the quiet and safety of a little community. Im really excited for everything that is to come, and feeling so grateful for the divine unfolding. But will I miss Copenhagen? Obvi. This city, and my home here, is where I have spent my entire adult life. The walls of my beloved kitchen that my husband and I built ourselves, have held space for two cookbooks, online classes, countless dinner parties, bleary-eyed breakfasts, and even the birth of our son for crying out loud! And although My New Roots began in Toronto, it flourished here and truly became something on Danish ground. The Scandinavian culture has had a profound influence on me, my aesthetic, and how I see the world now. Having Europe at my doorstep with all its history, architecture, fine arts, culture, and attitude has been an enormous privilege and deeply inspiring. And can we talk about the light? Oh the light! How my camera and I will miss the very special way the sun slants here. Its unlike anything Ive seen before. Anyway, I promise to keep you all posted as we leave one fabulous country for the next. I wont have a working kitchen for some months, but Ill stay as active as I can on Instagram so you can keep up with my kitchen renovations...I know youll want to see all that house porn. Tee hee. Okay, now for the main event. I MADE A CARROT CAKE. Successfully. It is delicious. I feel like I have finally achieved one of my biggest culinary goals ever, and its so appropriate that we celebrate ten years of this blog with a recipe that has challenged me for nearly as long. If you remember back to when I used to post giant layer cakes for my birthday, I ran into trouble in 2013, when I attempted three different versions, which all failed, and ended up making nut butter sandwiches instead. Since then, the headcount has continued to rise, yet some ridiculously stubborn part of me wont give up. In the past Ive almost always used spelt flour for baking, and if any of you have tried one of my famous layer cakes, youll know this has worked well. I was after the same crumb that you can achieve with wholegrain spelt, but wanted the cake to be gluten-free, so I started by using an all-purpose gluten-free flour. It was a total disaster. The cake turned out gummy and inedible, and the frosting, which I tried to make with cooked quinoa (dont ask) was just weird. The next route I tried was with almond flour, since Ive been eating a more low-grain diet for the past few months and I wanted the cake to reflect that. Before testing it out, I assumed that almond flour would make things really dense and heavy, but lo and behold it creates a crumb that is so fluffy, and really gives this feeling of deep satisfaction. Im obsessed. The only thing that I dont like about almond flour is the high price, and the fact that almonds are a very water-intensive crop to grow. But, this is a cake after all, therefore a special treat, therefore not something you have all the time. The initial carrot cake experiments with almond flour were good, but borderline too rich. Plus, since Id ditched the quinoa frosting idea and knew Id be taking the cashew road, I felt like a nut frosting on top of a nut cake was just, well, too nutty. To reconcile my relationship with coconut flour, I cut the dry ingredients with a tad to see what would happen. Not only was the cake just as good, but the texture was better and I liked the flavor the coconut flour provided. We are friends again. The Cashew Coconut frosting for this cake is what Canadians would affectionately call a twofer. Bahahaha! (I really do amuse myself). For everyone else out there, in long form, this refers to a two-for-one deal. You can make this recipe once, but have the frosting come out two ways depending on its temperature. Pretty groovy, eh? If you use the frosting right after making it, it will be loose and glossy, almost glaze-like. If you prefer a traditional-style frosting that is thicker and stiffer, all you need to do is put the mixture in the fridge overnight to achieve this consistency. I chose to go with the room temperature version since I hadnt really worked with it like that before. It provided a more even layer, but its also a little harder to control. Either way its delicious, so dont worry about making the wrong choice...there isnt one! The flavour is major: Im talking soooo cream cheese-like that even I was confused. If youre not feeling the chunky carrot cake vibes, please look away now, because the cake of my dreams is loaded with pineapple, walnuts, and bursting with warm spice and citrus zest. I went to town! Instead of using questionably-edible canned pineapple, I used the dried, unsweetened version from the health food store. This stuff ain’t cheap, but again, cake splurge. If you cant find pineapple like this, dates, raisins, dried figs or apricots would also be good, but Id skip the soaking step. Instead of walnuts you could use pecans, macadamias, or even pumpkin seeds. Altogether this carrot cake is moist, decadent, and satisfying with so many layers of flavour and texture that just wont quit. Ive learned a lot in the past decade, and this cake is an expression of that. Its something to be proud of, and something to share. Thanks for sticking by me while I worked out the kinks…now its time to celebrate all the things!     Print recipe     Farewell to Copenhagen Carrot Cake Serves 10-12 Ingredients: 2/­­3 cup /­­ 60g dried, unsweetened pineapple, plus more for garnish if desired 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 200g lightly packed grated carrots (about 3 medium) 1 cup /­­ 100g walnuts, plus more for garnish if desired 3 cups /­­ 300g almond flour (not almond meal) 2/­­3 cup /­­ 100g coconut flour 1 1/­­2 tsp. baking soda 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1 Tbsp. ground cinnamon 2 tsp. ground ginger 1 tsp. ground cardamom 1/­­2 tsp. ground nutmeg 1 cup /­­ 250ml eggs, at room temperature (about 4-5 large eggs) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml odourless coconut oil, melted 1 cup /­­ 250ml pure maple syrup 2 tsp. vanilla extract zest of 1 orange and 1 lemon (try to find organic, if possible) Cashew Coconut Frosting: 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 200g raw cashews, soaked for 4 hours 3 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml coconut cream from the top of a can of coconut milk 1 Tbsp. coconut oil 2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt Directions: 1. Pour just-boiled water over the dried pineapple (do not soak the pineapple youre using for garnish). Preheat the oven to 325°F/­­160°C. Lightly grease two 7 /­­ 18cm spring form cake pans with coconut oil. 2. Wash carrots well and grate them on a box grater. Set aside. Roughly chop the walnuts. 3. In a large mixing bowl, combine the almond flour, coconut flour, baking soda, salt cinnamon, ginger, cardamom and nutmeg. 4. In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together the eggs, coconut oil, maple syrup, and vanilla extract. 5. Drain the soaked pineapple and squeeze with your hands to remove excess liquid. Roughly chop. 6. Pour the wet ingredients over the dry ingredients and stir to combine. Zest the orange and lemon into the bowl. Add the carrots, soaked pineapple, and chopped walnuts and fold to incorporate. 7. Spoon roughly half of the batter into one of the prepared cake pans, then add the remaining batter to the second one. Place in the oven in the middle rack and set the timer for 40 minutes. Cakes are ready when they are golden brown and pass the toothpick test (bake for longer if necessary, up to one hour - cover cake with aluminum foil if you need to bake for longer so that the top doesnt burn). Remove cakes from the oven and let cool completely. 8. While the cakes are baking, make the frosting. Drain and rinse the cashews. Add them to a high-speed blender along with the other ingredients (you can use a normal blender or food processor, but the frosting wont be as smooth). If the frosting is too thick, add more coconut cream or a teeny bit of water and blend again. Chill in the fridge (frosting can be made one day ahead if you want it to be thicker). 9. To frost and decorate, spread a generous amount of frosting over one half of the cake. Carefully lay the second half on top, and spread remaining frosting over the top and on the sides. Decorate with remaining dried pineapple and walnuts, if desired. Serve and enjoy! Cake will keep for 5 days, covered in the fridge. Who knows what the future holds - the world seems so crazy these days - but I do know that I still have steam in me to keep going with this heart project, if youre all still up for reading and cooking from it. Words cannot describe my gratitude for you, allowing me to pursue my biggest dreams and expose my shadowy bits as well. I hope you know how much I love you. I truly do. Here’s to another ten years… xo, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   * Okay friends, there are still a couple spaces left for the next Wild Heart High Spirit retreat in Portugal! Its this November 5-11, hosted at the ridiculously beautiful Sublime Comporta hotel (guys, Ive been there and this place is NEXT LEVEL). I will be teaching cooking classes outside in the organic garden (pictured above!) and giving nutrition seminars daily, with yoga and movement classes twice a day with my dear friend and deeply talented friend, Mikkala Marilyn Kissi of Living Yolates. The kitchen is exclusively making My New Roots recipes for the week, so we can all enjoy these meals without having to lift a finger. Enjoy your private pool, open spa, horseback riding on the beach, bonfire nights and dancing under the stars. Come and get inspired to live your best life! Well show you how. Click here for more info, and see you in magical Portugal! The post Farewell to Copenhagen Carrot Cake appeared first on My New Roots.

Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl

March 10 2017 My New Roots 

Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl Poke seems to be everywhere these days, from fine restaurant menus, to fast-casual and even food trucks. Chefs are coming up with clever combos and creative reinterpretations - even fish-free versions for the veg set. I knew had to take a stab at it. Or at least a poke. Sorry. For those of you hearing about poke for the first time, this fresh and tasty dish (pronounced POH-kay), hails from Hawaii. In its most unadulterated form, poke is raw fish, originally combined with sea salt, candlenut and seaweed. It evolved over the years as ingredient availability increased, and the salt was replaced with soy sauce, the seaweed with spring onion, the candlenut with sesame and so on. Once it hit mainland America a few years ago, poke mania ensued and the dish evolved to become more of a meal - not just a snack. Now it is often served atop rice and garnished with all manner of innovative ingredients. Fully-focused poke restaurants have established themselves in major cities across North America. Many of these eateries allow their patrons to customize their bowls with veggies, sea weed, pickles, beans, nuts, and alt-grains, tapping into the to the fact that fast, fresh, healthy meals are becoming mainstream. Which totally rocks. I had most of the elements for my own poke-inspired version in my head...except for the fish (the most important part?). I racked my brain to come up with something that looked just like tuna or salmon, but didnt want to use fruit, like watermelon or papaya, since I didnt want the dish to be sweet. It wasnt until I was trying to fall asleep one night, that it came to me...chiogga beets! Chiogga, or candy-striped beets are gorgeously two-toned when they are raw. Sliced thin horizontally, they reveal rings of deep pink pigment and creamy white, resembling something that your grandmother keeps on her coffee table in a crystal dish. But for anyone who has ever roasted these stunning creatures will know that the magic doesnt last; the magenta bleeds into the white during cooking, resulting in an almost homogenous pale pink, with slight variegation. WHICH LOOKS EXACTLY LIKE TUNA. I almost couldnt sleep. Too excited. The next day I gathered up all the things Id like in a poke bowl: short grain brown rice (not long grain - an important distinction), spring onion for bite, carrot for crunch, edamame for pop and protein, and avo for creaminess. I took this last one a step farther and blended it with lemon and wasabi for the most boss sauce ever. This alone would be delish on most things...please try it. And for the fishy component, I thought back to the raw vegan tuna I made for my first cookbook, and how effective adding a sprinkle of nori was to boost that fresh-from-the-sea flavour. This is not a deal breaker for the overall dish, but it definitely made it taste complete. If you cant find nori flakes, just crunch up a couple sheets of the stuff that youd use to make sushi. Easy fix! I like to use wasabi powder in the avo cream since the pre-made stuff in a tube is questionable. Have you ever read the ingredient list on one of those packages? It can be scary stuff. In a pinch, use it, but tracking down the powder is worth it from a nutrition standpoint, and also a flavour one. The real stuff tastes infinitely better! What a shocker. Wasabi is Japanese horseradish, and like its western counterpart, it belongs to the Brassica family, like cabbage, broccoli and mustard. The root is dried and then pulverized, which gives us the powder that we can blend with water to create wasabi paste. It is a difficult crop to grow, which explains the high price for the genuine product. Most wasabi powders dont contain any wasabi at all, but are instead a mix of mustard powder and regular horseradish mixed with green food dye. A high-quality wasabi powder should be organic and contain only horseradish and wasabi. The colour should be pale green - not disco neon. Most health food stores carry wasabi powder. This is a good brand. Everything unfolded just as Id hoped it would. The beets came out perfectly pink with those thin white stripes that look just like fat striation. The marinade that I tossed them around in was acidic and ginger-y and just plain yum. Building the meal up with the rice, the beans, the veggies, a dollop of cream, a sprinkle of nori and roasted sesame, was ever so satisfying and fun. This healthy, fresh meal is calling you. No need to poke about, just make it. Again, sorry.     Print recipe     Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl Serves 3-4 Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 200g short grain brown rice, soaked overnight if possible 3/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 2 cups /­­ 250g edamame beans, fresh or frozen 2 tsp. cold-pressed olive oil a couple pinches flaky sea salt Beets & Marinade 3 medium Chiogga (candy striped) beets 2 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 Tbsp. olive oil 1 tsp. finely grated ginger pinch fine sea salt Avocado Wasabi Cream 2 medium ripe avocados 2 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1-2 tsp. wasabi powder, to taste pinch fine sea, to taste 2 spring onions, sliced lengthwise into ribbons 2 medium carrots, julienned 2 Tbsp. sesame seeds 3 Tbsp. nori flakes Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Wrap beets in aluminum foil and place on a baking sheet in the oven. Roast until tender, about 45 minutes (to check doneness, peel back the foil of one beet and insert the tip of a sharp knife. If there is little resistance, its ready). Peel back foil from each beet and let cool slightly. 2. While the beets are roasting, make the rice. Drain and rinse well. Place in a pot with 2 cups /­­ 500ml of fresh water and salt. Cover, bring to a boil and reduce to simmer. Cook until tender (add more during cooking if necessary), about 45 minutes. 3. While the rice is cooking, make the Avocado Wasabi Cream. Scoop out the flesh from both avocados and add to a food processor. Blend on high, then add the lemon juice, wasabi powder and salt. Taste and adjust seasoning as needed. 4. In a medium bowl, whisk together the lemon juice, olive oil, ginger and salt. Slip the skins off the cooled beets. Cut the beets into cubes and toss in the marinade. Let sit for at least 20 minutes. 5. While the beets are marinating, bring a medium pot of water to the boil. Add a few pinches of salt and the edamame. Simmer for a couple minutes until bright green and tender (do not overcook!). Drain and rinse under cold water to halt cooking. Toss with a little olive oil and sprinkle with flaky salt. 6. In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast sesame seeds, stirring often until fragrant, about 2-3 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside. 7. Julienne the carrots. 8. To assemble, divide the rice among the bowls. Add the marinated beets, edamame, carrots and a dollop of Avocado Wasabi Cream. Sprinkle with nori flakes, the toasted sesame seeds and top with the spring onions. Enjoy! I’m on my last few days of the North American tour now. Honestly, it’s been just magical and I am so grateful to all of you who came out to show some love and connect with the healthy community around them! I have just one more event left, and if you’re in LA, please come to The Springs tomorrow! I’ll be giving a lecture on Improving Immunity, Digestion and Detoxification, serving a delicious lunch, and launching a recipe collaboration with their chef! Hope to see you there. All love and smiles, Sarah B Show me your bowls on Instagram! #mnrpokebowl The post Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl appeared first on My New Roots.

Squash Sunchoke Mac & Cheese

October 7 2016 Meatless Monday 

Butternut squash is roasted and mashed with sunchokes in this root vegetable crowd pleaser. A Dijon mustard roux serves as the base for a luscious sauce in this hearty mac and cheese, finished perfectly with crunchy whole-wheat breadcrumbs. This recipe comes to us from Lisa of Cold Cereal and Toast. Serves 10 - 1/­­2 small butternut squash, seeded - 2 medium sunchokes*, peeled - 12 ounces elbow macaroni - salt, to taste - 1/­­4 teaspoon pepper - 2 tablespoons unsalted butter - 2 tablespoons all purpose flour - 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard - 1 3/­­4 cups nonfat milk - 1/­­4 cup low sodium vegetable stock - 4 ounces Muenster cheese, grated - 4 ounces cheddar cheese, grated - 1/­­2 cup whole-wheat breadcrumbs *Also known as Jerusalem artichokes, sunchokes can be found at farmers markets or in the gourd section of vegetable aisle in some grocery stores.   Preheat an oven to 450 degrees. Prepare a baking sheet with a layer of aluminum foil. Lay the squash, cut side down, on the baking sheet. Add the peeled sunchokes to the sheet, place it in the oven and bake for about 25-30 minutes, or until the squash is tender when pierced with a butter knife. Scoop the squashs flesh into a large mixing bowl and mash it using a fork. Add the roasted sunchokes, mashing to incorporate them with the butternut squash. For the smoothest consistency, add the squash sunchoke mash to a food processor or blender and puree if desired. Place a large pot of salted water over medium-high heat. Cook the pasta according to package directions, or until al dente, drain, return to the pot, remove from heat and set aside to cool. Place a medium saucepan over medium heat. Melt the butter in the saucepan, then whisk in the flour and mustard. Continue whisking over medium heat for about 1 minute, then slowly add in the milk, stirring constantly. Bring the mixture to a simmer, lower heat to medium-low and keep simmering, whisking frequently, for 5-6 minutes, or until the mixture has thickened to the consistency of heavy cream. Season the sauce with the pepper and 1/­­2 teaspoon salt. Add the squash sunchoke mash, Muenster and cheddar, stirring with a wooden spoon until the cheese has melted. Pour the cheese sauce into the cooked macaroni, stirring to ensure all ingredients are evenly incorporated. Preheat your broiler. Pour the macaroni into a medium baking dish and top with the breadcrumbs. Broil for about 10 minutes, or until the bubbly with brown edges. Divide into 10 servings and enjoy! The post Squash Sunchoke Mac & Cheese appeared first on Meatless Monday.

How To Make Chocolate Fudge

August 30 2016 Manjula's kitchen 

How To Make Chocolate Fudge (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); This Chocolate Fudge recipe is a huge hit with my grandchildren! Who doesn’t love rich creamy chocolate? I like this recipe because it allows me to let my grand-kids take the role of lead chef.  I get to be the sous chef for the day! This recipe is super simple and delicious! This recipe will make about 48 pieces. Preparation: 5 minutes Cooking time: 10 minutes Ingredients: - 1 14oz can sweetened condense milk - 1 tablespoon butter - 4 oz. dark chocolate chopped in small pieces - 6 oz. sweetened milk chocolate chopped in small pieces - 1 tablespoons vanilla extract - 1-1/­­2 cups walnuts chopped Method - First line 8-inch square pan with buttered parchment paper or use aluminum foil. - Microwave condensed milk, and butter for 1-1/­­2 minute. Stir to combine the butter and condense milk. Add chocolate stir lightly till chocolate is melted, if needed microwave for about 20 seconds again. Add chopped nuts and vanilla extract, mix it well. Spread in prepared pan. - Refrigerate for about three hours then cut into squares. Fudge also makes a great homemade gift to share with family and friends. You will also like to see the recipes for Date and Nut Ladoo, Eggless pancake, Peanut chikki, Chocolate Almond Candy The post How To Make Chocolate Fudge appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Mooli Ka Paratha (Punjabi Mooli Flat Bread)

January 6 2016 Manjula's kitchen 

Mooli Ka Paratha (Punjabi Mooli Flat Bread) Mooli is a white radish or daikon. This is an exotic flat bread filled with mooli. Mooli ka paratha is a popular north Indian breakfast treat with cup of hot chai. Recipe will make 4 parathas Ingredients: For Dough - 1 cup whole wheat flour, atta -  1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1 tablespoon oil -  1/­­2 cup water For Filling - 2 cups white radish/­­mooli shredded -  1/­­2 tablespoon salt -  1/­­2 teaspoon carom seeds /­­ ajwain - 2 teaspoons green chili finely chopped - 2 tablespoons cilantro /­­ hara dhania finely chopped Also need about 1/­­4 cup whole wheat flour for rolling and 5 teaspoon oil for cooking paratha Method Making the Dough - Mix flour, salt, and oil in a bowl add the water as needed to make soft dough. Knead the dough for about one minutes on a lightly greased surface to make soft, and pliable dough. - Set the dough aside for at least ten minutes. Making the Filling - Shred the mooli /­­ white radish, add the salt to shredded mooli mix it well let it sit for about 2-3 minutes. Squeeze the water as much possible from mooli. Add all filling ingredients together, carom seeds, chili and cilantro mix it well. Do this processes just before you are ready to make parathas. Making of paratha - Divide the dough into four equal parts. - Take one part of the dough and with your fingers flatten the edges to form a three-inch circle, leaving the center a little thicker than the edges. - Mold the dough into a cup and place the filling in the center, filling should be little less then dough. Pull the edges of the dough to wrap the filling. - Heat an iron skillet or heavy skillet on medium high heat. Test by sprinkling it with a couple of drops of water. If the water sizzles right away, the skillet is ready. - Press the filled ball lightly on dry whole wheat flour from both sides. - Using a rolling pin, roll the balls lightly to make six-inch circles, keeping the sealed side of the balls on top. If the dough sticks to the rolling pin or rolling surface, lightly dust the parathas with dry flour. - Place the paratha on the skillet. When the paratha start to change color flip it over. You will notice some golden-brown spots. - After a few seconds, drizzle one teaspoon of oil over the paratha. Flip the paratha again and lightly press the paratha on the sides with a spatula, to help paratha cook through evenly. - Flip again and press with a spatula making sure the paratha is golden-brown on both sides. Repeat for the remaining parathas. - Paratha are best served hot and crispy. They will be soft if not served hot. If you are not going to serve them right away, cool them on a wire rack to keep them from getting soggy. - Parathas can be kept unrefrigerated for up to two days wrapped in aluminum foil or in a covered container. For later use, parathas can be refrigerated four to five days or frozen for up to a month.  Re-heat using a skillet or oven. Mooli paratha goes well with yogurt or potato with yogurt gravy. Enjoy! The post Mooli Ka Paratha (Punjabi Mooli Flat Bread) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

9 Grilling Recipes for a Tasty Meatless Labor Day

August 31 2015 Meatless Monday 

9 Grilling Recipes for a Tasty Meatless Labor DayLabor Day is almost here, and that means friends and family will soon be gathering around the grill for picnics, block parties and backyard cookouts. This year, bring some delicious meatless recipes to your celebration with fruits, veggies, and even pizzas for the grill! Since Labor Day is celebrated on a Monday, here are nine hand-picked recipes from Meatless Monday Bloggers to help get you started. These clever and inventive ideas for a meatless Labor Day will have you firing up the grill in no time! First time grilling a meatless meal, or just getting started with barbecue in general? We asked Karen Caplan, President & CEO of Friedas Specialty Produce, for tips on grilling fruits and vegetables. Simple grilling hacks like making aluminum foil packets, re-purposing cooling racks from the kitchen, and using skewers for those unusually-shaped foods, are just a few of the methods she recommends.  Click here to learn all her tips and tricks for using the grill to cook up delightful meatless dishes quickly and easily.   Grilled Mango Skewers with Lime, Feed Me Phoebe   Grilled Peach Summer Slaw, Confessions of a Mother Runner   Grilled Potato and Kale Pizzas, The Kids Cook Monday   Grilled Tofu Tostadas with Tomato-Mango Salsa, Grab a Plate   Jamaican Jerk Grilled Vegetables, Craving Something Healthy   Grilled Stone Fruit Salad, The Kids Cook Monday   Mexican Corn on the Cob, Healing Tomato   Grilled Teriyaki Tofu and Vegetable Kabobs, Mommy & Love   Grilled Watermelon Feta Salad, The Kids Cook Monday   Hungry for more? Some folks just can’t wait to enjoy a savory burger straight off the grill. With meatless recipes for burgers of from lentils, beans, shiitake mushrooms, nuts, and squash, there are plenty of options to try in our 15 Mouthwatering Meatless Monday Burgers post. Remember: just because the grill is part of the Labor Day cooking tradition, that doesn’t mean meat is the only option! Happy Labor Day! The post 9 Grilling Recipes for a Tasty Meatless Labor Day appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Enjoy the Thrill of the Grill — and a Meatless Memorial Day.

May 25 2015 Meatless Monday 

Enjoy the Thrill of the Grill — and a Meatless Memorial Day.  It’s hard to enjoy summer without grilling – but it’s easy to enjoy grilling without meat.  In fact, going with veggies on the barbi, or grilling up veggie burgers, will let you enjoy all that delicious smoky flavor you you love without sabotaging your swimsuit diet. Then there are the health benefits of meatless grilling. Hotdogs unfortunately fall into that ‘processed meat’ category and eating too much processed meat may actually shave years off your life. Also, grilling meat at high temperatures, especially when its charred, can release cancer-causing compounds. Meatless grilling lets you avoid all that. One of the best parts of summer grilling is the endless creativity it makes possible.  Almost anything can go on the grill, from pizza to pound cake, tofu to fruit slices.  So kick-off the summer in style by moving your Meatless Monday out of the kitchen and onto the grill. To help you with that, we asked a good friend of Meatless Monday, Karen Caplan, President & CEO of Friedas Specialty Produce, to give us some tips about grilling fruits and vegetables.  What follows are some smokin’ suggestions from her: “Grilling brings out the flavors of fruits and vegetables like no other cooking method can. But not a lot of people use the grill for vegetables, let alone fruits! Here are some tricks and tips to make grilling fruits and vegetables a breeze. Grilling brings out the flavors of fruits and vegetables like no other cooking method can. But not a lot of people use the grill for vegetables, let alone fruits! Here are some tricks and tips to make grilling fruits and vegetables a breeze. Well-oiled grate: Vegetables and fruits tend to stick to the grate more because of the caramelizing sugars. Brush some oil on the grate or use a no-stick cooking spray before adding your produce to the grill. Use metal cooling rack as your veggie grill: I learned this tip from one of Alton Browns videos, and it works like a charm. Vegetables tend to fall through the grill grate. By putting a smaller grate cooling rack on the grate, you can still get beautiful grill marks without sacrificing too many slices to the fire. Aluminum foil is your best friend: Vegetable packets are easy to make, cook, and clean up. Add your favorite vegetables onto a piece of aluminum foil, drizzle with some olive oil, and season with salt, pepper, and fresh herbs. Fold up the packet and seal the edges well. Set the packets on the grill and let the vegetables steam themselves. You can do the same with fruits and sugar, and serve over vanilla ice cream. Skewers can also be your friends: Wooden or metal, skewers make grilling fruits and vegetables easy AND fun! The key is to make sure all the pieces are about the same thickness so they cook evenly. Parboiled fingerling potatoes, pearl onions, shishito peppers, elephant garlic cloves, baby sunburst squash, and zucchini are all wonderful on skewers (its important to parboil them first, so they dont dehydrate on the grill). Pineapple, watermelon, and other melon cubes are all delicious when lightly caramelized. Try something unexpected: You can put more on the grill than onions, peppers, carrots, and zucchini! Did you know that you can grill leafy vegetables like Belgian endive, radicchio, baby bok choy, and even romaine lettuce? They actually get sweeter when a little charred. You can also grill fava beans in the pods and eat them whole, pods and all. Try avocado halves, grilled right in the skin. As for fruits, have you ever had grilled starfruit? Slice them thick and put them on skewers with other fruits for fun fruit kebabs! Heres an easy recipe by one of my favorite bloggers, Sharon Palmer, R.D., thats become a favorite of mine…and it’s unexpected!”   Grilled Artichokes: Original recipe by Sharon Palmer, R.D. 2 large artichokes 1 1/­­2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 1/­­2 teaspoons Herbes de Provence (or any herbs you like) Salt and pepper to taste Prepare artichokes by rinsing, then trimming 1 inch off tops and 1/­­2 inch off stems. Slice in half lengthwise. With metal spoon, scoop out blossom portion (the choke). Place artichokes in medium pot with water and cook 10 minutes, until almost tender. Drain, then place artichokes in baking dish. Whisk together extra-virgin olive oil, balsamic vinegar, garlic, Herbes de Provence, and salt and pepper. Drizzle vinaigrette over artichokes and allow to marinate about 30 minutes. Place artichokes cut side up on hot grill (or grill pan) for 2-3 minutes, then turn over and grill 5 minutes, until golden brown. Serve immediately.   The post Enjoy the Thrill of the Grill — and a Meatless Memorial Day. appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Curried Butternut Velvet Soup

December 29 2014 Meatless Monday 

This simple soup comes together quickly, but dress it up with garnishes of pomegranate seeds (called arils) and fried sage leaves and you’ve got a dish worthy of company! To fry sage leaves, simply heat oil in a pan and cook them for about 5 seconds. This recipe comes to us from Priscilla of She’s Cookin’. Serves 4 - 1 small butternut squash, roasted - 1 medium sweet potato - 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil - 1 leek, sliced - 1/­­2 cup dry white wine - 3 cloves garlic, minced - 3 cups almond milk - 2 teaspoons curry -  1/­­2 teaspoon harissa - 1/­­8 teaspoon white pepper - Garnish: pomegranate arils, fried sage leaves, pistachios - 1 pat butter, optional Preheat oven to 375 degrees Cut the butternut squash in half lengthwise and remove the seeds and stringy pulp. Put the halves flesh side down in a baking dish, add 1 cup of water. Wrap the sweet potato in aluminum foil. Bake the squash and sweet potato for 30 minutes until you can pierce through the skin easily. While the squash is roasting, heat olive oil in a skillet over medium heat. Cook leeks until softened, about 5 minutes. Add garlic and spices, stir and cook for another minute. Add wine and cook for another two minutes to meld the flavors. Set aside. Remove the squash and sweet potato from the oven. When the squash to cool enough to handle, scrape the flesh from the skin. Cut the sweet potato into half, no need to peel – it will be totally pureed and you’ll retain all the nutrients in the skin. Add the squash, sweet potato, leek-spice mixture, and almond milk to your blender. Process on until smooth. Place in a saucepan to heat, stir in butter to add a touch of richness, if desired. The post Curried Butternut Velvet Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Toffee-Almond Popcorn

November 25 2014 Vegetarian Times 

1. Line large baking sheet with aluminum foil. Place popcorn in very large heat-proof bowl with room for stirring; sprinkle almonds on top. 2. Melt butter, brown sugar, and corn syrup in medium saucepan over medium heat, stirring to combine. Place candy thermometer in mixture, and let mixture come to a boil. Boil, stirring frequently with heat-proof whisk or spatula to prevent caramel from burning, until caramel darkens and candy thermometer registers 280°F. Remove pan from heat, and season with salt, if desired. 3. Working quickly, drizzle popcorn and nuts with caramel, tossing rapidly with two heat-proof spatulas to coat popcorn and nuts and prevent clumping. Spread on foil-lined sheet pan, and let cool at least 10 minutes.

The Easiest-Ever Way to Roast Vegetables

October 17 2014 Vegetarian Times 

The Easiest-Ever Way to Roast Vegetables Around this time of year, I love roasting veggies--it makes them so perfectly sweet and crispy-tender--but I hate cleaning up. My baking sheet always seems to require extensive soaking and scrubbing to get rid of the inevitable charred roast-y mess. The solution? Parchment paper! This handy stuff, typically used for baking cookies, ensures that any food slides right off. How to Use It Grab whatever looks good at the farmers’ market: carrots, cauliflower, sweet potatoes, butternut squash. Cut everything into roughly the same size chunks, toss in a bowl, drizzle with olive oil, season with salt and spices, and spread in a single layer on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. (They’ll steam, not roast, if you crowd them too much.) Roast on high heat--but not higher than 425?F, or the parchment could burn--stirring occasionally, 30 to 45 minutes, or until browned and caramelized. Add a few drops of good-quality balsamic vinegar for extra oomph. Then scoop up opposite ends of the parchment paper, slide some of the goodies onto your dinner plate, and toss the rest into a Tupperware for future bowls, stir-fries, pasta dinners, and salads. Place baking sheet back in cabinet, and veg out throughout the week. The Eco Factor Yes, parchment paper is disposable, but if it helps you on busy weeknights to squeeze in more veggies and buy less frozen food or take-out--also in disposable containers and often far less nutritious--why not cut it some slack? (It certainly beats its veggie-roasting cousin, aluminum foil, which is worse for the environment than plastic wrap.) Look for biodegradable parchment, such as PaperChef or If You Care, which you can tear into little pieces after using and toss right into your compost pile. Ready to Roast? Here are 5 simple recipes perfect for fall: 1. Cumin and Lime Roasted Sweet Potatoes (pictured) 2. Oven-Roasted Cauliflower with Raisin Vinaigrette 3. Roasted Carrots and Parsnips 4. Herb-Roasted Squash and Jerusalem Artichokes 5. Root Vegetable Sticks with Roasted Garlic Dip

Baked Applesauce

October 30 2017 Meatless Monday 

When apples hit their peak season they hardly need any brown sugar to sweeten a rustic applesauce like this one. You neednt even take off the apples skins to enjoy this cinnamon sauce on oatmeal, pancakes or straight from a bowl. This recipe comes to us from Patrice of Circle B Kitchen. Serves 12 - a light nonstick cooking spray, for preparing the pan - 8-9 baking apples (3 pounds), cut in half and cored 1/­­4 cup brown sugar 1/­­4 tsp ground cinnamon - pinch of salt - 2 – 3 tablespoons water, if needed Preheat the oven to 375°F. Prepare 2 shallow baking pans with a light layer of nonstick cooking spray. Place the apple halves, cut side down, on the baking sheets and cover tightly with aluminum foil. Bake the apples for about 30-40 minutes, or until tender. Set aside to cool. When the apples are cool enough to handle, slip the fruits from their skins. Place the baked apples back into the pan, scraping any pulp from the peels. Discard the apple skins. While the apples are still warm, mash them with a fork, stirring in the brown sugar, cinnamon a pinch of salt and a bit of water (if needed) to help scrape up any brown bits in the pan and to lighten the texture of the applesauce. Enjoy warm, room temperature or cold. The post Baked Applesauce appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Jalapeno Cheese Paratha

May 19 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Jalapeno Cheese Paratha Jalapeno Cheese Paratha is a whole wheat flat bread filled with a combination of grated cheese. This is not only delicious, but also a great breakfast option. Jalapeno Cheese Paratha can be served like cheese bagels or bread. This recipe will make 6 parathas and will serve 3. For Dough - 1 cup whole wheat flour (chapatti atta) - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1/­­2 cup water For Filling - 2 cup grated mix cheese (I am using mix cheese, Cheddar, Colby and Monterey Jack) - 1/­­4 cup jalapeno (finely chopped, adjust to your taste) Making the Dough - Mix flour, and salt, in a bowl add the water as needed to make soft dough. Knead the dough for about one minutes on a lightly greased surface to make soft, and pliable dough. Set aside for at least ten minutes. Making the Filling - Cheese and Jalapeno pepper mix it well and divide in 6 equal parts and roll them. Set aside. Making the Parathas - Divide the dough into six equal parts and form into balls. - Roll dough ball into a 3 circle. Place a cheese ball in the center. Pull the edges of the dough to wrap it around the cheese filling. Repeat to make all six balls. Let the filled balls settle three to four minutes. Note, this help rolling the paratha. - Meanwhile heat the heavy skillet on medium heat until moderately hot. To test, sprinkle water on the skillet. If the water sizzles right away, the skillet is ready. - Press the filled ball lightly on dry whole wheat flour from both sides. - Using a rolling pin, roll the balls lightly to make six-inch circles, keeping the sealed side of the balls on top. If the dough sticks to the rolling pin or rolling surface, lightly dust the parathas with dry flour. - Place the paratha on the skillet. When the paratha start to change color, and begins to puff up, flip it over. You will notice some golden-brown spots. - After a few seconds, flip the paratha and press with a spatula making sure the paratha is golden-brown on both sides. Repeat for the remaining parathas. - Parathas can be kept unrefrigerated for up to two days wrapped in aluminum foil or in a covered container. For later use, parathas can be refrigerated for about a week. Re-heat using a skillet or oven. Adjust the pepper to your taste, you can use any hot chilies I also like to use Serrano chili. For my grand kids, I make them with cheese only. Serving Suggestion - Jalapeno Cheese Paratha, is best for the breakfast and serve it with butter or cream cheese. - Cheese parathas are also good for sandwiches with lettuce and slice of tomatoes. The post Jalapeno Cheese Paratha appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Spinach Lasagna

January 16 2017 Meatless Monday 

Offering up a meatless version of a familiar dish is a great way to encourage friends and family to give meatless eating a try. And who doesn’t love lasagna? This version spotlights spinach and fresh herbs and uses a mixture of white beans, tofu and nutritional yeast rather than cheese. This recipe comes to us from Kathy Freston‘s The Book of Veganish. Serves 4-6 - 12 lasagna noodles - 1 (15.5-ounce) can white beans, drained and rinsed - 14 ounces firm tofu, drained - 1/­­2 cup nutritional yeast - 1/­­4 cup chopped fresh parsley - 1 teaspoon fresh or dried basil - 1/­­2 teaspoon dried oregano - 1/­­2 teaspoon onion powder - 1/­­4 teaspoon garlic powder - Salt and ground black pepper - 1 (10-ounce) package frozen chopped spinach, thawed and squeezed dry - 1 (28-ounce) jar marinara sauce - 1 cup shredded vegan cheese (optional) Place the noodles in a shallow 9 x 13-inch baking dish and pour on enough boiling salted water to cover. Set aside while you make the filling. Preheat the oven to 350°F. In a large bowl, combine the beans, tofu, nutritional yeast, parsley, basil, oregano, onion powder, garlic powder, 1 teaspoon salt, and 1/­­2 teaspoon pepper. Mash with a potato masher until smooth and well combined. Add the spinach and mix well, then taste and adjust the seasoning, adding more salt if needed. Drain the noodles and spread them in a single layer on a plate or a piece of plastic wrap. Spread a layer of the marinara sauce in the bottom of the baking dish and place 3 noodles on top of the sauce, overlapping them slightly. Spread half the filling mixture over the noodles, then top with 3 more noodles. Spread a thin layer of sauce on top and spread the remaining filling mixture over it. Top with the remaining 3 noodles and spread the remaining sauce over the noodles. Sprinkle the top with cheese (if using). Cover with aluminum foil and bake until hot, 45 to 50 minutes. Let stand for 10 to 15 minutes before serving. Reprinted from The Book of Veganish by arrangement with Pam Krauss Books/­­Avery, a member of Penguin Group (USA) LLC, A Penguin Random House Company. Copyright (C) 2016, Kathy Freston and Rachel Cohn. Recipe by Robin Robertson. The post Spinach Lasagna appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Smoked Tofu

October 5 2016 Vegan Dad 

Smoked Tofu Smoked tofu is not hard to make but it takes some planning and time to make it right. This recipe is perfect for sandwiches, pizza, or anytime you need salty and smoky flavour. INGREDIENTS - double recipe of brine - Two 1 lb blocks of firm/­­extra from tofu - 4 cups smoking chips - water - aluminum foil METHOD 1. Cut each block of tofu into four equal pieces. Submerge in the brine for two days, refrigerated. (I put everything in an old juice pitcher) 2. On cooking day, soak the smoking chips in water for 30 mins. Drain and put into a large foil package with many holes poked in the top. I make a large rectangle that fits the length of the burner, more or less. 3. Remove the grill from one half of the BBQ and begin heating one element/­­burner on high. After a few minutes, place the foil package on the coals or drip shield (depending on your BBQ). Once it begins smoking, reduce heat to med-lo. I use foil to cover up the holes in the lid that most BBQs have to attach a rotisserie, in order to keep more smoke in. 4. Place the tofu on the upper rack of the opposite side of the BBQ, as far away from the heat source as possible. Close the lid and smoke for 1.5 hours, or until the smoke stops. The temperature should be around 200 F for the entire time. 

Baked Eggs & Spring Peas

May 30 2016 Meatless Monday 

Fresh spring peas are shelled and sautéed with onion and Thai chilies, then spiced with cumin and coriander. Eggs are baked to perfection in the oven, cradled in nests of the seasoned peas. This recipe comes to us from Prerna of Indian Simmer. Serves 3 - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1/­­2 cup onion, chopped - 1-2 thai green chilis, minced - 2 1/­­2 cups fresh green peas, shelled - or - 2 1/­­2 cups frozen green peas, thawed - 1 tablespoon ground coriander - 1 teaspoon curry powder - 3 large eggs - salt, to taste - bread of choice*, for serving *Optional Preheat an oven to 350 degrees. Place the oil in a sauté pan or skillet over medium-high heat. Add the chopped onion and Thai chilis and sauté for 3-5 minutes, or until they begin to become fragrant. Add the green peas to the pan and season all the veggies with ground coriander and curry powder and salt, to taste. If using fresh peas, cook 2-4 minutes, or until the peas are just tender. If using frozen peas, cook for less than a minute, or until the peas have warmed through. Place the pea onion mixture into a medium sized baking dish so that the peas cover the bottom of the dish. Make 3 wells in the bed of peas with a spoon, making sure there are still a few peas covering the base even where you made the depressions. Break the 3 eggs into those 3 dents, taking care to ensure that the eggs are still sitting on a few peas in the depression and are not sitting on the bottom of the baking dish directly. Cover the baking dish with aluminum foil, poking a few holes in the foil with a fork so that the steam can escape. Bake for 20-30 minutes, or until the eggs are cooked to preference. Divide into 3 portions, serve with bread, if using, and enjoy. The post Baked Eggs & Spring Peas appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Savoury Stuffing Rolls

November 24 2015 Vegan Dad 

Savoury Stuffing Rolls What?! A new post?! As I explained on ye olde Vegan Dad Facebook page, I have been battling Crohns this entire year and that has very much dampened my enthusiasm for cooking and eating. I think I am finally getting it under control, so heres hoping! I have also spent the last three weeks on strike which was the inspiration for these buns. On the picket line we have been blessed by endless treats from supporters. I thought it would be nice to have a handheld savoury snack instead and these fit the bill. They are reminiscent of stuffing, hence the name. You could easily add some cranberries in with the apple, or raisins. Use this as a starting point and go nuts (maybe even add nuts?). Could be great for Thanksgiving or Christmas dinner. INGREDIENTS Makes 24 rolls - 1 recipe everyday whole wheat bread (make with all white bread flour, if desired, as I did) - 2 potatoes and 1 carrot, small dice (about 2 cups total) - olive oil - sea salt - 4 garlic cloves - 1 leek, white and light green part, halved and thinly sliced - olive oil - 1 cooking apple, peeled, small dice - 1/­­4 tsp sage - 1/­­2 tsp thyme - 1/­­2 tsp marjoram - 1/­­4 tsp cinnamon - freshly ground pepper - soy milk for brushing METHOD 1. Make the dough per the recipe link above. While the starter is rising, preheat the oven to 400 degrees. 2. Toss the diced potato and carrot in a splash or two of olive oil and season lightly with sea salt. Transfer to a cookie sheet lined with baking parchment and bake for 20 mins, turning the veggies after ten to ensure and even roast. 3. Wrap the unpeeled garlic cloves in a piece of aluminum foil and roast along with the veggies for 20 mins. 4. Set veggies and garlic aside to cool. 5. Heat a splash of olive oil in a small frying pan over med-lo heat and saute leeks until softened (about 5-7 mins). Add apple and cook for a minute more. Skin and chop up roasted garlic and mix through. Remove from heat. 6. Continue making the dough but add the herbs in to the dry ingredients. Add the veggies and diced apple/­­leek mixture in during the final two minutes of kneading. I like to start this in the stand mixer with the dough hook, but finish on a lightly floured counter to make sure nothing gets too smushed up. Add more flour is the dough is too wet. It should be slightly tacky but not sticky. 7. Transfer dough to a oiled bowl and let rise for an hour, or until doubled. 8. Line a large cookie sheet with parchment paper (or two smaller trays). Divide dough into 24 equal pieces and shape into rolls (a little tricky with all the veggies and apple, but be patient). Place on tray (in six rows of four), mist with oil, and cover with plastic wrap to let rise. 9. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. 10. When rolls have almost doubled and are touching one another, brush tops with plain soy milk and bake for 15 minutes, rotating tray half way through for an even bake. Cool but enjoy while still warm.

Strawberry Tart

July 6 2015 Vegan Dad 

Strawberry Tart Full disclosure: I have posted this recipe, more or less, before. But this is the version without so much rat in it. A friend surprised me today by dropping off a basket of freshly picked strawberries, and if a pie/­­tart is what you are after then I think this is the perfect way to enjoy strawberries in their prime. The only thing new this time around is the tart shell (I have posted a tart shell recipe before). I dont buy vegan cream cheese on a regular basis so I hope the use of aquafaba makes this recipe more accessible. I think it made for a better shell as well--crisp and durable, yet tender and so very delicious. INGREDIENTS Tart Shell (makes a 9 shell) - 1 1/­­4 cup (200g) all purpose flour - 1/­­2 cup (60g) icing sugar - pinch of salt (or 1/­­4 tsp is using salt-free margarine) - 1/­­2 cup (125g) cold vegan butter (or margarine, or half margarine and half vegetable shortening) - 2 tbsp aquafaba - 1 tbsp light coconut milk METHOD 1. Whisk together flour, icing sugar, and salt. Cut in fat with a pastry cutter. 2. Whisk together aquafaba and coconut milk, then add to flour mixture. Use a fork/­­your hands to bring together into ball. 3. Flatten into a disc and wrap in plastic. Refrigerate for an hour. 4. Roll out dough on a floured surface into a circle large enough to overhang the sides of your tart pan. Trim any excess along the outside bottom of the pan, then fold the overhang to the inside the pan. Press the dough smoothly and evenly into the pan. 5. Place in the freezer for 30 mins. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. 6. Blind bake the shell: line the shell with heavy duty aluminum foil. Fill with dried beans or baking weights. Bake for 15 mins (or until shell looks dry when you peel back the foil), then remove the beans and foil. 7. Reduce heat to 350 degrees and bake for another 8-10 mins, or until golden. Remove from oven and let cool. Filling - 6 cups fresh whole strawberries - 1 cup sugar - 3 tablespoons cornstarch - 1/­­2 cup water METHOD 1. Mash enough of the berries to measure 1 cup. Place remaining berries in a large bowl. 2. In a medium saucepan, whisk together sugar and cornstarch, then gradually whisk in water and then crushed berries. 3. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly until mixture thickens and boils. Boil and stir 1 minute. 4. Cool for 10 mins, then pour over berries and gently turn to coat. Transfer to cooled tart shell and chill at least 3 hours or until set. Terrible picture but great idea: a creamy topping is the perfect addition. This is rad whip from Vegan Pie in the Sky. 

Chocolate-Coated Key Lime-Coconut Creme Pie

January 19 2015 VegKitchen 

This pie is a combination of coconut creme and key lime so the tangy lime has been tamed somewhat - feel free to up the amount of juice (reducing the other liquids to compensate) or add more lime zest. The hint of chocolate and the crunch of the toasted coconut and cacao nibs is a wonderful counterpart to the creaminess of the custard. Recipe and photo contributed by Annie Oliverio of An Unrefined Vegan. Annie is the author of the forthcoming Crave Eat Heal: Plant-based, Whole-food Recipes to Satisfy Every Craving  * (April, 2015). Makes: 8 slices Crust: - 1 cup nut meal (I used almond, left over from making milk) - 1 cup walnuts - 1 tablespoon hemp seeds - 2 tablespoons maple syrup - 2 tablespoons date puree Crust coating: - 1 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips - 1 tablespoon coconut oil - 1/­­4 toasted coconut flakes - 2 tablespoons Choffy or cacao nibs - 1/­­2 teaspoon vanilla extract Filling: - 1 cup full-fat coconut milk - 1/­­2 cup water - 1 tablespoon agar flakes or powder - 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder mixed with 1/­­4 cup cool water - 12 oz. silken tofu - 1 tablespoon key lime zest - 1/­­4 cup key lime juice - 2 tablespoons maple syrup - 1/­­2 teaspoon liquid stevia Make the crust: Pour the walnuts into the food processor and pulse until coarsely chopped.  Add the nut meal and hemp seeds and pulse a few times to combine. Add in the remaining ingredients and process until a moist meal is formed.  Pour into deep 9? pie dish and use wet hands to pat out the crust until evenly distributed along the bottom and sides. Chocolate coating: Line a small baking pan or dish with aluminum foil.  Set aside. In a double boiler, melt the coconut oil and chocolate. When smooth, remove from heat and stir in the vanilla, Choffy (cacao nibs) and toasted coconut. Spread about half of the mixture along the bottom and up the sides of the prepared crust. On the prepared baking sheet, drop melted chocolate to form small disks - you arent going for perfection here. Put baking sheet and crust in the frige while you prepare the filling. Filling: In a small saucepan, bring the coconut milk, water and agar to a boil.  Boil gently for 5 minutes, stirring frequently. Meanwhile, combine the lime zest, silken tofu, lime juice, maple syrup, stevia liquid and arrowroot mixture in a food processor and process until very smooth. When the coconut milk mixture is ready, pour it into the food processor and pulse a few times to incorporate it into the tofu mixture.  Pour into the prepared crust and refrigerate until firm. Serve garnished with disks of coconut-Choffy-chocolate on top. - Here are more vegan cakes and pies. *This post contains affiliate links. If the product is purchased by linking through this review, VegKitchen receives a modest commission, which helps maintain our site and helps it to continue growing!

Roasting Veggies With Aluminum Foil Vs. Parchment

December 24 2014 Vegetarian Times 

Roasting Veggies With Aluminum Foil Vs. Parchment Should you line the pan with aluminum foil, or would it be healthier to switch to parchment paper? Yes, when roasting vegetables, parchment paper is better than foil. Recent research in the International Journal of Electrochemical Science suggests that when we use aluminum foil during cooking, some aluminum leaches into food. Leaching increases with higher heat (roasting and broiling) and acidity (tomatoes, vinegar, vitamin C-rich produce). Is aluminum leaching into food bad? Maybe. The average person consumes between 7 and 9 milligrams of aluminum each day through diet. The Food and Drug Administration considers such levels generally safe, and the Alzheimers Association concludes that this normal exposure to aluminum is not a significant risk factor in Alzheimers disease. However, the Center for Disease Controls Agency for Toxic Substances & Disease Registry suggests that consuming higher levels of aluminum than average may be linked to nervous system, brain, and bone diseases. People who cook often with aluminum foil (and aluminum pots and pans) risk more exposure than normal to the metal. So, although some aluminum in the diet is inevitable, keep exposure minimal with simple changes such as switching to parchment paper over foil when roasting. Parchment paper can tolerate temperatures up to 420°F. But note: dont confuse parchment paper with waxed paper, which cant withstand high temperatures and will smoke in the oven. Tip: When roasting, choose oils with higher smoke points (such as canola, sunflower, safflower, grapeseed, and refined coconut oil) to avoid an “off” flavor. Health-food junkie Dawn Jackson Blatner, RD, is creator of the weekly e-newsletter Nutrition WOW.

Spicy Peanut Chutney

November 3 2014 Meatless Monday 

Roasted peanuts are ground with sesame seeds then tossed with roasted garlic and seasoned with red pepper flakes. Shredded coconut balances this spicy nut condiment with a touch of sweetness. Try it on sandwiches, in pasta dishes or atop our Curried Butternut Squash Soup. This recipe comes to us from Karen of Sprouts in the Hood. Serves 16 - 1/­­2 teaspoon olive oil, for roasting the garlic - 1 head garlic - 1/­­2 cup peanuts, shelled - 1/­­4 cup sesame seeds - 1/­­4 cup unsweetened coconut, finely grated - 2 teaspoons hot pepper flakes - 1 teaspoon salt Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. With the garlic skin still in place, cut the pointed end off the garlic bulb, exposing the garlic cloves. Drizzle with the olive oil and wrap in aluminum foil. Roast in the oven for 45-60 minutes, or until the garlic has browned and become soft. Set aside to 8 cloves to cool and save the rest to spread on bread. While the garlic is roasting, place the peanuts in a flat layer on a baking sheet. Roast for 20-25 minutes, or until the peanuts turn golden and become fragrant. Set aside to cool. While the peanuts and garlic are roasting, spread the coconut out on another baking sheet and place in the oven for about 5 minutes, or until fragrant and a little crispy. When the peanuts have cooled, grind the peanuts together with the sesame seeds in a coffee grinder. Toss the ground peanut sesame seed mixture in a medium sized bowl. Add the 8 cloves roasted garlic and toasted coconut. Stir to combine. Season with the red pepper flakes and salt and enjoy. The post Spicy Peanut Chutney appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Squash Sunchoke Mac & Cheese

October 13 2014 Meatless Monday 

Butternut squash is roasted and mashed with sunchokes in this root vegetable crowd pleaser. A Dijon mustard roux serves as the base for a luscious sauce in this hearty mac and cheese, finished perfectly with crunchy whole-wheat breadcrumbs. This recipe comes to us from Lisa of Cold Cereal and Toast. Serves 10 - 1/­­2 small butternut squash, seeded - 2 medium sunchokes*, peeled - 12 ounces elbow macaroni - salt, to taste - 1/­­4 teaspoon pepper - 2 tablespoons unsalted butter - 2 tablespoons all purpose flour - 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard - 1 3/­­4 cups nonfat milk - 1/­­4 cup low sodium vegetable stock - 4 ounces Muenster cheese, grated - 4 ounces cheddar cheese, grated - 1/­­2 cup whole-wheat breadcrumbs *Also known as Jerusalem artichokes, sunchokes can be found at farmers markets or in the gourd section of vegetable aisle in some grocery stores.   Preheat an oven to 450 degrees. Prepare a baking sheet with a layer of aluminum foil. Lay the squash, cut side down, on the baking sheet. Add the peeled sunchokes to the sheet, place it in the oven and bake for about 25-30 minutes, or until the squash is tender when pierced with a butter knife. Scoop the squashs flesh into a large mixing bowl and mash it using a fork. Add the roasted sunchokes, mashing to incorporate them with the butternut squash. For the smoothest consistency, add the squash sunchoke mash to a food processor or blender and puree if desired. Place a large pot of salted water over medium-high heat. Cook the pasta according to package directions, or until al dente, drain, return to the pot, remove from heat and set aside to cool. Place a medium saucepan over medium heat. Melt the butter in the saucepan, then whisk in the flour and mustard. Continue whisking over medium heat for about 1 minute, then slowly add in the milk, stirring constantly. Bring the mixture to a simmer, lower heat to medium-low and keep simmering, whisking frequently, for 5-6 minutes, or until the mixture has thickened to the consistency of heavy cream. Season the sauce with the pepper and 1/­­2 teaspoon salt. Add the squash sunchoke mash, Muenster and cheddar, stirring with a wooden spoon until the cheese has melted. Pour the cheese sauce into the cooked macaroni, stirring to ensure all ingredients are evenly incorporated. Preheat your broiler. Pour the macaroni into a medium baking dish and top with the breadcrumbs. Broil for about 10 minutes, or until the bubbly with brown edges. Divide into 10 servings and enjoy! The post Squash Sunchoke Mac & Cheese appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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